xt78kp7tnh8h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78kp7tnh8h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591217  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 17, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 17, 1959 1959 2013 true xt78kp7tnh8h section xt78kp7tnh8h UK Students Conde: mn Preregistration System
By WILLIAM BLAKEMAN '

PTeregistratlon has been condemned by UK students
before it has had a chance to prove itself.
A Kernel survey, taken at random from all colleges
d
of the
At the University, showed more than
interviewed favored changes in the prereglstra-tio- n
students
system.
The students said they felt some change was needed
which would be fair to all students, regardless of standing
or classification. Many simply stated "Let's go back to
the old system In the Coliseum."
The reclassification system is being tried for the
first time next semester. It was introduced because of
the many complaints which came from students who
were unable to schedule required courses.
The change in prereglstratlon led all other Items in
a suggested list of changes at the University. The students were aked to write; a list of five changes they
would make at UK If they were in the position to
one-thir-

make them.

The construction of new classrooms and buildings
rated high on the list of changes. Other Items listed were
stronger Student Congress, a closer student-facult- y
relationship, and an Improvement In the serving of
townspeople and students In the SUB.
Most frequently suggested new buildings were Social
Sciences, Commerce, and Physics. Both students and
faculty thought the library could be improved. Many
suggested increased stack privileges, air conditioning,
and some method of reducing noise.
. Suggestions concerning Student Congress ranged from
completely abolishing the organization, to increasing its
power. Most students said faculty control of SC should

"Keep the townspeople out of the SUB was th
attitude of most students. Some felt two separate serving
lines would help the situation. Others felt a special
meal ticket would alleviate some of the problem.
Other Items mentioned several times by students Included:
Thanksgiving holidays which start. Wednesday morning, less social activity and more time for class work,
better lights on campus, an improved grading system, a
special training program for advisors, more space for
student parking, and better dorms for freshmen women.
Items favored by several' prof essors were a five-da- y
work week, a uniform salary scale, and having basic
courses taught by the best professors, not graduate
assistants.
Several faculty members advocated placing UK on the
quarter system as used at many universities, instead of
the semester plan.
Continued On Page 2

be lessened.

Those suggesting a closer student-facult- y
relationship felt many professors should have definite office
hours, and should be willing to help students. One faculty
member said Instructors who help students should not
have full teaching loads.

Jim mms LU
U ri i

Vol. L

versity of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY.. THURSDAY, DEC.

17, 1959

No. 49

Sfadents9 Party Wins

Four Positions In
Students Party won four seats
in yesterday's Student Congress
general election.
Wlnners for Students' Party were
Paula Judd, Education; Bill Smith,
Agriculture and Home Economics;
Oert Ranch, Arts and Sciences;
and Bill Oott, Engineering.

would decide what action, would
be taken.
Write-i- n
ballots were disquali- fied. Twenty-thre- e
of those dis- . carded
had Dean L. L. Martin's
name written on them. He receiv- Results In the Engineering elee- - ed nls largest support in the Col
lege of Arts and Sciences with 14
tion had
Henderson
Belfuss, Commerce; Ron- - celving 296. votes; Bill Gott, 235; votes..
In all colleges except Arts and
nie Henderson, Engineering; and and Henry Bennett, the other
Sciences. JTotin was lighUr than
Monroe Hall, Graduate School, Campus Party- candidate, 196:
It had been in last years Decern- captured seats for the Campus
John Belfuss, Campus Party ber election. Last year 280 Arts
Party.
"
"
JET;
Paula Judd, Alpha Gamma Del- - "
7Z
I 5:ua!"" voiea- Ams
ta. poUed 80 votes to Debby Dan- - Committee would confer with the year the total for that college was
candidates today and 296.
lei's 63 in the Education race. In
Agriculture and Home Economics
Bill Smith topped JKenny Martin,
167 to 121. Geri Ranch more than
doubled the number of votes cast

Books; Books And More Books
9

;

Two employees of the Medical Library place, books la their proper
place In ,tbo stacks a they arrive from various places on the
..
uK campus. (See story on page 5).

College Of Commerce
To Get New Building
uni- -

He said UK Is the only
versity which has a commerce
building . constructed before 1900
a
a
;u
f
ill
nave DU,1U"
anui mo"
constructed since World
r
.

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nial report.

A
piioed general- science
building has tep priority on build-

There is uncertainty with

re- -

said to the safety of White Hall,

the present commerce

--

re-Jo- hn

-

.

The College of Commerce is
second in line for a new building
at tils University.
Now in the planning stage, the
il fiOOfMiO triirliiip will ect ju'rond
call on building funds appropriated
by the Kentucky Legislature, ac- cording to information contained
in President Frank Dickey's bien

Election Committee discussed the
position of names on the printed
ballots. It looked as though one of
the candidates was unopposed and
the other two were running against
one another.

building,

Prof. Magsie said.

Faculty Approves
New Organizations

for her opponent, Joann Stewart.
She won by a 187 to 91 margin.
Campus . Party candidate
Hall, unopposed in the Graduate School, received 10 votes.
Two new student organizations
UK have been approved by the
Be ifus was elected ComJohn
merce representative as he beat University Faculty
Jerry Strieker, 141 to 111.
They are the Kentucky Korps, a
The Engineering race proved club which will draw its member- highly controversial. Before count- - ship from the advanced ROTC,
ing the ballots in that college, the and the Inter-VarsiChristian
ty

-

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ing impropriations.
Some 22 months will be require J to, complete the commerce

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building, according to Professor
J. L. Massie.. chairman of the
Commerce College's building com-

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mittee.
The new commerce building will
be located on the site of the former Little Commons and will extend up the hill as far as the
parking area near the Infirmary.
Present plans call for a building of approximately 100,00 square
feet containing about 30 classrooms. A building with two, or
floors
perhaps three ground-leve- l'
is possible because of the contour
of the plot.
Tie building will house the
College of Commerce and the
Bureau of Business Research,
h
which will occupy about
building.
of the
Tlie building committee has been
visiting loinmeiee buildings at
other universities in order to
learn by their mistakes and to
plan the beit possible building tor
.

mmmmmmtmmm

i

Fellowship, a national group
scribed as "conservative in the
ology and evangelistic in its
To become a member in the
Kentucky Korps the advanced
ROTC cadet must not be on academic or military probation. Gerald Silvers a member of the Kentucky Korps, said the purpose of
the organization would be to develop command poise and military

proficiency.
Silvers stated that the 17 cadets
now in the Korps would meet after

Christmas for the purpose of electing officers and selecting committees.
Membership in the
Christian Fellowship

ray

vr

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Wa:

A

Inter-Varsi-

ty

is open

to

all students and faculty members
Interested In its purpose and who
desire to taket part in the program.
Approval was made Monday by
the University Faculty en recommendation of the Committee on
Student Organizations and Social
Activities.

.

The Committee said it examined
the proposed constitutions and
of both organizations and
"found them consistent with the
rules and regulations of the University governing student
by-la-

one-tent-

.

UfC,

according to Pi of. Massie.

NS

CJiemit To Speak
Dr. C. II. DePuy, professor of
chemistry at Iowa State College, will speak at 7: 3 J p.m.
today to a meeting of the American Chemistry Society.

f

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On, On
cheerleaders are first row from left, Lana
and Carolyn Keid. Second row from left are
Lowell Stevens and Uay liurklow. Third row from,
New
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mmas.se.

UOfK

left' are Jeannine Haines, Betty Ellen Davis,
Cookie

Leet, Ethelee Davidson, June" Moore,
Suzanne Pi tier, and Kitty Hundley.

Student Directories
Student directories will go on
sale at 8:30 a.m. today.
Directories will be sold at the
Student Union ticket booth,
Kennedy Book Store, Donovan
Hall desk, and Bowman Hall
desk.

The' price of the directory
15

cents.

I

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

2

Dec. 17, 1959

UK Professors Forget Classes,

Turn Out For Bowling League
One of the oldest organized
leagues in Lexington, the University Bowling League has been in
existence since 1925. The league
began in the old Phoenix Alleys,
moved two times, and finally settled down at the Wildcat about
nine years ago.
a handicap
As it is strictl
league, the teams are divided up
on a basis of individual averages
in order to balance the teams. Dr.
Dudley Martin, of the Horticulture
Department, now leads the league
with a 179 average.
Prof. C. S. Walkman, who has
been with the league since Its beginning, sld that every department 6n campus has been represented at some time during the
league's history.
"Many professors who have left
UK have told me thaj the University Bowling League was one of
the organizations they most hated
to leave,". he said.
, Each year the officers and team
personnel are changed. Present
officers are: president, John Harrison, Agronomy Department, vice

By LINDA IIOCKENSMITII
- "Professorial dignity goes down
the alley with each ball," says
Victor R. Portmann, journalism
professor, and one of the oldest
members in the University Bowling
.

League.
Mr. Portman is one of over 50
UK faculty members, plus a few
townspeople, who hurries through
supper and dashes to the Wildcat
every Wednesday night for his
weekly appointment
with the
bowling ball.
n
teams,
On this night, 12
up mostly of faculty memmade
bers from a number of departments on campus, throw off their
scholastic worries and have a general good time. The only sense in
which an academic air prevails Is
In the names of the teams: Rocks,
Microbes, Aggies, etc.
,

.

.

1"'

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six-ma-

Psychologist
Addresses
University Receives Gifts Metal Society
Totaling Over $5,000
the
Gunning: for a strike Is Victor R. ortmann, assistant professor
t
ii
oi journalism.

for support of the Intensive Pas-tor- e'
Improvement Program of the
Experiment Station.
"Voodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, $2,000 to the
Graduate School for the fellow
jegistered this year; Erlanger
Hons Club, $81 as a scholarship;
Covington Business and Professional Women's Club. $81 for

Dr. Frank A. Pattie, UK Department of Psychology, spoke before
a meeting of
student chapter
of the American Society for Me'v
scholarship,
Mead Corporation Foundation, tals last night.
Dr. Pattie discussed hypnotism
$500 to Kentucky Research Foundation for scholarships in chemical and Its modern medical applicaengineering; $100 to be used for tions.
scholarship in dairying.
As president of the American SoMiscellaneous gifts include:
ciety of Clinical Hypnosis, Dr. PatYoder Brothers, Ohio, chrysan- tie cited cases of hypnotism being
themum cuttings to the Depart- used to cure skin disease and re grooming procedures.
ment of Horticulture; Hattie Har- place anaesthesia.
ris Kern, Rufus M. Kern, Lela
He said subjects are not unconKern Humble, a little doctor's of- scious, but have full control of all
fice and its relics In memory of senses and that hypnotism will
their mother for the Kentucky cure cases of "preexam Jitters,'
Life Museum; and Mr. and Mrs. although results are Inconclusive
Paul O. Blazer, Ashland. 125 shares as to whether it can really Improve
of common stock in the Ashland grades and study attitudes in colOil and Refining Company, valued lege students.
vv
at $2,875 for the Blazer Lecture
Fund.
.

if'

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,

Hr

1

GET YOUR FREE
1960 DATE BOOKS
At

Hales
Pharmacy

Initiated
By Chi Delta Phi

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,

905 S. Lime
Across From
Town House Motel
BRING THIS AD

FREE PARKING
REAR OF STORE

119 South Limestone

versity.
Feeling the University was unfair, one student scrawled "Cut
out coarses which are Insulting
to a persons Intelligence." (sic).

FOR THE FINEST IN
REFRESHMENT TRY

"Too Much, Too Soon"
Drotky MlonErcol

Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

t

2
fhtV

J

Jim Foster Reelected
Sigma Chi President

Be

give their opinion of the status of
Continued From Page 1
Formal initiation ceremonies for
Many professors felt honesty was morale among the students and Chi Delta Phi, women's literary
a problem. One professor sug- faculty.
honorary, were held Monday evengested "Try to arrange a 'climate
A great many students indi- ing.
.of study and research in which cated that morale was low, while
honesty, Integrity, and altruism a smaller number contended that Four undergraduates were initiated and Dr. Mary Ellen Rickey
are byproducts."
it was good. A few thought morale and Mrs. Raymond Wilkie were
On the same survey, the stu- was fair, and some said it was
selected by the chapter as hondents md faculty were asked to indifferent.
orary members.
Other answers to the survey Dr. Rickey is an assistant prowere: "Move Pat Hall across the fessor in the English Department.
street, put stained glass windows Mrs. Wilkie has had four books
in the SC office, and plant more published In a biographical series
trees in the botanical gardens."
TTTH
on the childhoods
of famous
One student said abolish edi- Americans. A fifth book will be
LAST DAY
torials in the Kernel, eliminate out in March."
Beloved Infidel
ROTC. and eliminate the Arts and .The four undergraduates inSciences College, both students itiated were Ann Shaver, Louise
STARTS TOMORROW
Rose, Mabel Pollitt, and Oeri
and professors.
Ranch.
were in favor
Several
Suspense and Drama s of serving students the SUB, unbeer in
On a
mi
limited cuts', and of lowering the
OPEN DAILY 1 :30 P.M.
Big
required minimum standing.
'
City
iV
Kangaroo courts and firing
squads were one student's sugV Daily!
gested way to improve the UniLAST TIMES TONIGHT!

'

together, forget their professorial
dignity, and Just have a good time
kidding each other." another professor said, as he took his graceful stance and prepared to send
the ball down the alley with the
ease he might employ to write an
exam question on the board.

-- GIRLS-

.

Preregistration Condemed

professor safd.
"It's always been a place where a
bunch of congenial fellows can get

Jim Foster, Danville, was reelected president of Sigma Chi
fraternity Tuesday night.
president. Jack Todd; and secreOther officers elected for the
tary treasurer, Dr. Dudley Martin,
coming year are Dick Armstrong,
vice president; John. Boston, reDairy Club Show Set
cording secretary; Russ Mathews,
secretary; Carroll
For Tonight In Arena corresponding Rod Hamilton,
Luby, treasurer;
The UK Dairy Club will hold its pledge trainer; and Mike Jolly,
annual fitting and showing contest historian.
at 7 pjn. today in the Dairy
Center arena.
Fitting la the preparation of
dairy animals for the show ring
and includes cleaning, clipping
hair, trimming hooves, and other

m

. The University received gifts of
money totaling $5,962 and several
miscellaneous Items at the JJoard
of .Trustees meeting Tuesday.
Donors were:
E. I. duPont de Nemours and
Company, $1,200 to the Experiment
Station for operating greenhouses
covered with the firm's film; National Plant Food Institute, 1X000

both of the HorMculture Department.
Considering ne enthusiasm and
good attendance at the league
meetings, UK's Iowlers seem to
be about as punctual for their
Wednesday night sport as they are
to their classes.
"Although we. have no sponsors
and the prize is very low, everyone
takes his bowling seriously," one

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High St. and Cochran

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CONRAD-DAVI-

2ND HIT

DtOOD AND STEEL"
with JOHN TUPTOH
--

944 Winchester Rd.

out
pf the

UffiMJ

Human
Rex REASON

I Heart!

CIRCLE

Block from University
82(j S. Limestone St.

25

NAN LESLIE
HCATIRS

AUTO

18-KA- R

THEATRI

IHOOOa HATING
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* 3
Library Mas "UK Yearbook Printed In 1894
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

ed in the history of the college.
MIKE WENNINGER
Kernel Staff Writer
University building
have
"Rickety Rix, Rlcjiety Rlx,
several of the names that
State College class of ft1." So goes were on the faculty roll In 1894:
a class yell printed in "Memoria Patterson, Anderson, Kastle, MilXCIV, a
booklet poli- ler, Neville, Pence, and White. Dr.
J. W. Pryor, after whom the Pryor
shed here in 1894.
The booklet Is the granddaddy cf PremedlcaJ Society Is named, was
the modern "Kentuckian." Its stu- then trying to pound anatomy and
into
mountaineers'
dent editors were Felix Kerrick, a physiology
heads.
fophomore, and J. J. Woods, a
Apparently James a. White, proJunior.
fessor of mathematics back then,
This first UK yearbook was
In the days when the school made his students solve algebra
was not the University of Kentuc- problems written in Roman numky, but was the State College of erals, for upon turning the pages
Djr

lOO-pa-

well-wax-

"Believing that all boys, especially college students deprived of
home Influences, are naturally Inclined to wander from the right
and to seek evil, the YMCA was
organized (here) in 1889.
"Like all other organizations of
this nature, it has had severe battles to wage, but,' in the end it
has. always marched Cut in triumph, and may it ever be thus
until every foe is vancuished. . ."
State College boys must have indeed been naughty
From the rc;icn aoout athletics
In the first yearbook, it is learned
that "In the ran of '92, the boys
seemed to have lots of enthusiasm
and material, but very little knowledge with which to forni a football team. Prof. A. M. Miller, who
had Just taken the chair in Geology, being an old Princeton man,
was elected manager of the team.

Kentucky.

C,

ex-offl-

1

CLASSIFIED

-

AMMUNITION

.733 Italian Military M 90; .733 Italian Soft
Point $14; .733 Italian Hollowpoint $9.
ft MM
Mauser Military $3 30; 7 MM
Mauser Military $430; 6.3 Italian Military $6;
MM Luger Military $7; 303
$3.
British Military $0; 30 Carbine (U.S.I any
Prices are for 100. Will ell In
not
o
quantity. Alno have gun
lifted. BRUCE MILLER (student! 837
HD4t
Furiong Dr. after 3 p.m.
FOR SALE Rolleif lex camera J.5F. In
llD4t
excellent condition. Call
FOR SALX Elderly typewriter, L. C.
Smith. Excellent condition. Not modern
or
but efficient $23. Phone .

LOST

One curcoat ilze 44. Owner
puked up a size 40 by mistake. Lost
Phone
weeks ago at Jerry's Drive-In- .

LOST

lD3t

SAE houM 230.

--

"The team not nav:ng ;nc iCioney
to hire a trainer, did very well under the circumi-.ance- s,
Prof. Miller
teaching them the use of signals
and hammering into their heads
some knowledge or the game."

CONTACT LENSES

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Ride from Elumeade Farm,
intersection of Ironworks Pike and
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Mon. thru Fri.'and back in afternoon
during second semester. Phone 4518.
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WANTED Two persons desire ride to
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That's why

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Phone
HAVE

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and

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NEW YORK LIFE
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something of the truant nature in
her.
"We don't mean to say that she
flirts with the boys and then rides
supreme over her social field reviewing broken hearts: no, not at
all, but she will fly through the
halls with the sweetest smiles and
tion.
head thrown back In such an arThe last two pages of "Memoria tistic manner that Cupid hlrmelf
XCIV" are devoted to "The State could not resist (her)."
College Girl." She must have been
quite a gal, judging from the
More than 60 percent of the
write-u- p
given her
state of Iowa is under cultivation.
"The State College girl is a loveAssociated Press.
ly and innocent creature of ShakePhew!
spearian model. She invariably possesses beauty and attraction. . .:.
Look Better
"She is a good stusenc, but we
say she could be a little
shall
V
See Better
better, of course with all that
with
beauty and innocence that , she
most assuredly possesses, there is

New 1960 JUM brings you taste... more taste...

and,-amm-

2

ed

ization's contribution to "Memoria XCIV" read:

pub-lifth- ed

Y.

195U-

white ties. Most of them have their
UK's first football team began
hair parted straight down the its career with two losing seasons.
middle, and one young gallant in Nevertheless, Kentucky trounced
the front row sports a
Tennessee, 56-- 0, in the first game
mustache.
played between the two schools in
The YMCA was vigorously com- l&il and this probably saved poor
batting the evils of college life. The old Prof. Miller from being forced
opening paragraphs of this organ- to resign by the Alumni Associa-

ge

of "Memoria XCIV," one comes
remarkable class
upon another
In 1894, Dr. James K. Patterson yell: "M.D. 3
Cs, XCV eleven
was president of the college, and K-S-Class of 97.' It must
"His Excellency, Gov. John Young
have been bedlam when the classes
Brown" was chairman
of 96 and "97 got into a yelling
of the Board of Trustees.
contest.
The faculty of 25 instructors
In 94, one of the three courses
must have worked hard to get the
21 members (including six girls) of of study offered to future mechanthe class of "94 graduated. After all, ical engineers was "Steam Engiin the senior section of "Memoria neering, the object of which is to
XCIV," the smug upper class- give that training necessary to fit
men boast that 21 students is men to be operators and designers
the largest number to be graduat- - of steam machinery." Ah, to have
been an engineering student 63
years before Sputnik.
Sigma Chi and Kappa Alpha
fraternities were the only Greek
organizations on campus in 1894,
both chapters having been founded
only the year before.
roit SALI
A picture of the Sigma Chi
a sober looking
GUNS AND AMMUNITION SAW .357 chapter shows
Magnum, new M5; SAW .43 A CP Re- group of young gentlemen dressed
.380 Automatic
volver, new $50; Colt
VG $22 50; Cap & Ball. VG $70.
in morning coats, high collars, and

Dec. 17,

"'

Y,

a"

I

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More tastd by far.'..yet low in tar. ..And they said "It couldn't be done! "
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:

* Giving Students Power
From the pages of the New York
Times .comes the revelation that an
Eastern university, Farlcigh Dickinson in New . Jersey, has intron
duced a new era in '
relations. Officials of this
university have worked out a construction program coming directly
under the aegis of the student body.
student-administratio-

For example, when the university
wanted to build a new lecture hall,
a special student assembly, along with
representatives of the construction
firms and university administrators,
heard bids, asked questions, and then
decided which company would get
the contract bid. And it wasn't always
the lowest bidder, since the students
took into consideration length of time
tp finish the job and additional materials needed.
The move by the New Jersey uni

versity is perhaps too bold for more
conservative Kcntuckians, who apparently regard college students as
too immature to make such significant
decisions and not well trained
enough to participate in matters of
business. But, in the words of the
Times, a student body "concerned
with what is being done to arrange
for better accommodations will,- by
environment, become more interested
in other activities of the university."
Although we don't expect UK officials to even consider such a step,
we wonder if the powers of Student
but
Congress are not only
even innocuous enough so as not to
interfere in administrative affairs?
To give the students more opportunity to express and assert themselves might enhance interest, create
understanding and morale, and build
stronger citizens.
-

Fiom

The Readers' Form

Prestige Of An Automobile

Discrimination
'To

The Editor:
It is quite interesting to note that the
president of Student Congress was not
taken into a junior men's honorary.
Especially since he had 10 activity points
more than necessary and a standing
eight points higher than necessary. Discrimination? I think so.

Death On The Installment Plan
By BOBBIE MASON

running when you're trying to get
The new cars are America's most away from someone. The gas engine
significant contribution to culture has revolutionized track teams.
And cars create exciting problems
since Dixieland jazz.
.which employ more people, thereby
. This year's line of prestige symbols,
Carole Martin
straight from Detroit, the source of providing more raw material for
strikes steel workers, mechanics, trafall Truth, is like 20th Century "ReStop Criticizing
fic directors, safety commissioners,
naissance. Michelangelo would . be
.To The Editor:
overjoyed at the classic chrome lines undertakers.
Your malicious, snide inuuendos perAlso automobiles are compulsory
and the
flowing from
Each issue is
taining to SC disgust-med
for keeping up with our
every swept wing.
to defamation of the only studedicated
American way of life. They make dent governmental medium on campus.
But even great art is commercialdrive-i- n
graveyards the pracitcal In none of the blasting editorials have
ized nowadays.
funerals.
answer to
I
any constructive criticizing.
seen
For everyone is driven by the inane
Of course this sudden master-passio- n
Apathy and lenity is inexcusable. Once,
desire to drive and to drive in style.
has produced a financial problem just once, offer some improvement or
The cars embody the . essence of for
Americans. better still, come to SC and voice our
many culture-seekin- g
luxury, prestige, speed, apd death.
They usually pay for these artistically opinions.
Psychologists have endeavored to designed weapons in installments, but
I could suggest that the Kernel spend
find out why people are obsessed with some are fortunate enough to be able more time in proofreading its confidensuch strange inclinations. They say to end the problem all at once with tial scandal sheet instead of criticizing
SC.
that a red convertible in a show their lives. There is a money-bac- k
,
H(X)VKH
window reminds a man of a mistress. guarantee though.
J. E.
(Those uerc not innneiulos. We meant
Costly substitute.
History tests will record the decline
EDITOR)
The bigger the car, the bigger the and fall of American civilization as every word' of thcm.-Tman. The bigger the man, the bigger the world's most mechanized mass
In Defense
suicide.
the tombstone.
Planets with intelligent inhabitants' To The Editor:
The smaller variety, foreign and
sports cars, contribute equally to will find our planet useful in solving
To the writer of the letter on birth
prestige because they cost more. And, their overpopulation problems. We control:
don't have to worry about overpopusince they go faster, they are a conMay I sincerely congratulate you for
venient rationalization for speeding. lation. Our uncontrolled accident taking advantage of your rights as a
They come economically in
plan exceeds birth control by far.
free citizen of the United States, and
and umbrellas replace convertible
Among their other virtues, autos taking the time and effort to express
your v iews on a subject that is contrary
tops.
are the backbone of holiday celebraThe more grandiose models are tions. Holidays provide leisure time to your own beliefs. You call yourself
mobile homes in themselves, with which ironically speeds us along to timid, but it takes strong character to
things one believes,
luxury superseding safety. They have our ultimate destinations. Drinking stand up for the
and since you are of this character, I
built-ibeds,
carpeting, at the wheel makes immediate arrival am sure that you will honestly respect
traveling offices with walkie-talkieeven more certain. And it makes us the attempt of a Catholic to express
kitchen sinks, potted plants, and pushfeel confident to boot.
his beliefs on this matter.
button entertainment.
In this mechanized age we even
First of all, it seems that the CathCars have other invaluable purhave suipide machines. And it doesn't olic Church is constantly being accused,
poses: occupying garages, giving take much skill to operate them. Any if I may quote you, "of controlling the
thoughts, actions, and feelings of people."
business to gas stations, parking, ( you fool can learn the art of dying.
It is considered an autocratic instiSo have fun, everybody.
can't park without one), Sunday drivslaughtering season is here tution in a country built on democracy.
ing, and matching your wardrobe.
Strange as it may seem to members of
Furthermore, they are faster than again.
denominations,
self-expressi-

.

on

.

fast-pace-

time-consumi-

ng

UE

six-pak- s,

,

wall-to-wa-

n

ll

s,

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Entered at tha Port Office at Lexis ft on, Kentucky as second iail matter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
tub tithed four timet a wk during the regular school year except holidays and exams.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Bob Anderson, Managing Editor

Bill Neikirk,

Editor

,

Stewart Hedcer,

Sport Editor
Assistant Managing Editors
Dick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographers
Alicx Akin, Society Editor
Stuart Coldfarb and Paul Dykes, Advertising Managers
Beverly Cardwell, Circulation
Perry Ashley, Business Manager
Bob IIerndon, Hank Chapman, and Lew King, Cartoonists
,
'

Paul Zimmerman and Carole Martin,

THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Bill Blakeman, News Editor

Suzy Horn, Associate

Chaparral

The "Stanford

Catholics are of
some
the opinion that their church is the
true church established by Jesus Christ
for the purpose of helping to guide men
to Him. Since we feel that we have
the truth, we are thankful for it and
teach it 'to our children in the same way
that you would teach your child about
Cod.' When one holds something which
he firmly believes to be true and good,
fie cannot help but give such a gift to
his child. I believe that many Protestants refer, to this as "indoctrination," but
we are taught not only the "what" of
our religion but also, the "why", and
we certainly know as much about other

religions as their memlers kno