xt78gt5fbx03 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78gt5fbx03/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19240208  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  8, 1924 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  8, 1924 1924 2012 true xt78gt5fbx03 section xt78gt5fbx03 The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY.. FEBRUARY

VOL XIV

8,

1924

No. 16

1
MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

VARSITY

W00DR0W WILSON HELD
WEDNESDAY

CHAPEL
Professor

Franklin

Farquhar

Chief Speaker to The

Students

THRIFT WEEK OBSERVED

DEBATE

TRACK

Tryouts for the debating team
will be held on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock People interested in ithc tryouts for the
Kentucky Oratorical contest to
on
be held at Transylvania
March 1, should consult Mr.
Sutherland.

Varsity track candidates arc
requested to report to Coach
George Buchhcit and Manager
Jack Frost in the men's gym
on
Monday, February 11,' to
start training for the Cincinnati
Y indoor meet March 1.

AT

UNIVERSITY

WEEK OF JANUARY

--

K-

--

Dean Massie of Christ Church
LECTURES TO BEGIN ON
Pronounced The Inof

Kentucky students

president of the United States.
Professor Franklin Farquhar, the
chief spieakep on this sad occasion,
paid brief but eloquenit tribute to the
fallen leader. "Woodrow Wilson met
Ibsen's definition of true greatness,"
Farquhar
said, "and his
Professor
king thought was the covenant of the
League of Nations, into which his tin
swerving confidence brought S3 nations. The deatth of Woodrow Wilson
should be the occasion for the resurrection of his dreams and ideal's
throughout the world so that generations will be born great in that heritage," he conltiimied.
Doctor Franklin McVey, who presided over the exercises, introduced
Professor William Sutherland, who
read extracts from the messages given
by the president to Congress April 2,
1917.
This message, Dodtor MfcVey
said, was characteristic of the man
in his championship of the rights of
mankind an dan expression of the
high ideals which animated' him.
Dean R. K. Massie, of Christ
Church Cathedral pronounced the in
vocation and blessing. Piano and vio
Iin selections were rendered by Pro
fessor Carl Lampert and Mrs. Lam
pert.
President Wilson's favorite hymns,
"How
and
Firm a Foundation"
"America the Beautiful" were sung
by the audience.

U.K.

GRADUATE

PEDOLQGICAL

ATTENDS
MEETING

Dr. J. S. McHargue of Experi
ment Station Asked to Read
Paper
Dr. J. S. McHargue, research chemist at the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment station ha9 received an invitation from the International Institute of Agriculture at Romea, to attend and present a paper before the
Fourth International Pedological Conference which will meet in that city
during the latter part of May. During the conference the folflowing subjects will be discussed by eminent authorities from many different countries
of the world: I. Mechanical and physical soil studies; application of hydraulics to agriculture; II. Soil chemistry; III. Soil bacterioldgy and bioand
chemistry;
IV. Nomenclature
classification! of soils; V. Soil cartography; VI. Plant physiology in relation to soil science.
During the conference a definite
proposal wiH be put forward for the
.foundational of the International Pedological Association. Pedological cx- (CoRtinued on page 4.)

23

Civic, Commercial and Religious
Organizations
in
Observance

K-

Students Are Advised to Keep
Account of Expenditures and

LUCY WHITWORTH, A

Assets.

vocation
University

17--

Y. M. C. A. ENTERS PLAN

DOCTOR McVEY PRESIDES

filled the chapel to overflowing Wednesday morning to pay tribute to the
memory of Woodrow Wilson, twenty-eight- h

DURING

VOCATIOJIALMIDANCE

FORMER STUDENT, DIES

Herdman Will Deliver
First of Series on February i!3

Was Teacher at University High

Miss

School, Member of Class of
1922

Miss Margaret Herdman, director
of the Chicago Collegiate Bureau of
Occupations, will speak to the women
students in chapel a,t the fifth hour,

Wednesday, February 13, on the general subject of Vocationlal Guidance.
Miss Herdman is a very able speaker
and has had six years experience mi
vocational and employment work. She
has been much in demand by other
universities for similar conferences
and the University of Kentucky was
very fortunate in getting her.
Vocational Guidance is under the
League
auspices of the Woman's
which each year has arranged the vocational guidance program. This year
there is to be Miss Herdman's general lecture followed in the sprmig by a
day designated as Vocational Guidance Day at which time speakers from
the various professions will be here
to talk to the women students.
The University Council has excused
all women students from their fifth
hour classes on February 13 as the lecture is compulsory. Vocational Guidance cards will be signied immediately
following the lecture.
After the lecture the Vocational
Guidance Committee will give a luncheon; the afternoon will be devoted to
conferences; and at five o'clock the
Woman's League will entertain with
a tea at Patterson Hall to which all
the women students are invited.

COACH BUCHHEIT

QUINTET

VARSITY

WINS

CLOSE GAME FROM WEST
VIRGINIA
Buchheit's
24-2- 1

RICE

MOUNTAINEERS

Cat Five Snatches
Victory in Closing
Minutes
AND

KING

STAR

Count is Even for Twenty Min-

utes but Wildcats Draw
Away at End.

Lucy Whitworth, graduate of the
University in the class of '22, died
Thursday morning at 3 o'clock at the
Good Samaritan Hospital following
a serious operation performed Friday,
February 1. After the operation
Miss Whitworth was thought to be
improving until Saturday night when
meningitis developed which caused
her death.
While a situdent at the University,
Miss Whitworth was very prominent
in activities and was a popular member of the Alpha Gamma. Delta fra
ternity. Since her graduation she has
been teaching .Finench in the University high school.
Miss Whitworth was the daughter of
Mr. a'wd Mrs. Jesse Whitworth, of
Hardins'burg, Ky. Her parents and
two sisters' survive her. As the Kernel goes to press ifuneral arrangements have not been announced.
--

After fighting on" an even keel with
the University of West Virginia
Mountaineer five for over thirty minutes, Kentucky's Wildcat quintet drew
away to a three point lead, held that
margin until the 'final gun was fired,
and won over the Mountaineers
Monday night. Kentucky's pass
ing attack, coupled with the brilliant
play of Bill King and Captain "Chuck"
Rice at the guard positions, was largely responsible for the Blue and White
2
BOY SCOUT EDUCATION HEAD victory. The count was tied at
SPEAKS AT CHAPEL EXERCISES at the end of the first half.
The Cats entered the game against
a much larger team rhat had not lost a
Ray O. Wyland Talks on "Citizenship game this season, but undaunted by
and Citizenship Ideals"
advantages proceeded
these
to hold the Mountaineers even for the
Ray O. Wyland, director of the de- first half of the game and then forge
partment of education of the Boy to the front with a three point lead
Scouts of America, spoke at the chap- and hold that lead until the game endel exercises Tuesday morning at the.
Kentucky's combination of the
ed.
fifth hour on "Citizenship and Citizen- short weave passes and the long pass
ship Meals."
proved much more foreful than the
The exercises were opened by a
song followed by devotional and an(Continued to Page 8)
McVi.y,
nouncements by President
K
Mr.
who i foduced Mr. Wyland
Wyland told something of what the
NOTICE
Ocy Scout movement means to America in which he said that the need of
There are rumors current
today was a new approach to citizenabout the campus that "Sevenship. Citizens should be measured
teen," this year's Stroller play,
by what they do and not by what they
has, in the minds of the judges,
have and the one who does most is ;he
been casted. This report is not
one who means most. He also said that
only without authority but it is
the Boy Scout movement was increasaltogether false.. No parts have
ing rapidly and in the future they hope
been assigned. When the decisto make the country move forward
ion is made, it will be on merit
ethically and morally.
alone.
Please correct all statements or insinuations to the conHeme Tits
(Signed) :
trary.
The Minnesota college boy's letters
Earl Maxwell Heavrin,
to Dad indicate an almost complete
Director.
mastery of the touch system. Minnesota Star.
24-2-

K-

UNIVERSITY UNION EOR

STUDENTS MAINTAINED
Aid For Traveling Students is
Given by Organization in

France
The Bulletin of the American University Uniow, just issued, calls attention to the removal of the Paris office
to more commodious quarters at 173
Boulevard St. Germain, where students1 and professors visiting France
will receive a cordial welcome from
the director, Professor Algeron
(Chicago), and from Dr. H. S.
Kraus1, (Columbia), assistant director.
The retiring director, Professor Paul
VanDyke (Princeton) in his annual report states that during the past year
the Union registered 1,392 American
students, of whom 700 were women
and 692 men: 1,164 were working at
the University of Paris and1 325 followed courses (including summer
courses) at provincial universities. Dr.
George E. McLean, retiring director
of the British division, reports 1,255
registrations, and Mr. R. II. Simpson,
the assistant director, summarizes the
different lines of work undertaken by
the London office.
Copies of this and another bulletin
including letters from professors and
students who have made use of the
facilities offered by the Union may
be ob'tained from the secretary, Professor J. W. Cunliffe, Journalism
Building, Columbia University, New
York City.
K
The Longer the Higher
"Agwes is looking as young as ever."
"Yes, but she says it costs her
more every year." Boston Transcript.
Cot-ma-

Thrift Week, promoted by the University Y. M. C. A., working in accordance with the national movement
fos'tcred by the National Thrift Committee of the National Y. M. C. A.,
was observed on the campus of the
University the week of January
More than 40 civic, commercial, educational and religious national organizations
to cause the observance of this week throughout the
United States and Canada.
Budget books were distributed by
the University Y. M. C. A. to all the
students who desided to keep a personal account of their assets and expenditures. These books are designed to
aid the student in keeping his persanal
expenses. Secretary Bart Peak announces that many of the books have
been distributed among the students
and that any student who desires- one
many have it by calling at his office.
The purpose of this national movement is to stimulate the individual to
think straight and to act wisely in regard to personal money matters in the
realm of earning, spending, saving,
investing, and giving.
The basic creed of thrift consists of
the following ten rules:
Work and earn.
Make a budget.
Record expenditures.
Have a bank account
Carry life insurance.
Own your home.
Make a will.
Invest in safe securities.
Pay bills promptly.
(Continued on Page eight)
-- K-

GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM
WINS

FROM LOUISVILLE

Fourth Successive Victory For
The University
Kittenettes
The Kittenettes added a fourth victory to their undefeated record when
they won from. Louisville Cardinals
9
Saturday, Feibruary 2, at Louis15--

ville.

The Kentucky girls showed the
best form displayed this season. Each
player was on her game every second.
Kentucky led off by scoring a foul
which was followed shortly by a field
goal by Kerth. Louisville, encouraged
and cheered by anxious rooters made
a long side shot. The score stood 4
for some time but in 'the last part of
the second quarter Kentucky got loose
and the half ended 4 in Kentucky's
9--

favor.

In the third quarter Louisville made
a big advance by 'long shooting, and

From that time
the score stood
until the last few minutes of play Kentucky led 'by a small margin. The accurate foul shooting of the Kittenettes
9--

(Continued on page 4)

* rH12.. KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Twe

Alumni Notes
Editor

Alumni Secretary

grams to members of the house and
senate, and to the Alumni Secretary
(or distribution to the prws, urging
their active support of all house and
lluffalo. I"cl. 9. (Second Sat- Miiate bills presented at thi; re3j;cr. of
iirday- - Regular) luncheon at 1:15
the legislature which have for .heir
p. in., Chamber of Commerce, cor- purpose the increasing of revalues .nnl
ner Main and Seneca Sts.
appropriations for the University. A
Lexington, Feb. 9. (Second Sat- new pride, and a deeper IoaUy is
Regular) luncheon at
unlay
kindled within each of us by the awak12:15 p. in., Lafayette Hotel.
ened sense of duty which Kentucky
Chicago, Fob. 18, (Third Mon- acknowledges to the University thru
dav Regular) luncheon at 12:30
Governor Y. J. Fields.
p. m., Marshall Fielcls's Restaur- Plans for the entertainment of the
ant, Men's Grill.
Senior Engineers on their annual inDetroit, Feb. 23. (Last Satur- spection trip, beginning April 3, were
day Regular) dinner, Dixieland
discussed thoroughly, and special
Inn.
appointed to insure that the
Somerset, Ky., March 7. (First
class of '24 sec not only the big inFriday 'Regular) meeting. 7:30
power
dustrial and
p. m., Dr. Norflcct's office.
plants in and around Buffalo, but also
the civic beauties of the city includinii
the parks, theatres, municipal buildMEMBERS OF BUFFALO CLUB
ings, the grandeur of Niagara Falls
ACTIVE IN SOUTHERN SOCIETY and the rapids, and the Little
CALENDAR

Hydro-Eilcc'tr-

ic

t.

A Southern Society has been organized by the natives of Dixie now reN. Y., of whom
siding in Buffalo,
a large per cent are Kentuckians and
a'lumni of the University of Kentucky.
The first annual dinner dance of the
Society was given on the birthday of
General Robert li. Lee, January 19.
A souvenir program of the affair has
been received at the alumni office. The
program was very attractively designed and contained, in addition to the
list of members, officers of the society
and evening's program, a list of old
songs of the South, such as "Dixie,"
"Maryland', My Maryland" and "My

Old Kentucky Home." the song that
has never been equaled in the estimation of most native sons and daughters of the state.
Dr. Philip L. Blumenthal and Luke
P. Mil'ward, both alumni of the University and active in the Buffalo Alumalso of the
ni Club, are directors
Southern Society. Luke Milward is
secretary of the society as well as a
momlber of the board of directors.
Other alumni who are memlbcrs of the
Southern Society are L. C. Daniels,
A.
O. K Dyer 04, R. D. Hines
H. Mason, diaries R. Perkins
Roger T. Thonvton '14 and Herman
Worsham '16.
ex-9-

ex-0-

WEATHER FAILS TO
KEEP DETROIT FOLK AWAY

ZERO

The Buffalo Club extends to all Seniors of the University, in addition to
the engineers, a hearty invitation to
pay us a vis-i- t at this time, and we arc
making special efforts to help locate
all who come with the idea of securing
We now
employment.
permanent
have a special placement committee,
of which Dr. Philip Blumenthal. 621
Breckenridge street, is chairman, who
will cooperate in every way possible
to secure employment for Kentucky
men. L. Clifford Davidson '23. secretary.
CLUB FAVORS BOND ISSUE
Philadelphia Alumni Wire Speakers
of Houses of Legislature
A recent communication from the
Philadelphia Club through the secretary. R. S. Clarke, enclosed copies of
a telegram the Club mailed to the lieutenant governor and the speaker of the
house of representatives at Frankfort,
Philadelphia Club anin which the
nounced itself in favor of the $75,000,-00- 0
bond issue.
The telegram read. "The Philadelphia Club, University of Kentucky
Alumni Association, learns with gratification of the bond issue including
provision fo; the University and urges
your support in order that Kentucky
may creditably fulfill need for better
educational facilities and be able to
supply the present and increased demand which already exceeds capacity."
Practically every alumni club of the
association has now sent telegrams to
members of the legislature favoring
the submission of the bond issue to the
people. It is of great value to the
cause if the legislators know the alumni favor this issue for they represent a
chsls of people capable of knowing
the needs of the University in addition
to the needs for good roads, which are
themselves a great aid to rural education. With the legislature assured of
the fact that the bond issue is wanted,
it would be nothing short of misrepresentation to turn it down, and therein its
fore each telegram received
favor adds to the evidence needed to
show them that the people do desire it.

A recent communication from the
Detroit Club says, "Despite the fact
that the mercury had fallen to 10 degrees below zero, the Detroit Alumni
attended the monthly meeting and
dinner at the Dix!c Land Inn last Saturday night."
That is the slparit that will keep the
alumni of the University firm friends
of each other and of Old State as well.
It speaks well of the pleasure it gives
the memjbers of the club to get together and talk over the news from
back at the college when they fail to
allow a depression of the mercury to
keep them at home.
The Detroit Cub at the mettmg
spoken of elected the following officers for the year: li. H. Clark '16,
president; C. M. Margraves '20,
H. J. Ueam, '23, secretary-treasureCharles E. Plank and Hen- DEAN BOYD OUTLINES AIMS
ry O. Wagner, mombers of 'he execAND VALUE ALUMNI OFFICE
utive committee.
The male members of the club after
The Alumni office is considered an
the meeting made out the rest of the
evening with a bowling match at the unnecessary expense by some persons
recreation building, according to the who are not acquainted with the work-i- t
attempts to do, with the assistance
letter, written by 11. J. Beam, the
of alumni clubs in many cities and
.KTiTtary.
counties. In order to get some outNOTES FROM BUFFALO CLUB side opinions on the subject it was
decided to ask the deans of the difcolleges of the University to
The Buffalo Alumni Cliib held its ferent
as to 'what value
regular monthly luncheon and busi- make statements
and
the Chamber of Com- they consider the alumni secretary
ness session at
12, office is to the university.
merce Building Saturday. Janvary
The first dean from whom a state1924.
Fach of the eighteen members
present expressed a keen interest in ment was received was Dean Paul P.
the bond issue now being considered Boyd, of the College of Arts and
folby the now, and as we hope, more Qc'cnccs. Dean Boyd's statement
enlightened, legislature. By a unani- lows :
"Privately
endowed colleges are
mous vote it was deeded to send tele

commonly s.nd to have a more loyal
and united alumni support than have
state universities.
If this is a fact,
Surely a
it is hard to understand.
state university should have a great
appeal because of the combination) of
state and institutional loyalty.
"But no body of men and women
can put their good impulses into effective operation for the advancement
of a cause, educational or otherwise,
without organization and experienced
leadership. It is for this reason that
we feel grateful to our active alumni
willingness to cooperate
for their
with trustees and faculty in bringing
to Kentucky a better University. A
skillfully and enthusiastically directed
active, unsclfisb alumni organization,
i:. essential."
Graduation or "quituation" must not
Lreak the ties with Alma Mater, nor
absolve the obligations assumed by
teacher and pupil. It is "till death
doth part us."

campaign manager. One of thes, written by Scluiltz Riggs ex-- , is quoted in
part, herewith:
"During my 'stay in Lexington I
waited on tables to pay board, sold
newspapers and also worked at the
Experiment Station Farm at 10c an
hour to finish paying my expenses
e
there. The total amount spent
of my earnings while there was
$40 for the entire period from September 1903 to January, 1908. I left
at that time to enter the service of the
firm I am now associated with. IF
STUDENT LOANS HAD BEEN
AVAILABLE AS NOW, I would
have remained to complete my course.
However, the training and experience
received has been of great value in
my business life. The University of
Kentucky is the best asset of our
State along educational lines and every boy who desires training should
have the opportunity to take a course
there. I endorse most heartily the
Student Loan proposition and feel
sure that it will be a great success."
Mr. Riggs is manager of the
district for the Metropolitan
Life Insurance Company and is conducting one of the most successful insurance businesses in the state. His
04
offices are in the City National Bank
Carlton C. Curtis, who is with A. A. Bldg., Paducah, Ky.
Ilousman & Company, of New York
City, asks that his Kernel be sent to
'12
him care of A. A. Housman & Co.,
"My intentions have been good, but
315 Montgomery St.. San Francisco,
well, here it is at last. 'Our Son'
Calif. He is temporarily stationed in
he will
California and will be there several wants to read the Kernel so
know what is going on down there."
months.
'Our Son' is Robert Leslie. Jr., who
arrived to gladden the hearts of Mr.
'98
and Mrs. R. L. Jones. January 23,
One of the supporters of U. K. is 1924. Mr. Jones is sales engineer with
is a salesman
ex-- ,
V. S. Griffing
who
the Carrier Engineering Corporation.
for the Great Southern Refining Co. Mrs.
Jones (nee Mary Brown), is a
Mr. Griffing marrricd Miss Mary T. former
student of the University. They
in June, 1906. They have two reside
at 312 Mt. Prospect Avenue,
aged thirteen Newark. X.
Lillian T
children
J.
ears and William C, five months old.
The family resides at 702 South Lime'13
stone. Lexington, Ky.
Win. Muir Lane, formerly with the
Westinghouse Electric and Manufac-tuiin- g
'03
Co., at Pittsburgh, Pa., is now
"Enclosed find my check for dues. a construction engineer with the DeI get much pleasure from the Kernel. partment of State Roads and HighIt is the 'livest' college weekly I know ways with headquarters at Walton.
and although I have been out of direct Ky. He is living at Flemingsflnirg.
touch with 'Old State' for a number of Ky., and all mail shouid be sent to
years, I still have a warm spot in my that address.
heart for the grand old institution. It
was my good fortune to be cne of the
'14
editors of the first publication, 'The
Floyd K. LeRoy ex- - is with the
Kentuckian,' a monthly which was Armstrong
Cork and Insulation Comand to assist
published in
pany, 1015 Broadway, Cincinnati, O.
n making possible the first football
souvenir ever published by the col15
lege. We were compelled to travel a
Grover C. Settles is farming near
rock road to make both ends meet, but Danvilie. Ky. He married Miss Marwe had 'the spirit.' In 1908 I also had
garet MicBride. April 1. 1922. The
the privilege cf rendering service. to other member of the family is Carolyn
'Old State' when as a member of the McBride, aged six juontbs.
The mailGeneral Assembly I helped to get the ing address is Shakertown Pike, Danappropriation of $250,000 for Ken- ville, Ky.
institutions of
tucky's educational
which State got the lion's share."
'16
Frank M. Kutcheson ex-- .
Mrs. E. W. Still (nee Kathleen B.
Mr. Hutcheson is practicing law at Sullivan), is
chairman of the DepartMrs.
Hutcheson
Henderson. Ky.
ment of Home Economics, State
They have Teachers College, Kirksville, Mo.
was Miss Inez F. Keen.
three children, Elizabeth. Frank K.,
and Fdw n Howard.
'17
out-tid-

Betwixt Us

2,

Chas. S. Schrader is in the research
'04
engineering department of A. S. H. V.
Charles A. Matlack is conducting a E. Research Laboratory, U. S. Busuccessful p'lumbing business at 171 reau of Mines, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Fast High Street, Lexington, Ky. He
married Miss Mary S. Banahan, Jan'18

uary 7, 1915. They have two little
Mayds,
Mrs. Fred O.
nee Mary
daughters, Mary and Betty. The
Ricketts, is principal of the Carmar-g- o
address is 516 S. Broadiway.
Consolidated Schools, Mt. Sterling,

Ky. Mr. Mayes, who was in service
during the World War and was disabled, finished his college work in the
extension department and graduated
laist summer with the D. A. degree.
They have one child, Fred Mtirston
Mayes, five years old.
19

"At last I have found time to crash
through with my dues. My intentions
have been the best but the time which
has elapsed would indicate that a certain road has been donated quite a
Still, .better late than
few sections.
never." F. Paul Anderson, Jr.,
to the President, Irvington Varnish and Insulator Company, Irving-toN. J. Mrs. Anderson was formerly EKzabcth K. Erdman, of Lexington. They reside at 94 South Munn
Avenu, East Orange, N. J.
20

The marriage of Mrs. Lillian Duty
ex- - and J. Harvey Allen, of Winchester, was solemnized January 22, 1924,
in that city. For more than a year
Mrs. Allen has held the position of
postmistress at Winchester After a
wedding trip east they will make their
home in Winchester whore Mr. Allen
0
and Miss
Charles- A. Asibury
is in business.
were marSarah Thomas Haley
ried December 27, 1923, at the First
Baptist Church, Lexington, Ky. They
from their wedding
have returned
trip and are at home on the groom's
farm on the Cleveland pike, addres's
Route 1, Chilesbvrg, Ky.
-

cx-2-

cx-2-

'21

The marriage of Miss Julia Gardner
and Edgar Neal Thurman
Ross
'21. was: solemnized February 3, 1924,
at the home of the bride's mother in
Lexington. After a few days visit to
Chattanooga, Tcnn., Mr. Thurman will
return to Northwestern University at
Chicago, where he lacks only a few
week's of completing his graduate
Mrs. Thurman
work in chemisitry.
with her mother until
will remain
April when they will go Wil'mington,
Del., where Mr. Thurman hais a position with the Du Pont Manufacturing
Company.
Robert H. Hays has been appointed
resident counsel of the Burley Tobacco Growers' Association, offices at 620
South Broadway. Lexington, Ky. Mr.
Hays served in the World War and
is now a lieutenant in the Officers Rc- cx-2- 6

(Continued on page 7.)

MMHHMH
Dues and The Kernel
One Year

$2.00
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION,
University of Kentucky,
Lexington.

NOTICE TO LAW ALUMNI
Sufficient money for final payment on the Dean Lafferty portrait for the College of Law hai
not yet been subscribed. Checka
may be sent to W. 8. Hamilton,
'07, 707 Marion E- Taylor Bldg.,
Louisville, Ky.
-

r;

06

One of the name's lately added to
the "honor roll" is that of Henry
English Read, who received his B.
M. K. in '04, M. E. in '11 and C. E.
in '20.
He is a member of the firm
of Rogers and Read, engineers and
surveyors, 410 Realty Building, Louisville,

Carrier Engineering Corporation
750

Frelinghuysen Avenue,

Newark, N. J.
Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia

Ky.

MANUFACTURERS OF WEATHER
09

to make "Every day a good day"

Patrick Henry Nublctt is superintendent of city schools of Hazard, Ky.
He married Miss Elizabeth Wood,
June 10, 1911, and they have one
daughter, Mary Wood N'dMlctt, aged

with the help of the following Kentuckians:

ten.
10

During the drive for fund lor tin
Greater Kentucky Campaign, oomt interesting letters were received by th

1"

J. I. Lyle. '96
E. T. Lyle, '00
L. L. Lewis, '07
M. S. Smith, 'OS
R. L. Jones, '12
J. R. Duncan, '12
ft, IX, IUWICIIU,

J. E. lolling, 'IS
H. Worsham, '16
R. Waterfill, '20
J. H. Bailey, '20
W. 1. Thornton, '21
N. O. Belt. '22
A. P. haaklia, '2 J

f

* THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL

Pact Tkraa

RENT A CAR
PAY BY THE MILE

U DRIVE IT
white blossoms. Miss Rogers was assisted in entertaining by her mother,
Mrs. Fon Rogers and her sister, Miss
Lottie Mac Rogers.
The charming hospitality included
about sixty guests, members of Delta
Rho and Beta Chapters of Delta Delta
Society Calendar
Delta fraternity and for the alumnae
Saturday, Feb. 9 Sigma Nu house of the two chapters.
dan cc in the evening.
Delta Chi fraternity host for
Womans' Club of U. K.
informal dance.
The Womlan's Club of the UniversiSaturday, Feb. 16 'Active Chapter of ty of Kentucky will meet Friday at
Alpha Gammo Rho will entertain 3 p. in. at Patterson Hall.
with a formal dance iro the evening at ithr Phoenix.
Reading of Play
The management of the Romany
Triangle Fraternity Dance
Theatre feels especially fortunate in
Kentucky chapter of Triangle fra- securing one of America's most cclc
ternity entertained Saturday evening bratcd scholars, Dr. Marion Miller, of
with an informal dance at the new Now York, for the first of its "Open
home, the Rhodes place, in Forest Days," a scries of delightful programs
Park, one of the traditional homes of for which no admittance will be
the city. The house was beautifully charged, and to which everyone feelMusic was ing an interest in the little theatre
decoraltcdi witli palms.
e
orchestra. movement is cordially invited.
furnished by a
KThe guests included Misses Isabella
Van Meter, Helen Church, Bertha
e
HEY ST.UDE!
"Rogers,
Emma Belle Price,
Bronaugh, Sue Lockctt Mitchell,
Annclle Kelly, Frauds Price, Jane
Of course examinations took
Lewis, Mary Hansen Peterson, Esther
your breath last week and regisSmith, Elizabeth
Gilbert, Frances
tration got most of your money
Helm, Mary Sncll Ruby, Jane Earl
this week, but early next week
Middldton, Lucille Coleman, Edna
sec if you can't drop by the
Lewis Wells, Louise Connell, Louise
Alumni office and make your
McCormicK Alfonsine Stewart, Dorfourth payment on the Stadium
othy Humphreys, Frances Ripy, Anne
Fund. Less than 50 per cent of
Shropshire, Ida Kenney Risque, Elizthe students bave made the
Catherine Courtney,
abeth Morse,
fourth payment yet. The money
Margaret Lav!n, Jimmy Allen, Maris needed to put the roof of the
garet Hunter, Evelyn Fithian, Sarah
basketball building, among other
Walker, Christine Gerhardt, Mildred)
things.
Cowgill, Emma Green, Bess Perry and
Mrs .Little.
KMessrs. William Blades, Arthur
Raising the Amount
Givens MarBcntley, Wayne Foust,
Scandalized Judge (to enraged attin, Charles Gibson, J. H. Layman, torney) "Silence! I fine you five dolGardner Bayless, W. O. Billiter, A. T. lars for contempt of court."
Rice, William King, Joseph Roberts
Enraged Attorney (planking down
Thomas
William
$20JbiH) "Five dollars doesn't begin
Barnes, Lowell to express mv contempt
Marshall
for this
Truitt, Maurice Black, Herbert
court." Sun Dodger.
Ryan Ringo, Paul Rouse, Curtis Sanders, Layman Mays, Sneed
Yager, Douglas Vest, William Blan-toWilliam Tate, Emmdtt Milward,
Jake Bethurum, Daniel Morse, James
Willis, Red Gardner, J. L. Shaw, J.
H Butler, Herberit Carter, William
Embry, Jack Green, James McFar-lanTurner Gregg, John Aaggart,
Al Kirwan, Gene Moore, Josepb
"I70R the student or prof., the
L superb VENUS
T. L. Warren, John Riffe.
all for perfect pencil work.
The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs.
17 black degrees 3 copying.
J. B. Dicker, Mr. and Mrs. D. V.
Aacriean Load
Mr. and Mrs. F. Paul Anderson, Mr.
Pencil Co.
Terrill, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Norwood,
220 Fifth Ar.
tint York
and Mrs. H. E. Glenn, Mr. and Mrs.
J. F. Wilson.

Society

seven-piec-

--

Lur-Jen-

--

Voss-mcye- r,

NOTICE TO WOMEN
All women students of the
University will be excused from
their fifth hour classes Tuesday,
February 12, to attend the Conference on Vocational Guidance.
Ezra L. Gillls,

Maxwells and Fords
NO

WD TAPE SUCH AS REFERENCE,

mMtMMMMHMMMHMMlMMMMMMM
t

A Complete Line

of Candies for the

Fraternity Store

Candy Co.

Serv-U- s

5854

Phone

401 South Lime

K-

WHOLESALE

All Good
The Vicar "So you like the coun
try? Arc your hens good layers?"
Mabel (fresh from town) "Top
plngl They haven't laid a bad egg
yet." Passing Show (London).

Banners,

Pennants I

Table Runners,
New Fountain Pens

hY our

Conklin, Waterman,

Organization
Complete ?
No organization is complete until
every member is wearing the
badge of that organization.
For
it i9 only then that the proper
spirit will obtain. Then member
will instantly recognize member
and each will feel more closely
identified with his club or fraternity.
How about youriself?
Are you
wearing the badges of the organizations to whicb you
Time's flying
are on us. Order your badges
direct from the people you know.
Don't forget we are complete
jewelers. We handle everything
any jeweler! sells.
mid-ter-

Miller Jewelry Co.
Greenwood Bldg.
6th at Vine
Cincinnati, Ohio.

Parker Duofold

'MM
University Book Store
Basement Main Building

PARRISH
DRY

8c

BROMLEY

CLEANING AND PRESSING
152 S. Limestone St.
Phone
QUALITY AND SERVICE

H

MM H

H

1550-- Y

H

Inn

Tip-To- e
FOR GOOD HOME
COOKED MEALS

Lunch 50c.

Dinner 75c

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

46

What a whale of a difference
just a few cents make ! "

Miss

Still-wel-

l.

Kentucky Belts
SILVER AND GOLD PLATED
BUCKLES

.

The guests were: Misses Marguer$2.10
ite McLaughlin,