xt78gt5fc941 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78gt5fc941/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591013  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 13, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 13, 1959 1959 2013 true xt78gt5fc941 section xt78gt5fc941 Control Over SC

Today's Weather:
Cloudy and Mild
High 69, Low 42

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY, OCT.

Vol. LI

No. 13

13, 1959

Develop Leadership,
UK Simdemis Told

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Discussed By Editor;
See Editorial Page

Y

By BOB ANDERSON
examples set by the early leaders
of our country.
Kernel Managing Editor
"Leadership cannot be taught In
Leadership does not consists of
a university course, it must be de- domination, but of getting people
veloped."
to work with you when they are
This was the dominant theme not obligated to do so, Van Arsstressed at the fifth annual Lead- dale stated.
"
ership Conference last weekend at Judge Van Arsdale said adversity
Camp Daniel Boone.
is necessary to the development of
The conference opened Saturday leadership. A harsh environment
morning with a keynote address by produces leaders, he continued, citJefferson County Judge Bertram ing . the example
of the harsh
C. Van Arsdale. Van Arsdale based
v,:
X
mountainous area of Greece which
his speech on history, citing the produced many of . the world's
greatest leaders.
Conference moderator J. Don
i
Meetings Today
Marsh, assistant dean of students
John E. Reeves, associate pro- -. at Wayne University, Detroit, told
feasor of political science, will
group he was gaining as much
speak at the first program of the the
knowledge from the conference as
Political Science Club at noon the student conferees were.
today in Donovan Hall cafeteria.
He said the conference would
SUB ACTIVITIES
give those present an opportunity
Alpha Chi Sigma, 7 p.m.. Room to assess
V. '
their present competency
128.
leadership against that of their
in
WUS, 4 p.m.. Room 204.
fellow campus leaders.
IFC Scholarship Committee,
Dr. Marsh urged the students not
6:30 p.m., Room 204.
to "be flattered because you have
Phalanx, 12-- 1 p.m Room 205. won your spurs, and dismount, and
Lances Royalty
Law Fraternity Luncheon, 12 rest on your
laurels." He quoted
Gall Peterson, Junior from Cave City, reigns over Lances Da.Jce,
noon, Room 206.
Harry Truman, who
Saturday night in the SUB Ballroom. The queen is a Delta
held
ODK Toy Sale, 5 p.m., Room once
said. The buck stops here."
Delta Delta pledge and was sponsored in the Lances Queen contest
206.
This, said Dr. Marsh, could have
ly Phi Kappa Tan and Phi Gamma Delta fraternities.
Woman's Club Reception,
served as the motto for the LeaderBallroom.
ship Conference.
SuKy Tryouts, S- -f p.m., Social
' During the afternoon, group dis"
' Room.
Freshman Coed T", 7 p.m.. cussions were led by students on
several topics of general student
Social Room.
Interest.
Tryouts for Tau Sigma, 7 p.m.
Groups and leaders were: stuEuclid Avenue Building.
dent religious life, Donna Lawson;
The council agreed to do this in
Lancee Carnival and Dance were
satisfactory tn both attendance order to facilitate the work each
and participation, according to sorority would have to do to perBob Wainscott, Lances chairman form in the carnival..
v
of the weekend event.
Five skits and a chorus line con..."
had previously dis- sisting of one member from each
Walncott
closed that this might be the last sorority made up the panhellenic
1.V .V
4
t.
year that Lances, Junior men's variety show.
'
honorary, would sponsor a carnival
Wainscott said that approximatand dance because of conflicts ely 15 booths made up the carnival.
with other activities.
Gail Peterson, Delta Delta Delta
He said that Lances is presently pledge, was announced Queen of
considering a plan to combine sev- the Lances weekend at the dance
4A
v
eral honorary groups and sponsor Saturday night. She was sponsored
one big show.
by Phi Kappa Tau and Phi GamWinner for fraternity acts at ma Delta.
this year's carnival was Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, which presented a The four attendents and their
sponsors were Sally Carmichael,
"Jock Par" skit.
place trophy went to KA; Kathy Songster, PiKA; Field-e- n
Second,
Willmott, KKG; and Prisilla
Sigma Nu's "Kingston Trio" skit.
Panhellenic Council agreed this Lynn, LXA.
Proceeds from the carnival. and
year that the sororities should
'4 J W
combine all the separate shows dance will be used for student
scholarships.
Into one.

v

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ent

4--

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Lances Chairman Calls
Carnival, Dance Success

student government, Taylor Jones
and Judy Schrim; student social
life, Jeff Brother and Barbara Bedford; student scholarship, Alice
Broadbent; student serrice programs, Garryl Sipple and Jim Heil;
and student
school spirit and
morale, Bill Williams and Myra

Tobin.
At these discussions, problems
facing groups Involved In these
phases of college life were brought
up and solutions suggested.
Among subjects discussed were
the possibility of having students
dress' casually at football games,
rotating house parties at fraternity houses and dorms after ball
games, ways of Increasing participation In campus activities, and
problems involved in making Student Congress more effective.
A faculty panel of University
President Frank G. Dickey; Dean
of Men L. L. Martin; Dean of
Women Doris Seward; Dr. A. D.
Kirwan, professor of history; Dr.
John Kuiper, philosophy professor;
and Dr. James Gladden, professor
of sociology.
The faculty panel discussed the
question of whether colleges are
"properly preparing the student for
the world, of today.
Among the points brought up by
the panel was the number of stu--

dents activities and the relatively
small group of students taking part
In them. This situation places an
unnatural load on these active

"Hi

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Plans For Denial Wing
Completed And Approved
Plans for the construction of the
dental wing of the UK Medical
Center have been completed and
approved, A. Paul Nestor, associate
business manager for the Medical
Center, 6ald yesterday.
Approved by Hill and Burton,
engineers for the federal government, the University and the State
Department of Finance, the plans
have been sent to Frankfort for
the opening oi bids on November

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dental school is scheduled for the
fall of 1961.
The entire Medical Center is a
federal and state project costing
approximately $27 million.

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Conference Conferees
Dean of Men L. L. Martin talks with group discussion leaders at last weekend's Leadership Conference
at Camp Daniel Boone. Seated are (from left) Barbara Bedford, Judy Schrim, Myra Tobin, Dean
Martin, Dr. J. Don Marsh, moderator of the conference, and Donna Lawson. Gerl Denbo, general chair -man, Bill Williams, Garryl Sipple, and Jim Hell are standing.

-

Enrollment Increases

Beds Replace Books In Dorm Study Halls

An unanticipated Increase in the University has no Intention of
women's enrollment at the Uni- dropping Its - normal Hllve-o- n
The wing, which contains six versity has necessitated the concampus" rule for UK women as
floors and 70,000 square feet of use- version of many
dormitory study-room- some, other colleges have done In
not only contain
able space, will
into bedrooms.
an effort to solve their housing
the facilities for a complete educaIn Jewell and Boyd Halls sev- problems.
tion in dcntlktry, but also space
(or medical research laboratories. eral of the double rooms harj been ' Dr. Doris Seward, dean of womrooms.
en, said there are plans for new
The enrollment for the dental made Into three-gi- rl
yet been discussed,
school has not
Miss Anne Law Lyons, UK hous- girls' dorms In the area of the
according to Dank! V. Capps. ad- ing administrator for women, said Euclid Avenue Building when
ministrative assistant to the Med- Tuesday that there was an In- funds become available.
ical center.
crease of 1,035 women at UK this
The men's housing problem Is
semester as compared to an in- not as acute as that of the womThe reason for this is that the
en's, according to Dr. Leslie Martin,
curriculum has net been develop- crease of 910 last September.
Miss Lyons made It clear that dean of men.
Capps said. Opening of the
ed
17.

s

However, Dean Martin pointed stated. The new dorm will house
out that the "war babies" (the in- 550 men.
creased birthrate during the war As for married students' housing,

years of 1941 and 1943) were expected to start hitting the colleges
in September of 1961.
This rush of college students expected to start In 1961 would necessitate a continuous building program if the University is to grow
with the student body.
Despite a new men's dorm opening next fall very few sophomores will get dorm rooms, it was

there are several vacancies at the
present time in Cooperstown and
Shawneetown. Dean Martin pointed out that the majority of students living In Cooperstown and
Shawneetown are not veterans.
Dean Martin attributed the increase In college enrollment to an
increase In the number of students
graduating from high school and a
larger percentage of these students attending college.

* i

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KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1959

2-- TIIE

New UR Extension

Seven Pledged By
Sigma Delta Chi

Has 283 Students
.
t.

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The newest extension of UK at
Fort Knox has been established
this fall with an enrollment or 283
students.
The University, which will administrate and supervise the center, will provide a program of lower
division resident Instruction with
full time qualified instructors.
The lower division will be
by the appropriate extension class Instruction leading to
a baccalureate degree requirement
of the Unlvt rtlty.
The Armor Center will provide,
without exjiense to UK, all necessary physical facilities and equipment Including classrooms, laboratories, and office space and will
take care of maintenance operation of the educational facilities.
A library win also be provided
by the Armor Center Including
bocks and personnel, and it will
tap-plement-

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Sigma Delta Chi, men's
Knox currently Include 20 class
fraternity, rerooms, one laboratory, and a libr slonal Journalism
cently pledged seven men.
ary containing 67,ooo volumes
regula
All academic rules and
Pledged were the following Jourtions at Fort Knox are the same nalism majors:
as at the University.
Robert L. Anderson, Garnet!
Brown, Richard Hedlnnd, Robert
YWCA
Jobe, Robert Orndorff, Newton T.
"Placement Interviews for gradSpencer, and Warren Wheat.
uating seniors will be held Oct
The fraternity Is currently cele14 and 15 at the YWCA office.
-,
brating Its fiftieth anniversary and
Mrs. Frank Loeffel will be rehas been on campus since 195.9.
milting for YWCA positions.

Positions

...

NOW
"SIGN OF THE
GLADIATOR"
TODAY

ENDS

"TAMANGO" and
"ORDERS TO KILL"

acquire new volumes selected by
the University in an amount not
less than $5,C00 annually.

t

7"

Carnalian Style Show
stjle show

A fall

Mount Idy Muse

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"Jock Par," Carl Huston Ebert, conducts an Interview with "Charlie
skit at Friday
Weaver," Bob Stovall, during the SAE
night's Lances CarnlvaL
prize-winni-

5

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4

Thomas L. Dawson, graduate
student in the Department of
Chemistry, has been granted a
$2,000 Eastman Kodak Fellowship
for 1959-6- 0 by Tennessee Eastman
Co.. Kingsport. Tenn.

Dawson, tJf Logan, W. Va., was
graduated from Eerea College in
June, 1958, and received an M.S.
degree In chemistry from the University of Kentucky in May, 1958.
Since that time he has been
working toward a Ph.D. degree ln
physical chemistry.
Dawson's research problem Is
concerned with the development
and application of a method for
studying the rates of certain reactions of organic compounds.

"A Night to Remember" 8:45, 11:30.
"Reach for the Sky- - 9:25.
FAMILY DRIVE IN "The Five
Pennies" 6:50, 10:45.
"Born to Be Loved" 9:15.
BLUE GRASS "The Diary of
Anne Frank" 6:43, 9:50.
LEX1NOTON DRIVE IN "HercuCIRCLE 25

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If

will be held

at Carnahan

House, UK
staff and alumni
Luncheon will be served at
club.
1 p.m. and each member will be
limited to three guests. Reservations must be made by Wednesday, Oct. 14.

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The Theta Sigma Phi alumnae
chapter wU1 meet Wednesday night
at 7;30 ln the home of Mrs Agnes
price Amlck on tne Russell Cave
pike
Miss Judy Pennebaker of the UK
chapter will report on Theta Sig's
g0th anniVersary convention.

les" 7:07. 11:25.

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MOVIE GUIDE
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Student Awarded
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Oct.

13, 1939- -3

Opportunity Day Set Moot Court Competition Begins
To Open Thursday
Opportunity Day, designed to include R. M. Sandefur, Southern
acquaint Kentucky's high school States Cooperative; Henry
n,
seniors with career opportunities
Winchester livestock breedIn agriculture and home economics,
will be held on campus Thursday. er; Dr. A. R. Parson. Fischer
Packing Co.; J. Ed Parker, LexSome 400 high school seniors
ington, First National Bank; J.
and their parents aer expected to
C. Zachary, Soil Conservation
visit UK for the second annual
affair sponosred by the College Service and Howard Downing,
of Agriculture and Home Eco- UK agriculture senior and past
nomics.
national president of the Future
Separate programs for tbe boys, Farmers of America.
girls and parents will be held In
During the morning, the girls
the morning with tours of the will hear a panel discussion on
campus scheduled for the after- "There Is A Place
For You In
noon.
Home Economics," and see a
Dr. Stanley Wall, associate dean fashion and style show presented
of the College of Agriculture and by UK Home Economics students.
Home Economics, will moderate a
Participating on the girls' panel
discussion panel on "Meeting Our will be Mrs. Billy Dlckerson, home
Responsibility
To Students" at economics teacher at
Athens Junwhich the parents will be given ior High School; Mrs. Imogene
a chance to ask questions about Ham, Fayette County
home demonUK.
stration agent; Mrs. Llbby Geddes,
The panel will be composed of Columbia Gas of Kentucky, LexDr. Doris M. Seward, dean of ington.
women; Dr. Leslie L. Martin, dean
Mrs. Catherine Smith, Central
of men; Mrs. Anne M. Clemons, Baptist Hospital, Lexington; Mrs.
associate professor of home eco- Janice Walton, assistant professor
nomics and Dr. Frank C. Buck, o fhome economics; Mrs. Doris
associate professor of animal hus- Tichenor, assistant in home ecobandry.
nomics research, and Miss Mary
Former UK agriculture students Winn Leake, Thorpe Interiors,
will discuss "You Are Needed In Louisville.
Agriculture" at the boys' program
Included in the tours will be the
moderated by Dr. Aubrey J. Brown, Agriculture Experiment Station,
head of the Department of Agri- Home Economics Building, Li
cultural Economics.
brary, sorority and fraternity
Members o? the boys' panel will houses, and teaching laboratories,
Be-sude-

The annual UK moot court com- petition, leading to a final round
before the Court of Appeals In
Frankfort, opened last night at the
College of Law.

Winners of the contest at Frank- fort will represent UK in National
Intercollegiate Moot Court Com- petition, sponsored by the New
York City Bar Association
Teams representing UK's four
law clubs are participants. The
two winning teams will advance to
Frankfort.
Fred W. Bond, Shelbyville, and
James E. Prater, Hlndman, repre- -

sentlngthe (Stanley F. Heed Club Jr., Lexington, of the (Fred M.

competed last night against Julius
E. Rather and Charles E. English,
both of Bowling Oreen, represent- lng the (Louis) Brandeis Club.
Judffe at last night's session was
w- - Murphy of the Col- f1"0''
leg of
ftnd w- - Rode5 cla?
and, Ro.bcrt P' stePhens, members
vi me txxmgum Dar.

Vinson Club,
Judges for tonight's session, in
addition to Trofrssor Murphy, will
be Charles Landrum and George
Barker, members of the Lexington
bar.
The teams are composed of
third year law students selected

E. Vimont. both of Lexington rep- the (Wiley) Rutledge
Club, will participate at 7:30 o'- clock tonight against C. Dale Bur- chctt, Galnare, and Perry R. White

study-resentin-

through lntraclub competition in
Dulaney L. O'Roark and Richard the first and second years of law
.

Students Attend
FFA Convention

g

Tne national
witlTa ronai
in nuvemoer
finals scheduled
in December.

competition opens
round in St. Louis
wun uie national
for New York City

GIURGEVICH SHOE REPAIR
387 S. Lime At Euclid

Two UK students are attending
the 32nd annual national Future
Farmers of America convention in
Kansas City, Mo., this week.
Seldon Little, a UK student, and
state president of the Kentucky
Association of FFA, will head the
official delegates from the Blue
Grass state.
Jerry Rlngo, also from UK, will
attend the convention as a member
of the awards group. He was 'a
national vice president two years
ago and is a Menifee County publisher.
Accompanying Ringo will be his
assistant, Gilbert Barley.

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Shoe Supplies
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"High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"
MR. AND MRS. JOHN INNES, Proprietors

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Bob Allen and his Chief Operator, Mrs. Julia Chipman, discuss Long
Distance records which will soon be converted to automatic processing.

Meet Bob Allen he's growing fast
with

a

company

fast-growi- ng

Robert E. Allen got his B.A. degree
from Wabash College in June, 1957,
and went to work with Indiana Bell
Telephone Company at Indianapolis.
'It looked like a growing company
wheT6vI could grow, too," he aays.
It was. Today he is an Assistant
Traffic Supervisor there. He's in charge

of six other supervisory people and
about '100 telephone operators.
' Bob attributes his rapid progress to
two main factors: the thorough train
ing he received and the steady growth
of the telephone business.
"I was trained to be a telephone man

ager, rjot just a traffic specialist, he
points but "I've also had practical,
experience in the plant, commercial and engineering phases of the1
business. So I'm equipped to handle
new responsibilities all the time. And
. communications
in this
field, that means I have more chancel
to keep moving ahead.'
on-the-j- ob

fast-growin-

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What about a Bell Telephone Com
pany career for you? Talk with the
Bell interviewer when he visits your
campus and read the Bell Telephone
booklet in your Placement Office.

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With Mrs. Chipman and Miss Cee, Group Chief Operator, Bob reviews a
processing card which will mechanize Indiana Bell's Long Distance billing.

blow-u-

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Carry

BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES

i

* The Control Over SG
An appalling situation existing in

Student Congress was brought to
light at this weekend's Leadership
Conference and it is one which every
UK student should be informed about.
We learned that the Student Congress Executive Committee now consists of 11 people five students and
six faculty members. What we would
like to know is why faculty members
outnumber students on a student
government committee? If the faculty
is going to insist on running the assembly, why don't they abandon the
pretense of student
and take direct control?
The supposed purpose of running
Student Congress has been to give
students the feeling that they are
on certain
governing themselves
points. In actual practice, however,
SC merely has served as a sounding
board of student opinion for the faculty and an administrative body which
handles matters of detail as putting
out student directors, sponsoring a
homecoming dance, and lending
money to insolvent campus organizations.
We are now faced" with a situation
in which, SCs constitution is being
violated and misused. While the constitution does call for motions to be
approved by the Executive Committee and placed on the agenda for
self-governme-

A

the regular SC meeting, "emergency"
motions may be made from the floor.
But, according to the SC president,
"emergency" legislation lias been
This means that any motions
made from the floor at SC meetings
must be referred to the Executive
Committee for a ruling on its acceptability. Under this setup, questions
which are likely to cause some controversy stand little chance to get
before the assembly. If they are voted
on and passed, they are liable to be'
ruled out of order.
I

nt

We understand that this will save
the administration the embarassment
of having to answer for SC's decisions
to discuss such questions as student
drinking. Nevertheless, it will also eliminate the prime reason for SC's existencethat of being a group for
sounding out student opinion and acting in
with the administration, not under its control.
For with the Executive Committee in control of what legislation is
to be put before the assembly, SC
might as well disband.
Even the phone company can put
out phone books, everyone at UK can
sponsor dances, and some of the insolvent groups saved by SC's financial
help might have been better off if allowed to dissolve.

Disagree Respectfully
To The Editor:
Although a Protestant, I could not
help being appalled by Name With-held- 's
crude condemnation of the
'
Catholic Church in todays (Oct. 8)
Kernel. Does he really believe that
he, an individual, possesses more wisdom than the multitudes who, have
developed the church through the
ages? I readily understand his de- sire to withhold his name from the
readers of the Kernel, but wonder if
he has forgotten that there is One
from whom no one can hide, and He
is the founder" of the church. As a
it is his privilege to
disagree with the church, but he
might do so respectfully.
Peggy Wyse
non-Catholi- c,

Socialized Religion
To The Editor:
I read with interest the Readers
Forum on religious apathy. In my
own personal opinion I think religious apathy does and does not exist.
Probably one would think it exists
because organized church groups are
not going about the campus trying
to stimulate an interest in religious
organizations. I think the reason for
this i$ that a lot of the uncommitted
students lave . come to see most
churches as where you go sit through
an hour or an hour and a half sermon
on the same subject that only remotely concerns principles laid down
in the Bible. Instead of talking about
how to get to the other world, they
concentrate on the complexity pf
problems in this world. Most students are too well aware of these
complexities.
Then, too, church has gotten to be
a place where you go to eat, to see
and be seen,( and to listen to one
man's opinion on Christianity instead
of studying the opinions of the Biblical writers." They attract students
Sunday night
with special
meals instead of more soul filling at

r

on

The Readers' Forum

25-ce- nt

r

tractions. To the businessman it is a
place to meet his customers, the
townspeople, and the students in
school here. In this way the businessman's firm can stay before the public
even in Church. I believe some students realize this and stay away from
the churches because these things can
be gotten somewhere else.
On the other hand, I find some
of the basic practices of Christianity
practiced more on this campus than
in other places I have been to. For
instance, the principle of love or
charity, one of the
of this
quality friendliness, is very much in
evidence in the classrooms, restaurants, and where every student goes
to in Lexington. Love or charity, in
my own estimation, with all of its
outward evidences is the very essence
of Christianity. And this essence, I
find, has a real place on the campus
of the University.
In conclusion, I would say that the
religious apathy is towards organized
religious groups, not Christianity..
sub-qualiti- es

James E. Crabtree

The UK Date "Line"
To The Editor:
-The "line" comes and goes, rarely
staying long unless needed. However,
he is usually within calling distance
to be used if needed. In the ' latter
. case, he will be in his seat well in advance of the beginning of the performance, but usually leaves after the
second scene, if not before, when the
players no longer need his clapping
to spur them on to achievement of
their fullest acting abilities. If he
does happen to remain in the final
scene, he leaves abruptly at its close
and is seen no more that night or day,
as the case may be. He enjoys first
nighters and is at his best for these.
He dislikes later, repeat performances,
but will attend although his interest
is slight and therefore his clapping
negligible.
.

Observer Of UK's Vanity Fair

L
A red star hovers high above Moscow University, symbol of Russia's
emphasis on education. The modern building is 32 stories high.

Life In Russia

Part 5

The University At Moscow
By DON MILLS

Approaching Moscow, the first structure that comes 'into sight is the tall
and handsome Moscow State University.
.It stands high above the skyline, symbolic of education's place in the Soviet
Union.
Its 32 stories shoot impressively into
the sky looking down upon Moscow
from Lenin Hills. It is said that there
are 22,000 rooms and more than 14,000
students in this compact unit. Another
10,000 students are at the old building.
There are 2,500 teachers in this
skyscraper which contains nice red
carpeting, beautiful chandeliers, and
marble columns. Lecture rooms are neat
and bright. Movable blackboards are operated on electric rollers. Each student-des- k
in the lecture room and the library
has an individual light.
When this building was going up in
1948, Moscovites did a lot of grumbling,
especially those living in overcrowded
rooms. There's none today.
". The youth of Russia are scientifically
and technically minded. They arc Sputnik and rocket minded, greatly interested in electronics and all aspects of
nuclear science. They want to read and
learn.
The library shelves are filled with the
latest American technical and scientific
books. In fact, there are journals from
all over the world. Most of the publications are in English, but English is
the second language in the Russian
schools. It is said that more than half
of the Russian scientists read the language fluently.
The library has no American propaganda books, as the Russians refer to
them, even though there are American

newspapers. American books usually
concern 19th century happenings and
show the worse side of our country.
Faulkner, Steinbeck, and Hemingway
arc popular contemporary writers. Along
with hundreds of American books in the
stacks are "Crapes of Wrath," Tobacco
Road," and "Uncle Tom's Cabin:"
Practically all students attend the
university free of charge. Some pay
their own way since their ability is not
high enough to obtain a gfant.
Students must be over 17 and under
35 when they take the entrance examination. If it is passed, the student will
receive free education for five years and
a good job upon graduating. Five years
are required for an ordinary degree.
The amount of money a student receives does not depend upon the income of his parents. The higher grade
a student makes, the more money he restudent receives
ceives. A
more than an undergraduate.
An art student said he received 350
rubles a month or about half of the
average Russian salary. He said the arts
student was the lowest paid and that
many of the students receive more than
an industrial worker Engineers and
scientists are the best paid. The number
of students in any department can bo
increased by raising the amount of
money.
post-gradua-

te

Kernels
"No young man believes he shall
ever die." James Dean
"Patriotism is the last refuge of a
scoundrel." Nathan Hale

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky as second clasi matter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Entered at the Post Office-a- t
we-during the regular school year except holidays and exiuus.
Published four timet
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Bob Anderson, Managing Editor

Bill Neikirk,

Editor

Stewart Hedcer,

Sportt Editor

Paul Zimmerman and Carole Martin," Assistant Managing Editors
Dick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographers
Alice Akin, Society Editor
Bob Merndon, Hank Chapman, and Lew Kinc, Cartoonists
Perry Ashley, Business Manager
Stuart Coldfarb and Paul Dykes, Advertising Managers

Rlngo. Jim Phillips, Bobbie Mason. Linda Hockensmtth. Robert Wenninger.
Smith. Kobert Perkins. dward Van Hook. Kob Tabb, Lawrence Lynch. June Byers, Ann
Harris, Beverly Cardwell, Margaret Copehart, Al ltovster, Jan Berrvman. Bob Johe. Mary
Miller. Herb Steely. Norris Johnson. Bob Krazer. Emajo Coranougher, Michel Fearing, Pat Hu!ker,
Curtis Smith, John Fltiwater. Garnett Brown. Kichard Hecllund. Chruta Flnley, Allen Travis,
Sue McCauley, Phil Cox, Kobert Kadlord, Beverly Pedigo, and Max In Cates.
Staff

Writers:-Jerr-

Georg

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Palmer Wells, News Editor

Warren Wheat, Associate

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Oct.

Goed Shares Tips
On Trek To Vandy

Beat, Pound
And Shake
Out Nerves

By ALICE AKIN
may seem a "fur" piece off,
but let's face it, If you're planBy The Associated Press
If you can beat a drum, shake ning to attend the Vandy game
a marimba or pound a piano you're November 7, now's the time to
not likely to get ulcers, says Ethel start planning ahead.
First, written permission from
Smith, noted organist, actress and
home has to be obtained. This may
popular hostess.
You don't have to be talented seem like a minor detail but what
or even trained to reap the ben- could be more embarrassing than
efits of music, explains Ethel Just to be Jerked from the group by
beating or pounding something the dean of women?
There's
that makes a noise will get rid vincing also the problem of conmom that this trip will be
of all kinds of frustrations. She
"
feels that this prescription Just as wholesome as any Sunalso
could do much to correct Juvenile day school class excursion.. If the
delinquency. If a boy or girt can parent Is inexperienced in such
let off steam playing a drum or matters, you've got the entire
blowing