xt78cz324v2c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78cz324v2c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19611031  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 31, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 31, 1961 1961 2015 true xt78cz324v2c section xt78cz324v2c Bloc Seating; IMan

jjs n m m

Ih Unnwexwary;

CLUjj

See Page Four

Today's Wealher:
Scattered Showers;
Low 62, High 72

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI II, No. 25

LEXINGTON,

KV., TUESDAY, OCT. 31, 19G1

Eight Pa gei

Med Team Enters Brown Case
UK MEN CHECK BLOOD;
POLICE SEEK SLA YER

'FORGIVE'
ADVISES
MINISTER

By DAVID

By JEAN BROWS
Kernel Staff Writer
Sometimes God dors things we
do not understand, mid these are
x-- s
i
the thin we must try the hard.
.
.
est to corrprr hend.
Tills wa the main theme of the
Script m e read by Dr. L'slie R.
Smith (,l the Central Christian
Church nt the funeral of Betty
Gail UioAn, Transylvania College
coed slain early Fiiday.
lie said in order to appreciate
the fine thing in the world, we
must see the tvil as well. We must
and find
forgive the evil-docomfort in the thought that God
is with us always, even unto the
...
end of the world.
One thousand people, including
Dr. Raphael Caffrey and Dr. Eudardu Bargas-Aldaradare shown
Miss Brown's Phi Mu sorority sishere working with instruments such as those used in their scientific
ters, students from both Transylinvestigation into certain phases of the Brown case.
vania and UK, members of her Chi
Rho Sunday school class, and relatives filled the church.
The sweet aroma of the nearly
200 baskets of floweis which covered the alter was sensed throughout
the church.
Although thrre was a rlrh and
e,
dignified air held during the
the f.ombernes intensified as
then used the blade to cut her
By JINE GRAY
the inspiring voi es of the Transylown throat.
Kernel Daily Editor
vania College a Capella Choir
Mrs. Barr filed suit for divorce
The estranged wife of a Unisounded from behind the alter
with "If Ye Love Me."
versity biology professor killed her shortly after Susan's birth. She
The service concluded with spor- two small daughters and then com- charged mental cruelty.
A child custody hearing followCooks-ville,
adic
singing of "A mitted suicide Saturday at
Tenn., a coroner's Jury has ed a countersuit filed by Dr. Barr
Mighty Fw tress."
In which he said his wife had
ruled.
Mrs. Thomas Barr Jr., a regis- been taking psychiatric treatment
tered nurse, had recently been without his knowledge or consent.
Lust Announcement
Judge Holladay awarded custody
ordered by Cookeville Circuit Judge
John D. Holladay to submit to a of the children to the mother and
All tiireks and unaffiliated
at the same time ordered her to
seniors who have not had their mental examination at a Cookehave an examination by a Cookeville clinic.
pictures made for the
The Jury ruled that she ap- ville psychiatric clinic.
must do so today or toDr. Barr, an associate professor
morrow in Room 205 of Enoch parently slashed the throat of
Moura, 2, with a razor blade; of biology, arrived at Cookeville
Cirehan Journalism Building.
4 months;
and Sunday night, but his relatives did
smothered Susan,
not reveal where he was staying.
The bodies of Mrs. Barr and her

y.

.j

IB.

SHANK, Kernel Staff Writer

bloodstains from tin car of Miss Hetty Gail brown were
compared anil analyzed last night by the Medical Center's
Division of Legal Medicine, Fayette County Coroner Chester
I lager said.
and crossed the street to her car.
The division Is aiding police In
their investigation of the slaying
of Miss Brown, a Transylvania
sophomore who was found strangled to death with her own brassiere
Friday morning.
Meanwhile, police investigations
had turned up no definite suspects,
Detective Capt. Rollie Leach said.
Police have thus far been able
to give this account of the crime:
At 7:30 o'clock Thursday night
Miss Brown drove to the Transylvania campus to study for a biology test.
She parked her 1959 Simca in
the campus driveway across from
Forrer Hall, a woman's dormitory,
went into the building, and studied
with friends until 11:50 p.m. At
that time she left the dormitory

Charles Risdon, a Transylvania
student, had parked his ear Just
behind Miss Brown's while he escorted a girl " to the dormitory.
After returning to his ear, he pull- or) o Innml.l. llic. It.n...n'.
.l
talked with her for a few minutes
about the next day's test.
The two students then drove
their cars off campus to Broad- -

...

Professor's Estranged Wife
Kills Daughters And Herself

Soviet Union Explodes
Superbomb In Arctic

FOURTH

Soviet Union brushed
WASHINGTON, Oct. 30 (AP)-T- he
aside worldwide protests today and exploded its vaunted superbomb producing the greatest blast ever set off by man. Anger
and alarm over the possibility of health hazards swept the
capitals of the world.

Swedish scientists said the early
morning blast in the Arctic may
even have been in the
range, me equal 01 iuu iiuiiiun
tjiis of TNT. Thev estimated it as
,,.., Q.
or,H
.hif limp.
the Soviets' major blast a week
earlier. That one had been reck
oned bv U.S. authorities to be in
the 30 to 50 megaton range.
At the I'nited Nations, where
many delegates expressed shock,
one suggested that the device may
have got out of hand. F. K. Corner of New Zealand noted reports
the blast was far larger than had
been predicted and suggested the
Kussians might not have planned
it that way. He aked: "Was this
Increase an accident?"
Dr. Ralph Lapp, nuclear scientist, expressed belief that the
superbomb explosion was a "very
cUrty" one which would lead to a
narked increu.se next spring in
nuclear fallout in the United
fctates.

.,

JQfS

children were found In their apart- ment Saturday night by a neigh
bor, Orville Harris.
He said she worried constantly
that she was not an adequate
mother.
Sheriff Bill Bilyeu said, "No
notes were found; the apartment
was undisturbed, and the children
were neatly dressed. The youngest
was dressed for bed."
Dr. Barr began teaching here in
September.
While teaching last year at
Tennessee Tech in Cookeville, he
was awarded a National Science
Foundation grant to study the ef- fects of mountain-pea- k
Isolation
on certain insects.

Sn

MISS BETTY GAIL BROWN
way, Risdon In the lead, then
turned right onto Fourth Street.
They turned off Fourth onto Upper Street, where Risdon turned
into his dormitory parking lot.
He said he last remembered
seeing Miss Brown's car as it
traveled on Upper near Third
Street.
Her actions from that time forward remain a mystery.
Investigators estimate she died
about 1:30 a.m., 30 minutes before her mother called police to
Continued on Page 8

EWING
HALL

McAllister
auditorium

j
IlCtllOVC

Stalin's Body
From Tomb
MOSCOW, Oct. 30 (AP The
Communist Party banished Joseph
Stalin's body today frora its hallowed place beside V. I. Lenin in
the tomb on Red Square.
It was a final degradation of the
man who had exercised iron and
despotic control over the party and
the whole Soviet Union for 25
years; who was hailed up until his
death eight years ago by current
Premier Khrushchev as "our great
leader and teacher, the in.spirer
and organizer of all our victories."
But times have changed and,
freed from the dread Stalin's imrevenge, Khrushchev's
placable
opinion has changed too.

LI

STREET

HAZELRIGG
HALL
FORRER
HALL

o
o
AC
CD

rl
MORRISON

I

)

L

WEST

THIRD

1
I
i
I
T.
Tolice Chief E. C. Hale gave this account of Betty
Gail Brown's actions near midnight Thursday.
Miss Brown left Forrer Hall (1) at 11:50 and went
to her car parked in front of McAllister Auditorium Ci). After chatting briefly with a classmate. Charles Risdon, she followed his car up to
Fourth Street (shown by dotted line), turned right

S CIENCE
BLDG.

I

STREET

--

..r

I

on Fourth Street and then turned south on
I'pper Street. Risdon pulled into the parking lot
behind Hazelrigg Hall (3). He saw her last
driving down I'pper Street (4). At 3 a.m. Friday
her body was found in her parked car In the
drive of Morrison Hall (5).

* 2 --

THE KENT

I CKY KERNEL,

Turstlay, Oct. 31, lOfil

rvr Morr Serious'

Construction Worker Is Injured
By Falling Column At the Library
- .'ions of
nnkle nt 1:30
was

Dr. Vandciiboscli Defends
Attack On Teaching History
Dr. Aniry Vandt iihoscli saiil
yesterday lie was nrvcr more
serious in liis lile when lie called for an end to teaching Kentucky history in elementary and
secondary schools.

The head of the Patterson
School of Diplomacy, speaking
the annual meeting of the
Kentucky Association of Colleges,
'Secondary and Elementary
Schools. Friday, said, "When the
United Nations was organized, it
was ironical that Kentucky students were still studying about
Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton."
The reply came in answer to
an editorial in yesterday's Lexington Herald suggesting that Dr.
anilenbosch might have been

joking about ending the teaching
of Kentucky history.
"It is not my intention to depreciate the study of local or state
history, but my question is whether the school children can afford
to spend time on these subjects at
the expense of vastly more important studies."
He further commented that, in
a time of
bombs and
long-rang- e
missiles, it is tragic
to study subjects that narrow
rather than broaden the student's
outlook. With such a shortage of
time, students must not study
items of little Importance, he said.
"The study of national history
is useless, too, if it Is not taught
within the context of world history, Dr. Yandenbosch told the
educators. He is one of 19 educa- -

Debate Team Captures
Dixie Tourney Third Time

The University debate team won the varsity division of
'he Dixie Debate Tournament at Mercer University in Macon,
Ca., for the third time Saturday.

The victory will enable UK to
keep the first place trophy per
manently.
"Superior" awards for individual
speaking went to Deno Curris,
Warren Scoville, and Philip Oro- an. "Excellent" awards were given
to Bettye Choate and Ben Wright.
The novice team took third place
in its division. Stanley Craig and
Ronald Elswick debated the affirmative and Richard Ford and
jPhillip Grogan the negative.
The varsity team members w ere
Bettye Choate and Warren Sco- OriN

DAILY

1:30 P.M.

ville for the affirmative and Deno
Curris and Ben Wright for the
negative.
During the last four years UK
hss won the tournament three
times and placed second and third
once.
"The team brought back two
n certificates," Dr.
troPhiM "n1
C'"rd Blyton, debate coach, said.

tor who ha been asked to deliver report on education in Kentucky to the (lovernor's Commission on Public Fducation.
Dr. Vandonbo.sch was a consultant to the drafters of the United
Nations charter in San Francisco
in 1945.

Shnlciil Debate;

7
A

4

TolSelMd Today
The opening debate of the UK

1

4

THIS

V

GtNCMTION!

BETTY CARTER

THE RAELETS

MT 0

OlOtCIA'

HAriNO HIS W
fCOOS .

t

Mir

prnt
Of

GIANT

HAEHJES

RAY

"ONI

JUlie-

MINT

-

CINlUt Of

TNI

I

'HARD
SAY

HI'
NIARTID

""U1T-

-

HANNAH

(NASUl

All Seats Reserved
PRICES: $2.00

$2.50

$3.50 (Tai included)

FOR THE FINEST IN
REFRESHMENT TRY

STRAND Theatre
LAST 3 DAYS!
Violent Passion . . . Unforgettable
Terror
As Two Women Are
Trapped in the Shame of a Fran-ti- e
War!

...

Bord en s
Very Big On
Flavor

3rd Week

OVER

MAL ZEIGfcR
CRtATIVl MUSICAL

Y

1

HELD

MOST

MEMORIAL COLISEUM
8:30 P.M.
SATURDAY, NOV. 11

Student Forum will be held at 4
p.m. today In the Music Room of
the Student Union Building.
"That the West Defend Berlin
Even at the Risk of Nuclear War,"
will be the topic.
Those debating are Jim Scott,
pre-laJunior from Lexington,
and Jim Stephens, pre-laJunior
from Frankfort for the affirmative.
Opposing will be Amnon Golan,
diplomacy major from
Israel, and Ralph C. Rogle, Junior
pre-lamajor from Newport.

Theatre

BEN ALI

ttf

THt

HIS ORCHESTRA

Block from University
820 S. Limestone St.

LAST 2 DAYS!

Mnn-C- km
Mti4
Ctiax
LAST TIMES TONIGHT!

"CARRY ON NURSE"
Ktnncth Connor
Hatti Jacques
"THE MILLIONAIRESS"
StHart
Ssphia Uiib

Inp.m.
A construction
worker
Jured yesterday while wnrkInK on when n folumn fell on his leg.
He was tnken immediately to the
the addition to the Margaret I.
Good Samaritan Hospital for x- Kin Library.
Charles Oustin received nbia- - rays nncl released around 4:15 p.m.

Plus

Natalia Wood

Warren Beatty

(Technicolor)

An)IVOMEA

mm FROM

Z&jtsy'

ONE HOUR SERVICE

944 Winchester Road

y

HELL

MONDAY THRU SATURDAY

PIRATES OF TORTUGA'

CROLLEY CLEANERS

' ' 1.00

Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service

116 W. Maxwell
Pick-u- p

Phone

and Delivery Service

Old Spice quality in a new hair tonic
Keeps hair handsomely groomed all
day Fights dandruff Moisturizes pre-

vents dryness

to

Guaranteed

Otce

:

non-greas- y

&cS'

HAIR TONIC

SHU LTO N

...

.

"J

.

...- "

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NO ADDED COST
-

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Phone
265 Euclid Ave.
Next to Coliseum
1966 Harrodsburg Road
880 East High Street

15

Cash

Discount
& Carry

-

:

:(

v- -

.

.

I

J

'J

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tucvliy,

Social Activities

IV Tl'LANE C'Ol'RT
Judy Weddle, a sophomore
transfer student from Sophie
b
College In New Orleans, La.,
and a member of Alpha Delta PI
KTority, has been selected to the
Urchin Beauty Court of Tulane
University.
Miss Weddle, from Somerset, attended
Somerset
High School
where she was a member of the
National Honor Society, Mu Alpha
Theta, band, and Majorettes. As
Miss Somerset, she represented
Somerset In the Kentucky Mt.
Laurel Festival.
EXC HANGE DINNER
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority
nncl Phi Gamma Delta fraternity
htld an exchaiiRe dinner last
Thursday nicht. The dinner was
followed by a Jam session.
ALPHA GAM PARTY
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority
Hive a New Arrival Party Tuesday nipht In honor of Delta
Gamma and PI Peta Phi sororities.
All sorni H ies wo e invited to play
l.ritUc while "b.iljy s. It ins." The
party tallied out u new arrival
theme with piiik and Ijhm decorations, and suckers and bubble gum
wtre givtn us refreshments.
RETREAT
Pi Beta Phi sorority held a retreat Saturday at the home of Dr.
COED

ORDER YOUR

NOW
Direct from Manufacturer

CUSTOM MADE FOR YOU
Not a

n

You Get MUCH MORE in a BALFOUR RING
MenSs Extra Large Ring
$33.00

Men's Large Ring
Ladies' Ring

ONE DAY LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING
At No Extra Cost

$31.00
$27.50

Plus Tax

ALL ORDERS PLACED BY
NOVEMBER 10
WILL RECEIVE
CHRISTMAS DELIVERY

SAVE 15
'Serving the Students for 47 Years"

Your Portrait By
Curtis Wainscott

SPENGLER STUDIO

-B-

LIME

AVAILABLE

ECKER-

LIME & EUCLID

PHONE

ONLY AT

.

.

.

277.SOUTH LIMESTONE

PHONE

EXPLORE KENTUCKY .
A

OFFICIAL

UK CLASS RING

ON CASH AND CARRY

&

Il

Balfour

For The Personal Gift

N.E. CORNER MAIN

31,

KERNEL Ads Bring Results

and Mrs. D. B. Harding, Eldemere Bill Wright, president; Carolyn
Rd., parents of Nancy Harding, Rouse, secretary; and Carle Oar-ret- t,
social chairman.
treasurer.
Discussion groups and skits
Music Listening Hours
were followed by a spaghetti dinner.
SUB Topics Committee will
sponsor Music Listening Hours
Meetings
from 8 p.m. today In the Music
Dames Club
The bridge group of Dames Club Room of the Student Union Buildwill meet at 7:30 p.m. today In ing.
the Dames Council Room, Coopers-tow- n.
Pin-Male- s
Any wife of a University
student or graduate student is inJulie Wardrup, Junior speech
vited to attend.
from Harlan, and
The sewing group or Dames Club therapy major
member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority,
will meet at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
to Bobby Joe Hundley, a sophoDames Council Room, Cooperstown. more architecture
major from LexAny member Interested in this
ington, and member of Kappa Alproject is invited to attend.
pha fraternity.
Sophomore Y
Sally Katherine Hughes, a senThe Sophomore Y will meet at ior at St. Joseph School of Nursing,
6:45 p.m. today in the
to Norman Osborne, a Junior in
of the Student Union Building.
d
from Lexington, and a
Any sophomore wanting to Join member of Phi Sigma Kappa
mu. t attend. There will be a discus-ion
of world religions beginning with Hinduism.
LARRY'S TENNIS SERVICE
Christian Science Organization
NEW RACKETS
The Christian Science Organiza"Epert Overnight Rcstringing"
tion will meet at 7 p.m. today in the
Kennedy Book Store
Student Union Building. All stuOr OH
dents arc invited to attend.
The newly elected officers are:

ORGANIZATION PRESIDENTS
The presidents of campus organizations are asked to turn
in their list of officers to the
program director in the Student
Union Building by tomorrow.
These lists are needed for
publication in the Student

()t.

Lexington, Ky.

Phone

.
KENT . . .
the home of
quality men's
clothing at

I

TWfU

DISCOUNT
PRICES!

u&L

rf r

Presents

the

the ideal time to explore trie
natural wonders of Kentucky . . .
many
when the weather is mild and refreshing . . . when natural beauty is most
colorful . . . when the outdoors is most
tempting for the relaxing pursuits of
and when
riding, hiking, golfing
fishing is at its best.

ever-popul-

Fall is

SPECIALLY
DISCOUNT-PRICE-

$22
Choice of:

Don't miss the many thrills of Kentucky
for a day,
in the Fall . . . this Fall
a week, or a month.

...

Kent also carries full and complete
line of
FRATERNITY CRESTS

NAVY
OLIVE

BLACK
GOLD
RED

Division of Tourist and Travel Promotion
Capitol Annex
Frankfort, Kentucky
Please sand
Kentucky.

Ask for FREE literature
fa-

on Kentucky's many
cilities to make your
Fall vacation the best.

FREE

literature

about

my

DBA

Vacation

Name

(fiJiiii
MENS WEAR

Address
City

In

Stale

120 S. UPPER STREET

3

* THE READERS' FORUM

The Kentucky Kernel
lTMmsi

Fntfrrd M the
l'uliliht'd

iY

Dislikes Woe Seating

of Kkmi cky

m mnoiiH
pnt ofliii" lita t.niniltnn,
wtik iliirnm thr n vnl.ir Imul i
lour turns
A SCHOOL
MX UOl.l.AHS

M.irth fl, 1879.
mutter nmlrr the
ix .
t during holiilayi and n.ims.
Act of

.ir

YEAH

Ed Van Hook, Editor

Wayne CiuxonY, Camjnm Editor
Jfan Si hwautz, S'x it ttj Editor
Run McReynolds, Curtoimi&t
Hill 1 lot. ton. Circulation Manager
TUESDAY NEWS STAFF

Kfrbv rnwux, Managing Eilitor
Ben Fitzpatrk k, Shorts Editor
Djck Wallac e, Advertising Manager
Junk Cray, Xcus Editor
mmmmm

nm

inn mini

miim

Eldon riiiLiirs,

Scottie Helt, Sports
unimiwimi iniiniiini iniinrm

inn

i

if

ir

-

"iTTir-

Associate

nnTTiiinniiiniiiinnni

n'umwirii

Bloc Seating Unnecessary

Although the bloc seating plan
resolution was passed by a substantial majority last week by Student
Congress, we are left wondering if
the vote reflects the true feelings of
the entire student body.
To us, it only proves that some
students consider the organization to
be an outlet for pet projects.
The statement that the purpose of
at the Xavier game is to
promote school spirit is weak and
lather vague. We would like for those
who champion this plan to prove that
residents of the housing units will
join in this venture wholeheartedly.
We have also been told the bloc
seating plan will be only for the one
home game to promote "stag day." As
yet, no one has been willing to fully
discuss the matter with a Kernel reporter.
Because of this, we are left wondering if there might be some intention by the Greeks to test the willingness of unaffiliated students to allow bloc seating for this game and
any future games.
There also seems to be some reluctance on the part of some Greeks
to go along with the plan. We realize,
howeYcr, there will always be some
opposition to anything from all sides.
We can only say that this plan or
any like it will not be justified until
the interests of all students are taken
into consideration. Until such a plan
is proposed, without discrimination

against any group, the Kernel is forced
to oppose the present movement or
anything similar to it.
A bloc seating plan Yvas proposed
two years ago, finally ending in a
"grab bag" for recognition from all

bloc-seatin- g

1)
i

1

To The Editor:
1
see the "Greek" congress, Student Congress if you prefer, has
adopted bloc seating for the Xavier
game. Nothing can be done to prevent this, independents. You who represent 86 percent of the student body
are forced to sit where the Greeks
(14 percent) tell you. This has come
to pass lecause you did not elect independents to the congress. Maybe
you'll wise up next year but that's
what they said last year.
Pnii.i ip Richie
Independent ( Retired )

Wants The Lyries

To The Editor:
At every half time of our home
games, I have heard our band play
the UK Alma Mater. Everyone respectfully stands while it is being
played, but as of yet I have not heard
anyone sing the words. Certainly an
alma mater, especially such a beautiful one as we have, has words, but
why doesn't anyone know them? I
didn't find any mention of the words
anywhere in the welcoming literature
all the freshmen were given. If we
are able to sing "My Old Kentucky
Home," I think we should le able to
sing our school's Alma Mater. What
are the lyrics?
Lynda Wimhkbly
("Hail Kentucky, Alma Mater!
Loal sons anil daughters sing;
Sound her praise w ith voice united;
To I lie breeze her colors fling.
To the Blue and White be true;
Radge triumphant age on age;
Rlue, the sky that o'er us
White, Kentucky's stainless page."
THE EDITOR.)
;

be to give the privilege first to senior
girls. These gills would be given keys
to their houses or dormitories.
Now that it has its constitution
written, AWS is free to take up this
important problem. We would like
to see some thing done immediately.
Not only would a senior privilege
Ik? restored, but women would face a
greater responsibility and hence maturity. Rules do not teach this.
Kyha Hack ley
Robbie Mason

(ives Opinion
To The Editor:

Comment On Curfews

quarters. We can only see chaos and
pandemonium as a climax to the present trite little race for recognition,
and we hope it happens soon.

that for some time the Office of the
Dean of Women has been in favor of
no horns lor women. We strongly
agree with this and would like to
encourage Associated Women Student Congicss to act immediately.
This plan has worked successfully
on other campuses. The plan for UK,
to introduce the idea slowly, could

To The Editor:
Concerning the emancipation of
women, we would like to comment on
the elimination of curfews for women
living in dormitories and sorority
houses.
It is gradually becoming known

My opinion of Kyra Hackley's and
Robbie Mason's lengthy essays is:
Words aie like leaves
And, where they most abound
Underneath the spreading foliage
Little fruit is found.
Max Jhuu

ll

University Soapbox

A

Fair Share Of

lly A. RRUCE CHERRY
To The Editor:
I feel it is necessary to reply to
the letter of Oct. 13 written by C. L.
Morgan. This letter hardly seems to
be constructive criticism, for if criticism of anything in particular were
intended it could not be thought of
as constructive. Constructive clarification is welcome, of course.
I must admit I do not know exactly what I am answering, because
the letter did not exactly say anything.
I, however, do have a few things
to say about some of the things mentioned such as selfishness, test files,
the Leadership Conference, a n d
groups. ,
Perhaps students and faculty are,
for the most purt, selfish. 1 doubt it.
At any rate, I fail to understand how
selfishness can benefit the University
or its people. Certainly student standards should be higher and our faculty
should be stronger, but it cannot be
done effectively by selfishness.
I think an honest appraisal of our
purposes and how we, as individuals
and as a university, may fulfill them
can be of bent fit. It must be chewed,
spit out, and chewed again, by administrator as well as freshman, until

UK's Total Activities Load

we understand this university, until
we know its spirit. Then, maybe we
will have enough interest to want and
demand higher standards in our
faculty.
I further fail to understand how
selfishness or a supposedly resultant
honor system would mark test files as
"second hand learning." A method of
study is as effective as a student
finds it, and I am unable to judge
any method except as it relates to myself. Frankly Mr. Morgan, I don't
see how you do any better. Secondly,
I believe a test file in the Margaret
I. King Library would protect students from lethargic professors and
provide an outline of what is important to know.
The Leadership Conference certainly did illustrate the need for leadership. It brought to mind the fact
that many freshmen need leadership
to show them what to expect both
academically and socially at the University. Freshmen generally have
some spirit and interest until they
perceive, by the lack of uppcrclass-mai- i
effort, that to have no spirit is
more "sophisticated" and that in
reality there is no spirit at UK. This
is leadership that can be supplied only

by personal contact with

uppcrclass-men-

.

Perhaps the freshman days of Mr.
Morgan were so well oriented, clear
cut, and spirited he would not be
aware of this freshman need.
I cannot agree that groups are
always "nice" and "important," nor
that they always accomplish little. I
do agree that the Leadership Conference illustrated a need for leadership in the groups on campus.
One of the more delightful discoveries at the conference was that
present and future leaders are vitally
interested in all groups on this
campus and more particularly how
they should relate to each other and
to the University as a whole.
I do not prophesy a sudden and
awesome change in these relationships; it should not be expected.
Apathy anil selfishness have been
rampant far too long- Hut it seems
now is the time to begin improvement.
There are those of us who are
working towards the definite goal oV
good personal and group relationships. Perhaps a campus-widspirit
can be realized through this goal.
Granted, many groups on campus are
only nice, are not important, and accomplish little. Yet, improvement in
-

e

organizations woithy of the ellort,
and improvement in relations between
them can be achieved, but only
through ellort, Mr. Morgan.
Apathy drags on these ellorts,
however. A leader needs a group.
Groups should and could very well
inspire an academic spirit as well as
an improved social spirit. I do not
agree with cer thing that President
Dickey says, but he made one point
at the Leadership Conference with
which I do agree: Students who are
cither wholly academic or wholly social in their outlook are pulling only
half of their share of the load. Dr.
Dickey relers to the load of the "total
activities" of the University.
I do not appeal to any who hail
wholly one way or the other; these
people would most likely be happier
if I left them alone. In short, Mr.
Morgan, I do not appeal to you
(which is probably an understatement by now), but I appeal to those
students who want to pull their lull
share of the load.
I will probably be accused of
idealism again. Rut I am of the same
mind as one before who said it better.
"A University is a place; it is a
spirit. . . . Amen."

* THE KENTl'CKV

'29 Guignol Opens
lis Second Season
ypars

Thirty-tw- o

Tliratre opened

ao,

the

Gulg-n-

ll-- 5

KERNEL, Tuesday, Oct. 31,

4

3

team had Just

Our undefeated

Its .second sea-fo- n beaten Clemsnn 44-Kelly was
with the production of "Mary,
the star of the game making two
St. John
Mary Quite Contrary," by
touchdown runs. One thouErvine.

The cast of the years' first play
was described as "perfect." "Excellent lighting, costuming and other
Incidentals were well executed,"
paid the Kernel.
The play concerned the visit of
an actress to the country home of
a ftrdate family and the resultant
effect on a male adolescent member of the family.
The audience seemed deliRhted
with the play and many expressed
their desire for another like it.
In 1929 UK's football team
headed national standings as to
tames won and points scored
against opponents. The campus was
Kinging praises for John Slmms
"Shipwreck" Kelly.

sand and one balloons we;e released by the Pep Club when
"Shipwreck" Kelly made the first
touchdown.
Kentucky had been expected to
lose the game, so naturally their
ictory caused much excitement in
the crowd of 6,000.
The Clemson coach even commented, "I thought I played on
the best team at Vanderbilt that
the South ever saw, but I was
wrong I saw the best one today
and it was Kentucky."
Sports writers were speculating
whether the Wildcats would be the
Southern Conference Champions.
If victories continued, UK would
be the champion.

Kernel Became
Biweekly In 1949

There was a clamoring for more
adequate news coverage of campus
affairs this week in 1949.
The SGA (Student Government
Association) recommended to
obtain improved news coverage,
the Kentucky Kernel should be is- rued on Tuesdays and Fridays of
cach week instead of only on Fri- days, as had been the practice.
Dr. Mel Plummer, director of
the School of Journalism, said the
appeal would be given every con
sideration. Dr. Plummer noted that
contracts with national advertisers
would have to be studied, and the
amount of labor and supplies inbe determined,
volved
before it
rould be decided if the extra edition could be undertaken for the
next fcemester.
It was announced 12 years ago
this week that the military department of the University was to con-Fi- st
of one regiment of ground
troops and one wing of Air Force
enrollees. The regiment was to contain three battalions and the wing
two groups.
An art seminar at UK this week
in 1949 set forth a few ideas on
me suDject oi art. At this seminar
a theory was advanced that mod- rn art served no purpose in the
modern world other than to satisfy
the artist himself It. was nlsn oh.
M'rv,d that the present trend was
to- away from abstract painting
ward a more recognizable type.
The Kernel's society column 12
years at,o, gave accounts of all the
happenings. It told of a party after
the Cincinnati game at the Ken- -

tuckian Hotel. A few boys were
seen wandering around in their
pajamas, and "none of them could
understand why the law wouldn"t
allow them to take a short cut
down the fire escapes." Society also
reported that the "sociology as- Mgnment about the Eskimo kiss
is now being studied In the grill."

Senior Calches
His Mustache
v

&r
lclll

v

vJll IJOrill

The usual quiet of dormitory life

was broken in 1909 when a senior
got his flowing mustache entangled on a protruding nail. Sometimes they became lost in the num-

erous folds of their knickers.
Thp Trtpa tintpH that pvprvnnfl
was wondering if the seniors were
prouder of their mustaches or their
"breeches."
In the same issue, an intriguing
statement was printed in the per- tiiml rnliinin "ThuM ukhinir In.
hi,,e information about the latest in
,ov, afTilirs Sfe Mr. r.udgel." There
was no fxpianalion about who Mr.
Oudsel was.
An editorial stressed the need of
0Denintt the librarv. Evidently
u
s,
iiii-iiii i eiwumi iiiuuey uvuu- ajje for lne opening.
Money to build the library had
been obtained and the library built.
Now it was necessary to open it.
The urgency of getting funds for
opening the library was empha- sized.

V

Tug Of War In The Twenties

twenties when it just faded
the
away. The pond, too, has disappeared, having
been filled with earth excavated from the Coli- neum site.

Many old graduates recall the cold, cold waters
of C lifton Pond into which they, as freshman or
sophomores, plunged while participating in the
annual tug of war, a I K event in late fall until

Kappa Sigma Vandalism
Causes Anger In 1959
Kappa Sigma Fraternity was the
victim 01 some ramer annoying
vandalism this week in 1959.
On Sunday morning. November
1. 1959, approximately 14 fraternity
trophies were stolen from the
Kappa Sigma house, and the greek
letter Sigma was lorn irom me
front of the house.
On Tuesday night of the same
week, a phone call was received at
the house by Johnny Fltzwater.
The caller informed Fitzwater that
if the fraternity
wanted their
thow rnnlH flnH hom
tmnhiec ha
UIlder a tree across from the Ad- ministration Building."
Four pledges were Immediately
dispatched to the indicated area
and found all the trophies piled
in a cardboard box. Many of the
trophies were broken, bent, or
"fhed, and the top of the 19o7
iiumrt'unimg-uisHd- y
iruii.r nau
been removed. Bill Kaufman dis
covered the box and said he and
the other boys searched the area
for "nvon
h? mifht have been
alfn,n' DU,1 ,ouno no one- The greek letter Sigma was al