xt79057csk6x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79057csk6x/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1908 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the State University, Summer School, Series 1, Number 1, March 1908 text Bulletin of the State University, Summer School, Series 1, Number 1, March 1908 1908 2013 true xt79057csk6x section xt79057csk6x ?*·¥°iés¥Z?·?<‘="Vgi}?    · :i V` 7  `‘‘»     E. .   M   V J` " "  I Vi"?   :- ,   ’=?*?YV  
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1 ‘1 e     _   y THE STATE UNIVERSITY.  
;I   ‘   -1 I   I CILEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.  i
    ·__— >·`   ‘ .  1;.
    » ’I I I HE STATE UNIVERSITY, Lexington, Kentucky, offers the  
1.   · if 1 , following courses, namely: Agriculture, Mechanical Engineering, . 7
r- " ' { r _. 1. 1 f Civil Engineering, Mining Engineering, Electrical Engineering, `
    " 1 K , . I , Classics, and seven Scientific courses, eacl1 of which extends over  
    _   ’_ four years and leads to the Bachelor’s degree; also a Department J
» ` _ _ .0f Law, and at Department of Education. The last has been established i·
  Q; ( instead of the Normal School. Persons who enter this department prepare Q
    ,. 1 for advance work in pedagogy and are granted a Bachelor’s degree in this V
  · ‘ .1 subject when completed.  
  __ I _ County appointees receive free, tuition, privilege of residence in the 1
  Q ` I dormitories, fuel and light and traveling expenses, if they remain ten {
ii V ._ ai 11; ’ ‘ econsecutive months, or one collegiate year. VQ
{     _ * The laboratories are large, well equipped, comprehensive and modern. It
;__. 4 ~ , _IMilitary_ Science is fully provided for as required by Congress,  
`   V I _I II ' ` Graduates in the several courses of study readily find employment with i
1 VQ ` liberal remuneration. The total number of matriculates for the last year ri
g ‘ was 1125; Each department has a specialist at its head, with the  
    VN necessary number of assistants.  
  —   I Young women find an excellent home, with board and lodging, in i
1. ._ >_ s ,` Patterson1Hall,` which is well equipped with all modern conveniences, bath- t
1 __ - , rooms and hall for physical culture, at $3.00 per week. All courses of study in if
  1 __ the _University are open to women upon identical conditions with those  
1     · applying tormales._ ~  
;V,   _ I The completion of the Agriculture, Mining Engineering Laboratory,  
  » and Education Buildings afford ample and commodious quarters for these ;1·
  `_ 1 departments, which are rapidly increasing in the number of matricnlates.  
  ; For catalogues, methods of obtaining appointments, information re-  
i `1 ._.,·   -— ‘ garding courses of study and terms of admission, apply to  
  . I . JAMES K. PATTERSON, Ph. D., LL. D.. PRESIDENT.  
  » V1 I _ or to `_
<3‘·—   D. C. FRAZEE, BUSINESS AGENT. °
gi.   V 1   FALL TERM BEcrno SEPTEMBER 101*11, 1908. L
  II       Attention is called to the followingrules of the Faculty regarding the  
  1 · ‘ ’ time for entrance: V.  
g~gIi». j  'LEPXIHQIHH, KPHIHIIQQJ '
    j
ff? ' JAMES K. PATTERSON, 1=»4.¤., 1.. 1.. 0.. F. s. A., Pnzsnnznr. ,
  { » l
    * 
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    A  
    SIXTH SESSION i
BT. ~ V; l
s__·;;;g SUMMER SCHOOL }
.11. .;;_i*j i ......---——————-—-——  
@*-..*1 1  
R:.  ~ .
  ,.__1 1  1  
  1 I. ARTS AND SCIENCES: ·
`\ ·  ‘ I
   f l. Mathematics and Astronomy.  
‘*`i;_,.f?Y  ~- 2. Language and History. I 
  Li   3. Physics. `
  @[1   4. Chemistry. ’
‘_ ’ _`  I 5. Anatomy and Physiology. 1
1;} _ A xy 6. Zoology and Geology. {
°`;4ljG2> N `C  7. Botany and Agriculture. V
     A 8. Academy. ?
¢.JY’, .  ` ‘
  II. ENGINEERING SCHOOLS:  
  l. Mechanical and Electrical. 1
:;*f’*l..; Z . 1
1;,;;-f   [_ 2. Civil. l
mix-   1
  _—_· LY';  3. Mining. .
  ‘  
3-.wY§;";. ;. ` 
     
  i .  III. DOMESTIC SCIENCE. ‘
  ifi
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  l
{ ISABELLA WEST MARSHALL. i
  JUNE 8th—JULY 17th.  
  The following courses in Domestic Science are offered to students of the  
j Summer Session. {
{ The courses are designed to meet the needs of teachers who desire to ac- l
i quire a knowledge of the subject sufhcient to teach in elementary schools  
[ under the direction of a Supervisor of Domestic Science.  
. ' It may also be taken as an introduction to the subject by students who  
ll wish to continue the course either during the regular University Session or {
  during a future Summer Session.  
` The department is thoroughly equipped for a proper presentation of the i
subject. j
Besides a lecture room there is a large, cool laboratory, fitted up with 5
individual gas burners, cookery apparatus and all the conveniences of mod- T
ern sanitary plumbing. X
Time for classes will be arranged during the cool morning hours.  
· Laboratory period, 1% hours. y 
Lecture period, % hour. '
i CO U RSES. ,
1. Practical Cookery, including discussion of foods belonging to the  
‘ following classes: ,
(a) Heat-giving and energy-supplying foods: Cereals, {
bread, potatoes, etc.
(h) Tissue-forming foods: Meat, milk, eggs, fish, etc.
(c) Foods containing excess of mineral salts: Fruits, i
, vegetables, including salads. , 
(d) Sugars~——candy.  
· (e) Beverages: Tea, coffee, chilled non»alcoholic bever- ‘
ages. {
"· (f) Special diets.  
_ (g) Ices and gelatine mixtures.  
2. Lectures upon Food Production and Manufacture. l
l (b) Consideration of Nature, Nutritive Constituents and l
  Relative Value of Foods.  
` (c) Amount of Food Required in Health and Influence of 4
{ Various Conditions Upon Amount of Food Re-  
  quired.  
J (d) Consideration of Different Kinds of Foods, together j
l with percentages of nutritive constituents found in Z,
  them. j
  Fee of $10 will be charged for one or all the courses. ’
l
J l

 . l
A l
l
{ Elie Qvrhnnl nf illiming Engineering. l
1 i
  JUNE |5th—AUGUST 8th. T
  `
  PROFESSOR NORWOOD AND ASSISTANT EASTON.  
is This Course is intended especially for practical miners, mine foremen, *
Il; and mine managers who desire to improve their knowledge of the principles
_¤ that underlie the methods of coal mining. Instruction will also be given to
 I others, however, who may wish to acquire some knowledge of mining.
 ( Instruction will be given in-
 ? 1. The different systems of mining coal. Laying out the workings.
 i Methods for thin and thick seams, and for flat and pitching seams. Causes (
  and management of squeezes, etc., etc. {
Q  2. Blasting. Various explosives. Pointing and loading holes. Evils ‘
  resulting from improper blasting. Dangerous and safe methods. Dangers
 ( from black powder and dynamite. Precautions in blasting.
(  3. Ventilation. Necessities for ventilation. Composition of mine air. `
 _} Wholesome air. Methods of obtaining and increasing ventilation. Study
jr  of furnaces and fans. Methods of coursing, splitting and regulating the
  current; overcasts and undercasts, etc. Measuring the ventilation; use of
(  anernometer, water gauge, etc.
  4. Mine gases. Nature and origin of each. Indications of the presence
J  of each. Testing for explosive gas and for black damp. Principle of the
  safety lamp, and various types of such lamps. Use of safety lamps, etc.
 2 The instruction in mine gases is illustrated with experiments, and the effect
  of different percentages of marsh gas on the safety lamp flame is shown.
  _ 5. Explosions. The various causes. Relation of coal dust to explo-
 ,_ sions, and management of dust. Relation of blasting to coal dust and other
§’  explosions. Prevention of explosions. Rescue work.
N  6. Supporting excavations, including the principles underlying timber-
 j_ ing, the different methods of timbering, computing the strength of pil-
"  lars, etc.
  7. Safety appliances for shaft and slope mine.
°i  8. Mine fires. Causes and management.
 { 9. Surveying, including use of compass, putting up sights, marking off
i,  rooms at various angles, grading track (use of level), laying out curves, etc.
  10. Map drawing. ‘·
,(  The instruction is illustrated with demonstrations and experiments
  wherever possible. The equipment includes a mine fan, which may be used
jg  to illustrate the principles of both the compressive (forcing fan) and vacuum
il  (exhaust fan) system of ventilation; also, anemometer, water gauge, safety
  lamps of various types, surveying instruments, etc. `
ll  Students will be expected to provide themselves with drawing tools, ‘
Z?  which may be obtained in Lexington at reasonable prices.
  Persons desiring to take examinations for mine foremen from time to
(5  time will find the course quite helpful.
‘?  The session begins ]une 15th and ends August 8th. Fee, $10.00.
gg  Rooms for a limited number free. Table board trom $2 to $3 per week.
L ; For further information address
gi  C. ]. NORWOOD or H. D. EASTON, .
[  , Lexington, Ky. i
.  

 .  Q
3  l
, Qummvr évaawn uf the §rhuul nf Qlnnl Ziuguwmng. i
I
I
S Students who wish to secure additional credit or make up deficiencies in
} order to shorten their regular collegiate schedule of studies or lighten -
  their work for the ensuing year will find the course offered directly adapted
  to meet their needs, and will receive the same credit therein as if the work
I had been given during a regular college session.
` Short courses will be especially arranged for those who are unable to at-  
tend the regular college session, but who desire to prepare themselves for  
` more advanced engineering work. l
\i; 3
  COURSE IN DETAIL.
_ STRUCTURAL DRAFTING.-—The work in Structural Drafting consists of
1 fifteen plates of structural detail and covers nearly every phase of structural t
detail met in actual practice.
` PLANE SURvEv1NG.——An elementary course in land surveying methods %
l
and the use of surveying instruments.  
GRAPHIC STATICs.—Principles and methods. Roof trusses. Bridge  
trusses. Locomotive wheel loads. Trusses with broken chords.  
RAILWAY ENGINEERING.‘*LOC3tlOll curves. Compound curves.  
Changing radius. Shifting curve. Turnouts from straight track. Turnouts
from curved track. Sidings and cross·0vers. Location and earthwork com-
putation.
Roon AND Bnrnca DnsroN.—Theory and design of roofs, bridges, `
` standpipes, towers and other problems of structural interest.
STONE·CUTTING.—··Pl3l1€ sided surfaces. Structures containing develop- I
able surfaces. Structures containing warped surfaces. Structures contain- l
ing double-curved surfaces. I
I
expenses. I
n " · 
A fee of ten dollars, payable in advance, will be charged for one course,  
` and Eve dollars each for additional courses.  
A For additional information send for regular College Catalogue, or write  
” WALTER E. ROWE, 518 Rose Street, _
Q Lexington, Ky.  
A I
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·, I
I .
  `
  I
 
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 (
I illllzrhanir Aria. l
  — I
; 7
  JUNE 8th—JULY 30th.  
I
  OBJECTS OF THE SCHOOL.  
l, The Summer School in Mechanic Arts was nrst established to give to l
l machinists, carpenters, metal workers, engineers, firemen, superintendents él
I of electric light plants, public buildings having power plants, and artisans `
l of all classes that training in engineering subjects which they have been I
l} unab