xt78pk06xc0t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78pk06xc0t/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1911 yearbooks ukyrbk1911 English Hausauer-Jones Printing Co., Buffalo, NY Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection The Nineteen Eleven Kentuckian Volume VII text The Nineteen Eleven Kentuckian Volume VII 1911 2012 true xt78pk06xc0t section xt78pk06xc0t   UatvanitY of Kentucky  The Nineteen Eleven Kentuckian
volume vii. "Long live the good School!  giving out year by year Recruits to true manhood and womanhood dear: Brave hoys, modest maidens in beauty sent forth, The living epistles and proof of its worth."
 Whittier. Table of Contents
lunik % Jurat Unnfe tbr &ermt& j$aak tlir (Hiiro llmik thr 3hntrtli iUmk tlir jFtfth TiUmk the Bxxth
The [ niversily The Classes Athletics Fraternities (Organizations College Life President Henry S. Barker IC   ' 1?"    fVI    T"   II' 
mriiii
ixiinriiiimiiniiMijiiximHuu
nineteen eleven
III IK IHI X XX II I I I
iirmii x x x x x x j
to
Judge Henry S. Barker
President of The University we
THE CLASS OF 1911
Dedicate this Book
kmxiiiivcixxxxxkxxx mxx1sissiii viixiiiviiiiii
iniiiuixiiiiiimiminninuiiiiiiiiunnimiuii
 r X XIIX X X XIX XIX XX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X I X X X I XX X X I
ttftttttttttttt*fttt*tftH^.tm.g'TTi
nineteen    e i
XX X X X X X XX.XX X X I-XII X-XX-XXX
Main Entrance
oiiiiiiiiiiixiirixiiiiiiiiixxxxxxxx
xmnixxiK
8 k   e   n   t u  c k  i a 1m
y^i^^xx-xxxxxxxxxixxxxxxxxxxxxx xxx mum;
LE VEN
J
Greetings
FRIENDS OF STATE ': TO YOU WE OFF EH NO APOLOGY FOR THIS BOOK. YOU ARE IN SYMPATHY WITH ALL THAT WE HOLD DEAR OF Ol'li COLLEGE LIFE. HISTORY, TRADITION, CUSTOMTHESE THREE HAVE CONSPIRED TO WRITE THE FOND RECORDS CONTAINED HEREIN.
IT HAS BEEN OUR LABOR OF LOVE TO ENGRAVE ON THESE PAGES OUR MOST CHERISHED MEMORIES. MEMORIES OF JOY AND GLOOM, OF HIGH PURPOSE AND LOWLY AIM; CONCEIVED IN A COMMON LOVE FOR "STATE," SWEETENED BY FRIENDSHIP AND PRAISE, SOBERED BY GLOOM AM) DEFEAT.
Kin KM)
HEAD ON
i m mmm m".
a m -m n w n mmmm x  ix  s mm m mmm mm m mm m mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmi
m IlIimKIIMIIIIIlII M MM"M M M M M M MM MMMMMMMMMMKMMMMMM MJ MMM]
A-uiaL
 ken
u   c  k i
riiiimiiiTiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim
************** + *?
i n e t e e n eleven
IIIIIIIIIIIII k   e   n   t u
K  I  A N
l. e. Nollau Official Photographer
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIXIIIIII]
e: im
i El V El N
Kentuckian Staff
Ed itor-in-Chief
0. II. Taylor
AssistanI Editors W. C. Duncan J. M. Foster
J. (). Lewis W. C. Shultz
H. G. Lytle S. C. Ebbert
(). E. Baird Miss Williams
J. F. Bru\er Miss Cruickshank
Business Manager
Perry Cassidy
Assistant Business Managers
J. J. FlTZPATRICK
Advertising Manager
B. II. collings
c. K. Bain
Assistant Advertising Managers G. B. Merchant W. W. Stevenson
Subscription Manager
F. L. Becker
i Issisluuts
L. L. Adams
II. Lee Moore
Treasurer
. Issislaut Treasurer
V. L. Downing
A. B. IIaswell
Phologra pliers W. B. Wilson L. E. Nollau
. I rlists
X. (i. Kociiester      H. M. Kelley      M. M. Harrison
***************
~r^--.,. - --- -      ^Ejaagaasp*
jffi 11111 Q Library k  sec im
f mmm.m I M I.I III H IIUHIH HII g 11 I.I 11 III-1II
nine:
IIIIillllllllllX XX XX
t EL EL n
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIXIIIIIIII
ttttt
El L. El V EL N
am niTT
The Library
prince
hropists-
THIS haven of quiet and rest is the gift of I Andrew Carnegie. Il is. however, another one of the substantial improvements which the University owes to the zeal and industry of her retired president. Mr. Carnegie had already bequeathed a munifieenl sum to the City of Lexington for the founding of a Public Library. He had no idea of departing from his well-established custom of never endowing two.similar institutions in the same city. However, the magnetic personality and the Scotch sagacity of Dr. Patterson conspired to induce the noted benefactor to depart from his usual plans and to honor us with the princely gift. With untiring energy the president now set himself to secure for the new Library the best of the literature of the world. His efforts were rewarded beyond all expectations, and he now has the pleasure of knowing that the new Library contains the oldest and the best of all the literature that man has produced. Here is to be found the divine handiwork of the master-spirits of the ages.
^ il hin t he frescoeiI walls
of  this shrine o upon the earth, bound between Here 1 he scholar
historian can learn the nature of long-forgotten peoples, i inspired breath from kindred souls.  The scientisl can learn of work along his chosen line of endeavor, or the nubile man can d
literature All that
the covers
can go fo
is contained the man has thought, of   the  Ikoks win
communion wit h
record of all   I ha all   thai  man has li   line  I he walls he minds of 01 11eI II
man  lias done
eliali is held if I his building, days. I I ere I 1 le le poet ea I eh the I he lalesl research ve into I lie hidden
mysteries of political economy. The president can burrow deep into the philosophy of the sages, or the less sober minded can seek enjoynienl In the popular magazine. The Library is the one place where each person can be in congenial company. 11 is (he meeting-place of master-thinkers, as well as of those who wish to steal "11 from class-work and enjoy an hour of quiel reveling, away from the watchful eye of the all-wise "Prof." The books in the Library have been selected with the utmost care by those who know their business. There is uol a selection in Ken-lucky thai can compare with il in range of subjects covered. Larger selections are common, but few have such a grasp of all phases of human interest. Never can the critic sav of our Library I ha I I here are "too many books and too little in them. "*......
K   E   N   T  U   Z  K   I A 1 li 1 * 111 A I i I i * H ITT
INI
iiiiii hi* xxxxxxxxxxx
NINETEEN
x x xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxx
ELEVEN
a Tribute to
James K. Patterson
Nearly half a century ago James K. Patterson became the head official of the A. and M. College of Kentucky. Since that time he has given his life and energy to the building up of this Institution. Old age has crepl upon him almost unawares and he has seen the dream of his youth only partially perfected. He has seen it grow from a school with four professors, with a graduating class of only one student, to a University with seventy-five professors and one hundred graduates. He was the initiator of each forward step. Though retired from his position, he is yet the father and guardian of his only living childthe State University of Kentucky.
President Patterson is one of the most illustrious men the State has ever had. His work is beyond comparison; it is a standard by which In judge others. His quick perception, his choice vocabulary, his refined utterance and his masterly mind are unequalled. With his indomitable courage and incomparable strength and virtue he overcame all political prejudices, and won the respect of his enemies. He is loo great to fall by public criticism. He is a true friend, a pious gentleman and a joyous companion. Within that aged breast beats I he heart of a noble man. The great lesson of his life is the fruit-fulness of unselfish striving for high impersonal aims.
___
C A.
12
 MaaMMara&aflBaMS
IK. I
IIXIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
MTU
k   1   a im
iiiiiiiniiii
n i n
EL L_ El \/ El N
31
Board of Trustees
Augustus E. Wilson, Governor of Kentucky
President Henry S. Barker .....
Hon. E. R. Regenstein, Superintendent of Public Instruction
Term Expires January, 1912
Hon. Tibbis Carpenter .... Hon. William H. Cox ..... Hon. Claude B. Terrell
Denny P. Smith ......
Chairman, Ex-Officio Member, Ex-Officio Member Ex-Officio
Scottsville Maysville Bedford Cadiz
Term Expires January, 1914 Hon. Cassius M. Clay Hywel Da vies, Esq. . Richard C. Stoll, Esq. Louis L. Walker, Esq. Richard N. Wathen, Esq. .
Paris Kensee Lexington Lancaster Lebanon
Term Expires January, 1916 John B. Atkinson, Esq. Thomas Louis Edelen, Esq. Charles B. Nichols, Esq. . James K. Patterson, Esq. . James W. Turner, Esq.
Earlington Frankfort Lexington Lexington l'aintsville
Executive Committee
Charles B. Nichols, Chairman
Cassius M. Clay Claude B. Terrell
Hywel Davies Richard C. Stoll
Miss Margaret I. King, Secretary of the Board and of the Executive Committee
* * * * 
*3
 imiiiiiiiiiiiuummumn,
K,   EC   IM   T  U   C  1*C   I   A INI
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIX
 IXXIHXXXX
xx x j
Association of Alumni
General Officers
Geo. Roberts, '98 Mary E. Sweeney. '06 Brook G. Hifner, '97
. President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer
Cincinnati Chicago New York
List of Clubs
Prof. John T. Faig, Secretary Washington Perren Rule, Secretary Louisville W. E. Freeman, Secretary Manila. P. 1.
Philip Riekkin, Secretary Euoexia S. Mr( 'i ij.ock. Secretary A. M. Kirby, Secret an/
xxxxxk'
xxxxxxxxxxx STATR   COLLEGE   OK KRNTUGKY,
XiExiisra-TOisr, ky. Twenty   Professors  and. Instructors.
The University in 1888 IIIIIII
History of The University
I
N September, 1861, James K. Patterson, then a young man of twenty-eight years, was placed in charge of what remained of Transylvania University. In 1865 Transylvania University was consolidated by Act of the Legislature with Kentucky University, which had up to thai lime been established at Har-rodsburg. Three years prior to the consolidation, Congress had given to each State in the Union 30,000 acres of land for each Representative in Congress, for the purpose of establishing and endowing agricultural and mechanical colleges. Kentucky received .3,30.000 acres under that allotment, a magnificent domain equal to more than 1.500 square miles, and which, if it had been judicially and economically administered, would by I his lime have produced an income of more than $400,000 a year. 11 was so managed, however, thai a nel income of but $9,900 accrues from the original magnificent endowment.   The State established an Agricultural and
President Patterson
M
eclianica
College in 1865, b
lade il one of the colleges of Ken-
tucky I Diversity, instead of establishing it upon an independent
l mmmmmm
immmmmmmmj
footing. Professor -lames K. Patterson was elected Professor of History and Metaphysics in I he new organization. In 1869 he became its president. In 1S7S the Agricultural and Mechanical College was detached from its former connection with Kentucky University, and by Act of I he Legislature was organized and placed upon an independent basis. The City of Lexington gave the city park as a site for the college, and the presidenl obtained from the city and county $54,125 for the erection of buildings. It was I henceforward known as the Slate College, until 1908, when il was made a University by the Legislature, taking thenceforward the name of State University. In 1880 President Patterson obtained fi 'ok the S l ;i l e 11 ic proceeds of a tax of one twentieth of a mill for the further endowrmen1 of the college. Two years thereafter the denominational colleges of Kent ucky memorialized
Vice- I'resiilen I \\ hi te
B33
* 
TTHTTTTTHnTrH
 mmm mmm 
IS
M'XMMM
 t*~ m X X XXXIIIIXXXIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII WAfc$		
K. . EC IH	I   T  LJ . G   K.   I   A SSI	
riiTiiiiiiii		km m ml
the Legislature to repeal the tax levied for its benefit upon the ground that they would in the future be unable to compete with a college organized, administered and sustained by liberal appropriations from the State. President Patterson fought, single-handed, and defeated the effort to repeal the tax, and when its constitutionality was tested in the courts, fought and won the case in the Chancellors' Court in Louisville and in the Court of Appeals of the Commonwealth, having as his opponents Judge Lindsay, Judge Humphrey and Colonel Bennett Young, who represented the denominational colleges. During the contest the building fund became exhausted through the negligence of the architect. The college was $35,000 in debt. The effort to negotiate a loan failed. The president borrowed the money on his own securities, placed it in the hands of the Executive Committee and thus enabled I hem to complete the building.
In 1887 he assisted materially in the passage of the Hatch Acl through Congress, which established and endowed Experimenl Stations as departments of Agriculture and Mechanical Colleges, created under the Act of 1862. The annual appropriation for this purpose was $15,000, subsequently increased by the Adams Act to $30,000 per annum. In 1890 he assisted in obtaining from Congress $25,000 per annum for further endowment of Agricultural and Mechanical Colleges, and in 1900-02 induced the Legislature of Kentucky to make an appropriation of $90,000 for a gymnasium and a college homePatterson Hallfor young women. In L904 he obtained from the Legislature a further annual appropriation of $15,000 for additional income.  The constitutionality of this Acl was also tested
m I he lower courts and in the Court of Appeals, in both ol which he won.
In 1906 he assisted in procuring the passage of the Nelson Mill through Congress, making an additional appropriation of $25,000
ally for colleges established under
he Acl of 1802.   In 190S I he
Legislature changed the name of the [nstitution to Stale I niversity.
President Patterson resigned Ihe presidency in 1910 after a service of forty-one years. He hands over to his successor an Institution with an annual income of $150,000. grounds, buildings and equipment valued at $930,000. colleges of Agriculture, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Mining Engineering. Electrical Engineering, Science and Arts and Education. Its engineering schools
are the best in the south and rank wit h I he besl in America. President Patterson retires with the title of Prcsidcnl Emeritus, retains a seal in the Faculty and was appointed by the Governor a member of the Board of Trustees.
He received the degree of Ph. I)., in 1875, from Hanover College. Indiana, from which lie graduated in 1856; LL. I)., in 1896, from LaFayclte College, Pennsylvania, and LL. D., in L910, from the University of Vermont. In 1880 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society of Creal Britain and of the Society of Antiquaries of Edinburgh, Scotland. In recenl years be has been elected a Member of the American I [istorical Associal ion, I be American Academy of Social and Political Science, and the National Geographic Society, lie is likewise a trustee of the American Civic Alliance.
 m~m mmm m.mm m mmm
mmm
9 :
NINE T EL
iiiiiimii iiiii
Faculty Group
'iinunr
miiiimiiiMn
 7184
72 22
 rtmt
IIIIIIIXIIIIIIUIIIIIIIllxiliii
T U
rx * * unimiiniiinim m kkkxxmm
NINETEEN    E L_ E \f
N
J
College of Arts and Sciences
Arthur McQuiston Miller, A.M. Dean of Arts and Sciences
James Garrard White, A.M.
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy
Joseph William PrYor, M.D.
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology
Merry Lewis Pence, M.S. Professor of Physics
Alexander St. Clair Mackenzie
Professor of English and Logic
Alfred Charles Zembrod, A.M. Professor of French and German
Franklin Elliott Tuttle, A.M., Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Theodore Tolmax Jones, A.M.
Professor of Latin
Glanville Terrell, Ph.D.
Professor of Greek
Ralph Nelsox Maxson, Ph.D. Professor of Inorganic Chemistry
Columbus Rudolph Melgher, A.M. Associate Professor of French and German
Joseph Morton Davis, A.M. Associate Professor of Mathematics
William Snider Webb, B.S., M.S.
Assistant Professor of Physics
Anna J. Hamilton
Associate Professor of English
Elizabeth Siielhv Kinkead
Lecturer on English
Aubyn Chinn, A.B.
Teacher of Domestic Science
Sir Dobyns McCann, H.S.. M.S. Assistant in Entomology and Zoology
James Edward Tuthill, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History, Economics and Sociology
Alfred I Iollv Gilbert, P.S.
Assistant Professor of Botany Edward Franklin Farquhar, A.M.
Assistant Professor of English
El1.1 a Latham R ees, (I.E. Assistant in Mathematics
Lloyd Cadie Daniels, B.S., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor ot Chemistry
Harold Hardest^  Downino, B.C.E. Assistant in Mathematics
Robert Hoover Sraiir, U.S.
Assistant in Physics
Clarence Raymond Eoeliioff, A.B. Instructor in History
William Tudor Pearce, B.A. Instructor in Chemistry
tffttt
IH-
IIIIHIII
23
- "i Snow Scene
24
S1SMIHI
 l^miUIXIXIIIIIIIXlUXKXIXJtJI]	***********
ic/**.    N 1 N E T                  El L. E	- \-/   El i 'VJ
tiiii hi iiiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii]	
College of Arts and Sciences
IN this College the discordant buzzing of machinery is never heard, nor is there danger of being shocked by coming into contact with unexpected live wires. The transit, plow and pick are but slightly known. They who wander through its enchanted vales, who drink from its fountains of truth and wisdom, who are fanned by the gentle zephyrs of poetry and romance, and who commune with the unforgotten dead will look back with pleasure upon the many happy days spent roving through the hallowed regions, and with an ever-increasing love for its mystic hordes.
The guides through this enchanted region by their kind and gentle ministry lessen the pain of the journey by leading the weary souls by still waters, by unfolding to them the many beauties of nature, by breathing into their ears beautiful odes to the harmony of life, and pointing out to them man's greatest opportunity.
Professor Jones leads them safely by Charybdis and Scylla. wandering at will through Hades and the Elysian fields. Doctor Terrell, with gentle touch and musical voice, leads them upward again, to stand awestruck before the perfection of the Parthenon, and mystified while listening to the Athenian philosophy.
Willi Professor Zembrod we climb the Alpine peaks and spend many pleasant days in Paris, stopping for a while amid the vine-clad hills of Spain. Professor Meleher presents to them the Kaiser, revealing to them the beauty of the German language and revels with them amid the glad, joyous students of Heidelberg.
l.nder the benign guidance of Professor Mackenzie they are led to i he altar of logic philosophy. and they learn to prattle in mysterious and misleading phrases, knowing or caring not their deep significance. Looking from i his altar 111 rough the study window they may see many evidences of supreme handiwork.
Doctor Tuthill, with an earnest but sad countenance, reveals to them the dismal record of man's existence, showing them the many ways in which "man's inhumanity to man exists in every-dav life, and explaining to them how to conduct their financial affairs so that their future prospects will no1 be blighted by nol knowing how to save their money.
Professor While and his assistants instruct them in the arl of X-chasing, so training their minds thai the elusive character must seek safely nol only in I he realm of stars and planets, but also in
 niiiuriimiii n w w rm n k x iXummiim
-:--,__i_m
25
 K   E   N   T U  C K
riiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii
ELEVEN
N
(Ihomisti \ Building
^m-^ feae sub
26
 			
			
	XXXXXXXXXXXXIXXXX		
that elusive and evasive region of the fourth dimension. Here they again see the sign, "woe unto all laggards who enter here."
Doctor Pryor reveals to them the perfectly harmonious mechanism of the human body. While still wondering al this perfection they behold myriads upon myriads of bugs, and are told many facts concerning their ways. Professor Miller reveals to them the mysteries of life and evolution, opening their minds with the enchanted story of the age of the earth, which the mountain and seas have revealed to restless man.
At last, realizing that they are soon to cease to wander in the enchanted halls, they feel assured that they shall go forth to life's battle better equipped by having thought and wrought in these hallowed confines.
r"			
			
			
27
  					
			5  K I		
IIVWITW;.....				BTTCTTT	4 J HHHPTTTT^TWni iillllAW
..... . . _li
The Teachers' College
Professor Snow
THE Teachers' College of State University has been established 'primarily for the purpose of providing adequate'preparation for the training of teachers in the county high school, and to furnish to intending candidates for superintendences and principalships throughout the State such a comprehensive view of the history and principles of education and of educational administration as will enable them lo appreciate and embody in their practical experience the most modern and valuable ideals of
the teaching profession.
Co-operating, as this department is able to, with the other schools of the University it is enabled to offer, in addition to the twenty points of strictly professional study, exceptional opportunities to all students desiring to specialize in the work of preparation for teaching drawing, manual training, physical education and domestic science. In this latter field a peculiarly fortunate circumstance permits of extensive specialization and opens  to all who
desire the attractive and essential details connected with the study of home economies.
Candidates for the H. S. in Education are permitted to so arrange their elective courses as to give I hem a solid found a t ion for subsequent teaching in this important department of educational activity .
Through the courtesy of the Superintendent of Schools I he City of Lexington and Louisville, students in the Teachers' College are permitted to use the high schools of these cities as schools of observation. This phase of the work is open to all seniors and graduate students and is conducted in connection with the Seminary In which cm-rent educational problems form the topic of weekly discussion.
A letter received from I he Secretary of Teachers' College, Columbia University, stating thai hereafter all graduates of the Teacher-' College in the State University of Kentucky will be eligible lo enter the graduate department of the institution in New York and enroll as candidates for the A.M.degree wilhoul conditions, is a source of great satisfaction to all friends of the State I niversity, and is bound to prove a stimulus to more thorough preparation on the pari of high school teachers in the Com.....nwealth.
The fact shows thai whatever aspirations our educational leaders may have had in I he past lo build a first-class Slate I niver-ity in Lexington as the crown of the Stale system of education, the thoroughness with which they did the work entrusted to them has enabled the leaders of educative thoughl and administration in the leading institution in I he country to accept the records presented for their inspection, and grade the course now being offered to our students in such a manner as lo place il on a parity with thai given anvwhere in the countrv.
il. '
*   *
29
  fTfTrTTi
iiiiiiiiiixxxxxj
		
	nine"	
jeb		*! 1 iIi1
Faculty of Agricultural Department
Melville Amassa Scovell, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Dean of Agriculture, Director of Experiment Station
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois. Director of Agricultural College and Director of the Experiment Station, 1910. Member State Board of Agriculture. Fellow American Society for Advancement of Science; Member American Academy of Political and Social Science; Member Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations; Member Association of Official Agricultural Chemists; Member American Chemical Society; Member American Forestry Association; Member United States Geographical Society.
Clarence W. Mathews, B.S.
Professor of Horticulture and Botany
B.S., Cornell University; Fellow Cornell University; Professor of Horticulture and Botany, Kentucky State University, 1892.
John Julian Hooper, B.S., M.S.A.
Professor of Animal Husbandry
B.S., Texas State College; M.S.A., Iowa State College; Assistant Texas Experiment Station, 1901-0*2; Professor Animal Husbandry. Kentucky State University, 1906-T.
George Roberts, B.Ped., M.S.
Professor of Agronomy
B.Ped. 1899, M.S., L901, Kentucky State University; Principal Kentucky YVes-leyan Academy. 1899-1900; Assistant Chemist Kentucky Experiment Station, 1901-1903; Chemist Experiment Station. University of California. L90S-06; Chemist Kentucky Experiment Station. 1900-10; Professor of Agronomy, Kentucky State University, 1910.
Thompson R. Bryant, B.S.
Professor of Bacteriology.
B.S., Kentucky State University, 1908; Assistant in Animal Husbandry and Bacteriology, Kentucky Experiment Station, 1908-10; Head of Extension Division, 1910.
TtTTTt UIi
9 t
3*
 (iniimniiiii	^HUXAAIAAUUAAu&l'i
IM   "T*                        1   jK  FM ^l'	
14 A * A A 1 A A A A A A A I11" J	IIKI1III1IK XX xxxxxxxxx-xx
M.\1 I i KM
! I N E T E E I
 kent
JIIIIIIIIIIIIII
xxxxxxxxx
IIIIIIIIIIIIII
ninetee
XXX XXX XXXXXXKXXXXX
The Agricultural College
THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE may almost be said to be the most important department of the University, both as regards the University itself and the State at large. The reasons are apparent. Kentuckians are interested principally in agriculture; hence thing's pertaining to agriculture appeal to Kentuckians more than any other subject touched upon in the University. The people seeing that the University through and in all of its departments is thus studying how to benefit the State at large, are more disposed morally and financially to support their University than they would be if we were teaching classics alone, pure sciences or other subjects which, though good in themselves, benefit the majority of our people only in so far as they are made practical. To the State the benefit comes in the raising of the general intellectual status of its agricultural element and the application of science to agriculture.
The graduates of many of the departments of our University go to the great cities or to other States to find employment, but il is the constant desire of the Agricultural College to send its graduates, as well as those who have finished its short courses, back to their farms, to bear the gospel of further possibilities to their friends and neighbors, both by word and deed.
By a recent arrangement the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station and the College of Agriculture have been consolidated and put under the directorate of Dr. M. A. Scovell. One of the first accomplishments of the newly consolidated college was the annexation of the great Elmendorf Farm to the equipment of the University. This is probably the finest stock farm in the world, and on it are to be found the best swine, sheep, cattle, horses and poultry that money can buy; the cattle including both dairy and beef breeds. It is so arranged that the students have full access to all the benefits
of this farm, to study the live stock and methods about such an insti-lion, to learn dairying on a commercial basis and to thoroughly acquaint themselves with the best blood lines of the various classes of stock and to learn what a given animal should be. both in appearance and performance.
New courses are constantly being added to the Agricultural College which, together with the newly acquired equipment of the Elmendorf Farm and that of the Experiment Station, make il one of the most thorough agricultural colleges in the country, despite the idea that we are far behind. To be sure, the Agricultural College is not so large nor so well equipped in all branches as some of the great northern universities, but in regard to live stock and dairying il may be said to be second to none. Its graduates find ready employment if they do not desire to go back to their home farms, and applications for men are constantly being refused, because the men cannot be had.
The Agricultural College is really doing missionary work in this State, inasmuch as they have provided for an Extension Department whose function is to carry the College lo those who cannot attend, in the form of institutes, short courses held a I various points, the maintenance and assistance of agricultural departments in high schools of the State, the establishment of boys" and girls" agricultural clubs and in the teaching of doinestic science in the high schools and in institutes For farmers' wives; the latter by the regular Domestic Science Department of the University which was recently made a part of the Agricultural College, and whose work is proving very beneficial and popular in the rural cominunil ies. Il is the constanl aim of the Agricultural College to be the first servant of the people of Kentucky.
x mx xmmmmmm x x xxx mm x x m mm m x m mm m m x m x m k m m m x m m m m m x m m m m m ]
mm~mmmmxxxmmmmmxxmmmm:
 m  a g
33
  rxxxx x in
____j_
III^XIIJIIIIIIIIXIIIII
XXX^XXXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX X
	XXIIXXI		
N 1 N E T E E ^     EI l_ El V E. N			
	IIlllIIIIKr		:_______________________               :_: .. -
The Experiment Station Staff
Melville Amasa Scovell, Ph. D.
Director of the Experiment Station
Alfred Meredith Peter, M.S.
Chief Chemist and Head of the Chemical Division
Henry Ernest Curtis, M.S.
Chief Chemist and, Head of the Fertilizer Division
Daniel J. Healy, M.D.C.M.
Professor of Bacteriology
Edwin Stanton Goode, M.S.
Head of the Division of Animal Husbandry
James Oscar LeBach, M.S.
Chief Chemist, Food Division
Harrison Garman
Head of the Division of Entomology and Botany
Lindwood Arnold Brown, PIi.C. Pharm.D.
Drug Chemist
Robert McDowell Allen. A.B.
Head of Food Division
Job Darbin Turner, B.Ped.
Head of Feed Division riiiiiiiiiiiii*ixiiii
l*-jll
.AjUUULL
im tuck
inj
N i N ETE en    e i el \/ e n unuiiiiiiniUM aaaaaaiai *IUUUU
Civil Engineering Building
[iiinm m i
TTTT
 HniiMiiiiniiiraiCTmnuMmiiiiiiinimiiimi
36
 tmixYxx iiiiiiiiii
t JLJ
A INI
[xiiiixiiiiiiiiiiiii
ixiixiiiiiixiiiixxixxxixii
m
nineteen    e le v
N_
_____J
College of Civil Engineering
Dean Rowe
Walter Ellsworth Rowe, B.S., C.E.
Dean of the College of Civil Engineering. Tau Beta Pi.
B.S. and C.E., State University of Nebraska; University of Chicago, IK!)!)-1900; University of Oregon, 1903. Irrigation Engineer, Wyoming and Montana, 1898-1901; Railroad Engineer, South Dakota and Montana; Mining Engineer, South Dakota: Bridge Engineer, American Bridge Company; Resident Engineer, Illinois Bridge Company; Professor of Mathematics, University of New Mexico, 1901-04; Professor of Civil Engineering. Oklahoma Agricultural College. 1904-06;   Dean of Civil Engineering, State University of Kentucky, I90(i.
William Joseph Carrel, B.S., C.E.
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering.
B.S., Michigan State College: C.E.. Kentucky State University; Structural Draftsman for Kales Iron Works, Detroit; Instructor in Mathematics and Civil Engineering, Michigan State College, 1903-04; Engineer [or the Champion Iron Company, Canton, Ohio; Engineer for the Kalm Re-Inforced Concrete Company, Chicago; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. State University of Kentucky, 1900.
Robert Craig Terrell, B.C.E., C.E.
Assistant Professor of Rural and Highway Engineering.
B.C.E. and C.E., State University of Kentucky; Chief Engineer for Kentucky River Coal and Coke Company, 1906-07; Assistant Engineer for Arkansas, Louisiana and Cull' Railroad, 1907-08; Assistant Professor of Rural and Highway Engineering, State University of Kentucky, 1908.
xx. x x x
X X X X X X' X X X
as
iiiiiMimiii
xxxxxxxxxxxxxmx xrx xxx:
 MIIIIXIXIIMK MMM IIIII1IIII1IH
I4JU.4JULUU
urn ix ii 11111
isi i in!
Observatory

XYXmxrxXK
ikiitiiixiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiii
38
(iiiibii)
 iiniiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
LJ
INI
[iiimiimiiiiimiiniiiiiiiiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiin
isj i rsi
im   e: l_
y mi
iiiixiiiiikiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiniimiiii
The College of Civil Engineering
Physics Laboratory
The College of Civil Engineering offers a very broad course in topographical Railway, Hydraulic, Highway, Structural, and Sanitary Engineering. It is the aim of the Department lo give a broad general training which may serve as a foundation for future development of any of the special branches of the science generally grouped under the term Civil Engineering. Hence, the course is so arranged that a thorough training in those fundamental sciences and principles upon which the art of Civil Engineering rests is provided; and. as far as possible, instruction is given in those special subjects underlying the several branches of the profession.
The College now enjoys the use of the best drafting rooms in
t M.JTM.M KM
mm M X K m MM MMMMX
1____
I he South, and I he equipment is second to none. Ample facilities are provided for emphasizing the importance of theoretical knowledge by its app