xt78cz32523s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78cz32523s/data/mets.xml  United States Housing Authority 1940 v.: ill.; 29-40 cm. UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Library Program libraries and the Federal Information Preservation Network. Call Number FW 3.7: 1/38 journals English Washington, D.C.: Federal Works Agency, U.S. Housing Authority: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Works Progress Administration Housing Publications United States Housing Authority -- Periodicals Public housing -- United States -- Periodicals Public Housing: Weekly News from American Communities Abolishing Slums and Building Low-Rent Housing April 30, 1940 text Public Housing: Weekly News from American Communities Abolishing Slums and Building Low-Rent Housing April 30, 1940 1940 2019 true xt78cz32523s section xt78cz32523s l
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2 Federal Works Agency - John M. Carmody, Administrator Vol. 1, No.38 - April 30, 1940 U. 3. Housing Authority - Nathan Straus, Administrator
M
' I
. Strausa Keysel‘hflg W hole Community Takes Part In
, Speak 111 New York C Ch - to P - t O .
LaGuardia Lays Cornerstones For orpus r18 1 r0] ec penlng
South Jamaica and Vladeck Homes Local merchants, one day early this Featuring “open house” rather than the
Nathan Straus, USHA Administrator month, served cake and coffee to 7,500 vis- actual moving in of first tenants, the Cor-
and Leon H. Keyserling, Deputy Adminis: itors inspecting three model apartments at pus Christi authority sent out letters of in-
trator and General Counsel, spoke at recent Kinney_Place, USHA—aided 'low—rent hous- Vitation to local ministers, pi'eSidents of
' cornerstone laying ceremonies in New York ing proiect in Corpus Christi, Ten. . parent—teacher associations, men’s luncheon
City, with Gerard Swope, new Chairman of Scheduled to open late in April, Kinney clubs, federated women’s 'clubs, all civ1c
the New York City Housing Authority pre- Place. is a. well-planned community of l34 clubs, leading Latin-American and Negro
siding on both occasions. dwellings in 27 one-story row houses With ciVic organizations, labor unions, the Amer-
" Mayor LaGuardia laid the cornerstone dashed stucco exteriors. The prOJect is ican Legion, and Veterans of Foreign
for South Jamaica Houses, new Negro proi— located on'a 121/3-acre tract, 5 acres of Wars. The local broadcasting company
ect scheduled for occupancy by June 15,with which are. included in a public park. The gave three periods. for addresses the week
a speech emphasizing the rapid progress 134 families that make up the-community before the ceremonies. The addresses were
made during construction. Work was not Will pay shelter rentals averaging $9.59 a given by the City—County Sanitary Engi-
. started until September 1939’ yet the first month, nearly 30 percent below the average neer, a member of the local school board,
. of 448 tenant families will begin moving in monthly shelter rent of $13.47 they would and a member of the authority:
within a few weeks. pay for substandard shelter anywhere in The average net construction cost of
Mr. Straus cautioned against “rejoicing the City. The average family llVlnAg‘ in sub- $2,257 at Kinney Place is one of the lowest
too much over past accomplishments” in standard houSing in Corpus Christi pays for comparable faCilities in the history of
. public housing, but stated his belief that 15 more for Amere shelter than the $13.25 'a American reSidential building. Over—all
years of spending at the present rate month which tenants in Kinney Place Will cost of new housing averages $3,542..
“would see most of the slums in the Nation pay for shelter plus all utilities. The Housing Authority of: the City of
gone the way of the dinosaur.” The demonstration units were completely Corpus Christi includes: CeCII E: Burney,
Other speakers at the South Jamaica furnished by local busmess institutions in Chairman; John K. Wright, Vice—Chair-
Houses ceremony were Hon. William B. “00176177770071 with members 0f the Corpus man; Henry Coutret, R‘. 0' 077777177717’ and
Barry, member of the House of Representa- Christi authority staff'and the homemaking G'. 0. Garrett. Finley Vmson is Executive
tives, and Dr. Walter White, Executive— superVisor of the public schools. Director.
Slecretary of the Naéional Association for , ‘3' AA . 3! .[ WW7 7.4345. ”“55 . 2,, W35? , A '1 'A,‘
t e Advancement of olored People. 7: ._73§:§»j 3». ‘7 2’ insists r" ' 4,5, “3'7 Ag 7'2 7"! A,“ f ,MH‘ ! '
2 At the Vladeck Houses ceremony the Ag. 77 «gig @wgffiw fa 3377'7‘9 V $fflrf‘éflgs‘t7t‘7yfl,
speeches were mainly devoted to the late 7'? r.» 77;“ ahégfléfl” $5,???" ‘K gji‘is“:.$ 3312333575- 35‘7““7'1" ‘3 33
B. Charney Vladeck, famous New York 5‘7; 7:» w§7€¥773' 731,27; géfi'flkfit 7&7}? @ aQfith‘mfil 5759’ “7 7’-
housing pioneer, for whom the project was 7%, .“fiwgéfvé‘Ai 2:2. '7‘ ‘3" 'n 2&1}: 7’9, 3:7“Vy'f! its". 2;,
named. 737777? riMM-‘a . use a; \s “\‘yAQuunr '
Praising Vladeck’s life-long struggle for 8. ;A§fi;"grggx“ ,2? “VJ \ - v,%!é, \
better housing, Mr. Keyserling said, “He 1,, ’7 £2 7 " ”\3’" ”3"";1 ~~,-_ ,2"
saw in housing a way for the cities to help ,3“ 7&2]! f/‘dgf? 1&3?" . ){QfiinA 377% { fihwfi“
solve their tax problems and their financial A1: j; A. gafiwfil,é 7‘ 777743339. 77 ‘oflfl‘ l7"
problems . . . He saw in housing a 2‘2" if; maydw Ta?- ‘43:. 7% 7‘77""; i
way for the country to help solve its unem— é @ggz_b’gg,7% \ $7777.77:
ployment problem . . . But most of all he is, a, j' fl was»?! fia‘w mm ' 7
saw in housing a way to help people, to help ’ 2 '2 We 2- 'Ww 2,!“ Kyan‘ ‘ a: ' 2r ’ 7.77:2)
mothers and fathers and children lead hap— a“ .2 ~ . 2 , ,2, § 3 ’ 3
pier and more useful lives . . . for, above 7:? I I 3 3377 H I' ,12 A“) \ 7%
all, Mr. Vladeck was a great practical hu- ,9 7: I “‘ I] I; '3 3‘ *‘u 73,14,153“? 7‘ 2;;
manitarian.” n ’ 7 . , ,, _ , , \ vig'fi '
Built on a slum site in New York’s East ’5? mama ,. 2., : . ‘ 2» .. ‘ ‘
Side, Vladeck Houses will be open for occu— ‘29‘A2;u7 ., ' A
, parlor by July 1- “WfdewM a. 7
Mr. Keyserling‘ praised the New York . pfiwaawateflm ”3?”;4, u, ’
- City housing program, but added, “All the u? “7 r‘fo';52_:*’*‘{ .72777777777773; 47A,,»
public housing projects completed or now A _ I A 1 7:337:7/37’733 777 7 ,
under way in New York City will house only " uuy7277jjfl "
. about 16,000 families—a substantial imm— ' /,”?2§.. .:
her, it is true, but a mere drop in the bucket 7;; MCW" {flfifflay 7«
' 77171727117712? goggleligxefrgifiligglif afiesdcfiynzffig Stucco-finish administration building at Kinney Place, where 134 families
are ill—housed.” will pay $13.25 a month for shelter and utilities. f
l :2 ,UK LIBRARIES
’ - - ». ._,., ..

 New Study 011 Health
And Slum Condltlons

“The evidence is overwhelming,” declares CONDITION OF STRUCTURE AND FACILITIES
Bleecker Marquette, Fellow, American Pub—
lic Health Association, in Housing and
Health Relationships Ito—Examined, “that Dwelling Units in '90 Cities l934-36 . .
slum environment acts as a barrier to the ’
efforts of public health authorities to con—
trol preventable illness among slum dwell-
housed.”

M12 Marquette’s article, published in UNFIT FOR USE OR IN NEED OF MAJOR REPAIRS
“Public Health Reports,” March 29, 1940,
and available upon application to the Serv-
ice Publications Division, U. S. Public
Health Service, \Vashing‘t0n, D. C., sum—
marizes the most recent developments in
the field of housing and health research.

The article discusses specific diseases
which are “in some measure attributable to W|THOUT PR'VATE BATH
bad housing.”

Tuberculosis: Studies in Cincinnati “show
high tuberculosis mortality rates for all the ‘
major residential areas classified by the s E Q E s 3 S l s ‘l
building department as distinctly sub- -— —— _ _ —— — —— ~— * —
standard.”

Pneumonia: Recent information shows
“that pneumonia incidence as well as mor—
tality is excessive in areas of substandard WITHOUT PRIVATE INDOOR FLUSH TOILET
housing and room overcrowding . . . The » .
vast majority of pneumonia cases received
at the Cincinnati hospitals, public and pri—
vate, come from the substandard, over- _
crowded areas of the city.”

Rickets: “While rickets varies with cli—
mate and season, its incidence is increased
by residence in dark, damp houses.” WITHOUT GAS OR ELECTRIC LIGHT

Infant and maternal mortality: Accord— in": ‘9‘:
ing to a report by the Garden Cities and :f' "1 ’ : . .
Town Planning Association of England, lo .19
“Infant mortality in the slum areas of Man-
chester was 120 per 1,000 live births; in the
city of Manchester as a whole, it was 71;
in the Wythenshawe development, 60; and
in the two garden cities, 33 and 25, respec- WITHOUT RUN NING WATER
tively.”

Typhoid fever: Typhoid fever “remains a
problem in smaller communities where there
is no public water supply or where the pub-
lic water supply is not properly protected
from contamination. In these communities
it: :gf::§cfif°fygflfi $31,335 a fawn 1“ Each complete Symbol represents 2 % of total dwelling units

Disease spread by rats: “The rat has an
important, r016f m filedfin'ect 01' lllldll‘ect ' S‘ources/ZUrban Housing: i938, Wer/(s Progress Ade's/rafion,‘
ransm1ss1on o suc iseases as pague,
typhus fever, tularemia, trichinosis, rat—bite Rea/ Frapen‘y Inventory, Dept. Of Commerce, /.934.
fever, and Weil’s disease. Slum elimination
and replacement by rat-resistant structures
aid in the reduction of this menace.”

Mental health and environment: “The in-
S‘Stent “0159 .and confuswn almosl ”war“ The above chart illustrates the various factors which characterize substand-
ably present m subsmndard housmg area: ard urban housing in this country on the basis of the most recent and exten
is bad. Lack of privacy in arrangement 0 1 '
rooms and overcrowding people in rooms is sive housing survey. This survey, known as the “Real Property Inventory,”
:gfzing’nélgggiléfgede%éi0;?:efif§f mental, was initiated by the Department of Commerce and carried out with relief

Mr.) Marquette concludes his article with funds. It is the best currently available source of data on housing conditions
a section on “Housing and Positive Health” in American cities_
in WhiCh he (“mes a Milbank Memorial The 1940 Census includes a housing schedule and when returns are tabu-
Fund round table discussion: “The round . . . ’ ’ . . . .
table desires to underline its conviction that lated and published, complete information about hous1ng in this country w1ll
. - - any Government pl‘Og'l‘an} has fallen be available for the first time. Since the Census is a complete enumeration, . .
woefully Short Of Its. Oblecme If It 510* 1“." and since all data will be gathered on a uniform basis, the results are eagerly
create decent cond1t1ons of human hvmg 1n . . _ , “
the neighborhood as we” as within the awalted by all students of public hous1ng. In the meantime, the Real Prop-
dwelling itself." erty Inventory” remains the standard source for urban housing statistics.

2

 Upkeep of Lawns and Grounds Wlth Tenant Help ,, mrw’z;,.5w
By Clifi’ord R. Clair, Management Supervisor, Region VI; Formerly Housing Manager, “111,41 WMWE‘zg‘Qfi’
Cherokee Terrace, Enid, Okla. ' ' 1757,??va .7.

. . The use of tenant labor for the upkeep of people had scarcely enough money to buy , , , ’fifi’;/

' lawns and grounds 'in Cherokee Terrace necessary groceries. Regardless of pride Q, W {’3
Project started early in the USHA program. in their lawns, they certainly could not be i , :' M “Wm ..
Before undertaking tenant yard mainte- asked to choose between renting lawn mow- Q; . €
nance we considered the advantages both to ers and buying a loaf of bread. We knew Q ' i» 1'
tenants and to the project. Tenants would also, that some of these low—income tenants ' t
have more control of their surroundings, previously had no lawns to keep. If we 3,, 2
they would have more pride in their dwell— were to be successful in creating the desire ' ; 1 ’1"
ings, and would gain satisfaction in doing for them to have pretty and clean lawns, we aw i5 V :11
something with their own hands to make must of necessity help them with the tools, ‘ 1 a ' ' Q. .
their homes more livable. Also their work as well as encouragement and advice. \ K ' ' "5 " ,, " I 33’ "
would be reflected in lower rents, an ever We, therefore, furnished one mower for \‘_.' .0 ' , .,. '1 Q, : '

present consideration. The project also each 10 dwellings, and enough water hose '3 "Q _,Q,.' .' 1- ‘ :Lfl .1
could expect a lower maintenance cost for to reach 75 feet in each direction without ' . , " ‘ ' 5.23;“ -, Q
labor and supervision, better looking lawns overlapping. To keep down the cost of ,‘ 5 ._ ,jf. Q.“ Q Q i”,
than would be possible with a skeleton issuing lawn mowers and hose to tenants, Q ,1 " jj; ;.
maintenance crew, and a perpetually beau- thereby increasing maintenance cost, a plan ” V; . . Q QQ .v '1 . ' ’
tiful and clean outdoor area. was provided whereby lawn mowers were .. Q Q- ‘ ' ‘ " "V ' -. " 5 Q 13',”

This problem, therefore, seems to be a installed in the rear yards, 1 to each 10 “”1111, _Q___ ,
mutual one, with tenants and management dwellings. They were padlocked to a steel ‘1‘; ., , Q] , ,-
working for lower rents, happier homes, post located far enough from the building ,,.§,,“,I,’ [.25 ,:,-,§‘,:,j;:‘.;'.Q-‘~‘.’ Q
and the rotection of the investment (which to be in plain view. Water hose was pro- _
means :11) livable place for future low- vided with simple steel strap hangers on A dual purpose spray.
income families). the wall, just above the bib faucet, where , , Q Q

Equipment was next on the program. hose could be looped over it. The nozzles ing the mower in plain Slght was an ever
Should we or should we not furnish it, and were fastened to the hose by a length of present Incentive for the tenant '30 use {'5-
to what extent? chain to prevent loss or misplacement if I have seen tenants, after fimShmg their

It was decided that the more expensive unscrewed. All water bib faucets were evening meal, go out on the back PQI‘Ch to
items of hand mowers and water hose be of the removable handle type and all these rest, and after Slttmg there for a Whlle take
furnished, because many families of ex— handles or keys were removed, making it notlce 0f the lawn mower, get UP, and start
tremely low income cannot afford the out— impossible to turn the water on without to work. After 0116 tenant had started, two
right purchase of these items, but can pay them. The keys to the faucets and the lawn or three more WOUId get the. urge, and 50011
an additional 10 or 12 cents per month in mowers were fastened together and issued may would be working until after dark on
rent (the added cost if the project furnished and charged to each tenant just the same as the” lawns.

. . these items). We felt it would be clearly a keys to the dwellings. liocklng ‘the W335? faucets prevented
subterfuge to say that this item would raise Locking the mowers eliminated requisi- chr1d1en from playing Wlth. the. water.
rents too high, and for that reason to force tioning of this item from the maintenance Chlldren 0f pre-school age delight in play-
tenants to buy or rent equipment in order help, prevented children from playing with mg WlthQ water, and usually go Off and leave
to keep up their lawns. We knew there were the mower and causing breakage, and en- 1t running. Thls 18511115 1n greatly In—
some families earning $10 to $12 per week couraged the immediate return of the mower SJESSdgsiglfgfeld c?€:tlwrdle3:11:na m7? ’pdflclro £09111“

. - . . . . - ~ _ o 1
and suppmting at least four people. These when the tenant was through With it. Plac the afternoon) for children to put on bath-
;<15 I . ”4;; ,Q'. , -. "? 51-5mm, ”faxing , _ “if ing and sun suits and play in the water.

W11 “$3? fixer» 31,27, ‘ “533:; Q5 1% A small committee on care of grounds was
$$EWEM§:.WV fl 1" .v 1 1 ' v, .3 131%; 2' formed and members of this committee, to-
i" ’ ., y "1 ,1 f5: ii ' Q10 my; é gether with myself, made an inspection of
- 2,9“... .1; “1,1 1‘ Q 5,, 1E: ,1 f2 5 waif. all grounds each Saturday. Notes on the
55, g; . ‘ 31,, ,_ F ‘ {i 1 . ,‘ a, , “best—kept yard,” as well as the poorest,
$1,, 114.11,, ' - .1- 1 )5? 1 i ,1, g Q 131,912? , f were made, and winners for the best yards
"11,11,113 Q! ,_ ,2 :1, 1. .. Q???“ .1; 531%, 1.3:. 1:41,. _ , ”353% E for the week were announced. Tenants who
1,131,, ,. f 1351 3“ 1:1... if: . ' g .2 1’ '1‘ Q , 11,1“ ,, i? 11 , werie not keeping ltlhgir yag‘ds in the best of
“3"; I. ' ,sr “-73 Q 1’2“ Q .. ,U , ‘ 3,, a ": 5‘ con ition were ca e on y the committee,
12:15»: i Q”- '- ”.7, ,‘il _ g I5, ’ ’ ‘gfi‘gfléfigg 1‘5: Q, '; ,g. and steps were taken to remedy the condi-
’" ’ » 7' if?! 1;”,yggéffgfi :3 Q 3 :3; ,1, @fl;’;~§ tion. In the event of sickness, or when ten-
J, r g, {:1st ; 1' ”if”? 31;. ,‘s 1% .54 4,31’22 ants were out of town, assistance was given

“ 4;. a. $5 we .. Aim?“ .1 r: by neighbors. , .
V .. 31$ f‘fig 996:“ ~ , .1, " 7,. :~ By stimulating a healthy sense of rivalry
””1“; 7i, ' . “ 5‘ ‘, ‘27 ' ‘ Q among the tenants, we encouraged extra
W ‘ . Q ‘ -, , ”1,5: -, « effort on the part of many, and raised
" ' V 2 Q ’ -Q g}; f the general level of tenant maintenance
, , 2’ > ' Army "Q ~ throughout the project. At the same time
’ . .: wafi'g W” j': ‘ ’ . » ' ‘ we developed among the tenants that pride
Qf a Q- 1%”), ‘ __ ‘ . - in “keeping the place up” which is an es-
”; ’ w ' " sential element of every real home. We
.7‘:”§*‘”§ 59“., __ . ,. _ ' " Ti ’ found, in short. that it was possible to com-
“a;"‘ ‘ . f ‘ Q‘ . bine certain of the emotional values usually
3:53-3:52?!“ § ,. “$53", ' ~ - .i . ' 3 ' ‘ attributed to private ownership 0f property
:T'Fi'f‘i Q ' A” _ Q ‘ with the economy and efficiency of a public
. . ” .3“ - . housing project. A genuine cooperative

7:5 x . -1 . . .‘ spirit can always accomplish this.
W1 " Wm "‘7‘ ' ' ' ' ' i We found that handling the care of
W 'Wsam . grounds in this way has created a beauty
Ten families can share the same hose. spot that is a credit to the city.
3

 '.' i=
New Local Authorlues a, ~
' , ”rewiring, e. . ‘ .1 .
Total 60 In 12 States - ”We. o . .
l" ,, , . I ‘ ‘
With the creation, from March 1 to “fit ilk! . ‘ ‘
April 22, of 60 new housing authorities in fifmlfilw 21’ ‘ ' l ' ' ' i,
12 States, the total number of local housing H $31k“: Lni off-.2155“ ., . ii .l’: .”' '
authorities representing communities and "‘filf‘ 55,,- , ' a l 7
counties equipped to participate in the ”in"f:riflgelflji:(in; m :i i““‘:.l\‘i
USHA program increased to 376. Of the ily"1m:l- Til“; new“. i" ' ~.. Vi“; . .
60 newly formed authorities, 42 represent in. wall“ Mrfi‘ii‘fi .n ,
counties, and are designed primarily to " risen .‘ r" “11% a as , * in“ " {in
carry on rural housing programs. Twenty— ' ill, ll ,. 7"" may?“ ,1 gist, $n; 3.:‘M ‘ ' ,
nine of the new county authorities were set » ”fr-m; 3’73- ’5 €33" .. ‘, I". ‘
up In Georgia, eight in Mississippi, and five 3221:“wfiq ”fig-M7157. e’ “t ’"e . air-i . . . , .
1n Arkansas. The total number of county “all *m‘x‘gfi igzjifi‘fi " —‘- . ~ 5i ' in“? '7 '2" 1"": : ~ '
authoritles participating in the USHA pro— ,, ‘31)”th 2' ~53 72:.“ ‘ , j w 51:3 , 3 -
gramuncreased from 59 (including two com— wig?” ¥ lgi; L a: I "'V ' V ' '" ‘ '
bination city-county authorities) on the M, ‘- ,» L"i"'3::.:»'étfi , . .. a 1r»: ‘ ' “Ln ‘ it ‘
firSt 0f Malleh’ to 101 as Of Apl'll 22- A ""1“?" ti;?% ’ 5 S ‘1'::"~,‘l,‘:: 7' aflfil’filjlfiggw ‘
Practically all the local authorities ai-e ~ " "ii“ . : .1
gorng ahead with the preliminary steps in iuwefimn? 11.57;,4. . ' ' ‘ .
their housmg program; making or " .
veys and preparing applications for USHA ff” I fie? rfi‘ww‘ey - I V i I
ass1stance. At present, there are 198 _ , 1’ eirfirt" i:1,‘”"~ian. > . . ‘
gSpEI-gz—iillediiimggoiggftis iglsilidwciliiiiiigcftmn’ An apartment building containing some of the 6,785 homes constructed by the
, , — am~ . . . . - . '
ilies in urban and rural mew DOJunkwaI Foundation in Tokyo, Japan, smce 1924. The Foundation was ,
Followifig is a list of local authorities set established with private donations and Government funds to provide dwell-
:p Since 2611 1 ings for the homeless sufferers of the earthquake and fire of 1923. Later,
LABA A: ~‘ ‘ . - - ~ .
Dothngn ousmg Authmlty 0f the Clty 0f the clearance of slums was added to the actIVIties of the Foundation. At ,
ARKANSAS: Housing Authority of the City present It has built or 1s buildmg 3,029 detached and semldetached houses _
of Conway, Housing Authority of Cross and 2,450 apartments in Tokyo and Yokohama. .
County, Housing Authority of the City of -—_——_—-_——-_——__-———
Fort Smlth: Al‘k-i Housing AUtllOTity 0f thority, Monroe County Housing Author— MISSISSIPPI: Housing Authority of the
the ‘County 0f Lawrence, H0u§11ig .Auf ity, Morgan County Housing Authority, County of Claiborne, Miss, Housing Au-
thorIty 0f the €011th. 0f MlssISSIPDli Muscogee County Housing Authority, thority of the County of Coahoma, Hous-
Ark., HOUSIDg AUthOEIty 0f Nevada Oglethorpe County Housing Author- ing Authority of the County of Covington,
County, Housing Authority of the County ity, Pulaski County Housing Authority, Housing Authority of the County of
Of RalldOIDh, Al‘k- Telfair County Housing Authority, Ter— Franklin, Miss, Housing Authority of the .
CALIFORNIA: Fresno Housing Authority. rell County Housing Authority, Upson County 0f Hinds, MiSS-i 30115ng Auth-or— .
CONNECTICUT: Housing Authority of the County Housing Authority, W alto n lty Of the County Cl. Oktlbbeha, Housing
City of Middletown. County Housing Authority, Wilcox County AllthOl‘lty if fill? CltYfOf OXfOI‘d, MISS-ti
. _ . _ Housing Authority, Wilkes County Hous- Housing Ht 01‘1ty 0 the COUDtY 0
GEORGIA‘ Haitow County Housing Author— ing Authority, Worth County Housing P311013, MiSS-i 110115ng AUthOTitY 0f the
ity, BeIIIen County Houslng Auth011ty, A th "t County of Yalobusha Miss
Charlton County Housing Authority, Cof— u 011 y. . . , ‘ I
fee County Housing Authority, Colquitt IDAHO: Buhl Housmg Authority, Nampa RHODE ISLAND: Housing Authority of the
County Housing Authority, Cook County Housing Authority, Twin Falls Housing City of VVoonsocket, R. 1.
Housing Authority, Crawford County Authority. . _ . ' _ TEXAS: Housing Authority of the City of
Housmg' Authority, Crisp County Hous- KENTUCKY= City of MadISOHVlHe MunlClPal Galveston, Housing Authority of the City
ing Authority, Decatur County Housing Housing Commission, City Of OWGDSbOTO of Waxahachie.
Authority, Dodge County Housing Au- Municipal Housing Commission, City of
thority, Elbert County Housing Authority, Somerset Municipal Housing COInMiSSiOD-
Grady County Housing Authority, Hart LOUISIANA: Housing Authority for the City Schedule Of Bld Openlng Datesl
County Housmg Authority, Jasper County of Baton Rouge, Shreveport Housing Au— ———‘—
Housmg Authority, Jenkins County HOUS— thOl‘lty. Local authority and project ‘ Number i Date of bid .
ing Authority, Johnson County Housing MASSACHUSETTS: Hinsdale Housing Author- number W7_°‘f:r:l:wli(3°:nmg
Authority, McDufiie County Housing Au- Ity. Charleston (S. C.~17(i)_,‘ 129 ‘ 5_15_40
——————-————————-— Chester (Ea.—7—]),.......‘ 396 l 4730~40
N - D‘ ' ' )ol).—lv2 34? l 7- 2—40
Weekly Construction Report ”(0411190310 ((Micikfl), pt l ) 1 )
___—____—————— II)__._...._._______,,.,,..,. 92 5.- 7740
~ . » , Detroit (Ml(5ll.*1’5)_..vl 440 5—21410
\\ kill \‘Hlelel P g . V _
iiem I A1331 ,‘gj‘gggo l ms, {£3,340 1 9&3; 0 Elizabeth 0.14342)”; 405 ! ii~22eio
* _ 7 . W", F W Granite City (Ines—1).. 151 l 5—16—40 ' ' ,
Number of prOJeCtS under construction , 198 ‘ 195 +1.54 Helena (Mont.~4~d)-... 72 r, 54 3~40
Number of dwellings under construction._,.,__..._._l 75,780 74,451 +1.79 Jersey City (N. J._g_1)i 498 5‘16““) '
Total estimated over—all cost 1 of new housing._ ,l$337,173,000 $331,619,000 +1.67 McGomb (Miss—7372).... 90 4-30410
Average over—all cost1 of new housing per unit,,,i $4,449 $4,454 —0.11 New York Citv (N_ Yr
Average net construction cost 3’ per unit.............. ‘ $2,790 i $2,795 ‘ —0-13 545)___,,,,,,:,,____,,,,,, 1, 170 4730740 ‘
__—___—‘.__.—_.._ Portsmonth (01110410—
Ilncludcs: (alBuilding the house, includingstructural costsanil plumbingdmating, and electrical installationgfli) dwelling 1)..._.."".."."."."." 260 1 5*]5‘40 ,
equipment, architects” foes, local udiuinistrativc expenses, financial charges during construction, and contingency expenses; —-——————
(0) land for present (lm'clopnimil; (d) nondwolling facilities. 1 There is usually a 30-day pcriod bctwccll bid advertising .
l The cost of building the house, including structural, plumbing, heating, and electrical costs. and bid opening.
Publication is» approved by the Director, Bureau of the Budget, as required by rule 42 of the Joint Committee on Printing.
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. Subscription price 51 domestic, foreign $1.80 per year. Single copies, 5 cents.
Material for PUBLIC HOUSING should be addressed to Informational Service Division, U. S. Housing Authority, Washington, D. C.
4 2251504 u. 5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE