xt79057csd17 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79057csd17/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590923  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1959 1959 2013 true xt79057csd17 section xt79057csd17 n

Weather Today:

Editor Applaud
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Cloudy And Mild

Convocation Plan;
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Vol. LI

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Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, SEPTEMBER 23,

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1959

No. 2

UK Board Aceepts
149,630- In Gifts

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Oifts totaling $149,630. Includ-

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Chattanoga, $500 to the
Schlnmberger Foundation, HonsResearch Foundation to be used in ton, Texas, $1,000 to the College)
support of the Honor Loan Fund of Engineering as the ' Schlom-berg- er
for engineering students; Ralston
Collegiate Award for 1939-6- 0;
Purina Company, St. Louis, $500
$19t
Paduah
for a scholarship In the College to cover fees and books for a
of Agriculture and Home 'Ecostudent for the first
nomics.
semester; International Nickel
Foundation, Chi- Company, New York City, $963 Im
cago, $3,050 for scholarships in the support of the engineering scholar- College of Agriculture and Home
Frank M. Hawley, Cincinnati,
Economics for 1959-6Inland
$20 to be used in a memorial to
Steel Company, Wheelwright,
$1,000 to the Research Foundation the late John O. Stoll, Lexington
for four scholarships for the first publisher and alumnus of the Unisemester- of the 1959-6- 0
school versity of Kentucky; Armco Foun- year.
Continued On Page 12
Raney,

ing $83,000 from W. L. and Susan
Vaughan Clayton of Houston,
Texas, were accepted by the Board
of Trustees recently.
The Clayton gift will go for the
purchase of Cave Hill property on
the Harrodsburg Road. The property is to be used for residential
purposes by the UK Medical Cen-

Dr. William R. Willard, UK
Medical Center vice president and
dean of the College of Medicine,
said no specific disposition has
been decided upon as far as the
Medical Center is concerned.
house was built in
The
1821 by David Bryan. Clayton, internationally known financier who
.was author of the Marshall Plan
and an undersecretary of state in
administrathe Rosevelt-Truma- n
tions, bought the property in 1952.
It includes the main house,' a
guest house and 13 acres of
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Timber!

Workmen art busy cutting down one of the four large tires being
removed from the parking area behind White HalL As a result of
the clearing, parking In that area will be Increased by 50 spaces.
'
.

Construction To Add
4

land.
The second largest gift accepted
was $43,000 from the Q ray son
Foundation, Lexington, for work,
by the Animal Pathology Department in equine virus abortion and
allied diseases of horses.

Other donors and gifts Include:
Magnolia Petroleum Company,
Dallas, Texas. $972 to the Kentucky Research Foundation for two
scholarships in the Department of,
ine widening 01 nugueiei unre Civil Engineering: Western Kenfrom Rose JStreet to Fraternity tucky Mining Institute. Madison-vill- e.
How is part of a future plan, but
$250 to the Research Foundala not under contract row, Farris tion for the Henry A. Petter scholW
arship in engineering; Murray

SpdjMhSpcea.
new paiun(
aw1 vAMiateij
spaces win be aded to the White
Hall parking-- , area, E. B. Farris,
head of Maintenance and Oper- '
atlonx. mid Yesterday.
- The
extract which Includes the
pian or Buckupping .tne Rose
Street let was a proved by the

Two Students File
UK Insurance Claims
Parker Sams, Arts and Sciences
student, was the second student to
file an injury claim with the company handling the new student
insurance, offered for the first
time Sept. 14.
Sams broke his right arm at a
restaurant near the campus
Thursday night, after signing for
the insurance during the same day
v
at registration.
The first notice of. a claim was
placed with the company Sept. 16
by David .Montgomery, engineering student.'
T
Montgomery, who. went to the
Central Baptist Hospital September 16 for an appendectomy,

took the plan put September 14.

Neither student knew exactly
how much his total claims agalnsl
the company would be, but Montgomery said that the hospital bill

alone amounted to $144. '
a
aa
a a.
. ta
Aoueu to A.aoa ne saia, wuji
mis,
be the doctor's bill and the cost of
.

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medicine."
C. W. Sulier. president of tha

Suller Insurance Company, local
representative for Continental In
surance Company, which. - offers
the insurance, said the company
would probably cover all of Sams"
expenses but it was . doubtful
whether all of Montgomery's room
and board would be covered.

KingLibraryExhibits Relic Books

Board cf Trustees at their recent
.ID Cards
meeting, The addition of blacktop
Late1 registrants who had their
Something to interest nearly
to' the area ; wculd allow ' about
pictures made last- - spring may everyone Is in the foyer exhibit in
a 5 per cent increase in parking spaces, by marking off the pick up ID cards in the office. bethe Margaret I. King Library
hind the ticket office In the through September.
area. Chief Eagizieer Farris said.
The White Hall lot will be used basement of the Coliseum. YelFrom the earliest of clay tablets,
one giving the Sumerlan flood
for the general faculty parking low fee slip is necessary.
that have permits for that area.
Students who have not had story, to fragments of two papyrus
Dean Let He L. Martin said. The their pictures taken should report texts, the exhibit has as Its topic.
increased' tire was approved beto the University photographer's "The Book .In the Ancient Near
cause of the overcrowded condioffice. Room 213 Journalism' East."
Lawyers and law students will
tions in that parking area.
Building, 5 CDT.
want to study the clay document
The construction of the lot
who had their pictStudents
started last week with the removal ures made during orientation and containing the law code of Lipit-Ishta- r,
a document from about
of about four " eld trees, which did not get their yellow fee slips
1870 B.C. written in the Sumerian
were needing cutting, Farris exstamped may go to the office beplained. The construction of this hind the ticket office, basement language. It predates the long-knoexpected to take from two of the Coliseum from 5 CDT.
Code of Hammurabi, now in
area
to three v.etks.
the Louvre, by more than a century; and for its interest in the
history of civilization, it is one of
the most important archaeological
finds ever uncovered. It was found
In the Temple Library of Nippur in
the late 19th Century.
Businessmen will find a familiar
plored more fully. Another ques- text In a commercial record exBy The Associated Press
Secretary. cf State Christian A. tion that must be looked into, he cavated, in the city of Karesh
Herter yesterday warned against said, is the possibility of an inter- - (modern Kul), Turkey, which was
underestimating the Importance"' qf ' national police force to preserve the seat of an Assyrian trading
Soviet Preinier Khrushchev'a total peace if the nations ever agreed colony. Its merchants exchanged
on total disarmament.
lead and woven goods from Assyria
disarmament proposal.- - ' Asked whether the United for copper from, the mines of the
a luncheon of the
Herter teld
U. Nt Correspondents Association States, agreed with British Labor Anatolian mountains.
that the Ecviet leader's plan "re- 'Party Leader Hngh GaitskeU that Thi3 record is sealed in a clay
quires the closest attention and the world should take Krushchev envelope 'and shows three seal impressions from the seals of the parstudy." While It i3 propaganda, he upon. his proposal. .Herter saJd:
set forth must be
"Take him up on the objective, ties concerned. Another record
said, the
yes. But take him up on the de- sealed in a clay tablet contains
taken beriously.
spoke tails? From what I've seen, I'd another commercial record from
The iccretary of state'
.
the Hammurabi period of Babylon
shortly after the General As- say no."
v
steering' comthe steering committee there la.
sembly's
In
For the mathematician, is a small
mittee agreed unanimously to In- was no objection io a Soviet proscribe the Khrushchev plan on the posal that the Khrushchev plan tablet Inscribed with the multlpll- -.
agenda of the assembly's current be added to the agenda. There cation table of nine, continuing up
'
was a brief clash, however, be- to 9 x 50. It too Is from Nippur,
session.
Herler faid the Idea of complete tween the Soviet Union and Brazil and it was written sometime beove to have the tween 1500 and 1000 B.C.
disarmament 1 r.ot new, nor are over a1 Soviet
as personal
very novel feat- new proposal taken up apart from
used
Two seals
there acy other
proposal And other disarmament questions.
and a means of identifying
charms
ures in the Soviet
The committee finally decided ownership are on displayOne is a
the omi?ions, he said, are imhematite seal'from Iraq from the
portant.
to. leave this problem to the
political committee where time of Hammurabi, about 1700
noted that Khrushchev sugHe
gested international controls, but the .disarmament debate will take B.C., showing a ritual scene. The
other is .a Judeite seal from Ur of
Herter declared this must be ex place.
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the Chaldees dating from about the famous skin manuscripts found
2600 B.C., showing one of the, typi- near Qumran, Israel, in the last
cal scenes of a bearded, nude hero, deeade. Accompanying the repro- wearing only a belt in a fight with' duction Is abo a copy of one' of tha
a lion rampant.
earthen jars in which the scrolls
"
y
The hero is thought by many were found.
The student of comparative relischolars to represent Gilgamesch,
the central figure of several Sum- gion will be interested in the clay
tablet giving the Sumerlan flood
erian epic poems.
These clay tablets are reproduc- story. The pharmacist will want to
study the tablet containing tha
tions Is also on display.
f ragments of papyri are orl- -. world's oldest known prescriptions.
The
glnals. One Is a literary fragment
For the librarian there is tha
of the first or second century A.D., oldest known library catalogue,
and the other is a business docu- tiny tablet from Nippur (In modem
ment, an account of expenses ad- Iraq) listing the titles of 62 Sumerian literary works. These books
dressed to Hermias.
The exhibit has an exact repro- were current In ancient Babylonia
duction of the Dead Sea Scrolls, from about 2000 B.C. to 1500 JB.C.

Red Disarmament Plan
Not To Be Taken Lightly

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Taking time out from his studies, Terry Roberts, freshman com
snerce major, views part of the foyer exhibit in the Margaret I.
King Library. TbU particular exhibit shows Busslaa propaganda
.

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* I

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday,

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.

Sqicmlcr 23,

1959

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

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ButisM 9s Associates

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about 4.000- persons. All but abou((
firmed officially.
Cuban troops beat the
Irf .Havana, there were rumors 200 have since been released.
brusii yesterday for associates of the army had ordered all troops of
There were unconfirmed reports,
40 men arrested .near the eastern Havana province Into their barhowever, of a resemblance In the)
tip of. this Island nation on a racks. It was recalled that the gov- government's counter tactics. Ruplottlng-agaln- st
charge-o- f
the gov- ernment took such a measure last mor had It that some of Castro'a
ernment.
month when a major conspiracy
soldiers taking a leaf from summade up most of the
Castro's regime was un- mer
operations
group nabbed last night in Orlente covered. '
A. Morgan of
of MaJ. William
province the cradle of Prime MinThe Baracoa case appeared no- Toledo, Ohio, one of Castro's top
ister fldel Castro's rebellion
where near as big as that conspir- aides Infiltrated the ranks' of tha
Fulgenclo Batista dic- acy,
which led to the arrest of plotters.
.
tatorship - , '
The' action centered at Baraco,
a port of 10,000 where Cuba's first
NOW! JBNPS THURS.
t y y mi""-- ' M m m mm
(SSZZ si n
founded In
f1
white settlement .was.
jt
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it is 80 miles across the
A SOUTH AMERICAN
windward passage from Illspanlola,
FUN.FCST!
whose Dominican and Haitian governments are both viewed with suspicion by Havana officialdom.
Capt. Arego Hernandez, chief of
rural police at Baracoa, said the
suspects planned to seize the town's
airport and blow up a munitions
.
GnbmaScoOC: aTCTfOWOWC..
SOUW
depot. He identified the leader as
ICOLOR by DE LUXE
h
I
a ak.
CUALIFICATlON-SHI- RT
Miguel Alba, a veteran of Batista's
WEBB
CAROL
STARRING CLIFTON
JANI WYMAN
Q-- c;
COAT -- 10defeated army.
LYNLIY
GARY CROSBY
JILL ST. JOHN
A cleanup of the ' rest of the
is bunk." ARNOLD conspirators is under way In the
Baracoa area, Hernandez said.
LIKE MAN, IT'S ALWAYS
Other quarters reported a total
how I love you!"
they were
of 50 arrests and said
continuing. This could not be con- - DRIVE-IN-TiM- E
BELTLINE!
no questions, and IH
By .The Associated Press

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UK Receives
Loan Grant

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ELECTROLUX z xz z z
"I grow old! I grow old!"
METHUSELAH .

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"Dust thou art, to dust

"This Angry Age"
Anthony Perkins-Silvan- a
Richard Conte-J- o

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An allocation of $110,251 from
the 1959-6- 0 National Defense Student Loan Program was received recently by UK.
The money will be loaned to
student teachers and majors In

STARTS 7i IS

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1ST AREA. SHOWING!

7:15

STARTS

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'AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS"
In Color

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Triple Feature!
(1)

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DEAD"

Peggie Castle 7:2S
(2) "THE MATING GAME"
Color!
Deb. ' Reynolds
(3) "NITE MY NUMBER
CAME UP"
First Run Thrills!

MAuitci CHEVALIER

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Th "CIRCLE 23" Open All Winter With
Heaters and Indoor Seatino.

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FAMILY DRIVE IN "The Bride
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"Hound Of The Baskervilles,"

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KENTUCKY "Holiday For Lov-- ers," 12;42, 2:53. 5:04, 7:15. 9:26.
LEX. DRIVE IN "Mark In Space,"

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by

and engineering first.
Repayment at 3 per cent Interest
is to be made at the rate 'of one-ten- th
each year, beginning with
the first year the student ceases
e.
to attend
Dr. Cecil C. Carpenter, dean of
the College of Commerce and
chairman of the student loan committee, said the allocation was the
largest UK has ever received.
The University will receive
$73,600 of the amount this month
with the balance of $34,593 to be
paid in January.

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"MAN IN SPACE"

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LAST TIME TONIGHT
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Eaves, Mathematics Head,
Patents Two Inventions
An amateur inventor since he
was 12 years old, James O. Eaves,
head of the Mathematics and Astronomy Qrpartment, has been
granted a patent on one of his

,

inventions.
The patent was granted on a
mechanism for timepieces aimed at helping shoppers
escape nverparking and lecturers
to avoid overtaking.
Another patent will aeon be ledial-setti-

ng

aned U Dr. Laves far a new-typ- e
buckle which he designed.

The

dial-setti-

.

mechanism may

ng

of complicated devices
"which would perhaps be classified
as Rube Goldbergs," but has
limited his patent applications to
simpler developments.
One of his first gadgets, born
of a dislike for unevenly rolled
toothpaste tubes, was a toothpaste
squeezer,' a box into which the
tube was inserted and properly
squeezed by turning a handle.
His first patent applications, on
a ruler that could be used as a
model - for drawing various geometric figures, was refused because the idea had been' patented
a quarter-centur- y
earlier but never
number

be fitted to a. conventional watch
or clock and will serve as an

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday. September 23

'Junk' Mail Aimed At Select Group

NEW YORK (AP) Ever won- der why our mailbox is generous- ly supplied with matter advertls- ing bird seed to corsets, when you- have ihownno direct interest in
tne products?
The answer is that your name
has made, a list, . perhaps dozens
nf iief.
tth inn- your.part.
"Basicallr. the 'success of inv
business mail depends on Its reach:
ing a properly selected audience,4
says the Business Mall Foundation,
You. the consumer, fit somewhere
in this "selected audience.

Borne
advertisers build up agents who make a business of
their own lists from their sales helping list owners and list users
records or from association lists find each other. Once the adver- or directories.
User has a list, he testsamples It
to make sure it includes people who
buy or rent.llstt Just
ftbout Rnyone wltn
malIing m want and need his produce.
of his own magazines, manufac- The reason lor your getting more
turers, wholesalers, retailers will
,
than one piece of mall on a certain.
if
product means, simply, that you're
the Foundation.
"Thus, If you're selling lawn- - on more than one of the advertls- mwrs,its logical you'd be most er's mailing lists. .
successful using lists from home- be- Tne Foundation saysmaking magazines, seed houses or cause businesses want onlythatplace
to
.
nurseries."
theif productg or Mrvlces before
There are even list "brokers", those who are most Interested.

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elapse time Indicator through the
use of
set of adjustable dials. marketed.
Dr. Eaves has also designed a
Any of several alarm devices may
shower-hea- d
which keeps water
be connected to the' invention,
temperature constant despite use
Eaves said.
'Depending upon the particular of hot or cold water from other
p
pen
. fountain
dials employed, the mechanism taps, a
may be used either directly Indi- which he discarded as impractical
cating tne amount of time remain- and later saw developed unsuccessing In an allotted period, such as fully by a major company, and an
tlie unexpired time on a parking alarm clock that would set itself
meter,-- or for directly indicating at night.
the amount of time already elapsed
The latter project wasn't patof a given period, such as during ented because it would have needed
the cooking of food." he added.
"about a million" patents to proThe second invention employs tect it, according to Eaves. He said
a convenient, way of covering a there are so many ways to push a
buckle securely so it will not snag button, it would have been imother object. With around 100 practical to try to cover it. The
million pairs of buckle shoes pro- same applied to a children's bike
duced eaJi year. Eaves feels there for which he drew up plans but
,
is a market for the Item.
didn't patent. The only thing
Eaves, who was recently elected which could have been patented
national president of Mu Alpha would have been the method of atTheta. honorary mathematics fra- taching the wheels, he said.
ternity, has been interested in deWith the patenting of two or his
signing improvements on things projects. Eaves isn't resting on his
since boyhood when a cousin in- laurels. He has
other
vented a nailless horseshoe.
ideas in various stages of developlie admits he has drawn up a ment. "

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.

one-pum-

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Kosher Kitchen Boss
f IsBahama Baptist
$ "IT'
'

Br THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. A
Nerb Baptisffrtom. the Bahamas
, ' makes some of the best gefllte
fish In town.'
i And if matzoh balls are your
z. dish. Adam Burnside is your man.
"irurn&loy 54,' is head chef in
E the frfelly-toshe- r
kitchen of the
r: Chelsra Hotel here.
'
For more than 33 years now,
he has been pleasing the palates
of Orthodox Jewish diners, most
of whom are unaware tliat their
approved by Rabbinical
food
authorities) Is prepared by a
church-goin- g
Baptist.
Born" in Nassau. Burnside came
to this country as a young man
.'
and began his. kosher cooking
career as head-- ; .fry cook in a
Miami Beach restaurant.
After working ia some hotels
In Miami Brach. Philadelphia and
New York, he came to this resort
In 1928 to take over as head chef
in the kosher Blltnore HoteL
After similar jobs la half a. dozen
other local kosher hotel, he moved
to the Chelsea earlier this year.
In addition to gefilte fish, (a
fish loaf) and matoa balls (a
Tm'

. l"

(

--

--

1950- -5

But Burpslde has done more
than merely master the intricacies of Jewish. cooking. He has
learned to prepare his meals in
accordance with the extremely
strict Jewish dietary laws.
Under, these la ws, some meat
(like pork) and some sea food
.(lobster, for one) .. is forbidden.
Even meat that Is permitted must
be prepared in a certain way.
Meat may not be mixed with milk
or milk products, and the pots,
pans and dishes for meat and
dairy must be kept'separate.
So well has Burnside learned
these rules and so scrupulously
does he observe them that he has
received the personal commanda-tlo- n
of Rabbi Moshe Shapiro,
president of the Atlantic County
Board of Rabbis, and Rabbi Alexander Rosenberg of New York,
chief food administrator of the
.
Orthodox union.

When tilings get too close for comfort
your best friends tvon9t tell you..
but your opponents ivill!
Old Spice Stick Deodorant brings you safe.
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Better than sprays thai drip.
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doughy

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served

in

chicken consomme), Burnside is
noted "for his borscht (beet soup),
potato latkes (potato pancakes)

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.and cheese blintzes (sweet cheese
wrapped

n pancakes).
His recipes are In constant de
mand and he Jias given some of
them to rabbis. ' -

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;To Be Offered
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A beginning

anese language

course in the Japwill be offered this

iyear by the University's Depart-Jmeef Modera Foreign Lan-

nt

guages.
.Dr. A, E. .Blgge, department
head,- said the course will be
taught by William J- - CJiarablish;
formerly of the University of
Michigan. Chahblbs Is a Far
Eastern specialist in the Universof Diity's new Patterson-Schoo- l
plomacy and International Commerce.

:

-

III

The course,1 "Elementary Japanese 4la." will be tauzht Mondays through Fridays at 3 p.m.
(CDT)-i- a
Room 312. Miller Hall.
It will carry four hours of University credit.

"McVEY

l

hall

* 'A

Need For Communication

Communications, as it is with any
complex society or organization, has
always been one of the most frustrating, problems in a large university,
Many students in such an institu-tio- n
as UK always have the recurrent
gripe that, Tm just a number at, the
University, not an individual." Such
a complaint, of course, is naturally
.justified, because most UK students
are not even adequately informed
over the problems of the University
and their implications. They are
designated as numbers by an IBM
machine. Their teachers do not know
them, and most certainly, the administration does not
Many large universities, simply
ignore this indictment,, because they
feel that students Can overlook and
accept their position as nobodies In a
mass educational atmosphere. This
is one of- the major dilemmas facing
education today. -

of convocations, inwhich eventually
every UK student will have the opportunity to be reached, will be initiated by the UK president to inform
the students of University policy and
know-- 4
problems. We have no way-oing what exact problems any! policies
will be discussed, but obviously it is."
designed to communicate the schools
budgetary and administrative ones. ,
The convocations will be. held, with
each college on specificidatcs'r Classes
in each college affected "vvill be dis-'- ?
missed- for one hour during jhe. day
set for the convocation.
Both the administration and faculty
no doubt see the convocation as a step
in the right direction for better communication with the student. But the
student also has a responsibility in
attending them. It is, at least, an
to learn about the operation
and present status of UK. It is not
considered , a panacea for. all communications problems.
Nevertheless, if the student- - does
not avail the opportunity offered, he
'should have no gripe that he has not
been informed of the University's
operation and problems.

.

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op-porti-

.

.

mity

To Read, Petchance To Sleep
as-

serted recently that the best way to
put oneself to sleep at night is to read
a dull book. He documented this
advice with backing
anti-sheep-count-

from a sleep expert.

The gist of the argument was
enough to disturb the sleep pf many ,.
a Great Books Club member. .The
columnist suggested that some of
g
are
candidates for
the classics. He specified in particular .
The Decline and Fall of the Roman
Empire,., and added some petulant
pokes at "War and Peace," the poetry
of .Walt Whitman, the hovels of Henry
'
James, and "Alice in Wonderland.
Having'slept through a considerable
part of Mr. Gibbon's Roman decline
we are inclined to credit this theory
in part. But only in part.
Actually a great many of the works
the-bes- t

i

we now casually lump together as
"the classics" were the great awaken-er- s
of human Iiistory. Almost every
revolutionary progress in human
thought," in human government, and
in artistic form .was brought about
by the spread of ideas that one thinker
wrote down and other thinkers stayed
-.
up nights reading.
So, without getting too serious over
what was really a playful column, we
should like to rescue a lot of these
writings called "classics" from the dull
weight of their label, which is nearly
as discouraging as- "educational" TV.
And we'd still much 'rather read
something that will keep us up than
something that will put us to sleep-ma-inly
because we have a sneaky
n
feeling that it when the Romans
to worry about getting to sleep
that they really began to decline.
The Christian' Science Monitor.
-

Reservations And Response
the game found themselves seated
near the goal line, while other seats,

.The UK ticket office's new reserve-sea- t
plan in the student section at
Stoll Field was initiated at Saturday's
game and immediately met' with un.

line. Fraterwere open at. the d
nities and church groups were not
able to .assemble in groups, as has
been tradition in the pait.
Whatever the reason for the reserve-seidea in the student section, it
didn't work. It perhaps operates efficiently a basketball games, ifut a view
at Stoll Field and
from the
from the basket in Memorial Coliseum
is decidedly different.
50-yar-

favorable, and somewhat vehement,
response from, students.
It did not facilitate seating of students any more rapidly than under
d
basis, nor
the
e
did it prevent the usual
rush where students mill through the
aisles seeking their seats.
Some students who came early to

at

first-serve-

first-com- e,

pre-gam-

goal-line-

s

be-'ga-

be allowed to court his blushing
That old standby of young love
the moon has met a sad fate in the damsel in the light of that
new moon; instead, they must
Western World. The Russians, 'with
their advanced program of rocketry, ignore this ominous object in the sky
have triumphed over a Western sym- .and look to some other soothing ro- bol of love, sweetness, and honey mantic symbol say, for example, the
with an accurate bullseye directly on North Star, Milky Way, or Big Dipper.
i AimI that big," bright moon must be
the moon's kisser.
The shot, of course, will have grave considered as something to hate as a
consequences in the United States, competitor for your love, for the like.'
for with the Russians having an emBut. alas. Kentucky will suffer inoxe
blem of their nation on our nearest than any other state. No longer-wilnatural satellite, it will be necessary , stills be abla to' operate ia the light
to stick tostringent security rules so of the moon, because it i. oiTething
tha't the good old American people tliat must be escaped from. That age-o-ld
demon, once simply called moon-- will feel safe and sound when they
shine, must have its name 'changed to
go to sleep at night
Just imagine the various steps that a nice euphemism. We could revert
might be taken to allow the U. S. to to Milky- - Way Xlash, or Jupiter Juice,
escape from this terrible danger fac- or even better, ,Venus Love Water. .
' .'
But, we. must admit, there "is one
ing its morale. .
First, the names of popular songs glorious conquest over the Russians
must be changed. No longer must it the U. S. "could boast of since the
be called "Blue Moon" but "Red firing of the moon rocket. It is one
Moon." Or, "By the Light of the that should be echoed 'over every
Silvery Moon," must become, "By the propaganda outlet, and sounded and
Threatening Glow of that Red Moon." resounded over the Voice of America.
There are thousands of. others which It will do wonders for our security.
could be altered.
Just think, we have proved that a
Then, a young gentleman will not werew olf is a dirty, stinking Commie!
now-corrupt-

ed

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"Big Brother is watching everybody now, Sam,"

,

A Dirty, Stinking Commie

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UK's president, Dr. Frank C.
Dickey, however, lias come up with
an idea that immediately indicates he
realizes and is attempting to alleviate
the communications problem, A series

sleep-inducin-

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A widely syndicated columnist

V'-V.-

The Reader's Form
To tlk? Editor:
The reason that I'm writing con"
cerns, the Student Congress election.
I feel that it is .my duty to express
to the Kenyel the feeling that I and
our assembly of last year had in
regard to the election.
Here it is in a nutshell:
In the last meeting of the school
year concerning the election, there
were representatives of lxth parties
(four from each), and the dean of
men and women, and myself, along
with tlie rest of the executive
mittee. At the end of the plus three- hour meeting, it was unanimously de'
cided that:
i
V 1. There would be a new SC election this, fall, about a month after
the opening of school.
--

be allowed

2. The parties would

k
to reorganize and have a
campaigning period prior to the election.
3. The parties could nominate the
same candidates who ran io the spring
election or choose different ones.
This point was made quite clear in
the meetiug.
I hope that everything comes of.
smoothly and that SC will be, back
on its feet again. I Odly wanted to
write this letter to herp protect the
integrity of. last year's congress regardless of what happens.
two-wee-

Pete Feslmam
Ferlman .was president of last
year's Student Congrm.-TIIEDI
TOU)
E

The Kentucky Kernel
Universixv

:

of Kentucky

.

Entered at the Post Office at Lexiniftoa. Kentucky a second cU matter under the Act f Mrc& 3, 1979,
PublUbed tour timrl a wrt-- during the regular ai aoul year eceut hulidi aad
SIX DOLLARS