xt79319s2k90 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79319s2k90/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19370728  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 28, 1937 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 28, 1937 1937 2013 true xt79319s2k90 section xt79319s2k90 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

SUMMER
ISSUE

UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXVII

4TH if

ON AUGUST

t

Expect New Second Summer
Term Enrollment Record
As 1,005 Students Register

T

"',",-- "

NEW SERIES NO. 68

28, 1937

'37 GRADS JOIN ALUMNI IN BODY

AT CONVOCATION

Will

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, WEDNESDAY, JULY

HEINE TO SPEAK

Classes

OF

Dismissed

He

For Meeting In

Me-

Authorities Claim Knrollees
For Short Courses Will
Hring Total Past

Page Mr. Foster!

morial Hall At
11 A. M.

Record 1.031

prrson from Jefferson-vlll- r,
evidently a listener to
the University of Kentucky's
radio programs on the songs
of Stephen Foster, sent a card
to E. O. Sulzer, studio director, bearing the following inscription :
"Dear Mr. Foster: I listen
to your program all the time
and like It very much. Your
songs are very food and I
want a copy of the book. If
you will send it to me. Also,
your broadcasts sound very
good to me and If you would
send me a book of your songs,
I would appreciate It."
A

SPEAKER IS STUDENT

OF AMERICAN HUMOR

Final Convo On August
To Have Forestry Expert As Lecturer

SYMPHONY CONCERT
7:30 THURSDAY
MEMORIAL HALL

13

it

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v,J?-- r

Franklin J. Melno, noted author
and lecturer, will be speaker at the
second convocation
of the final
term of the Bummer Session at 11
a. m. Wednesday, August 4, in Memorial hall.
Classes will be dismissed at 11 a.
m so that students will have an
opportunity to hear the lecture.
'
Mr. Meine is the author of two
v1
,
books, "Tall Talcs of the Old South"
west," and "Mike Pink, King of the
'
I!
-1He has written
Keelboatmen."
numerous biographical sketches of
American humorists.
Mr. Meine has been awarded the
'
f
,
-1
I
"t - I
j
I
Guggenheim fellowship to study the
i
f
basis of American humor. He is In
vestigating the period of American
humor from 1830 to 1860.
Possessor of what is termed by
Dr. T. D. Clark, assistant professor
ol history, as "one of the finest collections of American humor In the
Mary Edith Bach, Lexington, secretary of the Class of 1937, and Carl V annoy, treasurer, look on a Richard
country", Mr. Meine is well known
Butler, president, presents Robert K. 8alyera with a check for 100 per cent membership In the Alumni Asboth as a lecturer and a writer.
sociation for the 1937 graduating class of the University of Kentucky.
He will be introduced at the conThis is the second year in which the entire senior class has Joined the Alumni Association at a body.
vocation by Doctor Clark.
Following the lecture of Mr.
Meine, only one more convocation
is scheduled for the second term.
Dr. Herbert N. Wheeler, chief lecturer of the United States forest
service, will address the students at
9 a. m. on August 13.
It's dancing and bridge slated for
The first convocation of the secSaturday night when Summer Sesond term featured the music of the
Utlca Jubilee singers who presented sion students hold the first party of
Negro spirituals and southern sons the second semester from 9 to 12
Friday, July 23. Four general con- o'clock in the recreation room of
vocations were held during the first
Directed by Prof. C. A. Lambert,
term, the speakers being Dr. Frank Patterson Hall.
the University summer school orAdmission price for the affair will chestra will present the first in a
L. McVey, president of the University; Albert B. Chandler, gov- be 25 cents ucr person. An orchestra series of Little Symphony concerts
ernor of Kentucky; Dr. George be 25 cents per person. An orchestra at 7:30 p. m. Thursday in Memorial 1,000 Kentucky Boys Plan
Strayer, Columbia university pro will furnish music for the dancing, hall.
To Attend Annual
fessor, and Dr. Harry Barnes, visTwo solos will be featured on the
according to an announcement by program
State Meeting
Thursday night. Miss
iting lecturer In history.
Mrs. Sarah Holmes, dean of women. Mary Eleanor Clay wil sing "Oh,
Kentucky
1.000
Approximately
Bridge tables wlll.be at hand for Promise Me" by DeKoven, and Mr.
those who prefer the gentler sport. J. Preston Bryan will play a violin high school boys will gather on the
The initial Sumer Session party solo. During the program the or- University campus next Wednesday
was a dance held In the Training chestra will play five selections, In- foi- the annual convention of the
Kentucky chapter of the Future
School gymnasium Saturday night,
Estimate Of $18,810 Lowest June 20, More than 200 first term cluding Mendelssohn's "Wedding Farmers of America.
March."
Received On S. U.
The convention will last through
students danced to the music of
The second of the three final seElectric Work
"Smoke" Richardson and his or mester concerts will be given at Saturday and will be made up princhestra.
7:30 p. m. Tuesday, August 3, in cipally of business meetings, conWith an estimate of $18,810, the
Chaperoncs for Saturday's party Memorial hall. A complete program tests, and livestock Judging practice.
of will be Mrs. Sarah Holmes, Miss for this concert has not yet been A tour of the Bluegrass is scheduled
Electric company
Bcltzhover
Louisville was the low bidder on the Mildred Lewis, Miss Wilda West, announced by the music depart- to start the program Wednesday
electrical fixtures for the student Miss Marguerite McLaughlin, Miss ment..
afternoon.
union building, it was announced Washington Prof. Bernie Shively,
Among the speakers who will adThe complete program for ThursMonday.
dress the future farmers during the
Mr. T. V. Park, Mr. Gerald Lang, day night concert follows.
Bids were opened Monday mornford and Prof M. E. Potter.
Wedding March
Mendelssohn convention are Albert B. Chandler,
ing in the office of Dr. Frank L.
Oh, Promise Me
DeKoven governor of Kentucky, and J. A.
McVey, president of the University.
Lli:ke, national advisor of the Fu(Solo, Miss Mary Eleanor Clay)
Col. James H. Graham, dean of the
Narvissus
Nevln ture Farmers of America, office of
College of Engineering and supereducation, Washington D. C.
Selection from Hansel and
visor of the building program, preA banquet will be held in the UniHemperdinck
Gretel
sided.
versity commons Friday night. LiveViolin solo (to be selected!
Approval by the University board
stock Judging practice will take up
(J. Preston Bryan)
A new reception point in the hills II Trovatore Selection
o! trustees is necesary before the
Verdi the greater part of Saturday's probid Is official but University of Magoffin county for hearing ed Waltz .. Vienna Beauties
Ziehrer gram.
authorities consider it likely that ucational broadcasts from the Uni
the Beltzhoover bid will be accepted. versity of Kentucky and other
William Hepburn and company of sources, has been established the
Lexington was the second low bid- past week, it has Just been ander with an estimate of $20,000. nounced. The new center is at
In the eastern part of
Other bidden were Brock Electrical
company, Lexington, $20,998, and. the county, and will be operated by
Approximately 125 workers In the
their return to their homes
Thirlwell Electric company, Louis- John Neeley.
according to Mr. field of adult education and In the rfter the close of the curernt sum$21, 130.
Arthurmable,
ville,
Neeley is located seven miles from field of special education, which mer term.
Mr. Homer W. Nichols, Director,
the nearest Improved road. There i.icludes education for handicapped
Division of Special Education of the
is. at present, but one other radio
persons, are enrolled in the second Kentucky
45 within a ten mile radius.
State Department of EdTwo other University of Kentuc- summer term at the University. ucation, Frankfort, Ky. Is a guest
More than 43 students have ky radio Listening Centers are lo- These persons are from all sections professor teaching for the first
signed up for the course in group cated In Magoffin county. One of of the state, most of them having time offered in Kentucky the Ed.
I'i5g course "Education of Handileadership to be taught from July these, under the direction of Nerl been working in the WPA Educa28 to July 31 by Miss Alice Bowers, Arnett, is located on Hog Trough tion Program of the Kentucky De- capped Children". Dr. A. W. Castle
it was announced yesterday by Dr. creek in the southern part of the partment of Education during the Chief, Extension Education,
Department of Education,
J B. Miner, head of the psychology cunty, while the other, managed rast year, in their respective school
Karrlsburg, Penn., who Is perhaps
by Grant Hammond is at Lykins, in districts, county and city.
department.
These students have been orien the outstanding authority on adult
Miss Sowers of Cornell university the northwestern portion.
Listening center clubs will be or- tated by those In charge of the education in the United States toh teaching the course daily from
ganized at all three centers by Jane group so that they may derive the day, is teaching the two courses In
9:50 a. m. till noon. Listed as psychology 14, the course carries one Evans, National Youth Administra- most benefit from the courses being Adult Education (175e & 175f). Dr.
credit, but students not seeking the tion supervisor, who is doing this olfered in the special fields of edu- Castle taught at the University in
credit are permitted to take the work in eight of the University's cation for the handicapped and In July and August, 1935, giving Inadult education. Practically all of struction to certain groups of perlistening posts.
course.
those enrolled in the three courses sons who at that time were being
"Group Leadership" Is designed
'Education of the Handicapped" trained for work In the WPA EduTESTS OFFERED
T.
for leaders In such adult groups as
Ed(175g) "Administration of Adult cation Program.
aswomen's clubs, parent-teacheCommittee work on the several
Students desiring to take tubercu- Education" Ed(175e) and "Methods
sociations, forums and community
enterprises. It Includes a study of lin tests may do so any Wednesday and Materials of Adult Education types of projects is "being done, and
traits found in successful leaders, from 2 to 4 p. m. In the dispensery (175f) Ed. have practically definite! courses of study for the use during
methods of developing these traits, in Neville hall. The test, which assurance that they will have em tht coming year will be worked out
chows whether or not a person has ployment in these new and special t'nei set up. Each student In this
and successful procedures In organi-(tiand administration of these tuberculosis, will be given free of Held that are so rapidly being rec- tpccial group k a member of the
ognized In the educational field, committee dealing with their specia
charge to any enrolled student.
groups.

tJ'
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Second Semester Summer Session
Party Is Scheduled For Saturday

Little Symphony Concerts
Slated To Begin Tomorrow

Future Farmers To

Convene On Campus

Louisville Firm
Gets Fixture Bid

-

New Listening Post

Is Established In
Magoffin County

SHORT COCRSFS P.FCIN
ON NEXT WEDNESDAY
High Enrollments Lead Officials To Expect Record
In the Fall

all-ti- me

PORTER QUITS
ENGINEER POST
I'ap?r Hlames Resignation Of
Assistant Professor On Dis
agreement Over Matters Of
Policy

R. Clay Porter, for 10 years assis
engitant professor of
neering, resigned his position at
the University, according to a story
in Thursday's issue of the Louisville
Courier-JournThe resignation
was accepted by President Frank L.
heat-pow-

er

al.

McVey.
credited PorThe Courier-Journter with resigning because he differed over matters of policy with
Col. James H. Graham, Dean of the
al

College of Engineering. According
to the paper, Porter gave as one of
his reasons for resigning the fact
that L. S. O'Brannon, formerly of
the department of mechanical engineering, would not be on the engineering college faculty next year.
story conThe Courier-Journa- l's
tinued: "O'Brannon said today that
he was not in sympathy with the
policies of Colonel Graham and for
that reason had requested and received a year's leave of absence from
the college to work at the agricultural experiment station, where he
is now doing experimental processing work on tobacco
"First reports of a reorganization
of the curriculum and teaching personnel at the College of Engineer
ing were published June 30. At that
time, Colonel Graham outlined the
new set-u- p
for the college.
"Colonel Graham said that Por
ter's resignation was accepted in
the regular course of business and
without comment.
" 'Men will be transferred to other
departments of the university,
many to tfte building and grounds
department, and to other work,'
Colonel Graham said then. 'Some
may be sent to the new reformatory
now under construction at Le
Grange upon its completion. There
they would be teachers of vocational
training, mainly in manual training. This latter plan is tenatlve
and must be approved by Governor
Chandler before it is effected.' "

Many Kentucky WPA Administrators
Enrolled In Courses

At

Penn-fylva-

a

rs

on

mashing

me

1936-19-

37

all-ti-

Coach Adolph Kupp
Is Out Of Hospital
UKy Net Me'ntor Returns
Home After 32 Days In

Infirmary

Adolph Rupp, University basketball coach and maker of
returned to Lexington Monday
utter spending 32 days in the Norton Infirmary, Louisville, following
a spinal operation.
In an interview ati 'he Louisville
railroad station, Coa . Rupp expressed approval of a plan for an
North-out- h
annual
bsketball
double-head- er
to be held at the
Jefferson County armory. The plan,
suggested by Roy M. Mundorf,
net coach at Georgia Tech, is to
have the University of Kentucky
end Georgia Tech play a double-headagainst two representative
northern teams.
"You have my word for it, as
toon as I get back to Lexington I
will write Coach Mundorff and we
will start work immediately on the
program, "Coach Rupp promised.
Commenting
on the proposed
extravaganza,
basketball
Coach
Rupp said, "Roy and I talked that
thing over in Chicago at the annual
rules conference and I liked it. It
sounded fine to me and I'm sorry
Roy didn't get in touch with me
while he was In the city. I think
the two of us can choose a different
Northern team each season and
give Louisville cage patrons a taste
of the best basketball played in
America. I don't say my teams will
always show the best brand of bas
ketball, but they won't miss it fur
and I know Roy's will be tops with
a capital TV
er

University

Group Leadership
Course Draws

With 1,005 students enrolled for
the second term when the regular
registration period closed Monday
afternoon, it is considered highly
likely by the Registrar's office that
the
second semester high
will be shattered when signing for
the short courses begins
The record final term enrollment
was set in 1935 when 1,034 students
signed.
This Included the short
courses. This Summer's final semester enrollment of 1,005 without
the short courses makes the breaking of the record highly probable.
Because of the registration system
used by the University it is impossible to determine how many of the
1935 students signed for the short
courses
Registration for the short courses
will be held on August 4. The
courses, principally In the College
of Agriculture, will last for two and
one half weeks.
Enrollment for the first term of
the summer session reached a
total of 1,797, not Including the short courses. The 1,797
enrollment broke by 75 the record
set In 1935 when 1,722 students regis
tered for the first term
High enrollments of the two sum
mer semesters lead the Registrar's
office to believe it probable th
a
new all-tihigh will be set when
students sign for the regular winter term in September. A record
was set last September when 3,422
students registered for the first
term of the
school year.
This number surpassed by 190 the
previous
high of 3,232 set
in 1931.
Dr. Jesse Adams, director of the
Summer Session, expressed him
self as being "well pleased" with the
second term summer enrollment.

interest, and is required to do certain creative work in this committee. An
of ideas and
experiences is being stressed, due to
tl'e lack of materials yet at hand
In these new fields, and the findings will be crystallized and developed Into usable methods and prointer-chan-

cedures.
Officials of Kentucky Special
Programs in attendance are
Mr. Homer W. Nichols, Director of
Special Education, State Department of Education, Frankfort, Mr.
O. J. Jones, State Head WPA Education Program of the Kentucky
Department of Education, Louisville, Ky. Dr. Olney M. Patrick, of
the Kentucky State Department of
Education, Frankfort, and the following State Supervisors of the
Program Mr.
Education
WPA
Waylon Rayburn, Murry, Ky. Mr.
Robert Traylor, Princeton, Ky. Mr.
Lindsay Allen. Hodgenvllle, Ky., Mr.
Roy O. Cumbler, Lexington, Ky.
Mr. F. O. Burd, Louisville, Ky., Mr.
Ray N. Dryden, Mt. Olivet. Ky., Mr.
Robert E. Lee Barker, Harlan. Ky.,
end Mr. James R. Salyers, More-lit-ud,

Ky.

SINGERS HEARD AT CONVO
Vtlca Jubilee singers were heard
in nogro spirituals and southern
songs as the first convocation of
the second semester was held in
Memorial hall last Friday morning.
The singers also gave a conceit
Friday night.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

rage Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
th umvmamf of kkntuckt

Knterrd at tha Port Offlca at Lrtlnfton, Kmluckf, M
daaa mattor nndrr thi Art of March , 1171.
MEMBER

Ktntuckj

Publlcatloni, rfprfntd b
A mfmtir of the Major Oollrd
la E.
J. Norm Hill Co.. 416 Lrmnaton At., Nrw York City; Weil-woo- d
Chicago; Call Bulidlna, Ban rranclaco; Ml
Warkrr Ilrlw.
Blvd., Loa Atiarlti; 1004 Second Art., eaattla.

ed

H

COMPLETE CAMPUS COVERAGE
Ross J. Chepei.lff

Editor-in-Chie-

f

Business Manager

Ike M. Moore

Perhaps

U.K. Listening
Centers Doing
Noble Work

not well

to the avUniversity of
erage
student,
Kentucky
and to the citizens of
the state, is the noble work being carried on by
the University Listening Centers.
Established seven years ago under the direction of Elmer G. Suher, University publicity director, they have grown until today they are receiving international recognition. They are reputed to be the "only Listening Centers in the
world." Many nationally known magazines have
tarried articles relative to these Centers, appropriately giving credit to the University of Kentucky for taking this step forward.
Serving 24 communities in the mountains of
Kentucky at the present time, the posts are part
of a plan of Mr. Sulzcr, "godfather of the Centers," to bring education to people in this state
who have never before had the opportunity to
make contact with the outside world.
This plan deserves much recommendation
from the people of this state, for it is bringing
to the attention of the United States the progressive attitude of this University. It is unfortunate that finances limit and handicap more rapid
growth of these Centers. They are financed entirely through voluntary contributions, which
though always welcome, arc uncertain.
Tlie Kernel sincerely hopes that authorities
can work out a plan which will put the U. K.
Listening Centers on a permanent basis.

Summer School Calendar
Thursday, July 29

7:30 p. in. Little Symphony concei t in Memorial hall, under the direction of Prof.
Carl Larapert.
Saturday, July 31
m. Second semester Summer Session
p.
2

party in Patterson hall.
Tuesday, August 3

7:30 p. m. Little Symphony concei t in Memorial hall, under the direction of Prof.
Carl Lampert. This concert was
moved up from Thursday, August
5. There will be no concert on that

date.
Wednesday, August 4
1

1

a. m. Convocation

after

come too quickly
coeds at the Univerare now fighting to have

"Good-nights- "

"Good-evenings,-

"

sity of Alabama

their 10:45 weekend
(hanged to 12 o'clock.

night

While

ahead

deadlines

are certain

lessons that can be drawn from the realization of
the point I hope to be able to make.
It seems that my sister has a boy friend who
attends Yale University. Oh, he's a swell fellow
and all that, but he just doesn't understand how
the rest of the world lives. Perhaps, until we
had a talk this summer, he never had stopped to
consider that students at the University of Kentucky could have a good time at all. Primarily,
that was about all he was interested in knowing
about when he learned to his surprise that I
went to the University of Kentucky.
"University of Kentucky?" he questioned.
"Yes," I replied proudly, and told him where
it was and so forth. I recalled that he had invited my sister to the Yale Prom and so that was
what we talked about. The Yale Prom was quite
a "can can," as George Kerler would say, and it
lasted until three bells.
I explained how poor, relatively speaking, students in the south arc. Which lead to his asking
me how much it would cost me to take a girl to
the Prom down here. That amazed mel "Nothing," I said.
That answer didn't suit him. He knew it cost
something, so he asked what it would cost to
entertain a girl for the weekend.
"Put her up in a hotel 'n' everything?" I suggested.
Well at fust 1 couldn't imagine how anyone
could possibly spend more than 10 to 12 dollars
in such a case, but then again I knew there must
be some wild boys who could squander between
20 and 25 dollars. So I suggested that even if a
lost his rhyme and reason,
fellow went hog-wilhe couldn't spend more than $25.
It was "Yale boys" turn to be amazed! And he
asked if that figure would include cock-tai- l
parties and everything. Oh yes, everything I
flowers and bromo-seltzetold him U Drive-Its- ,
But the point is this. The Yale boys have to
keep up with the Cabots and Lodges who attend
Harvard and those conniving gentlemen who
tread lightly on the Princeton campus. So up
there it is a sure sign of something or other (affluence, influence) when one boy can out do the
other in spending dough to the best advantage,
and the best advantage will be that advantage
which makes the biggest show.
Down south we'uns is looking with envious
hooligans who so blightly,
eyes at the
carelessly, uselessly cast their good father's hard
earned dough on the waters and before swine.
They, each one of them, are not one bit happier
in their prom than we, who have had Little Jack
Little, are. Immcasureably better off are we in
our simplicity, and with less of that pseudo-cultur- e
and conceit that so impresses the "Yak-boys- "
with their own importance.
r.

slap-happ-

in Memorial hall. Dr.

Franklin Meine, speaker.
Because

"Saratoga", a story of the turf,
will continue at the Kentucky
theatre for the remainder of the
Oang-Wa- yt
Here comes thnt sore head again.
week
in this racing
Back again, for a brief interlude, after a fine six
romance Is the late Jean Harlow
weeks of rest, peace and quiet at home. But just
nnd Clark Oablc, the great lover
to prove that the rest has done me no good whatwith the great ears.
America's
soever and that there are still things I can gripe
sweetheart will hit town Sunday,
about. I, with the reluctant Insistence of Ross
Chepelefi, submit the following bitter dose (Auwhen Shirley Temple comes to the
thor's note).
Kentucky in her latest photoplay
"Wee Willie Winkle". Also in the
a t.REAr portion of this column will picture will be Victor McLaglen
and Michael Whalcn.
of time, there
By RALPH E. JOHNSON

Board of Oommrr
lntarcoUefiata Praia Aaaoflatlon

Lrlnton

Has Your Coiffure
'Gone With the Wind'?
Summer winds and swimming
play havoc with your coiffure.
Let us design a new one for
you one that will be beautiful this summer and be in
good style this fall . . . one
that will make your hair soft,
lustrous and naturally beautiful. Call for an appointment now.

y

Ken-ICottag-

a

I

new series of travrl dialogues
inaugurated from the University studios of station WHAS,
Louisville, on Thursday, July 29, at
1:30 p. m. Seven weekly programs
will comprise the series. Each period will be devoted to some American city, and Interesting and inwill
be
Information
structive
brought out about that city through
the speakings of two question master!, and one announcer. The series
is entitled "Answer Me This." New
York will be the city under discussion this week.
A

will be

The cinema version of William
aaa
Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"
Safety will be the theme of Monwith Leslie Howard and Norma
Shearer in the title roles, closes day's broadcast of the weekly Parentrelationship series from
today at the Strand as half of a -Child
double bill. Beginnings of swing the University studiua. J. S. Mitmusic are told in "Melody for Two", chell, assistant principal of the Uniwith James Melton and Patrica versity high school will speak on
Ellis, the rest of the bill Thursday "The Safety of Our Children."
aaa
and Friday lt'a Errol Flynn and the
Mach twins in "The Prince and the
Again on Friday at 12:15 p. m.,
Pauper," and Lloyd Nolan and Lawrence C. Brewer of the agriClaire Trevor In "King of Gamb cultural extension bureau of the
lers". Loretta Young and Tyrone College of Agriculture will broadPowers are slated Saturday, Sunday cast on "What Farm Folk are Asking". This program is composed of
end Monday In "Cafe Metropole
The rest of the double feature Is enswers to questions sent Mr.
"The Californian", stars unknown Brewer by the men, women and
to your columnist. "Make Way for children of the farm population of
Tomorrow"
with Victor Moore Kentucky.
aaa
ccmes to the Strand Tuesday and
Wednesday, July 28
weanesaay. uonaia wooas ana
"Doings of
Jean Maddtfn In ("Talent Scout" 12:15 to 12:30 p. m.
Kentucky Farm Polk", by C. A.
completes the bill.
Ltwis, assistant editor. Agricultural
aaa
Joe E. Brown, assisted by Law- Extension Division.
John Jacob
rence Rice, will be "Riding on Air" 1:15 to 1:45 p. m.
Niles' "Salute to the Hills".
at the Ben All in half of a double
Thursday, July 29
Limfeature today.
Westbound
"Farm Marited", with Lyle Talbot, Is the oth- 12:15 to 12:30 p. m.
kets", by 8. E. Wrather, assistant
er half. Clark Gable, ears and all,
and Myrna Loy will play at the Ben in Markets.
"Piano FanAll Thursday, Friday and Saturday 1:15 to 1:30 p. m.
tasies".
in "Parnell". Also on the bill is
' Talent Scout" with Donald Woods 1:30 to 1:45 p. m.
"Answer Me
This", No. 1, "New York".
and Jean Madden. Sunday, Monday,
Friday, July 30
Tuesday and Wednesday the Ben
At offers you "Marry the Girl" and 12:15 to 12:30 p. m. "What Farm
Folk Are Asking", by L. C. Brewer,
"Knight Without Armor".
The
first of the two brings you the glo- College of Agriculture.
Bill Cross'
rious combination of Hugh Herbert, 1:15 to 1:30 p. m.
Orchestra
Frank McHugh, Frances Hughes
"Summer
end Allen Jenkins. The latter pic- 1:30 to 1:45 p. m.
Sports Chats", No. 4, by M. E.
ture has lovely-legg- ed
Marlene
Potter, Head of the Department of
Deitrich and Robert Donat.
Physical Education; and others.

neering.
1:15 to 1:30 p. m.

Balloons
round ones, cigar
shaped ones, red, blue and green
ones bounced and floated over the
toad and the lawn in the wind In
front of Corbin hall while two
freshman men struggled frantically
to close a rip In a large paper sack
and prevent the escape of the few
remaining ones.
A second strong gust of wind
twisted the sack suddenly and the
remaining balloons broke loose In
another burst of color. The bag
flapped wearily in the wind. Both
freshmen rose to their feet, still
holding the empty bag, not knowing

Virginia Sha- -

doan, organist.
1:30 to 1:45 p. m.

"Parent-Chil-

Specializing in

FISH FRIES

WILL BE OPEN
For
Appointment.
Call 2199

SoUthem Girl
Beauty Salon
NEXT DOOR TO TAVERN

OPERATORS
Miss Ruth
Miss Taylor
Mr. Louis

THAT

J etc

-

1,

WISa--

ss

HATfcA

u

THi

WORLD DC
MANDB) TO
Jf
L. C .
I

HARLOW

GABLE
I

MCIUtt

Li

LIONEL
BARRYMORE
FRANK

MORGA

d

tronomy.
1:15 to 1:45 p. m.
Orchestra.

Charlie McCarthy
Edgar Bergen
"DOUBLE TALK"

Bill Cross'

Now

Is

the Time

bal-

.

.

.

.":

'

5

i:

"

it"-1--i

.

-

?

"

"

and

$1.00 to $10.00

The

OVER THRU SAT.

Tuesday, August S
"Fall Sown
12:15 to 12:30 p. m.
Alfalfa In the ACP Program", by
Ralph Kenney, field agent In As-

To Secure Your

PERMANENTS

$2.50 and up

t

School.

n't

"QUICK SERVICE"

HELD

Relationships", No. 9, "The Safety
of Our Children", by J. S. Mitchell,
assistant principal, University High

whether to try to capture the fugitive baloans or not. Dull pops,
one after another, decided their
course of action.
Their balloons
were breaking as they came In contact with sharp blades of grass or

e

ed

12:15 to 12:30 p. m.

Frosh Ltearn

stones.
"Guess we won't have any
loons for the dance," said one.
"Guess not," said the other.
Montana Kaimin.

New York, N. Y. Why people
commit suicide will be studied In a
ri.e-ye- ir
research project by the
Nrw York University college of
medicine, it was announced by Dr.
John Wycoff, dean of the college.
The study of
deaths
in the New York area will be supervised by Dr. Nathaniel Ross,
clinical professor of psychiatry In the college.
"Although appjoxlmatcly 30(000
persons commit suicide annually In
the United States, we still know
comparatively little about the problem," said Dean Wyckoff.
"Suicide, per se, is not necessarily a disease but does occur frequently in a number of mental
conditions and, therefore, might be
prevented.
'The purpose of our research will
be the study of suicide of adults
snd children from the point of view
of manifestations, frequency of occurrence, and the social background
cf individual affected by suicidal
tt ndenctes. Clemson Tiger.

Monday, August 2
"Engineering
on the Farm", by Earl G. Welch,
field agent In Agricultural Engi-

Balloons And
Winds Don't Mix,
Montana U.

OYSTERS IN SEASON
END CIBL PERMANENTS

New York U.
Will Study
Causes Of
Suicides

Doin' The
Seem The
Dials
Shows
- ANDREW ECKDAIIL"

This Campus
and
That IDorld

OF

OmCIAl HTWSPAPtll OF THE TUUENi

Wednesday, July 28, 1937

on or

about

FRIDAY, JULY 30
2 Doors Above Euclid on Lime

Graduation Photograph
The Joy and dignity of this occasion are such that you will
want to commemorate it with a Lafayette Studio Photograph.
Arrange NOW for your sitting. We'll furnish the cap and gown.

Lafayette Studio
"The Kentuckian Photographers
PHONE 6271

301 W. MAIN

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Wednesday, July 28, 1937

IIOOMER9

Six Operas In Sixth and Last
Of Cincinnati Summer Opera
The sixth and last week of the
current opera season at the Cincinnati Zoo Garden opens Sunday,
August 1, with "Faust," Oounod's
musical adaptation of Qoethe's epic
tragedy. Norman Cordon heads the
cost with his Inimitable personation
of Mephistopheles, and Dmitri Ono-fr- el
and Santa Biondo sins the roles
of the lovers, Faust and Marguerite.
Joseph Royer portrays Valentin,
with- - Charlotte Bruno as Slebcl and
June Buriff as Martha. "Faust"
will be repeated Friday, August 6.
Another performance of "Carmen" will be given Tuesday, August 3, with Maru Castagna as
Carmen, Harold Lindl as Don Jose,
slid Joseph Royer as Escamillo the
seme cast which drew the largest
attendance in the history of Cincinnati Summer Opera earlier this
Luigi
season.
Cordon,
Norman
Dalle Mollc, Virginia Johnson, June
Buriff, Lodovico Ollviero, and Charlotte Bruno are also In the cast.
Angelo Pilotto's powerful char-

acterization of the hunchback Jester, Rigoletto, will be featured in the
opera "Rigoletto" Wednesday, August 4. Rosemarie Brancato will
sing as Oilda, with Dmitri Onofrei
as the Duke of Mantua, Nomran
Cordon as Sparafuclle, and Maru
Castagna as Maddalena.
"II Trovatore" drew one of the
many capacity audiences of this
summer's season, and it will be repeated Thursday, August 5, with
Fidelia Campigna in her brilliant
a,
interpretation of the role of
Jose De Oaviria will sing the
role of Manrico Angelo Pilotto as
the Count Di Luna. Azucena will be
enacted by Maru Castagna, Ferran-d- o
Leo-I'or-

by Norman Cordon.
The last double feature bill of the
season will bring the brilliant 1937
season to a close, Saturday, August
7 "Cavalleria Rusticana" will be

i

paired with its perennial running
mate, "Pagliaccl." In the first opera
Maru Castagna, Harold Lindl, Joseph Royer, Charlotte Bruno, and

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104

W. Main

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June Buriff will sing. In the second, the parts will be sung by Harold Lindl, Angelo Pilotto. Virginia
Johnson,
Lodovico Ollviero, and
Luigi Dalle MoUe.
Tickets for these operas may be
purchased at the 8ummer Opera
Offices at Sixth and Walnut St