xt78pk06zp9k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78pk06zp9k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky 1961 athletic publications  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Football Media Guides University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1961 image University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1961 1961 2015 true xt78pk06zp9k section xt78pk06zp9k     TY O
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 'I961 KENTUCKY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE  
Date Opponent Site Starting Time K
Sept. 23 Miami (Florida) at Lexington ,,,........,.....,4.........,. 8:00 p.m. EST
Sept. 30 ‘*‘Mississippi at Lexington ..,.t.t..,....,.._..,.,..,........... 8:00 p.m.EST
Oct. 7 *Auburn at Auburn ..,....,...,.........4.,,... .. ........,....,. 2:00 p.m. CST
Oct. 14 Kansas State at Lexington . ..,..,.4..,. . ...,...,,,.t,.4..... 8:00 p.m. EST
_ Oct. 21 *Louisiana State at Baton Rouge .. ,...............,.... 8Z00l).l1].CSrI` lv
Oct. 28 *Georgia at Athens . ,:......,....,.4..:....,,.     ..,.,....,, 2:00 p.n1. EST . {
Nov. 4 Florida State at Lexington ., ...........,......... . ..:,   2:00 p.m. EST 1
Nov. 11 *Vant1erbi1t at Nashville .... . .,...... . ...,...., . .... . ....... 2:00 p.ni. CST 1
Nov. 18 Xavier at Lexington .,.....,.., . ....:.....,..,.,.:..:. . ...,.._.. 2:00 p.m. EST
Nov. 25 .‘*’Tennessee at Lexington (Homecoming) :.... . ..., 2:00 p.m. EST
1960 SEASON RESULTS
All Games: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 'I — .500
SEC Only: Won 2, Lost 4, Tied 1 — .357 .
Date Opponent Site UK Opp. Crowd
Sept. 17 *Georgia Tech . .... . ........ (.»\—D) 13 23 ·10,5S)·1-
Sept.21 *"X[ississippi . .... . ..... .. .. (N1-N) 6 21 30,170
Oct. 1 *.»\uhurn .. . . .. .... . .... .. (H-N) 7 10 33,000 Y
Oct. S Marshall ..... .. ............,...   55 0 20.000
Oct. 15 *‘L.S.U.   ..   ., . .....   (H-N) 3 0 28,000
Oct. 22 *Georgia     .....     ..... (1-1-N) 13 17 31,000
Ott. 20 1·`1orida State , . . 2   . .... (.·\—D) 23 0 10,200 Q
Nov. 5 :!:\iZ1I1(lC1`1)1l[ ,       (HC-D) 27 0 28,000 I
Nov. 12 Xavier ......... . .,.. . .,..,..,..., .. (1-1-D) 49 0 20,000 {
Nov. 10 *Tennessee .,.,..,   .........,.... (A-D) 10 10 39.800 _ Q
EKG 81 289,772 1
  Soutlieastern Conference Game Home Attendance: 160,000 (Est.) _  
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UNIVERSITY OF I
1954, he fulfilled a life—long ambition and climaxed a unique rise in the A "
coaching game. He became a college coach for the first time after nearly    
a quarter-century in the profession of tutoring football. ` fg
Born in Millersburg, Ky., July 2, 1906, and brought up in Paris, V  
Ky., only 17 miles from the University campus, Collier began his ath- V? `_,/
letic career at Paris High School by playing both football and basket- `  
ball. Later at Georgetown College, he lettered in both sports. Although ·,* ,  
not an outstanding gridder because of his lack of size (he weighed only    
125 pounds then), he nevertheless was regarded as a close student of the `  
game and, upon graduation in 1927, was named coach of all sports at  
Paris High. (  
He held this position until he entered the Navy in 1943. During ,  
16 years in the schoolboy coaching ranks, his teams won or shared two  
Central Kentucky Conference football titles and six basketball cham·  
1  
8    
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 l
pionships. His last high school grid team (1943) ranked as unofficial i
state champions. Also during this period he took postgraduate work {
at the University of Kentucky and received a master’s degree in educa- "
tional administration in 1942.
It was while he was stationed at the Great Lakes Naval Training
Station during his Navy tour that Collier and Paul Brown discovered
each other. Brown, a lieutenant and head coach of the Great Lakes
football team, became impressed with Yoeman Collier’s football knowl-
edge and added him to the staff as an assistant coach. The following l
year (1946) when the Cleveland Browns were organized with Brown ll
as head coach, Collier made the unique jump from high school ranks  
(via service ball) to the pros by going along as backfield coach.  
During eight seasons with the perennial world champion Browns, Y
Collier made a reputation that stamped him as a great teacher of foot-  
ball—determined but quietly patient.  
l
Enters College Ranks In 1954 As UK Coach E,
liVhen the Kentucky job became available in 1954 with the transfer
of Paul Bryant to Texas A Sc M, Collier was lured into collegiate ranks
for the first time in nearly a quarter-century of coaching experience.
Given a three-year contract, Collier launched an immediate attack
t based on his version of the Split T offense and spiced with a generous
helping of gridiron fundamentals and stress on perfection in play
execution,
The results came almost immediately as the ¥Vildcats forged a vic- ·
tory string of live straight from mid-season, capped with a win over  
. arch-rival Tennessee The Kentuckians were in bowl contention all the I
way as they wound up with a 7-3 record for the 1954 campaign. E
Coach Collier was rewarded by grateful school officials with a new
five-year contract and fellow mentors of the Southeastern Conference
voted him "SEC Coach of the Year." In gaining this honor in his "fresh- i
1nan" season at UK, an achievement made all the more noteworthy
since it was the first time the title had been bestowed on a coach  
V in his initial year of college tutoring, Collier climaxed a unique rise in Q1
the game.  
The 1955 campaign was virtually a repetition of the previous year. f
In carving out a 6-3-1 mark, Collier could point with pride to the fact i
that his men registered a win over Ole Miss, the only setback suffered  
, by the eventual SEC and Cotton Bowl champs, and a second straight ,
f triumph over powerful Tennessee that eliminated the Vols from bowl  
` contention and again boosted the \iVildcats’ stock for a post-season date.  
10 ` l
1 l

 1
l In 1956, Kentucky slipped to sixth place on a record of six
( wins and four defeats and in 1957 hit rock bottom in the conference
” standings as the result of only three victories in 10 starts against some
of the South’s toughest grid powers. But there was some solace to be
gained in the knowledge that impartial observers classed the ’56 record
as remarkable in view of personnel problems and praised the 1957 out-
fit, which wound up in a blaze of glory by upsetting Tennessee for the
third time in four years, as "probably the nation’s best non-winning
. team." Another point of pride in the luckless ’57 record was the Wild-
lj cats’ near upset of eventual national champion Auburn, who needed a
( key penalty and questionable help at the goal line to eke out a 6-0 win
( on their home ground.
‘, The next two seasons saw the Xvildcats plagued by injuries and ill
  luck against many of the top teams of the country while playing a cali-
j hre of ball that should have had them winning consistently. The ’58
( record of five wins and a tie in 10 starts was remarkable to observers in
  view of injuries and a "ki1ler" schedule while the ’59 club, which posted
(l only a 4-6 record, was a gritliron enigma. UK played to the limit of its
ability, throwing serious scares into three of the nation’s top five teams
(Mississippi, LSU and Georgia won by an average margin of 10 points).
Last year’s KN/ildcat crew, again beset by injuries to key personnel
and unfavorable schedule, probably was one of the best in the confer-
ence despite a final, 5-4-1 record. After dropping close decisions at the
start to the "Big Three" (Ga. Tech, Ole Miss and Auburn), Kentucky
rolled the rest of the way with only a four-point loss to Georgia and a
{ tie with Tennessee marring an otherwise perfect record. Enroute, the
  \=Vi1dcats registered five shutouts to become the nation’s sixth best de-
  fensive unit and also ranked fourth nationally in both pass offense and
‘ defense.
Coincidental with his success on the football field, Collier has
gained increasingly wide popularity and respect throughout the state
; and nation. Relations with Kentucky high school coaches are at an all-
~ time high and the \Vildcat mentor is constantly in demand as an au-
  thoritative lecturer at coaching clinics all over the country. In the sum-
@1 mer of 1957, he went overseas for the Army and Air Force to conduct
if clinics for armed services personnel in japan and Hawaii. He also
l served as head coach of the Grays in the 1958 Blue-Gray Game and pre-
i viously assisted on the East coaching staff two straight years (1956-57)
{ for the annual Shrine East-¥Vest Game at San Francisco as well as the
  1955 Christian Bowl game.
Q Collier married Miss Mary Forman Varden of Paris in 1931 and
Y they have three daughters—Carolyn, Kay and jane.
j 11

 KENTUCKY COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS
Record i
Years At UK Coach-—·-School Tenure Won Lost Tied Pct.
1881 Unknown .................................... 1 1 2 0 .333
1882-1890 No Competition
1891 Unknown ........................i........... 1 1 1 0 .500
1892 Prof. A. M. Miller (Princeton)., 1 2 4 1 .357
1893 john A. Thompson (Purdue) .. 1 5 2 1 .687
1894 \V. P. Finney (Purdue) ........,. 1 5 2 0 .714
1895 Charles Mason (Cornell) .......... 1 4 5 0 .444  
1896 Dudley Short (Cornell) ............ 1 3 6 0 .333 ,
1897 Lyman B. Eaton (Cincinnati)., 1 3 5 0 .375 -7
1898-99 W. R. Bass (Cincinnati) .......... 2 12 2 2 .813 1
1900-01 NV. H. Kiler (Illinois) .............. 2 6 12 1 .342 1
1902 E. N. McLeod (Michigan) ...... 1 3 5 1 .389
1903 C. A. VVright (Columbia) ........ 1 6 1 0 .857
1904-05 F. E. Schact (Minnesota) ........ 2 15 4 1 .775
1906-08 I. VVhite Cuyn (Kentucky) ...... 3 17 7 1 .687 1
1909-10, ’l2 E. R. Sweetland (Cornell) ...... 3   5 () .821 _
1911 P. P. Douglas (Michigan) ........ 1 7 :3 0 .700
1913, ’l5-16 ]. ]. Tigert (Vanderbilt) .......... 3 16 4 3 .760
1914 Alpha Brtunage (Kansas) ........ 1 5 3 0 .625
1917 S. A. Boles (Vanderbilt) .......... 1 3 5 1 .389 1
1918-19 Andy Gill (Indiana) ................ 2 5 5 1 .500 `
1920-22 VV. ]. ]uneau (Wisconsin) ...... 3 13 1() 2 .560
1923 ]. ]. \¢Vinn (Princeton) ............ 1 4 3 2 .556
1924-26 Fred ]. Murphy (Yale) ............ 3 12 14 1 .463
1927-33 Harry Gammage (Illinois) ...... 7 32 25 5 .556
1934-37 C. A. Wynne (Notre Dame) .... 4 20 19 0 .513
1938-42, '44 A. D. Kirwan (Kentucky) ........ 6 24 28 4 .464
1943 No Team—War Year
1945 Bernie Shively (Illinois) .......... 1 2 8 0 .200 ,
1946-53 Paul Bryant (Alabama) ............ 8 60 23 5 .710
1954- Blanton Collier (Georgetown). 7 :36 31 3 .535
29 Coaches in 70 Years—Record for 623 Games .... 345 244 35 .581 ;
1
GALS' COACH FIRST UK MENTOR 1
Prof. A. M. Miller, who became l{entucky`s first football coach in 1
1892, was chosen because he had learned about the game from sideline yi
observations while a student at Princeton. His only previous coaching 1
experience was at a girls’ school in Pennsylvania. Q
12 i

 THE COACHING STAFF
1   ERMAL ALLEN
gt   =·—   ...,_   . (Kentucky '42)
f   Defensive Coach
> `$“         One of Kentucky’s most famous athlete graduates,
—•   g    Allen, at 40 has had a full career as a collegiate
  star, pro-football player amd successful college grid
.»   *% coach. He starred at quarterback for the Wildcat
i a_   Y  forces from 1939 to 1941 and entered military serv-
'   V if i ice following graduation. Retuming as a graduate
· “" student after his discharge, Allen played two games
of the 1946 season before a rules interpretation made him ineligible.
Allen joined the UK coaching staff of Paul Bryant for the remainder of that
season, spent the ’47 campaign as a T—quarterbacl< with the professional
Cleveland Browns, whose backfield coach at this time was Blanton Collier,
and then re-joined the VVildcat staff in 1948. He became Kentucky’s head
' freshman mentor in 1950 and was promoted at season's end to backfield
coach. Allen was retained in this capacity when Collier became head man
of the \Vildcats and now is chief aide in charge of defense. In the off season,
he plays a lot of golf and copped the state amateur championship in 1955
' and 1958. The mentally-sharp Allen holds a master’s degree. A son, Ronnie,
will start grid play at Georgia Tech this season. Home town: Morristown,
Tenn.
  ’·v- JOHN NORTH
.   C . (Vanderbilt '48)
Q gw n V Offensive Coach
Vw     A former star flankman at Vanderbilt, john North
` **"'   joined the Kentucky coaching staff in the spring of
a     1956 as Freshman Coach after a full career as col-
1 A  »,_     r legian, pro player, high school and college coach.
f _   The 39-year-old Tennessean played at Vanderbilt
 ,,,,._, , i .-s; -”_      ``i' in 1941 and 1942. During \Vorld VVar II, he served
      &— ` three years in the Marines. Despite shot·up legs
E from South Pacific battles, he earned second string All-SEC honors at Vandy
l in 1946-47 and played end two years for the Baltimore Colts. He started his
‘ coaching career in Tallahassee, Ala., in 1951 and three seasons later became
line coach at Tennessee Tech, a job he held until his transfer to Kentucky.
{, After guiding the Kentucky freshmen to two straight undefeated seasons,
V ]ohn Moved up to varsity end coach and in 1959 changed duties to take
, over general offensive operations. North holds a master’s degree from Pea-
` body College in Nashville. He is married. Home town: Old Hickory, Tenn.
.` 13

  -   ‘·i`    ED RUTLEDGE
‘     (Western Ky. '4'I) j
  www   Offensive Backfield Coach and Scout ‘
· ' I   ft   A former FBI Illtlll and highly successful high
A ` ~ V9;" . school football coach, Ed Rutledge is starting his
·   `  laii O if `”`i`   sixth season on the Collier staff and again will
,   handle a major share of scouting duties in addition
{   to tutoring the backfield offensive operations. Rut-
, L fg ledge played end at VVestern Kentucky State Col-  
lege, graduating in 1941. He spent the next 6% Q
= years as a Navy pilot and starred on the service champion Pensacola NAS i
grid squad. The 42-year-old Ohio native coached short stints as an assistant f
at Bowling Green (Ky.) High, Ironton (Ohio) High and had experience as
athletic officer of the Naval Air Technical Training Center in Memphis prior
to becoming head coach at Danville (Ky.) High. He also served seven
months in 1948 as a special agent of the FBI. His second Danville team ~
captured the state championship on an undefeated season. Ed joined the I
. Kentucky staff in 1956 as freshman line coach and two seasons later became ·
head freshman coach. After two years and a 4-1-1 record, he moved up to
_ the varsity and his present duties. He holds a master’s degree and is married V
with one son. Home town: Ironton, Ohio.
_ ...    BILL ARNSPARGER
     ‘ (Miami (O.) 'SO) _
    Defensive Line Coach `
A "”°     One of Coach Collier's former grid pupils at Paris
W , fi, _;     ifl (Ky.) High School and a native Kentuckian, Ams-
    parger joined the UK staff in 1954 as an assistant
  in charge of offensive line play. The 32-year-old
    former Marine brought to the staff an excellent back- `
  Q ,;_ _. ground of coaching experience which began at ,
 U Miami (Ohio) U. following his graduation from
that school in ’50. In 1951, he moved with boss Woody Hayes to Ohio State ;
where he was tackle coach in charge of offensive line play for three seasons.
Arnsparger played at tackle and guard on Collier’s teams at Paris High from ·
1941-43 and entered UK as a freshman in ’44. His tour of duty in the
Marines began shortly thereafter and he transferred to Miami U. after his _
discharge to play under Sid Gillman and later Hayes. After seven seasons
tutoring the offensive line, Bill this spring shifted duties to the defensive line. 5
Like his current boss, Bill has his master’s degree and is married. Home Q
town: Paris, Ky. ,~
14  

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