xt79057csc9c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79057csc9c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19430326  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 26, 1943 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 26, 1943 1943 2013 true xt79057csc9c section xt79057csc9c The Kentucky Kernel

ON PAGE TW- OThe Student War Fund
Finallv Comes To Life
VOl.LML XXXIII

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Classes Dismissed
Tuesday, March 30
Dr. Charles Russell, Curator of
Conservation and Chairman of the
Department of Education at the
American Museum of Natural History, will speak at the first spring
convocation at 10 a. m Tuesday,
March 30, in Memorial Hall. All
third hour classes will be dismissed.
Dr. Russell is in charge of the
most extensive department of education in any museum in the world.
He is responsible for the teaching
etaff of the museum, for a technical
staff that plans, manufactures and
distributes photographs, sound and
ilent motion pictures, slides, dioramas, cased collections and specimens, all to the number of more
than a million shipments annually,
snd for all of the public relations
s,
cf the museum such as radio
guiding, information, lectures, press relations and many
others. Dr. Russell, who also acts
as Executive Curator of Forestry
and Conservation at the museum,
has very little spare time; however,
Li the course of a year he and his
taff deal directly with enough children to make a connected human
chain reaching across the entire
state of Kansas.
Interested In Scauts
Although Dr. Russell cons.dn
his work at the musuem his major
hobby, he is also greatly interested
In the Boy Scouts of America and
has served in almost every capacity
except as a Boy Scout. He is a
twenty-fiv- e
year veteran, having
organized one of the first rural
troops in America.
For thirteen years before joining
the museum staff in 1938. Dr. Russell was president of the State
Teachers college in Westfield, Mass.
He has also taught and directed at
many other colleges and universities and is author of several books
cn education. In 1930, Dr. Russell
was a member of the White House
Conference on Child Health and
Protection.
Bm In New Vrk
Dr. Russell, a native New Yorker,
is primarily interested in problems
of social and economic adjustment
through education.
The next convocation is scheduled for the fourth hour Wednesday, April 21. when Virginius Dab-needitor of the Richmond
writer
and
on problems of the South, will
speak.
Dean Leo M. Cliamberlain an
nounced that it is possible that one
additional convocation will be ar
ranged .and, if so, it will be sched
uled for the third hour.
As the ROTC parades, usually
held near the close of the school
year, are not being planned for
quarter, interruptions of
classes other than those mentioned
are unlikely. However, in these un
certain times it is not possible to
give absolute assurance of this.

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Dr. Charles Russell

...

will speak ul t otti vt utiun at
JO am.. Tue.sdav. in Memorial
hall.

...

YMCA ELECTION

TO BE BY MAIL
Ballots Sent Out
To All Members
Ballots for the election of officers
have been mailed to all members
of the YMCA. Bait N. Peak, secre
tary, has announced.
Members should check the names
of the candidates according to di
rections on the ballots and return
them by noon Saturday. They may
be addressed to the YMCA and
dropped in the University post office
or they may be left at the YM
office Ui the Union building.
Tw Run
President
Brice Kennelly, arts and sciences
sophomore from Covington, and
Norman Chrisman, engineering
sophomore from Pikeville. are the
candidates for president. The one
receiving the largest number of
votes will be declared prfsirient arid
the other will be
Jim Hurt. Hardburly, and Joe
Ford, Owensboro, are candidates for
treasurer. Due to a misprint on the
ballots, these are listed as
candidates. Peak explained.
Candidates for secretary are William Embry. Lexington, and Russell
Conrad, Burlington.
Four I For Bvard
Candidates for student members
of the advisory board are Duane
N. Y.
Van Horn. Binghamton,
Kenneth Bruckart, Washington, D
C; Ralph McCracken, Lexington;
and Logan Savage.
Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain, dean
and registrar, and Prof. Edward
Newbury, psychology department,
are candidates for the faculty member of the board.
Paul Nickell and Guy Weeks, the
new YMCA secretary for the
organization, are candidates
for the businessman member of the
board.

Fr

...

club members will be entertained with a puppet sliow by Peggy Hartman and Carl Rulcliff at
its regular meeting at noon today
in the Football room of the Union
building.
IM KRFAITH . . .
council will hear a discussion
..
o:i ' Judaism and Christianity" by
Rabbi Julian F. Fleg at 4 p.m. Mon
day in room 204 of the Union build- iiig. Churches of Lexington have
been invited to send representa- to all meetings of the council.
FRLSHMAN . . .
a movie,
. . . club of the Y will
Men of Science," at 1U. regular
meeting at 7 p.m.. Tuesday in the
lounge. Union building.

...

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...

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SOCIAL WORKERS
Subjects Open
In Psychiatry,
Group Work
Two new courses. Principles in
Group Work and Psychiatric Information, are being offered for the
first time this quarter, according to
Dr. Vivien M. Palmer, head of the
social work department.
The first course, to be taught
Florence R. Miller, has been
planned especially for club leaders,
responsible
teachers
for group
projects, and volunteers assisting
in recreation work for young defense workers. The course, open to

both graduate and undergraduate
students, may be taken for either
three or four credits.
Psychiatric Information is open
to graduate students and is plan
ned for social workers and persons
interested) in behavior problems.
The teacher will be Dr. Orcena
Knepper, psychiatrist at Eastern
State hospital. It is a two credit
course.

66 Senior

Students

To Receive Orders

For Active Duty

29 Ordered

To Active Duty
On April 5
The first group of Enlisted Reserves at the University was called
to active duty when 29 men students received instructions from the
War Department to report on April
5. Part of the men will report to
Fort Thomas and others will go to
Louisville.
While orders to single students
have been arriving throughout the
past two weeks, this was the first
group to be called.
The men who received the orders
were James M. Buell, Cumberland,
arts and sciences senior; Harold J.
Evans. Woodburn. agriculture senior; Jack Godhelff. Lexington, arts
and sciences senior; Waller Leet,
Jr., Lexington, commerce junior;
William W. Kruse Jr.. Newport, engineering freshman: Kenneth E.
Lanter. Dry Ridge, arts and sciences
freshman: William H. Fulton Jr..
Frankfort, first year law student;
William F. Kelly. Lexington, arts
and sciences freshman; Wallace
Lake. Sand Gap. agriculture sophomore; Orvet H. Cockrel. Caneyvtlle,
agriculture junior; Charles E. Hayes,
Campbellsville,
senior;
education
Roy M. Kirchhoff, Bellevue, arts
and sciences sophomore: Raymond
A. Brockman, Knifiey. agriculture
junior; Walter F. Martin. Dry
Ridge, arts and sciences freshman;
Maurice D. Leach Jr.. Lexington,
commerce sophomore; Henry Hart
Hagan Jr., Bardstown, commerce
sophomore; Leon G. Llttrell. Winchester, arts and sciences sophomore; Lewis G. Bondurant, Brandenburg, arts and sciences junior;
John E. Maloney. Lexington, arts
and sciences sophomore; Lloyd D.
Lowry. Carlisle, commerce fresh
man; Gerald V. Dobsan. Munford-villengineering freshman; Joseph
H. Butler, Milton, agriculture fresh
man; Charles G. Cook. Waddy. en- gineering freshman; Louis O. Cash.
Louisville, engineering graduate stu- dent; Garry G. Buttermann. Louis- ville. commerce freshman; DeWitt
Burke. Lebanon, commerce fresh-- I
man; John C. Fears. Louisville,
arts and sciences freshman; and
Thomas H. Maxedon, Lexington,
commerce freshman.
e.

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WAAC Officers
Here On April 1
To Advise Women

Unt-Maj- or

To Weekly Issue

for processing.
They then will be returned to the
University to remain until their
graduation early in June. These
advanced course men will be quartered and fed with the Army Specialized Training group, and will be
subject to the same rules and regulations in disciplinary matters.
The men will be quartered in one
of the men's residence halls on the
campus, and will be fed in the Stu- dent Union cafeteria along with
the Army Specialists group.

At the recommendation of the
Board of Student Publications,
ine jvernei wiu ue tmuuaueu ao
a weekly newspaper and will be
distributed each Friday during
the spring quarter,
Shortages of staff members,
composing room workers, and
newsprint, as well as the de- creased University enrollment.
have necessitated this change.

i

Psychology Head,
Staff Member
For 22 Years

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Rehm, Rowland

j

Two entire casts playing alternate
, llfhts ,m c used for Ule forth- colmng production of "My Sister
Eileen" which will open at Guignol
theater, April 12, Frank Fowler,
rector, announced yesterday.
Barbara Rehm and Fiances Row-land aj. and sciences seniors from
Lexington, will play the title role
of Eileen.
This is Barbara's second appearance in the leading role of a Guignol play this year. As Claudia, in
the production of the same name,
she captivated Guignol audiences.
She also appeared in "Old Acquaintance," which was presented
at Guignol last year.
Acting is not the only accom
plishment that Barbara has to her
credit. Durbig her four years at
lne University she has been presi- dent of Alpha Gamma Delta, band
sponsor for two years, Sweetheart
of Sigma Chi, twice attendant to
the beauty queen, and a member of
Mortar Board, senior women's hon
orary.
Frances transferred to the Uni- vr,H.v 1?T vMr from tVm TTnivmct

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-

Barbara Rehm
will have the title rule of
Eileen in the fort tii inning
uf "M Sitter Eileen,"
which will vjjen at (iuignul
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theater

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12.

sity of Louisville where she was
member of Pi Beta Phi, national
sim1mI .sororitv
Shu Us winuv'rMrl

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PHYSICAL EXAM
16 University Men
Affected By Order
Of Naval Bureau

"

The sixteen men who were members of the Enlisted Reserve Corps
at the University last quarter and
who signified their desire to enter
the navy rather thah the armv
must report at 9 a.m. March 30 to
the Office of Naval Personnel in
Cincinnati, for their physical examination, it was announced recently
by the Bureau of Navy Personnel.
Each man must take with him his
birth certificate, three letter of
as to character
recommendation
resume of
and fitness, a
his life history in his own handwriting, and two photographs.
square, showing full face
view and side view. If the applicant Is under the age of eighteen
he must bring a written consent by
his parents.
If the applicant successful!:.
for
passes all the requirements
naval enusimeni. ioionei d. r.
Brewer, who Is in charge of the
University's ERC, will give him the
army's discharge papers dated the
into the
day before acceptance
navy. This will be the last opportunity for these men to enter the
navy rather than the army.
Any of this group who are on the
campus and- want transportation t
Cincinnati are asked to report t
Dr. W. S. Webb, head of the physics
department, who will obtain government transportation for them.

f

B. Miner . .

of the (nMhulugx
department, died Wednesday.
Funeral seiue uill be held
today.
.

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head

rd

KERNEL ADDS
TO NEW STAFF

j

been named advertising manager of
The Kernel and Bettye McClana-haDallas. Texas, has been appointed society editor. They succeed Vincent Spagnuolo and Dawson Hawkins, respectively.
Miss Bohannon. who is a journalism junior, is a member of the
Kentuckian staff and a pledge of
Theta Sigma Phi. national journalism fraternity. She is also vice- president of Chi Omega social so- rority. She is a member of the 240
Committee and Cwens. sophomore
leadership fraternity.
Miss McClanahan.
a journal! m
sophomore, has served for the past
two quarters as assistant society
editor and was a Kernel rtDorter
sh- - v. i vWonian of the Year" will b th
rinrinir hor
theme of the annual Women's
rush chairman of Alpha Delta
s.
30 Pm
held
sororitv. and a member of t'ue' K
ln tne BllSrass
Alma Magna Mater, and da- - APril
Panhellenic council. She is a newlv of tne Cnlon building
Entertainment for the evening
elected ROTC sponsor.
Claudine Gibson. frehman from wiU foIlow ,nis general theme, and
will take the form of a series i t
Tsliinri
rvi
St. Simon
chosen circulation' manager to sue-- 1 skits depicting women of the year
."
T.nr1uskA Almeria I Mrnt.ni7iif
Tinr .ceed. Mllmore Bowen. She is a both modern and ancient.
"., was a memoer
ne
oi me rresoy-teria- n member of Kappa Delta .ccial soTickets will be one dollar each
church, American Psychologand will go on sale early next week
rority.
ical association. Southern Society of
in the office of the dean of women
Philosophy and Psychological Corand at the Union information
poration, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta KapTickets will also be distributed m
pa, Phi Delta Kappa, Delta Sigma
the various sorority houses. Th
Rho, and Alpha Delta Sigma.
affair will be formal and open In
Funeral services will be held at
Women who can p;ay musical in- all University women and
3:30 p.m. today at the W. R.
struments are needed by the Uni- mothers.
mortuary chapel, with Dr. versity band immediately.
Those
Mortar Bvard Taps
Jesse Herrmann, pastor of the Sec- who would like to become band
Mortar Board, senior women 3
ond Presbyterian church, officiatmembers should report to the office honorary, "'ill tap pledges, aning. Burial will be in Berlin, Wis.
of Director Charles Magurean or nounce the students whose name
should report for practice at 3 p.m. will be placed on their plaque, ard
Monday or Wednesday, in the Music present an award to the freshman
center.
soman ith the highest standing.
This is the first time that women
Cwens. sophomore honorary, will
have been permitted to play with also tap pledges, and new members
the "Best Band in Dixie."
of Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman
Victory gardeners, attention!
Credit will be given to all men scholastic honorary, will be an- Here's your opportunity to learn and women in the band. Magurean uounc
to oe successiui in your down-tannounced
Theta Sigma Phi. journalism nonearth toil. A two credit course in
ary, will present a plaque to the
open to all
vegetable gardening,
1p
tr
freshman journalism woman having
students, will be offered in the ag- - .
the highest grades for the first tw;
riculture college for the first time E,IeCtS
quarters. Phi Beta Kappa will ree- . w. . ...
......
. .. .
witKj nil.
f
Albert A. Cheek. Lexington. has ognize its new members, as well a
teach this new course. Horticulture
been elected captain of Company all students with three standings,
10, which is scheduled for the 8th
3
of Pershing Rifles, honorary
las Prrsentrd
hour Tuesday and Thursday.
military organization. He succeeds
Alpha Gamma Delta wJl prcM-nA new elementary course in floriL. P. Witt. Lexington.
a cup to the outstanding freshman
culture 22, under Prof. N. R. Elliott
Other officers chosen were John woman and the Women's Athletic
will be offered the 7th hour Tues- H. Kerr. Lexington, first lieutenant: association
and Phi Beta. muic
day and Thursday to students in
any college. Students in this class Richard Stofer, Lexington, second honorary, will each recognise their
lieutenant; and Jack McNeal. Ash- most outstanding senior member
will learn to care for house plants
land, second lieutenant.
Barbara Rehm. president of r,?
and outdoor flowering plants.
Council,
Administrative
Women's
course in landscape
A
sponsors of the banquet, will act vs
gardening open to all students will
toastmistress.
winter, it was announced. Dr. C. S.
"Kentucky Architecture" will be
Waltman wiU teach a new course
in principles of spray practice. This discussed by Clay Lancaster at 3
2
course is for agriculture students P , Tuesday, in the Browsing
only. A new course. Plants and room of the University library.
A scholastic aptitude test will bs
This is the fifth in tne Invitation given Friday. April 2. at 9 a.
Planting Materials, will be taught
in. m
to Reading series of informal talks Room 102 of
by Prof. Elliott for agriculture mathe Hygiene building
on books, personalities-- , and special
120 is a prejors. Horticulture
to applicants
for enlistment in
Interests.
requisite to that class.
2
or Navy
Army Class
This discussion, like all others in
The laboratory courses in landDr. M. M. White announced yesscape gardening, Horticulture 120, the series, is open to all students.
terday, candidates selected on th
and floriculture. Horticulture 122, faculty members, and
basis of scores on these tests will
will be continued, but will be reducbe placed on active duty at coled to
courses. They will
leges on the Army and Navy lists.
still be open to juniors and seniors
Members of the Enlisted Reserve
all
only. Horticulture 1, required of
and others interested should se"
agriculture majors, will also be reDr White. Personnel Office. frr
duced to a
course
further information.
All persons interested in
working on The Kernel during
the spring quarter must attend
a special meeting at 3 p.m.,
Monday, in the Kernel newsroom,
of McVey
Commission checks for those stuJimmy
Suunders,
HopkmsvUle.
hall. This includes both old and
dents who sold orders for the 1943
has recently been elected president
new workers.
Kentuckian are now available in
of Lances, junior men's honorary
Positions are now open in rethe Kentuckian office,
J
Other officers elected were Bill
porting and other work. Apof McVey hall. Joe Bohnak.
Ballou. Maysville. vice president.
plicants must not necessarily be
business manager, has announced.
Cal Roozell. Lexington, treasurer,
journalism majors.
Students should call for tlietn im- and Roy Kirchhoff, BHIevie, sec- n,

I

'WOMAN OF YEAR'
BANQUET TITLE

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Band Needs
Women Members

their

Mil-wa- rd

Gardening Course

In Spring Quarter

Lieut. John Kenneth White, 23,
was recently killed in an airplane
crash at Laurel, Miss.
Lieutenant White had received
his wings February 16 at Marianna.
Fla., and had married Miss Hester
Louise Young, Lexington.
The lieutenant was a former Uni- versity student.

been selected but the exact parts,
outside of the leads, have not yet
been determined.
The shortage of men has defi
nitely affected the casting of "My
Sister Eileen," which calls for
twelve Portuguese sailors in one
scene. According to Fowler, there
are still three or four parts for men
which have not been filled, as well
as those for eight Portuguese sailors.
Anyone interested hi trying out
for these roles should see Frank
Fowler at the Guignol from 1 to 5
o'clock any afternoon next week.
The students who have been assigned roles In the production are:
Bette Allen. Jacquelyn Wiedeburg,
Vestina Fairfax, Dawson Hawkins,
Beatrice Moretti, Hettie Knight,
Adalin Stern, Ann Austin, Geneva
House, Sue Fan Gooding, Joanne
Thornton, Frances Street, Patrica
Ochs, Betty Harris Russell, Donald
Lail, Spencer Merwin. Bill Young,
Billy Nave, Charles Gruenberger.
John Renfro, Bob Whitley, Harold
Likens, Gene Quails, George
Caswell Lane, Doiui Hollings- nrxv
'..rth, and
Kin-nalr- d,

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r? NAVAL RESERVES

Will Be Taught

in "Ah Wilderness" and "Arsenic
and Old Lace" at Guignol, but the
role of Eileen is her first major part.
The dual casts for the play have

By Lois Ogden

f m mm

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Lieut. John White
Killed In Crash

To Play Title
Role Of Eileen

iqj.wiw.

.

Two Casts Selected I or 'Eileen'

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TO REPORT FOR

al

University on Thursday, April 1, to
advise women students who are Interested in becoming WAAC's.
A general meeting will be held at
2 p.m. in the Union building. After
the meeting, the officers will talk
to students individually.
Women can sign up now and re- main in school until the end of the
year. Miss Jane Haselden, assistant
dean of women, emphasized in an
nouncing this conference.

I

)

Dr. James Burt Miner. 69. professor and head of the psychology
department, died at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday at his home. 114 Waller
avenue, after an illness of ten
days.
Dr. Miner had been a member of
the University staff for 22 years,
having been appointed in 1921. He
was connected with a number of
leading colleges in the country before coining here. He was an instructor at the University of Illinois. University of Iowa. University
of Minnesota, and the Carnegie Institute of Technology.
Surviving are his wife, the former Jessie L. Schulten; a son. Capt.
Horace Mitchell Miner, serving with
the army in North Africa: and a
granddaughter. Janice Miner.
Authority and Author
Considered an authority on mental illness, he was the author of a
number of books and articles on
this subject. He spent three sabat-icyears in Europe where he visited nearly 100 institutions for delinquents and the feeble minded
in England. Germany, France, and
Italy.
His books include "Three Motor.
Visual and Applied Rhythms." "Deficiency and Delinquency." "Translation, Principles of Experimental
Psychology." and "International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and
Scientific Method."
He organized the first psychological clinic west of Chicago at the
University of Minnesota in 1908;
organized the Research Bureau for
Retail Training at Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1918; and
was consultant for the Salesman
ship Research Bureau and Person- i
nej Bureau
Editor
Served
.' as
.
Dr Miner
itor of tne ..journa, of Educational
edi-Psychology" and
tor of lne . psychological
Ex
change "
th- In addit,on to his duL.
n,,,vmitv h
for tne cYvil
Board of Lex
ington and was a member of the
ooard of Family Welfare society and
a former
of that
organization.
Born October 6. 1873. at Berlin.

Third Officer Marcia Randall and
another officer of the Women's
Army Auxiliary Corps will be at the

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OFFERED FOR

ff

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t

NEW COURSES

41

Dr. James Burt Miner
Succumbs Wednesday

OF ARMY CALL

Major W. Gayle Starnes, former
The 56 senior ROTC students In
assistant director of the extension
year advanced military
department, has been named chief the second
course at the University will be or- n f t Vi ti iiair,ir,(r Hii'iuiAii nf tViA T
upo" lne
ington Signal depot to succeed
Army Specializ- Lieut.-Co- l.
Paul D. Meek.
ed Training program on the
Starnes has been serving ve
campus, Col. ' B. E. Brewer,
as executive officer of the depot's
department,
nead of tne mim
training division since his return anounced
.
irom me tommana ana uenerai
j ,k, .,,,,... c
T
Staff school at Fort Leavenworth, for the special Army training at
Kan., in February.
the University will be drawn in the
Capt. Thomas M. Hahn, associate near luture
was
professor of physics on leave,
previcusly announced,
the
made officer in charge of technical xnlw student5 wiu
allowed t0
training branch.
finish their courses and receive
their degrees. However, they will
be ordered to active duty with the
Kernel Changed
rest of the Enlisted Reserve and
will be sent to a reception center

College men who will be with the
American armed forces in the Brit- ish Isles are invited to register at
the American University Union, 1
Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, Lon- don, W. C. 1.
The Union, as in the last war, is
for both officers
a meeting-plac- e
and men o: universuy connections,
and for their friends. It provides
reading and writing rooms, a
plete file of current catalogues from
and
both American
universities
British, a lending library, and de- tailed information cn educational
opportunities in Great Britain and
Ireland.
Jl'MOIt-SKNIO- It
Those who may desire to read in
fellowship of the YWCA will Record Office, or in other archieves
..
at 7 p.m.. Tuesday, in the ' tne British Museum, in tlie public
Mu-siroom of the Union building. whether in the London area or out- special musical program
may obtain from the Union
been arranged.
readers' tickets which will enable
'
PITKIN t'LL'B
them to begin reading on their day
. . . members will meet at noon 0f application.
Wednesday at the Maxwell Street) pj.
of special courses
church.
ing conducled for American troops
GOVERNMENT
STVDtNT
(Qn ieave, during the current aca-- .
will meet at 7 p.m. demjc year at 0xford Cambridge,
. . association
Tuesday ill room 204, Union builduniversities may also
d
irtg.
be seen at the Union. Men expectCHI HELTA PHI . . .
ing to be stationed near any of the
will meet at 7 pan. Wednesday
.
British provincial universities can
building.
in room 205 of the Union
likewise find at the Union such edu- INION NOTES
cational information as may meet
loday
with their individual needs.
Patterson Oratorical Contest, 3
p.m.. room 204.
Jt-ifCouncil, 4:30
House President.-pm., room 204.
Members of The Kernel business
Saturday
staff will have a compulsory meet- LVnce lor Avon trainees, 9 p.m., i ing at 3 p.m. today in McVey hall,
Bluegrass room.
Jay Wilson, business manager, mi- on Page F'jiir'
CoMtuu'-- rt
com-t.'.v-

Wednesday, March 31, is the
last day a person can enter an
organized class. A class may
ba dropped without a grade
through April 12, Dr. Chamberlain announced.

Major Starnes
To Head Training
At Signal Depot

nt

With London Union

quarter.

Soldiers who will be assigned to
the University for training in the
army's specialized training program
will be eligible to receive college
credits for scholastic work completed
while here. Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain, University dean and registrar,
has announced.
Separate files have been arranged
where the progress of each soldier- student may be kept apart from
the University regular student files
At the end of the war, the army
men who have taken courses at
the University may obtain college
credit upon application if they cer
tify they were graduates of an ac
credited high school at the time
the course was taken.
"We feel that inauguration of
this plan has many advantages,"
Dean Chamberlain said. "Many of
our students here at the University
will be called into active service
while in sight of graduation. Under
the new plan, members of this group
trained under the specialists' corps
program at a school where credit is
given may finish graduation requirements before being released
for the army.
'Students now enrolled in the
freshman, sophomore, and junior
classes if called into service and
sent to take courses under the army
program at a school where credit
is given also will have a distinct
advantage as they will feel more
inclined to finish their courses of
study after the war if they can earn
some credit while in service."

Men In Forces
Invited To Sign

.

two-thir-

FOR WORK HERE
Files Arranged
To Keep Progress
Of Each Student

NUMBER

RECEIVES WORD

More than 100 students enrolled in the University during
the second day of registration,
making the total number registered 1532 at closing time Wednesday, according to Dr. Leo M.
Chamberlain, registrar.
of these
Almost
students are women.
Wednesday . was
Enrollment
918 les than final enrollment
for the winter quarter and
1.280 under that for the fall

.'

Lex-Jngt-

Kampus
Kernels

For Spring Term
By Second Day

TO GET CREDIT
.'- -

pro-tram-

.

Kaseball, Trackmen
Called I5v Coaches

1913

FIRST ERC GROUP

1,532 Registered

ARMY TRAINEES

.

Times-Dispatc-

FRIDAY. MARCH

LEXINGTON,-KENTUCKY-

All Third Hour

Dl'Tt'H l.l'NCH

-

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Museum Curator Will Address
First Convocaion Of Term

.

ON PAGE FOUR-

o-

,

Ipr)Shin

t

R!f
imics

Lheek

C--

j

two-cre-

Lancaster To laiK

At Reading Series

Army, Navv Tests
Set For April

I

2.

town-peopl-

Kernel StalT
To Meet Monday

Kyian Checks
Are Now Ready

Jimmy Saunders

To Head Lances

;

!

i

* The Kernel Editorial Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
WEFKLY Dl'RINO THE SCHOOL YEAH
H:HI.1SHFD
PERIOPS
FXCEPT HOLIDAYS OR EXAMINATION

(

d at the Post Office at lxinptnn. Kentucky.
i.i.ti i'lks.s mutter under the Art of March 3. 1879
MEMBER
Press Assocltitmii
Kcniuckv Interrolifsiste
Board of Connnerre
Lexinirtnn

ei

l

-

Kenlurkr

Nnttonnl

a II

i

111

l

Wl

y

...

Wstkivs

...

III Rsl'OON

.V;i

Temporary "30

A

7'f)l

WISE

Miiiiiti

....

Wit son

Hushirss Matiwzrr

MMMMN1ID rM NATIONAL AOVtailSINS
f.Wiefe fmHisken krpmemlairn
.
NC
AvI
f!MICw
IM AM.lt.

tO

BETTYE McCLANAHAN
BETTY BOHANNON

Advertising Manager

RITBSCHIPTI01
RATES
$150 One Year
One Quarter

HETTY FLEISHMAN

Cartoons

M.

MAOiaOM
SOfTMl
laifftM

I

Vl

Alt ntpned article
and eoftiieni ore fo he rin xutfrrd tne
orf fJie irrifeTii
fp'H'ow
fhemere. nmf rf., w.f nrrrstti rily
f rffe opium
of The Kerne.

Society Editor

CLAt.'DINR (UBSON

Circulation

KERMEL
it
in ii1111

Goodbye To Tuesday's Kernel
in

vl;n

kernel lias gone to war.

lie I' .ti it of Publications has yielded in lite
.1
ti
i
press of wartime conditions and i
ih. il iiiilv one edition of I he student i.iki lie
published cat ll Week.
I

hoc

II had lieen the
of I lie kci ni l stall ami
lie journalism department thai i lie handw i ii ing
ml the wall could lie ignored for the rcmaindi i
of I lie year. Rin a careful c nusidti ai ion ol if
i

fails has made us realize iliai die mow
sary immediately if The kernel is lo
a sound financial basis.

is neces-

on

Along with the problems ol linante occasioned lv i lie loss in tin ulaiion and resuliani loss
in advertising revenue comes a siaie ol cmcr-gencin the print shop. The keinel prim shop

has mainla inetl a polity of employing students.
Almost all ol ihese students have already received tails 10 i he armed fortes. It has been
found imHssille to hire sufficient iinih.mii.il
winkers to replace them.
The idea of pulling out two smaller pacrs.
tabloids, eath week was given ninth thought,
bin mechanical dill it nil its vetoed the plan.
I he
kernel has lor a long lime dreamed of
the d.iv when it could take its plate in the
ranks of schools publishing a tlailv newspaper.
The fiillilliiitm of this tlream was not lar oil
when war broke out.
When i he war is over and the campus is
li.uk to normal we look forward to the return
of lucsday's kernel and I lie ossihle birth of
Monday. Wednesday, and Thursdav edn ions.

And The War Fund Comes To Life
I he I'nivcrsiiv Student War l'lind has finally
come io life. Afier a vear of I he obscurity
which onlv projects greeted with enthusiasm
l. the siutlenis anil then forgotten tan know,
the Student War Fund has i given a lilc-g- i
ing shot in the arm.
Several weeks ago an investigation was made
into the stains of the Fund. The hisioty of the
Fund from its birth in a kernel editorial lo its
lecognition hv an SGA bill establishing a committee to administrate il was traced.
I he Fund was to lie the answer to I'nixersity
siutlenis' desire 10 make an inioiiani contribution to the war effort. The money in the fund
was to lie plated in defense1 bonds and held lor
the duration. After the war. the money from
the sale of the lxinds was to lie used as an assistance hind for siutlenis wishing to reluin to
the I'nivcrsiiv for studv.
Organisations were lo give affairs "for the

War Fund."
We brought these facts lo life then and we
do so again lodav 10 remind the siutlenis that
sut Ii a thing as the Student War Fund exists.
Our last effort met with little success. We
pointed out thai the students ol the I'nUcisiiy
bat! failed again. The siutlenis agreed by their
silent c that thev had.

A

..

Fund.
In a last determined effort to make the I'ui- vctsiiv Siudeni War Fund a living project. The
kernel has taken the SI7.7I which it realized
liom the scrap drive to the Com pi roller's ol- I
ice and. on its own initiative, ocncd an at- coiiiii in the name of ihe Fund.
The necessiiv for suth a fund has Ik en
brought home to us in ihe past few weeks with
l
7
ihe departure of a great pari of the male en- tollmen! for the armed fortes. Some of these
mt n will Ik-- unable lo conlinue llieir edui at ion
alier the war unless a fullblown Student War
Fund is at hand lo help out.
Ccrtainlv we who are led IkIuiiiI could do
tins In i lo bit for those who have gone lo light
for all of us. The kernel has made the Inst
move. It is up to the students of the .t inversus
to keep the ball rolling.
-

,,,.

''UeT;r''and dtu4

It is a rare occasion In history
when a nation and especially when
the world as a whole is given a
second chance. It is a rare and re- markable privilege for a nation to
ia- able to turn back in its footsteps
:.nd correct the errors of its past.
Today that second chance
.oine for the United States.
We are living in a sick world,
Something has gone wrong
I
don't see how anyone can deny . it.
.
.
Even Del ore tnis last war started,
the cogs were slippi