xt79319s2m2f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79319s2m2f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19500224  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1950 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1950 1950 2013 true xt79319s2m2f section xt79319s2m2f The Kentucky Kernel

Observe
Religious
Emphasis Week

UNIVERSITY

OF

Cloudy
Cold

Ilish 38

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1950

VOLUME XL

NUMBER 17

Convocation Is Feature Of Founders Week;
Humanity Talks Stress Need For Fine Arts;
Symposium, Musicale Conclude Observance
Ilr. Arnold B. Come, of Centre
ollege, will be one of the principal speakers during Religious Emphasis Week. Dr. Come will
address the faculty Monday.

C

Rev. Ben M. Herbstein

Address Highlights
Religious Emphasis
Week On Campus
By Janet Anderson
Religious

Emphasis

Week, Monday through Thursday, will follow
the general theme, "Design for Living." This week of lectures and
programs dealing with the spiritual
side of college life is sponsored annually by the Interfaith Council.
Betty Dickinson, arts and sciences
sophomore, is chairman of the event
Highlighting the program will be
an address at 7 p.m. Tuesday by the
Rev. Ben Herbster, pastor of the
Zion Evangelical
and Reformed
Church, Norwood, Ohio. Virginia
Henry and Elliot Jones, presidents,
respectively, of the YWCA and the
YMCA. will preside at this campus-wid- e
meeting, to be held in the Y
Lounge of the SUB. Singing will be
led by the Rev. George A. Jacobs,
pastor of the Georgetown Christian
Church.
Daily lectures on the beliefs of
various religious groups will be held
at 4 pjn. in the Music Room of the
SUB.
Lecturers Are Listed
On Monday, Rabbi Joseph Rauch
of Adath Israel Temple. Louisville,
will present "The Jewish Faith";
Tuesday, the Rev. M. Francis Miel-ecpastor of St. John's Catholic
Church, Newport, will discuss "The
Catholic Faith"; Wednesday, Dr.
Arnold B. Come, head of the Department of Philosophy and Religion at Centre College, will speak
on "The Protestant Faith"; and
Thursday, Mr. Frank Hord, Louisville, will present "Christian Scih,

ence."

'51 Series
Planned In
Coliseum

Drs. Donovan, McLain Speak Wednesday;,
Writers' Symposium To Be Held Tonight;
Louisville Philharmonic Will Play Saturday
By Katheryn Whitmcr
By Joe Coyle
birthday of the
a. B. Guthrie Jr., author of "The
The eighty-fift- h
university oi is.em.ucKy was ceie- - Blg sky" antJ "Tne Way west" WU'
brated Wednesday by formally pre- - ;be moderator at a symposium of
sentmg a new home to the art. mu- - Kentucky writers at 8 tonight in
sic, speech, and drama departments Gu:nol Theatre. Kentuckians Hoi- and by honoring the men and wo lis Summers and Jesse Stuart will
men who were its founders.
appear with him.
President Herman L. Donovan
Also on the program will be Wilcalled on the departments housed liam Sloane, New York publisher,
in the new Fine Arts Buildings to and Robert Penn Warren, Pulitizer
slant their programs in the direction Prize winner.
of the people.
Orchestra Participates
"The University of Kentucky is A concert by the
Philthe people's university," he said. The harmonic Orchestra, Louisville
featuring
TTnlirari-iti- r
nannnt hanmA ovrll1cil'a
ly for the education of the genuis Nathaniel Patch, pianist, will be the
because it belongs to and must serve c'osmg feature of the Founders
all the people, President Donovan Week proeram. It will be given at

continued.
Dr. McLain Speaks
Closely allied to the hopes expressed by President Donovan were
portions of Dr. Raymond F.
address in which he pointed
out the true meaning of the arts.
Speaking on the subject, "John Doe.
Artist," Dr. McLain declared that
the nature of life itself is an inevitable struggle from which emerges
Mc-Lai-

UK students will be admitted to art.
The arts work in human experinext year's Central Kentucky Com ence, he continued, through intensimunity Concert and Lecture series fying and clarifying that experience.
on presentation of their student ac In return, life requires of art both
iivity books, it was announced this relevance and detachment. Dr. Mcweek.
Lain continued. Art, just as science,
The series will present seven con- must have relevance to give it
certs and four lectures at Memorial meaning in the human experience
Coliseum by famous personalities of its time, and it must have detachand groups, including James Mel ment to make it ageless.
ton, leading tenor of the Metro
President Donovan, in outlining
politan Opera; the London Philhar the University's role of taking the
monic Orchestra, conducted by Sir fine art to the people, said the inThomas Beecham; the Don Cossack stitution must contribute toward the
Chorus; Jascha Heifetz, violinist; enrichment of the cultural life of all
Elena Nikolaidi, Greek contralto; Kentuckians,. He also expressed the
Arthur Rubenstein, pianist; the hope that the program in the new
Dallas Symphony Orchestra with building would acquaint the people
Walter Hendl conducting and Wil with all the fields and ages of the
liam Kapell as piano soloist; Charles fine arts rather than being dedicatLaughton, radio, screen and stage ed to the fad of the day.
actor, and Eleanor Roosevelt, U. S.
Challenges Discussed
delegate to the United Nations.
In his address, President Donovan
program will be also discussed the numerous chalRounding out the
lectures by two of the following lenges to the Fine Arts Department.
three Elmer Davis, commentator
For the Department of Art and
and political analyst; Edward other art teachers throughout the
Weeks, editor of the Atlantic state, he said, there is the challenge
Monthly, and Dr. Ralph Sockman, to bring about through their teachings the removal of
minister.
art
Admission for those, other than objects from the roadside stands
UK students, will be by season that line the Kentucky highways,
memberships only. Prices for adults
(Continued on Page Four)
will be $7.20; full-tistudents of
other colleges, high schools or elementary schools and children under
ed

Seminars also will be held at 5
p.m. daily ia the Y Lounge, SUB.
The schedule is: Monday, "What
Can I Believe?" by Dr. Come; Tuesby
day. "Christian Ways and College school age (if accompanied
Daze" My Faith and My Future), adult) $420, tax included. It was
by the Rev. T. B. Cowan, pastor of emphasized that no single tickets
Everybody's
Lexington; will be sold at any time.
Church,
The University
is
Wednesday, "World Peace or Perish," by Rabbi Rauch; Thursday. with the Central Kentucky Com"Love, Courtship, and Marriage," by munity Concert Association and the
Dr. James W. Gladden of the UK Lexington Public Forum in presenting the series.
sociology department.

may be obtained
Memberships
from Mrs. I. D. Best, 293 S. Ashland
Avenue, general chairman of the
Dr. Come will be the speaker at a
faculty luncheon to be held in the membership campaign.
Student Union Cafeteria at 12 noon,
Monday. Cost of the luncheon is $1.
Reservations may be made by call
ing the YMCA office, according to
Franklyn Morns, Religious Empha
sis publicity chairman.
Speeches and discussion groups in
dormitories, fraternity and sorority
houses, and classrooms will also be
2-- 3
program,
included in the four-la- y
Morris said.
The Kentucky Highway Conference will be held at the University
on March
It is being sponsored
by the College of Engineering and
the Kentucky Department of Highways.
The purpose of the conference is
to bring together state, county, and
city engineers and officials, and
highway contractors to hear discussions on design, construction, and
maintenance of roads and streets.
Registration will be held at 8:30
At this week's SGA meeting the a.m. in Memorial Hall. The welrecommittee
student directory
coming address will be given at 10
ported that student opinion favored a.m. by D. V. Terrell, dean of the
discontinuence of plans for a 1949-6- 0 College of Engineering, and H. L.
Student Directory.
Donovan, president of the Univerto the dial tele- sity. Emerson Beauchamp, commisThe change-ove- r
phone system in Lexington made sioner of rural highways, will disthe directory, which was all ready cuss the "Rural Highway Program."
Presiding at the various discusto go to press, worthless.
Judge S. R. Cheek,
The directory could not be pub- sions will be W.
Boyle County;
O. Snyder, execulished now for several more weeks.
tive secretary Kentucky Association
SGA voted to use some of its re- of Highway Contractors; D. H. Bray,
serve fund to purchase gold star state highway engineer; S. A.
Mory
memorials to the University's war
professor of structural engineerdead. The gold stars with names Jr.. UK;
ing,
and R. E. Shaver, head of
inscribed will be imbedded at approEngineerpriate places in the hallway walls the Department of Civil
ing.
of the new colliseum.
The charters of Delta Sigma Pi
Kyian Sales Deadline
and Theta Xi, new campus social
Deadline for the 1950 Kentuck-ia- n
fraternities, were accepted.
sales is Tuesday, Jeanne WilA committee
was appointed
to
check with Bernard Schively, UK son, business manager, has anathletic director, to find out which nounced.
The office, located in Room 55
sections of the new gymnasium will
of McVey Hall, will be open from
be reserved for students. The committee will also check to find out 1 to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.
Seniors are not required to sign
which sections in the stadium will
up for the Kentuckian. Their paybe reserved for students next footment, which is included in their
ball season.
graduation lee, is sent to the KenNew committee appointments were
tuckian by the registrar's office.
made for the current semester.
Seniors are requested to pick up
The week of March 27 was set as the Kentuckian when they are disthe tentative date for SGA rprins tributed in May, however.
elections.
Come Speaks To Faculty

Speakers On Humanity Subjects Declare
That We Must Concentrate On Our Arts,
Discontinue Devotion To Foreign Works

Library Exhibit Carries Out
Theme Of Founders Week

By Betty Compton
"We shall not be taken seriously
of books written by
in the cultural field until we take
Kentucki.-iiior about Kentuckians
Dr.
ourselves seriously."
is on dispiay in the first floor foyer
Howard Hanson, one of the nation's
0f the Margaret I King Library
s,
at the
foremost music
carrying out the fine arts theme of
Fine Arts Building Tuesdav niyht.
Founders Week, these books reflect
Dr. Hanson .director of the Ejst-ma- n
the meaning of Kentucky to several
generations of American novelists,
School of Music Ft Rochester,
poets, and songwriters.
N. Y., continued by cri'izing AmerThe exhibit, which opened Feb.
ican importation of the cultural
18. was prepared by Mrs. Hammond
arts. "A nation which reaches out
Dugan. associate archivist.
for foreign art because it is supIn nine showcases are displayed
posed to te better will never see its
some of the University's rarest books
d
own soul," declared the
concerning Kentucky frontier days,
fincf nr.
By Bob Fain
Kentucky at war, and the politics
pr. Ecjwin E. Stein, head of the
Seventy-seve- n
and products of the mountains.
students made 3.0 UK music department, when
One case is filled with
for the fall semester, it ducing the speaker deribed him
Memorial Auditorium tomorrow
thrillers and dime novels, such as has been announced by deans of six 'as posessing all the qualifies needed
starting at 3 p.m.
by "The Phantom Hunter," and "Old colleges. This number is three be- - jn a national leader of music,
The Philharmonic, conducted
Robert Whitney, will present three Quick Hand," familiar names in low the total of 80 who made per- one Leadership Problem
program, nineteenth century Kentucky fic- feet standings for the last spring! The enthusiastic speaker added.
selections of the four-pa- rt
semester.
will accompany Mr. Patch in tion.
and
"But one of the problems of leader
Also on display are some of the
Students making perfect stand- ship in these times is that, somethe other. Mr. Patch has recently
joined the music department of the better known works of leading Ken- ings are:
one might take your advice and
College of Arts and Sciences: follow you."
University, and has given concerts tucky literary figures such as John
Fox Jr.. Elizabeth Maddox Roberts, Janet A. Anderson. Mary J. Bishop.
here.
Dr. Hanson stated that a studr of
James Lane Allen, Jesse Stuart,
James T. Bradbury, Elizabeth R.
Part One From Opera
humanities teaches a sensitive- S. Cobb, and Joseph A. Altsheler. Bryant. Stuart G. Carpenter. David the t
Part one of the concert will be The original manuscripts of Fox's
L. Carter, Jim Cherry. Henrietta
Founc-erthe overture, "The Thievish Magpie" "Mountain
Week spenler
Europa"
and James Cohn. Mrs- Edna H Edwards, John Tne first
by Rossini. It is from the opera
s,atement bv pro- Still's "Rivers of Earth" are dis- B. Flege. William T Garrad. Gene furtnered his
of the same name.
claimi
that musie calls for ..an
There
HnTy'
teaching."
Part two will consist of "Sym- played. of Johnare also some manu- R;v,Ha!anVlr!im,H
scripts
. Hart"'enthusiastic and devoted appronrh-Betty- e
Jacob Niles, Ken- othy
phony No. 3 in A minor. Opus 56" tucky's composer
each
and singer of folk
J. Kelly. Elmer & McDamel
by Mendelssohn. This symphony is
quality".
.
Jr., Bettve L. Mastin, Fred H. Payne. nd Participation intrinsic
commonly called the "Scotch Sym- music.
ui the arts must
Martha L. Pennebaker. Ann Perrine. be accompanied by creation.
inspired by a
phony", having been
Martha N. Pollard. Robert G. Smith.
Pipers
competition
of Highland
d, bvffsnmP
Kenneth Wells, Robert H. Whisman. fhE?',Han!onv, con
which Mendelssohn heard in 1829.
un"
.htt!e
and David M. Woodhead.
PProfcched
in a spirit of
Patch Heard In Third Part
College of Education: Margery A. ess
Mr. Patch will be heard in "RhapCutler. Burtis Franklin. Josephine sincerity and the creative arts mast
811 return for tneir inspiration tr
sody on a Theme of Paganini,
R. Jones. Cecil F. McGee, Betty J.
Opus 43" by Rachmaninoff in the
Mayse, Mary A. Mosby. Geraldine the "grass roots."
Known for "Merry Mount"
American students who want to Northcutt, Suzanne Rogers. John!
third part of the program. This
Dr- - Hanson stated. "I believe man
composition is in the form of 24 travel this summer are offered a Scanlon, Robert B. Stewart, and
variations upon a theme from a choice of 27 trips planned by the Jane C. Tucker. The following were is turning today to phi'osophy and
caprice for the violin by the violinist National Headquarters of American part time students in the College religion and to the creative arts
Youth Hostels, it was announced by of Education: Betty Hammock, Har- - for the solace, comfort, and
Paganini.
'
E. Noel. Evalena Spears, and spiration which they can brin; to
The concluding number of the Ben W. Miller, director of the
him."
concert, will be "Waltzes from 'Der association.
Mary Whittenburg.
In addition, hundreds of other
A composer in his own right. Dr
Rosenkavalier'," by Richard Strauss.
College of Agriculture and Home
Ushers for the concert will be trips, many of which will cost as Economics: James H. Barnes. Cecil Hanson is primarily noted for his
as $1.25 a day are planned by C. Burnette. William N. Cherry, symphonies and for the
members of Phi Beta and Phi Mu little
AYH Local Counciis throughout the Bertha L. Combs, William H. Dear- - opera "Merry Mount."
Alpha fraternities.
This opera
en, Sara A. Dugan, Elsie R. Hurt, carries out Dr. Hanson's interest ir
In a speech scheduled for last United States.
Trips sponsored by the AYH Na- Ida C. Kummer, Willis G. Moremen. American culture in that it is
night, Philip Rhys Adams, director
rt
E. Parsons, Joe E. Skaggs, ten in English and has an
of the Cincinnati Academy of Fine tional Headquarters will range in
S. Smith, Robert W. Teater, ican theme.
Arts, was to speak on "The Place length from five to 10 weeks and
will start in late June and early and Joseph W. Willet.
"Be As a Lion", a composition of
of Fine Arts in Our Society."
College of Engineering: Wallace Dr. Hanson's, was sung by the Uni-A portrait of Pres. Herman L. July. On these trips, hostelers will
Bennett, Elmer G. Brooker. Alii- - verslty Choristers at the Founders
Donovan also was to have been "avc' " s"m" mlxea groups wun
trained leaders.
son H. Caudill. Roger L. Hulette. ray Convocation Wednesday
unveiled,
L. McMurry, James Nease. jrnj.
Joseph W. Pochomis. Roger N.
xhe distinguished educator has
Stark, Charles Theobald, and Glen several works for both chorus and
.,
Weatherspoon.
orchestra to his credit. Several art
college oi uw: ueraia j. jonn- - -- Lament for Beowulf and "Drum
ston.
Taps." Dr. Hanson has comiosed
College of Commerce: Richard F. works for every instrument, and has
Anderson, Mary E. Boyd. Charles E. specialized in compositions for choir,
Coyle. Mary A. Cubranis, Margaret organ, and piano.
M. Dooley, Mildred L. Foreman,
Marietta P. Georgiadon, Margaret J.
Gibson, Stanley M. Hunt. Stanley
L. McElroy. and Ann W. White.
The College of Pharmacy has not
announced its students who made
perfect standings.
An exhibit
s

11 Make

stated

edu.-ator-

Perfect

Standings

dark-robe-

intro-standin- gs

hair-raisi-

j

Ir-v- in

s

-

Summer Trips
Are Offered

'"f

in-ri- et

well-kno-

;

writ-Walt- er

Amer-Robe-

j

morn-Charl-

Highway Meet

By W. J. Boushey

Warning that "if you kill the
theater, you dry up the sources from
which, and from which alone, can
come significant
Walter
"
Prichard Eaton, noted dramatist.
drama critic, ana teacner. empna.siz-e- d
the necessity of the "living theater" in developing dramatists.
Eaton, former New York Sun
drama critic and professor emeritus
of playwriting at Yale Universitv,
now a visiting lecturer at the University of North Carolina, marked
in Founders Week acthe
tivities Wednesday night when he
discussed in the Guiar.ol Theater
"The Place of Drama in Our Sociarti-sts,-

mid-coi-

nt

ety."
Citing

the supremacy of stase
drama over the movies, radio, and
television, Eaton said. "They are incapable
of developing
endurin
works of art which can be printed,

read, studied, revived, or otherwi.se
take their place in the root system
of our culture."
After tracing the development of
the stage all the way from the
Greeks, stopping along the way to
point out certain trends, he discussed current college drama.
"As the professional theater
shrinks and seems almost to perish,
the college theater is picking up the
torch. When I think of that I am
afraid I don't care very much
whether it is educational or not. I
just want to cheer," he said.
a significant
Eaton mentioned
change around 1SS0 when drama
study individuals, not in
tended to
relation to their own moods, but in
relation to society. "The hero of the
new realistic drama did not fall because of a fatal flaw in himself, but
3 fatal flaw in societv," he commented.
Getting directly to the title of his
lecture he added. "Each age must
find its own expression if its art is
to be vital. It must breed" a.--a tra!rr
new artists, it must fill the breasts
of its writers, especially its young
writers, with a creative urge."
After the lecture, which was
broadcast over WBKY and WKLX,
an informal reception was held in
the music room of the Fine Am
Building.

Berea Head
Visits Campus
Dr. Raymond Drukker.

College, spoke to a general assembly
students ar.d faculty of the College of Engineering at 10 o'clock
yesterday in Memorial HalL
of

I

3.

Seniors who entered the University at the beginning of this
semester and who expect to complete their requirements for graduation in June or August, and
who have not at a previous time
made application for degrees, are
requested to do so on Friday or
This applies
Saturday, March
also to graduate students who expect to complete their requirements for graduate degrees. All
applications should be filed in
room 16 of the Administration
Building.
As the Commencement lists are
made from these cards, it is very
important to file application at
this time.
Candidates for the bachelor's
degree will be charged a graduation fee of S9. This will cover
the rental of cap and gown, diploma fee, the Kentuckian. and
other necessary expenses. Candidates
for advanced degrees, other
than the doctorate, will be charged
a fee of $20, which will cover the
above with the exception of the
Kentuckian. and in addition, the
cost of the hood to be presented
the candidate. The fee for the
doctorate is $25. Graduation fees
are payable not later than the
fourth day preceding the commencement.

U

l

!

,

U

3

June Graduates
Should File For Degrees

Date Set For
March

executive

assistant to the president of Berea

n

fJv'l.f&

3-- 4.

SGA Drops

Plans For
Directory

President Herman L. Donovan discusses the FOL'NDEHS WEEK program with Dr. Raymond MoCIain,
president of Transylvania College, before the convocation in the Fine Arts Building Wednesday morning.
Dr. Donovan spoke on "Accent on the Fine Arts" and Dr. Mct'Iain, guest speaker, discussed "John Doe,
Artist".

Shown above are the executive committee of the house president's
council, sponsors of the Vocational Information t'onfrrrnce. Left to
riRht: Barbra Kirwan, chairman: Jean HarrrIL Kathleen Bealmear,
Ntlda Ewinj. Patsy Futrell. Karen Kennedy, and Sue Dossett. Sealed
are Dean Sarah B. Holmes and Virginia D. Kelley, Advisor.

Memorial Hall To Be Scene
Of Women's Job Conference
'

Students and faculty of 45 colleges and universities have been invited to come. According to Dr.
Gifford Blyton. director of TKA at
UK, 225 students and faculty from
25 states are expected.
The newly formed TKA chapter
speech on UK campus will act as host to
The largest
event ever to be held will convene the convention for the first time.
The convention will feature disat UK for three days beginning
cussion,
debate
Thursday, March 9. The convenand extempore
tion will be made of members and tournaments. Following this comKappa Alpha nation- mittee Rroujr. will iiicti ami a stuplednes of Tail
dent congress will convene.
al iorensic honorary.
inter-collegia- te

Dr. Elvis Stahr, dean of the College of Law at UK, and a member
of TKA. will act as presiding officer at the student congress.
Robert J. Blakely of the St. Louis
St
and F.ldon S. Dummit,
gubernatomial candidate.
wil speak during the course of sev- eral banquets.
in nil
UK is rnterin.T student
of the convention's activities.

D,w',
,;.r

--

.

ily

ar

Comptroller Conducts;

Group To Hold
Meeting Here

The Vocational Information Con- ference which is suon.ored by the 6 o'clock on March 15 to 16. Heads
Oifice of the Dean of Women and of departments and professors wUl
w. ...
r.t.i,.il '
"""The meet,
ri,' lead these disciut-ionsings have been scheduled in the de- is primarily for the nirtnir.!
Conference
en Thar trilHpnr
'l!t
beneni oi iresnmuu aim sopuouiuir navp
uer opportunities to see the
women students.
vocational displays. There will be
The conferenc?. which was for- - tours conducted through the
conjunction with the partments.
held in
job conference, was a separate event
Conference Theme
year and will be repeated this
"Keys to Vocational Opportuni-yelast
to aid the students in their ties" will "be the theme of the
of a career and to give them ference. The main purpose will be
the latest authoritative intormatum tJ inform the students of the train-i- n
vocational fields.
ins possibilities at the University in
the fields which will be represented
Opens March 14
in the conference.
on March 14 in
A convocation
The fields to be di.scused will be
Memorial Hall will open the. con- elementary education, medical technology, music, home economics.
ference. Mr. Virgil L.Eco,.mic'co-entucky
duector ot7he
journuliMii. physical education, puo-ii- c
operation AdmmistratMn. Washiiv'- health musing, social w rk a::d
win spent on now to rt.:;lt0vi
ton. D.
oi religious educat.ou.
.
"tjeiect a vucaumi
radio. rnvMcal tnerapv. secoi'.carv
tie- - ediicitimi. personnel, pub.ic lua.lii.
Discussions of vocations in
. i.'oiary rc;cr.ce. art.
ecli
p.mnient.s will be ciuliu led on
campus Ul me aiu'iiiauiij i:o:ii i ij ;uiu aiLituin.!

Paint Clinic

One-Da- y

A one-da- v
paint clinic, designed to
assist Kentucky Colleges and Uni- vcrsities in giving better protection
to their property through the use

J,;CqJ'S'w"are' recentlvat
Universitv

Frank
a

D.
s

the
under the auSpices pf
Peterson, comptroller.
.......
o,i

and business oifice employees from
schooLi
Kentucky
til tended
the
inectin;

con-choi- ce

j

1

C

s

1

tiu-ia-

* Friday, February 2t. 10"0

The Kentucky Kernel

1.-

wi(met mrttclet ana" column! ore to be
MEMBER
he irrijrrt Kentucky Intf rcolletiiat Press Association
opimoni o
tendered the do
iircrnrii reiect
fceateluei.
Lexington Bord of Commerce
the opinio c) The Kernel.
res Association
Kenturky
"
'
National Editorial Association
PUBLISHT WEEKLY DURINQ THE
.ni,TwM ar
i
r r j iiv '1.1 'ri j u
tunn r
Dtnvsvu
PERIODS
OR EXAMINATION
National Advertising Service,lBC.
Mil

i

.

BUBSCPTPTTON

,..

Jnwm
Von.

CWiew PuUitktn
Haw
Madison Ave
Cmm
fnm - LM aaaaiia

Entered at the Post Office at Lexington,
aecond class matter under
lb Act of Marco 1, 1879.

4tO

Kentucky,

N. Y.

raaca

Editor Earl Conn, Kent Hollingsworth, Bob
Asst. Sports Editors
Gorham
Gene phmips
Hcrbert

Oeorge Reynolds

Managing Editor
Bob
News Editor
Nell Blair
Sports Editor
Tom Diskin
Harold Fleenor ..Business Managei
Society Editor
Betty Boggess
Holton Mastin, Head Feature Writer
Wilfred Lott AdvertMne Manager

Cartoonists
News Desk

..

-

mIvmiI

W...--

1...--

Bob Fain
Photographer
Ben Williams
Dorothy Allen ....Circulation Mgr.
Librarian
Irwin Higgs
Henry MaIony- - Simpson Tompkines,
Bob Fain ghirley Porteri w
Boughey, Linda Patteson, Frances
Dick Maeke, Joe Lee, Joan Cook ......
West, Joe Coyle, Marilyn Faulk
.
Copy Desk
ner, Julie Blumenthal, Joyce Cool- ey. Bill Simon, Lewis Donohew,
Joan Cook, Bruce Dunlap
Advertising Staff
Janet Anderson, Kat.heryn Whit- mer, Jacqualine Day, Temple Cole.
Rosemary Hilling and Bill Mansfield
Wes Bird, Mary Swetnam, and
Assistant News Editors
Reporters
Jack Suttles

j

AMERICAN CANCER
1

1

B,MG
1

CR'J0W CRAWFORD -

EARA STANWYCK -- EDDIE
CANTOR

--

Quit

Ernest Hemingway' new novel,
"Across the River and into the
r
Trees," is the story of a
old U. S. infantry colonel who returns to Venice for a last visit
with a voung and beautiful Italian
girl. They are happy in their intense love, but it is a hanpiness
made poignant hy their realization
colonel
that the
hasn't Ions to live. Hemingway, in
visit, recounts
describing their last
the events in the soldier's colorful
liie which made him the brutal,
and vet strangely tender man that
he is. The novel starts in the February issue of Cosmopolitan magazine and is Hemingway's first
famous "For Whom
work since
the Bell Tolls," published in 1940.
fifty-yea-

Xlore and more students are bringing it to our attention that
the furniture and interior woodwork and walls of campus buildings
' are being defaced with alarming indifference.
Since there is practically no way in which such action can he
suppressed, short of actually catching the person in the act ot
whittling, writing or generally messing up the property, the only
! way to improve
the situation would seem to be an appeal to com- "
mon sense. The old saw alwut doing it at home does not apply
here, because all the people of the state have an interest in the
University, whereas, possibly, indulgent families control our respective homes.
Both students and faculty members are at fault, especially concerning mistreatment of walls. We realize that a long class period
often leads the student to some means of preoccupation and the
teacher to the restful propping of a foot against the wall. But it
would seem that the student could just as well use paper for his
doodling and the professor could sit down while delivering his

d

Service Group Names Chemistry Fraternity Pitkins Hear Bach
Dr. Hager W. Bach or the
Taylor To Committee Announces Pledges
will give

'
s ront'mipUy

rea(jer

Tne

with

Jonnny seeing people through the
eyes of a boy who is one 01 mem
and thus knows them for what they
are.

It

is a quiet book, moving slow

with Johnny throu3h his first
love, through High school and college and finally back to the moun
tains, where he hopes to unu mm-se- lf
again after an unhappy love
affair at school.
The suspicious nature of a moun
tain boy made Johnny believe that
Hazel, the sister of his new school
teacher, had snubbed him in telling
him goodbye. Actually, Hazel had
fallen strongly in love witn jonnny
and was disappointed in a naive
sort of way that he had not taken
advantage of her when he made love
to her, though he was unaware of
her feelings.
Johnny, bitter towards people in
general, had then gone off to school
and woiked his way into an instructor's por.it ion only to rebel at
asking the blessing m the college
dining hall as the position required.
His experiences with Edna, tne
ly

Dr. Rhea A. Taylor, professor of
history, was recently initiated into
AlDha Phi Omega, national service
fraternity. Dr. Taylor will act on
the advisory committee, according
to Dr. N. O. Long, senior faculty
advisor of the fraternity.
The service fraternity has also
initiated 15 other members. They
are George D. Bere, Kenneth Blev-in- s,
Jackie Boyd, Stuart Carpenter,
Broughton Coke Jr., Bruce Cotton,
Don Cundiff, William Davis, David
Holiday, James. W. Lyon, Robert
Roger
Moore, Robert Schwartz,
Snow, Nelson Whipple, and David
Woodhead.

Winners Of Canasta
Play-O- f
fs Announced

the
This is a first novel by a graduate
of the University of Kentucky.

WATCH MASTER
And Fully Guaranteed
WATCHES
JEWELRY
APPLIANCES

Henry Hornsby majored in journal- ism here, and received his degree
in 1938. At the present time, he is
acting city editor of the Lexington
Leader. George Reynolds.

RAY ARNOLD
"Your Neighborhood Jeweler"
Lexington
504 Euclid Ave.

One of the central tests of any
man is the nature of his pleasures.

ai
riiia
Tm

ebe

l.a.
nrnfii ra.riilaU.
r
rnnc.

Disklai

Lat wb.
iw and
Hlbl

b

Bereans Hear Talk
On Child Literature

Mrs. Kilrov Harris, instructor in
a the Department of English, will take
series of talks on "World Related- - pan in a panei discussion
Auditorium of Berea
nK... toth Pitkin Club lnoon
each 'lege. She will speak on children's
j We'(jnesday
at the Maxwell Street literature from the standpoint of
Prphviprian Church.
the author.

Expert

nt

...

Watch and Jewelry

You may have the world's best
idea, but, unless you live it, you can't
give it to the world.

Repairing

All Work Guaranteed

m

Mi

Tinys Jewelery Shop
109 N. Lime
"Twenty steps from Main"
I

CO,

5

f rrmool,

t.

Student

SPECIAL
Sandwiches

50c LUNCH

LUNCHES
Of All
K,nd

DAILY

Serving 3 Timet

So Conveniently Located

Come Over To The . . .

.

Daily, 7 o.m.

10 p.m

Sunday
8 o.m. Till 10 p.m.
S.

Campus
Kitchen
545 $ Lime

r., Colir.

ATTENTION

Dial

JUMD!it

t"'

All You Hove To Do
Is To Come To

y

ART LANE'S

s

SKITCH

s

Z

cni
wmm

And Register
If Your Name Is Drawn
YOU WIN THE

THE CRY OF THE WILD GOOSE
Frankie Laine

1

DANCE LESSONS

MUSIC, MUSIC, MUSIC
Theresa Brewer

1

Studio Hours
12 to 9 p.m.

TENDERLY
Randy Brooks

TUESDAY,

DRAWING

FEB.

1

xi

s

,

a

M,
VJ vJimm

and

28

AA

mm

1

HIS ORCHESTRA

featuring

School
21

Record Department

1

E.

(

Dancing

Madelyn Russell

Gregg Lawrence

II

1

1

r

k

1

THE BEST IN SERVICE

intuiu
the nation's most danceable band

And

Auto Accessories
AT

Tire Co,

$3 per couple

--

Vine at Southeastern

BILL
Sunday 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

Hiding iftiiLa

.!!"
Varie

Couples Only

JoyBand Casino

FOR SAVINGS"

TOMORROW-

JONES Modern Symphonitte

Fraternity Groups

An L G. Balfour Representative
Will Be In The Campus
Book Store To
Help You
Order

Class Eiings

Hight St.

Phone

Reservations

atttrr

r

A COURSE OF

IF I KNEW YOU WERE COMING
Ellen Barton

Open Daily 6 A.M. to 9 P.M.

professional

has pledged
Dr. Peyton C. Teague, assistant pro- fessor of chemistry, and the follow- ing students James Reynolds, uayie
Warner, Neal Fitzgerald, Saul Gor
don, A. G. Thorp, Dee Haun, and
James Crary.
fraternity,

SUILirf IGBACCO

1

IN TUNES

"HEADQUARTERS

Sigma,

Chi

WATCH
REPAIRING

DANCE LESSONS

in

Alpha

Gretchen White and Dotty San- ford were the winners in the Sayre
Hall Canasta Tourney held recently
Other winners in the preliminary
rounds were Recie Slusher and
Billie Brvant; Jackie Day and Ruth
White; and Joyce Howze and Phyllis
Rau.
school secretary, served to bring his
Residents of the Hall are plandiscontent to a climax and he retourney for next week.
turned to the mountains to find ning a bridge
Hazel teachi