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i

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON,

VOL, X
ARBOR DAY EXERCISES

NAVAL APPOINTMENT
FOR 1916 GRADUATE

KENTUCKY,

IS BEGUN

E. H. Clark, graduate of the University, who has been in training at
Honorary Senior Fraterni- Camp Dewey, Great Lakes, 111., for Camp Buell is Ready Univ.
service with the navy for the past
is Ready Uniforms
ties to Pledge New
month, has been selected for entrance
Lacking
Members
Into the Naval Academy at Annapolis
PLANT SENIOR TREE for training for the Naval Officers' MEN PLEASE OFFICERS
Reserve, it was stated in a telegram
Four hundred drafted men of TenThe annual Arbor Day exercises received yesterday by the young man's
when the senior tree will be planted, parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Clark, of nessee arrived Tuesday to begin their
intensive
three months'
technical
and the pledging ceremonies of Lamp 118 Bassett Court.
and Cross and Staff and Crown, honYoung Clark was a member of the training at the University for immeorary senior fraternities, will take '16 class from the College of Mechani- diate service in France; Lexington
place Friday morning on the campus cal and Electrical Engineering, and again has become the guardian of an
of the University.
President McVey was employed in the works of the army camp and the University of Kenhas declared a holiday during the Buffalo Forge Company before his tucky an army Instructor.
Before dawn, news of the time of
fourth hour in honor of the occasion. enlistment.
The tree to be planted by (the class of
arrival of the different contingents of
1918 will be dedicated to Judge W. T.
selectives was heralded by telegrams
Lafferty, dean of the College of Law. PHILOSOPHIAN TO GIVE
from the local boards of Tennessee
Virgil Chapman, president of the
addressed to Captain Royden, and
Senior classf will be in charge of the
thruout the day, telegrams announcing
MANLESS PLAY MAY 17 the route and number of men forming
Arbor Day program.
The class
prophecy will be read at this time by
the contingent was received.
Miss
Bertha Miller, who was
With
"You Never Can Tell" Is gram the arrival of the first tele
elected prophet by the class last fall.
announcing that fifty men were
Play Chosen For
Immediately
after the dedicadue in Lexington at 6:45 via the
Production
tion each senior throws a spadeSouthern Railroad, Headley Shouse,
ful of earth around the tree, and at
student captain and commanding ofIN LEAD ficer of Company A, doing guard duty,
the close of this ceremony the senior STROLLERS
speaker presents the spade to the
sent a sergeant with three privates to
"You Never Can Tell." Shaw! Is meet
junior representative, with a suitable
the contingent. From that time
it a mystery? Oh, no, only a Shaw on, every train from the South bore a
flow of oratory from each.
play, to be given by the Philosophian number of Tennesseeans, who, smiling
The spade will be presented this
cast, and jubilant, passed along the streets
year by Harry Milward, and accepted Literary Society with an
on behalf of the Junior class by under the direction of Mrs. Sallie of Lexington, blocked with citizens,
Lexington Col- welcoming them.
Charles Planck. The class of 1919 Bullock Cavef of the
lege of Music, May 17, at the Opera
upon arrival,
Immediately
each
will keep the spade as one of its most
group was conducted to the Fair
cherished possessions until Arbor Day House.
It is one of the most important fea- Grounds, now camp Buell, authorized
of next year.
tures of the Philosophian's yearly pro- army camp of the United States,
Immediately after the program is
present a play. Great care where they were examined for contacompleted "Tap Day" exercises for gram to
has been exercised this year to select gious diseases by Lieutenant M. S.
Lamp and Cross and Staff and Crown
play which will appeal to the most Fletcher, the medical officer stationed
will take place. Each year on Arbor a
fastidious as well as those who wish at the camp. Lieut. Fletcher is awaitDay these Senior organizations honor
In "You ing the arrival of serums before he can
to be entertained.
the members, of the junior classes, who merely
Never Can Tell," George Bernard inoculate them.
have made high scholastic records and
Shaw is at his best, charming his
Because of the unexpected arrival
have ben prominent in student activi-tireaders; now as the most serious of of the larger number of the men, the
writers, now as the most inimitable
It is customary for Lamp and Cross, jester, combining philosophy with officers in charge were not prepared
to serve the first meal hot, but a sufthe men's organization, to pledge ten sparkling
wit and subtle humor in an ficient supply of sandwiches, pickles,
juniors each year. Last year the fol- amazingly
versatile manner.
cheese and other edibles, characterislowing members of the present Senior
Since the Philosophian Literary So- tic of picnics, were provided, which
class were pledged: A. W. Brittain,
ciety is a woman's organization, and lent a happy hour's enjoyment to the
Tilford Wilson, Harry Milward, Tom
only members are eligible to the casts hungry men, many of whom had had
T. Richards, Royce Iglehart, "Boone"
of its plays, it will be necessary for nothing to eat since they left their
Simpson, Tate Bird, T. E. Peak, C. L.
women to take men's parts. But why homes in the early morning. At night,
Morgan and George Park. Brittain,
not? These are "manless" days, and
(Continued on Page Five.)
Wilson and Bfilwardf are the only surely the fair sex have shown their
members in the University now. Of ability to rise to the occasion whenDEEREAUX PLAYERS
the others, seven are in military ser- ever there is necessity.
IN CHAPEL TUESDAY
vice, one is studying medicine and the! The story Is delightful. Mrs.
Clandon, a twentieth century
The
Chapel fj Tuesday evening!!
seventh is in agricultural work.
Staff and Crown, the girls' organi- mother who has become famous as the Devereux players!!!
author of treatises on twentieth cenUnder the auspices of the English
zation, was founded by Doctor
tury women, after spending eighteen Club, "Ghosts" will be presented by
n
proformerly a
years in Madiera, whither she has fled Clifford Devereux and company in
fessor in English in the graduate after being divorced from her hus- chapel Tuesday evening at 8:15 o'clock
school of the University. The scholas- band, returns to England with her in and the proceeds will be given to the
tic requirements for membership are teresting family, brought up on the Red Cross.
n
Those who have seen these
ideas of their mother.
n advanced
high, no girl who has ever had a
players will not fail to be inGloria, "whom she has educated to
or failure being eligible. The
take up her work where she, Mrs. terested. Tickets will be on sale Frimembers of the active chapter are
Clumlon, left," and Polly and) Phil, day at the Post Office and may also
Frieda Lemon, Celia Cregor, Aliene the twins, who are brimming over be purchased from any of the memKavanaugh, Lelia Gault.
bers of the club.
(Continued on Pajre Fiv
all-st- ar

Lan-fre-

well-know-

coul-itio-

i

y

,

No. 29

1918

STAFF FOR 1918-1- 9 TO
PUBLISH LAST KERNEL

T
TENNESSEANS

'

MAY 9

NEW

BOARD

ADOPTS ALL

M'VEH

SUGGESTIONS
Next week's issue of The Kernel
will be published as usual, but not by
the same staff for following the elecNew Departments and Intion of
assistant editor
structors to be Added
and business manager by the Kernel
Next Year.
Board, which will probably meet today
for this purpose, for the collegiate
MANY CHANGES MADE
year 1918-1the newly elected
will appoint the rest of his
The Board of Trustees of the Uni
editorial staff and his reportorial staff,
versity of Kentucky met at the call
and will with the force, issue Kernel
of Governor Stanley at the University
"No. 30" of "Vol. X."
a. m. Wednesday. The following
at
For the last several years it has members were present: Governor
been the custom of the editor for the Stanley, Senator H. H. Frohman,
subsequent year to appoint and as- Ghent,
J. M. Elliston, Elliston, P. P.
semble his staff, and publish the last Johnston, Jr., Lexington, Irvine Lyle,
issue of the current year.
New York, R. C. Stoll, Lexington, R.
G. Gordon, Louisville, R. P. Ernst,
Covington, Rainey T. Wells, Murray,
INSTALLATION
J. W. Turner, Paintsville, Honorable
V. O. Gilbert, Honorable Matt Cohen,
TO TAKE PLACE JUNE 4 and President F. L. McVey.
editor-in-chie-

f,

editor-in-chi-

9,

ef

li

M'VEH

The meeting was called to order by
Ninety-On- e

Graduates Will

Receive Diplomas

June

5

BROCK WILL BE HERE
The program for commencement
week at the University will begin with
the baccalaureate sermon to be given
at the Auditorium Sunday afternoon,
June 2, at 3 o'clock, by Dr. Charles
pastor of the Fourth
W. Welch,
Avenue Presbyterian church in Louisville, and will be concluded with the
alumni luncheon at the cafeteria Wednesday afternoon, June 5.
The installation of Dr. Frank Le
Rond McVey as president of the University will be the feature of the program Tuesday, June 4, and on that occasion C. R. Brock, Denver, Col., president of the Alumni Association, will
be present to represent the organization.
Ninety-on- e
Graduates.
Ninety-on- e
graduates will receive
diplomas at commencement exercises,
which will be held on the campus
Wednesday, June 5, beginning at 10:30
o'clock. A large tent will be pitchad
in front of the main building and the
exercises will be held in it.
to deliver the comInvitations
mencement address have been extended to Secretary of the Treasury
William G. McAdoo and John Lind,
former ambassador to Mexico. Owing to pressing business Mr. McAdoo
was forced to decline and Mr. Lind
has not been heard from.
Wartime Simplicity.
Notwithstanding the small size of
the graduating class the commencement procession will be unusually
long, for the entire staff of the department of general administration of
the University will be included. Com
mencement is one day earlier this year
than usual, and the entire week will
be marked by wartime
simplicity.
Otherwise, this commencement will
not be unlike those of former years.
(Continued on Page Three)

R. C. Stoll in the temporary absence of

Governor Stanley and the board proceeded to organize by electing the following officers: R. C. Stoll vice chairman, Wellington Parick, Secretary,
and John R. Downing, Treasurer.
On report of a nominating committee, the following members were
elected on the executive committee:
R. C. Stoll, P. P. Johnston, Jr., R. G.
Gordon, R. P. Ernst, and J. M. Elliston. Mr. Patrick succeeds Mr. Grehan
on the latter's request that he be relieved to give all his time to the Department of Journalism.
The President made a report to the
board consisting of a resume of what
is going on at the University at the
present time. He reviewed (I) the
financial situation at the University,
indicating that the University will receive from the State this year more
than $200,000 in excess of that of last
year. The income from the State and
Federal Government to the University
will be approximately $450,000 from
the General Fund. The Experiment
Station will receive from the State
and Government $185,000. The Extension fund from the State and Government will amount to $199,6,17.22. The
Public Health fund will add $18,000,
and $42,000 will be received from the
Government for special training of the
men now at Camp Buell.
The total estimated income for the
University and Experiment Station, including Extension work, Public Health
work, and military training of drafted
men will be approximately $940,000.
The President indicated in a general
way what the University expects to
accomplish in the way of construction
for the coming year Owing to difficulties in securing necessary labor and
building material, the building program for the coming year will be curtailed. It will bo confined to the repairing of a few buildings, including
tho possible construction of a third
floor above tho rear of Patterson Hall;
tho rejuvenation of the dormitories for
men; a new shed for mechanical en- -

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
glneering; tlio repair of the chapel In
the Administration Building; the erection of a temporary live ntock pavilion,
the building of nn abnttoir; the con
Rtruction of a temporary home for
Home Economics, nnd the construction of heating plantn ndequate to take
care of the situation at the present
time. President McVey Indicated that
owing to the war, it would be out of
the question at the present time to
consider a heating plant such as has
been previously dlscust.

NUMEROUS ALARMS KEEP RED CROSS CAMPAIGN

HEAD OUTLINES WORK

CADETS ON GUARD BUSY

Prisoners Captured on Cam
pus and Kept All
Night.
MIDNIGHT

RAID MADE

John H. Downing, chairman of the
Kentucky Red Cross campaign, spoke
in chapel Wednesday morning.
Mr.
Downing, who is the treasurer of this
University, and cashier of the Phoe
nix nnd Third National Dank, gave a
detailed explanation of the organlza
tlon of the Kentucky campaign from
Its incipiency, when he was called
from Louisville by long distance
phone and requested to accept the
chairmanship for all Kentucky, to two
days ago when he was ready to report
to the national headquarters that Ken
tucky was ready for the second Red
Cross drive of the year, which will
start the last part of this month.
Mr. Downing explained the immense
volume of work that so great a drive
will entail, and read the names of the
executive committee he has appointed
from every section of the State to aid
him in this work. After the appointment of committees the work of dividing the quota of $900,000, which has
been alloted to Kentucky, among the
counties of the State, was accomplished, with the appointment of a chair
man in each county. This took about
three weeks to accomplish. Everything
has been arranged now, however, ex
cept for the appointing of some of the
womens' committees, all is in readiness for the big drive.

The College Boys" Store
CO.

GRADDY-RYA- N
INCORPORATED.

CLOTHING, TAILORING, SHOES & FURNISHINGS

A midnight raid on the enemy, the
"WEAR FOR YOUNQ MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNt"
capture of three prisoners and a camp
The President reported to the board
bonfire, inspiring sons, reminisccnes
that acting under the authorization of
were the
and tales of adventure,
sethe Executive Committee he had
features of the twenty-fou- r
hours
cured the services of Olmsted BrothFOR SMOKERS AND BANQUETS
guard duty done by one of the five
ers of Drookllne, Massachusetts, tho
companies last week.
GET YOUR SUPPLIES AT
foremost landscape architects of the
Mounting guard at 2:30, with its
country to make plans for the campus,
six squads and officers all present,
and recommended that Mr. Arthur
this company, took over the arduous
Cooledge of Boston, be secured as an
guard duty and at 3:30f the following
advisory architect to work Jointly with
afternoon, it was relieved, each man,
Olmsted Brothers.
satisfied with his day's work. The
The President stated to the board company was unusually congenial,
that he had been strongly urged re- spirited and eager for work. Each
cently to consolidate with the Univer- man willingly assumed whatever post
sity the schools of medicine and den- was assigned him, diligently and sertistry at Louisville. He Indicated that! iously walking his beat in the regula
he had discust the matter with Dr. tion manner.
Henry S. Pritchett of the Carnegie
From the moment the first sentinel
Foundation for the Advancement of was posted at JCastle Walk, interest
Teaching, Dr. Flexnor, of the Rocke arose and increased until sleep was
feller Institute, and Dr. John G. Bol impossible and each man sat up
d
ing, secretary of the American Insti
and excited, eager for a call to
tute of Medicine, and had come to the arms.
233 West Short Street.
conclusion that if anything is done
About 9:30, the call, "corporal of
regarding the consolidation of these the Guard, number 7, was sounded
Institutions with the University, It from tfaa fountain and a relief accom- Y. W. C. A. CONFERENCE
ON KENTUCKY RIVER
should be done with the full knowl- panied by the corporal of the guard,
edge and consent of the State Legisla- rushed to post 7 to catch sight of
Twelve University men, including
ture.
three men fleeing across the campus. Secretary Johnson and three profesA financial statement in the form of A chase followed down Limestone, sors represented the University Y. M.
y
a budget was presented to the board and with the aid of two plain clothes C. A. at the
conference held
by the President for consideration anil men, three men were caught, brought Saturday at Camp Daniel Boone on
after discussion was adopted by the back by the guard and tried. One man the Kentucky River. The purpose of
board as a tentative working basis was found innocent, but the other the meeting was to discuss plans for
two were placed in the guard house the coming year and to create more
for the coming year.
EVERYBODY EATS AT
where they remained all night. Not enthusiasm for the bigger part tbo
On recommendation of the Presimany minutes later, a call was sound Y. M.'C. A. is going to have in this
dent, the board created seven new departments in the University: Depart- ed from post 9. A relief rushed to country from now on.
point found that the sentinel had
Those present from the University
ments of Art and Design, Music, Zoo- that
wrestled with a negro who tried to run were: Secretary J. E. Johnson, Pro
logy, Economics and Sociology, Anthe lines. Extreme caution was advis- fessor C. R. Melcher, Professor Kara- cient Languages and Literatures, and
ed and each guard walked his beat ker, Professor W. E. Freeman, J. W.
Bacteriology.
The Department
of
alertly.
Lindsay, R. E. Davis, W. D. ThompBotany was transferred from the Ex
Back in camp, around a huge log son, E. R. Gregg, J. P. Barnes, John
periment Station to the College of
fire, were gathered the boys of the Duncan and Jesse Tapp. The prinLiberal Arts.
campus, officers bunking with buck ciple speakers of the occasion were
On recommendation of the President
privates in the cots wwlch circled the Doctor Ganfield, Doctor Fortune and
the following new members of the fire, all singing happily, regardless of Doctor Bush.
faculty were added in connection with quality of voice or harmony.
The meeting was one of the first of
these departments:
Suddenly the harmony of voices its kind ever held by the Y. M. C. A.
Dr. C. A. Schull head of the Depart was broken by the sudden alarm of of the State colleges and was said to
Phone 1635-- X
341 W. Main
ment of Botany. Dr. Schull is now guard number 9, calling "The guard." be very successful. Another meeting
at the University of Kansas, and has Immediately, the men rolled from tiheir of this kind will be held the last Satthe degree of Doctor of Philosophy cots, sprung to arms, and the guard urday of next September. Sixty men
from Cornell.
DENTIST
was formed. Detachments were sent from the various colleges of Kentucky
For any kind of dental service call oh
Dr. Edward Wlest, now at the Uni- down Winslow, across the campus en- attended the conference.
versity of Vermont, was appointed as circling the Old Dorm, and directly
DR. T. SLATON
$1.00 Per Year
head of the Department of Economics to the post. A band of negroes from BOYD VICE PRESIDENT
127 CHEAPSIDE
OF STATE SCIENTISTS
Winslow had assembled, loaded with
and Sociology.
5c Per Copy
Oflc hear, S m. m. to 6 p. m. Phase M4-Dr. C. B. Cornell of the University rocks to get revenge for the attack on
Dr. J. E. Banton, Kentucky State
of Nebraska was appointed Assistant one of their number. They were chas- Forester, was elected president, and
ed away and order was restored. The Dr. Paul P. Boyd,
Professor of Education.
Dean of the Colrest of tha night was spent in sleep- lege of Arts and Science,
Professor E. C. Mabie was appointed
ing and watching the sun rise. Th
of the Kentucky Academy of
Assistant Professor of English.
FOOTBALL SUPPLIES, SWEATERS, KODAKS
twenty-fou- r
hours were thoroughly Science, which
held its fifth annual
Dr. AV. D. Funkhauser was appointed
enjoyed.
146 WEST MAIN STREET
meeting in the Physics Building, Satas head of the Department of Zoology.
urday, May 4. Other officers elected
Dr. Funkhauser has his doctor's deNEW SWEATERS EXCITE ENVY were: Dr. Alfred Peter, Secretary,
gree from Cornell.
and J. S. McHargue, treasurer, both
Professor Carl Lampert was appoint
Basketball sweaters for both girls of the University.
ed head of the Department of Music
and boys' teams have arrived. Each
President McVey and Dean Thomas
Dr. Glanville Terrell head of the De team
voted to have white sweaters Cooper were elected new members of
partment of Greek was transferred to
with blue letters and they are as the organization.
Several University
the head of the Department of Philos- beautiful in appearance as they are
106 N. UPPER ST.
professors
were on the program
ophy.
efficacious in exciting envy.
which filled the morning session. The
In Physical Education, Mr. Andrew
Classes Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday evenings.
afternoon session was featured by the
Gill was appointed
as head coach. of Florida, was appointed Professor election of
is the aim of this school to teach dancing as
officers and an address by
Miss Florence M. Barrett, M. A. (Chi- of Law.
Dr. J. A. Detlefsen, of the Depart
should be, advocating
all times proper
cago) was appointed instructor In
The board fixed June 4 as the date ment of Genetics, Univeraity of Illi
positions and decorous actions
Spanish.
for formal installation of President nois, on the subject, "Laws Governing
Professor W. L. Summers, J. D now McVey. This program is yet to be the Transmission of Characters from
Music Piano, Saxophone, Violin, Trap Dram
Professor of Law at the University arranged.
Parent to Offspring."
wide-eye-

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KENTUCKIAN

HUMPHREY STUDIO
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C D. Calloway

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MRS. J. TANDY HUGHES
Member of A. N. A, M. of D.

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at

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
A. A. GAME ROBERTSON WRITES
MAN FROM MISSOURI
U. K. MAN "OVER THERE" WINS FIRST
HAS GOOD YEAR HERE
FROM "OVER THERE"
After pitching in practice to the

At u meeting of the Patterson Lit
erary Society Friday night plans
were laid for the last meeting of the
year, which will be held at the home
of the president Walter C. Piper on
the Versailles pike. Officers for the
next semester will be elected then.
The date of the meeting will be un
nounccd later.
Members of tho Union Literary So
ciety are Invited to the meeting and
plans for the coming year will be dls
cusst. It is expected that this meeting
will advance the efficiency of tho or
ganlzatlons, ad both societies are anx
lous that all members attend.
The program Friday night was
featured by a debate on the
"Resolved that the Allies should In
vite Japan to act against Germany's
invasion of Russia." A tribute to the
society and Kentucky was paid by El
don Bummitt, who left for Missouri
Monday afternoon. He said the year
he has spent in Kentucky and with
the Patterson society, he regards as
the most profitable year of bis life.
Walter Piper delivered Henry Wat
terson's "Lincoln."

READY FOR HUN ATTACK Wildcats

German Dead Form Bridge
For Advancing

British

5

PRISONERS ESCAPE

Emery Wells, a graduate of the
University, now a first Lieutenant of
Engineers with the American army in
France has written an interesting letter to his parents Mr. and Mrs. S. P.
Wells, Woodland avenue.
Lieutpnant Wells' letter in part is
as follows:

whom he omjptetcly bewildered Jim Park, has joined the
Columbus, Ohio, team of the American
Association, where he seems to have
repeated the stunt.
In his first game with the big
league team, played against Indianapolis, Park showed up well. He held
the Indiana team to three hits and
he himself drove a hit that brought in
the winning run for his own team.
This is an auspicious beginning and
Jim's friends are all tickled at his
prospects for the season. He will
leave the Columbus team sometime in
June to train for the air service of
the United States army.

que-.tio-

CATS IN TWO GAMES
LAST PART OF WEEK
The Wildcats are slated to play two
games this week. They meet Ken
tucky Weslyan Thursday afternoon on
Stoll Field and Georgetown Saturday
on the home field.
Wesleyan has bowed to the Wild
cats once and the Tigers of George
town have been scratched twice by
the same cats. The Kentucky play
ers are expecting to "pull" two per
feet repeaters in the games for this
week. The contests will be spicy and
full of pep, however.
McClellan will start against Wes
leyan Thursday afternoon with Tho
mas catching. This battery has play
ed well all season and will make it
self felt. Lasley will pitch against
Georgetown.

JACKIE TEAM WANTS
TO USE STOLL FIELD

"Somewhere in France,
"My Dear Mother and Father:
"I have a detail of sixty regular
men in my department and am kept
busy. I have been on duty continuously tn the past 48 hours; I have
charge of the barracks, which includes
thirteen different types of buildings.
"My largest day's work was un
loading 107 cars of material and loading fifteen others for shipment. My
'stock of goods' is valued approximately at a million dollars.
"I was talking to a captain of
engineers today who had just come
from the Amiens territory. He said
he could stand on a ridge and see the
German shells coming and going, and
in spite of all the horror of it, it was
the most interesting sight he ever
witnessed. The gunners were about
five miles away.
"The large German airplanes, he
said, flew over the town every night
like swarms of bees, each carrying
six bombs weighing 200 pounds apiece
Finally one of the searchlights would
locate an airplane and then the air
craft guns would be turned on it.
This captain saw two of the German
planes thus shot down.
"The Germans, I think, have ad
vanced as far as they can, but at what
cost. I have heard they lost 500,000
One man, a captain of the
men.
medical corps, who was here a few
days ago, said be saw German dead
in many places three and four deep
At another place where the. Germans
were crossing a branch in close for
mation, the British opened fire and
the branch was actually damned up by
bodies of the dead so that the men
following behind walked across on
their packed bodies. The English
gunners were actually made sick kill
ing these troops.

S. A. Boles, director 'of athletics,
received a letter from the manager
of the baseball team at the Great
Lakes Training- Station this week asking for a contract to use Stoll Field
for ten days' training period for the
team of Jackies.
On account of the presence of the
and the consequent
400 soldiers
heavier use of the field, it was necessary to refuse the offer. The mat
ter was referred to the secretary of
"We have a large force of German
the Board of Commerce, who will try
prisoners here. Five of them escaped
to find a park suitable for training.
last week but we soon recaptured
them. It is a long way for the Ger
ADDITIONAL U. K. MEN man army to reach us, but if it comes
TO GET COMMISSIONS we are ready for it."
Eight moie University of Kentucky
men have been recommended for com- CHATTANOOGA NAILED
missions as second lieutenants from
the Third Training Camp, according FOR TURKT DAY GAME
to information received this week. Two
Next year's Wildcats will probably
of this number were omitted from
play the University of Chattanooga
the Camp Zacbary Taylor list pubhere Thanksgiving Day.
lished last week, and the other five
They are called the Moccasins and
Camp Stanley,
are recommended from
have met nearly all the big teams of
Leon Springs, Texas.
Those omitted from the Camp Zach-ar- y the South. In 1915 they held the
Taylor list are: Jack Howard, mighty Tennessee team to a score of
14 to 7, and kept Washington and
Clem Kelly, Jesse Shuff, former stuJefferson to a small score.
Coach
dents of the Collegeo f Law. From
Boles is trying to get as stiff a
Camp Stanley are: Edwin M. Cobb,
Richmond, Infantry; Paul L. , Cocke, schedule as possible for the Wildcats
Louisville, Field Artillery; George A. as he believes Kentucky is in for a
Hillsman, Livermore, Infantry; Ben season of football that will rival any
Newcastle, Infantry, of the palmy days of yore.
F. Lancaster,

and William K. Staton,

Infantry.

FORMER STUDENT ON TU8CANIA

"April 15, 1918.

Brooksville,

SAVE YOUR TINFOIL

Carl B. Pennybacker, New Haven,
Ky a student In the old "Prep School"
of the University, was on the Tusca-niwhich was torpedoed and sunk
last month. He was first reported lost
but has since written, to his family, of
his safe arrival in England, according
to a letter from his mother to the
Registrar. Pennybacker is now with
the Aero Squadron in England.
a,

McVEY'S

INSTALATION,

(Continued from Page One.)
Captain H. N. Royden will be chief
marshal of the commencement procession. Young women members of the
University Red Cross chapter will act
as ushers for the exercises.
The order for the week follows:
Sunday, June 2.
3 p. m. Baccalaureate
Sermon,
'Municipal
Auditorium,
Woodland
Park, Dr. Charles W. Welch.
Monday, June 3.
1 p. m. Class luncheons.
Tuesday, June 4.
9 a. m. Annual meeting of Board
of Trustees.
10 a. m. Class day exercises.
2 p. m. Installation of Dr. Frank
Le Rond McVey, president of the
University.
' 5 p. m. President's reception.
Wednesday, June 5.
10:30 a. m. Commencement exercises.
1 p. m. Alumni luncheon and annual business meeting.
'Order of Commencement Exercises.
Academic Procession.
Music University Band.
Invocation The Rev. Richard Wilkinson.
Music Miss Estelle Baldridge and
Miss Hattie Keith.
Address Commencement Speaker.
Music. University Band.
Conferring of degrees President
McVey.
Pledge to Senior class President
McVey.
Hymn "America."
Order of Procession.
President McVey and speaker of
the day.
President Board of Trustees and
President Emeritus James K. Patter
son.
Trustees and official guests.
Deans of colleges.
Faculty
of College of Arts and
Science.
Faculty of College of Agriculture
and Experiment Station
Faculty of College of Civil En
gineering.
Faculty of College of Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering.
Faculty of College of Mining and
Metallurgy.
Faculty of College of Law.
Staff of the Department of General
Administration.
Candidates for Advanced Degrees.
Candidates for Bachelor Degrees.

A letter received recently by Wil
liam Lindsay, senior in the College of
Arts and Science, from Elmer K.
Robertson, a student in the University
last year, who is now in active service
in France, contains some interesting
pictures or his life and trip "over

Get them From
MICHLER BROS.
UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVE
H. L. MILWARD

J. D.PURCELLCO.
LEXINGTON, KY.

there."

NEWEST FALL MODES

IN
Corporal Robertson wrote the letSUITS, DRESSES, COATS,
from an old monastery in which
ter
the men were housed. He said the
SKIRTS and WAISTS.
walls of the building were five feet
Pleasingly Priced.
thick, and it is believed to have held
5,000 monks at one time.
Corporal Robertson commends high
ly the work the Y. M. C. A. is doing
in France, and urges college men to
take up this branch of service. Of
his voyage over he says:
"Boy! You have no idea what emo
tions and moods one passes thru
on the trip over. I don't believe I
have ever appreciated nature quite
o much as I have when lying on deck
before
with life preserver ont ready to jfb
Cotton,
over. Quite a little time is spent that
way too."
As a word of caution and advice
Robertson adds: "Come over if you
can. The water is good and very soft.
Advise all your friends who are about
For information mritm tm
to make the trip to carry all the fruit
WILLIAM S. MYERS, Dinette
and Uneeda Biscuit possible, for I
Athm, Naw Ywk
have seen them sold for ten times
their ordinary price. I hope many U.
K. men will get in their places in this
B.
war, for it's a great cause and we
SHOP
must win."
The Cloteet Shop to University

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