xt795x25bt5b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt795x25bt5b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581202  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  2, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  2, 1958 1958 2013 true xt795x25bt5b section xt795x25bt5b 4

Kernel Wins National Award For Editorials
rat4
The five editorials were Judged us one entry,
with no particular one singled out for the fireplace award. Several of Bland's editorials were
reprtnted In the Courier-Journlast spring.
This ts the Kernel's fourth award three national and one Southern in the past throe years,
and the second from Sigma Delta Chi. In 1956
g
place in
the paper was awarded second
for its coverage of a narcotics ring which
was broken up in the men's dormitories here.
The second national award was won last year
by Ray Cravens, then Kernel cartoonist. Cravens'
cartoon on highway safety, published shortly be

The Kernel's editorials have been awarded first
place in the 1353 National College Newspaper Contest sponsored by Sigma Delta Chi. professional
Journalistic fraternity.
The award was presented to Gurney Norman,
president cf the UK chapter of Sigma Delta Chi.
at the fraternity's annual convention In San Diego.
Calif.
Five Kernel editorials, ail written during the
195758 school year, were submitted for judfinf.
Two were written by Frank Strunk. Kernel editor
the first semester of last year. The other three were
written by Jim Bland, second-semesteditor.

al

news-writin-

er

Sigma Delta Chi
'Professional lournalisuc iratcruitv
-

fore Christmas, tied for first place in a
sponsored by a Chic to Insurance firm.
In regional collegiate competition, the Kernel
wa.s one of the runners-u- p
in the American Newspaper Outld's "Best Newspaper In the South'- coil-tes- t.
Winner of that contest was the University of
Miami Hurricane.
The Kernel will enter the Sigma DrIU Chi.
the American Newspaper Ouild and the highway
safety contests aam this year. Results of th
latter will be announced this spring, but Judtnf
in the Sigma Delta Chi contest will not be held
until summer.

T-

-

TT

i

H
presents flm

15 1

Place

in tUc

Editorial Writing
of tkc

Oi vision

1956 Student

ITcwspapcr (?ontet

The Kernel's Editorial Award

UK Meets Detroit

On 1959 Schedule

NSA Is Voted Down
By Student Congress
Student Congress last week rejected a motion to join the National Student Association.
The action ended at least temdebate on
porarily a
vote found
the issue. The final
nearly the entire assembly voting
not to join the national group.
Education Rep. Donna Lawson
report on the
gave a
issue. She presented statements
from National Panhellenic Conference officials who have studied
the organization for some time.
She also - presented a statement
from the Purdue University student government president ques- two-mon- th

20-min-

ori SHOPPING

DAYS

TO CHRISTMAS

signal

by

10S

lor

the resignation
etlitor.

ol

t

lie-Kerne-

l

The document also ciiarged that
the Kernel has abused freedom of
the press, undermined the principles of national security and dis-

regarded its public obligations.
Originated by MS II Cadet
Michael W. Brown, the petition
followed a Kernel editorial which
criticized the Army ROTC for
using pushups as a form of discipline. The editorial had called
them "embittering, embarrassing
and an affront to one's
self-respec-

t."

The editorial appeared in the
weekend after the Ole Miss game
Kernel on Thursday. Nov. 20. The
and "before an away contest with
petition was delivered by Cadet
Auburn.
The Oct. 30 game with Miami of
Florida is a renewal of a series
which began in 1943. The schools
have met four times since then and
UK has won all lour games. This
is the first meet hi:--: betwten UK
and Detroit..
The 103! Miami game will begin
series between
another four-gam- e
the schools. I'K will play the Florida school here in 11 and 19(!.'5
with a second game in the Hurricanes' Orange Bowl in lfiG2. The
two schools will not meet in 19(10
due to schedule conflicts.
The 1958 Miami team experienced one of its most unsuccessful
Continued On rage 2

tioning the value of joining NSA.
The effect of the rejection appears uncertain now, since SC
passed a resolution favoring further research into all phases of
NSA. The governing body will use
a series of panel discussions with
NSA. IFC and national Panhellenic
officials in order to study NSA
more, fully.
Pro-NSforces In SC plan to
investigate the organizafurther
tion in order to emphasize its
Miss Lawson said
good points.
yesterday she neither favored nor
opposed the national group, but
was interested in having Student
Congress look into it more completely.
It is definite that NSA will not
be an issue in
fall SC election
campaign. Both parties were hesitant to favor joining the organization.
Probably NSA will not come up
in Student Congress until January.

TV OF KENTUCKY-

KV..

TI

ESDAV, DEC.

l!)'S

No.

108 Cadets Petition
For Editor To Resisn
Army ROTC cutlets has askttl

eXcntucky Xcvnei

in-le- ad

LEXlMiTON.

Vol. L

A petition

to

UK has completed its 1959 football schedule with the addition of
an Oct. 2 game with Detroit in
the Motor City.
The game in Detroit along with
an Oct. 30 contest with Miami in
the Orance Bowl Stadium will both
be playrci on Friday night.
Next year's schedule shows some
changes from the 1938 sl.ite. Several weeks a so I'K head coach
I.lanton Collier expressed t he belief that the ideal schedule would
contain six rather than eight conference games. The 103.( slate will
find I'K meeting seven SEC teams
of this year's eight conopponents.
ference
The Detroit game will be on the
same weekend that was an open
date this year. It will be played the

U N I V'E R S I

Brown to Jim Hampton, Kernel
editor-in-chie- f.
Monday evening.
Nov. 24. Hampton wrote the editorial.
The Kernel editor's reply lo
the charges made in the ROTC
cadets' petition is on today's
editorial page.

The cadets themselves had voted
to do pushups rather than drill.
The petition requested the
resignation of the "responsible
members of the editorial staff" and
did not specifically name the editor. However, he presumably would
be the only staff member affected
since the determination of editorial policy rests entirely with
him.
A second request of the petition
was that University authorities
take action, should the "responsible members of the editorial
staff" fail to resign, to prevent
the recurrence of certain abuses
claimed in the document.
The petition did not specify any
particular preventive measures,
and it is not known whether censorship was meant to be implied.
The University administration ha
--

Thomas Li'

!e

Tomorrow is the final date for
veterans to sign for (II allotment checks, the Veterans Administration office announced.

charge, the petition

al-

ruthlessly disregarding the factt,
has thereby deprived the cadet f
second-yea- r
military science of Hie
democratic process of selecting
their own disciplinary measures."
Another accusation was that tho
editorial staff "lias repeatedly exercised dubious license of the presi
instead of freedom of the presa
by un.p tspianly and destructively
attacking the cadre of the ROTC.

citkens,, who.

by

nature of their

position as public servants, aro
themselves
unable to defend
On Page Z
Continued

Fox--

2H-ye;- ir-

l:i

lt r ami maternal grandparent.

the weekend Willac-N. Ihi.'.s, director of UK Gir.und
Theater, and hi'- - wife, of 220 Bir-l-c- ii
aw-tanfv I ;ir.e, ami a wotn-uv.t re injured m a car wieck mk
milt'' not tli of Georgetown.
Mrs. Brings was admitted to the
Central Baptist Hospital with a
broken dhow. Mr. Brlggs. also an
assistant professor of I nglish at
abutment.
for
A bridge enthusiast. Fox was well the Cniversity, was treated
possible sprains of the knee and
Winin Lexington
and
known
chester where he participated in ankle.
duplicate bridge play. He was :i
Another assistant professor of
i
U. S Annv Reset ve. I ncli-Mrs Lewis Robin-omember of the
a small chin cut and abrasby li is parents,
He is survived
Mr. and Mrs. .Marcus L. Fox, a is- - ions or the liht arm.
13(

Veterans9 Cheeks

In it

leged that "the editorial staff f
the Kentucky Kernel ha used deliberate provocation in A cheap
attempt to fill news spare, and,

One Killed, B Injured
In 2 Holiday Mishaps

;.'
Arts and Science.- - lreshir,.m.
killed Nov.
three miles west ot
Immediately alter the editorial
was published the Military Science Vin h ser on the Levin, ton Wo.u!
to Wnu hosier
Fox. was
Department dropped pushups ah
Lexington, w hue L" had bet :i
a form of discipline lor MS II lrom
cadets. The pushups had been visiting friends.
S. W. Fpperson, deputv sheriff,
nsed to replace the former disear was ilcmolishetl
said Fox's
ciplinary drill, in which cadets
w lien it apparently skithietl, turned
drilled from 8 a.m. to work off
struck a concrete
demerits they had accumulated. around and
7--

never censored the Kernel or exercised any control over its newt
and editorial policies.

Also over

'

-'

h.

n,

A

More than likely it will be delayed until sprir.u.
Miss Law son said the proposed
SC panels on NSA would not begin

unlii s;)ttti(

Greeks God and Goddess Candidates
One fraternity and sorority candidate will be chosen
from tbis group to reign over festivities during
Greek Week, which begins tomorrow and end
Saturday. Fxchauge dinners at all Greek houses
will be held tomorrow. I riJay night the Four

Freshmen and Chde Trask' orchestra will ti
4 concert in the Coliseum. The (lod and Goddevt
Ball, with Buddy Morrow's orchestra, will be be!4
downtown saturJay niht iu the l'hormt Hjtfla
Convention Hall

* )

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Chooses OHieers
ox.,,,
mined

TucmU, Dec

io.-- s

2,

Graphics '58 Exhibit 108 Cadets
UK Art Gallery r eature
J
Continurd From Pace

Lexii.pton chnptri

th

by

of the Allinnce Franrai.-e- .
"Graphics 58," a collection of
Hi ry nrc Mrs. C. II. Evans, contemporary prints and drawings,
l"if sidcnt; Mrs. Charles K:van- - i;, now on exhibit nt the University
nnj.h. vic e president; Joan Welch, Art Gallery.
The ' exhibition 1".
Kiretary-trcnMircDirnx de Net- - made lip of 50 works by 32 Amer- r;

tnncourt, publicity; and MilledKO icin artLst'-G.ilphin and Mrs. Euuei-- Thomp- Amonc, iC pur.sf., t the Nov. 23
.vn. pi on ram chairmen.
pening was one of the represented
The alliance will meet next at 3 p,.
Lawrence Calenno. resident
p.m. Dec. 14 in the Fine Arts artist at the Univcrsitv nf Illinois.
EiiildiiiL, Music Lmmue. Member- consists of a
The collection
fhip dues for students and faculty
' impressionistic prints of
"n " 2 annuallv
contemporary artists. Some of the
.
better known are Hen Shahn. Law r- m
I tC lYIOfMS
rence Calegno. Adja Yunkers, and
Ralston Crawford.
Continued From I'age 1
According to Hichard 13 Free- of the Art Depart ment
,, i '
"
.u
nnn oon.o '
interested people will be
,
r
contest aBamst Oimon next stimulated by the brilliant display
n?
of thq so diffrmit an(, so pri.sr,na,
stvlrs of arti.ts who ranw from
Detroit had ...wvAn .500 season, internationally
known name, to
winning four, losing four and tying
onrs Jufct beRinnmR to
cnc. The Titans defeated Xavier 'ncer
"
"achieve recoition.
33-- fi
durins 1958. Xavior was the
Frederic Thiirsz. of the Art-Deonlv mutual opponent both UK
T
paitnient, and
ineent Loiiqo,
?nd Detroit met this year.
printmaker V
md teacher at Ben- UK sports publicity director
p
Ken Khn said f.nal decs.on on
responsible for
v..::ch I K home games would be
played at night has not been the exhibit '
oneerninjf the exhibit, Mr.
if ached.
exhibition,
said. "This
The 1959 .schedule will find UK Long;o
not meeting 1953 opponents Hawaii though limited to prints and draw- Ins- ls an admirable example of
end Mississippi State.
lhe most ""rent preoccupations in
The schedule is as follows:
art. Here is an outstand- array of talent, artists chief- nK
Sept. 19 Ga. Tech
r. Home
om the New York area, many
'X
Sept. 2fi Ole Miss
Home
whom have achieved national
2 Detroit
'
Oct.
Away
Away
Oct. 10 Auburn
.

KP

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.

-

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

LSU
Georgia"
Miami (Fla.)

17
24
30
7
14
21

..

Vanderbilt
Xavier
Tennessee

rccoRnition in painting and all of
whom brine originality and encite- mcnt to graphics."
-of extreme importance in this
collection of prints is the hich dc- jiPe 0f rieat!ie excellence di.s- -

id. "The
played
o
images are presented with skill in
performance and casual virtuosity,
They .speak of our time."
A bronze casting. 'Tort rait
of
Mile. Popany by Constantm Bran- cusj. adds the third dimension t
ex- an otherwise
hibition. This is one of three casf- d
by
inss made and
Erancusi who is recognized a.-- , this
tury's most Inventive sculptor.
All prints included in this ex- herein;'-Iiik-

-

hand-finishe-

"
purchased

lkl
I

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Many fouri Indud
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Howaii Study Tour $549 up and
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NOW
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load

( F I'OH 1) I
I

ST0BrNS Hat

Russell B. Milliken, Paducah, a
r
student in the College
of Law. has teen elected president
of the Student Bar Association. He
ajso is a
instructor in

Daai.ic.

fTuiMfmix

Tim

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NOW
PLAYING

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economics

Other officers for

are

1953-5- 9

rphonel
55570J

NGTON
preseru

Morton Nickell. Ashland, vice presi- dent; Georpe Young, Evarts.
retary. and Jude Zwick, Cincin- nati. treasurer.

Li,

KiNTUCKT

A JOSEPH FIELDS PRODUCTION

RICHARD WIDMARK

DORIS DAY

an

' THE TUIIIIEL OF LOVE"
S-

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.......

GIA SCALA

The Feace Study Group will
meet a4 '8 p. m. Wednesday in
Kcom 206 of the SUB.
Tom Fountain. College of the
Bible student, will introduce a
discussion on "Science in
Mis-order- ."

viz f

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ELECTRIC

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Genn forJ and Ernest Borgnine
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AND See
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(8:40)

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Admission 65c
FIRST OUTDOOR SHOWING
Fronk Sinatra Noto.e Wood
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Art Gallery.
"raphicH iS" will be on exhibition
until December 0.

of mil

a

1

acainst such student attack as has
time and csain appeared in the
Kernel."
It also (harmed that the Kernel
"has deliberately undermined the
principles upon which national
security Is based by destructively
criticizing the KOTC.
"My its continued publication of
malicious and unfounded opinions," the petition continued, the
Kernel allegedly has "shown indifference or complete disregard to
the public obligations which it accepted on becoming part of American journalism."

'

"
at the

Have

!

"

* 1

I'K Damvs

The Damps

(

Guatemalan Student Has

C.lttb

lub will meet at

7:r,0 tomorrow in
Kodfii.

tlic St

Sotial

H

'Cosmopolitan Outlook '

Christmas program, featuring Santa Clans, Is planned for
wive and children' of UK stu'' Cosmopolitan personality plus is
dent.
Mrs. Harold Markeshery, social the one way of cle.sci ibing .1 UK
sophomore from Guatemala.
hairnian, Is In charge of
Gall Francis Palmer, a language
major, is an interesting combination of American, Hritisli, and
Latin American cultures.
Horn in Tiquisate, (iuatemala. of
I
I
nritlsh parents, she has attended
American schools for only five
Dr. Henslcy C. Woodbridge. Mur-la- y years. She spoke Spanish jhefore
State College librarian, will she could speak English and
lecture at the Humanities Club learned to cha-ch- a
before she could
meeting at 7:30 tonight in the "rock and roll."
Music Lounge of the Fine Arts
Gail's father is superintendent
Euilding.
of agriculture on the United Fruit
His topic will be the Latin Amer- Company's plantation in Guate- ican reputation of historian Wil- mala. He left England 35 years ago
liam H. Prescott.
for Jamaica where he met his wife.
Woodbridge's paper, the resrrJt of After marriage, they made their
a bibliographical study on Prescott, home on tho plantation in Guate- 'vill be published by the Organiza- - maia. Gail says her parents have
lion of American States' Inter- - nevcr iiVed in the States because,
American Review of Bibliography "They don't like it up here."
early next year.
Gail nas two 0icit.r sisters, one
Since coming to Kentucky in living in Hopkinsville and the
1053, the Murray librarian has be- - other, whose husband Is a native
come interested
in the state's Guatemalan, in Guatemala City.
authors and folklore. He has con- - Gail graduated from Tiquisate's
tiibuted to the Register of the elementary school and came to the
Kentucky Historical Society, Ken- - States to attend high school in
tucky Folklore Record and
the San Marcus, Texas. She says she
Eulletin of the Kentucky Library came to the University because her
Association.
sister lives in Hopkinsville. "I can
to once in a
For the past several years, he have a home
and Prof. D. K. Wilgus of Western while," she explained.
Kentucky State College have comGail prefers Latin American
piled an annual bibliography of climate, music, and boys to the
Kentucky folklore.
American varieties of the same.
A

III

K1MK

K

Kl KM

j ear

around and the boys because
they're gentlemen."
She says she has us many Latin
American friend.-- , in Guatemala as
American ones, y
she sneaks
Sj anish to the Latins and Faig- hsh to the Americans.
One of the things Gail misses
most is the "siesta" the Guatemalans take for two hours after lunch.
She thinks everybody in the States
is "always rushing."
Gall likes two stateside cominodi-tie- s
extremely will tlmuuh-Fra- nk
Sinatra and New Orleans. She
thinks "if I,inutn had the nght'
life of New Orleans, it would be
a pretty decent place."
Dating customs in Guatemala
are a little different trom American ones, Gail says. Until a kjirl
is 21, she must be chaperoned when
she has a date. If a boy wants to
Ko steady with a girl, he formally
asks her parents for permission,
A date never begins before 9
PGail says, and parties or
dances are rarely over before
in her case, Gail said, "Gosh. no.
When asked if the dating cus- torn regarding chaperones applied
111 ner case
Gail said- "Gosh no.
t that be terrible!
wouicm
"

Murray Librarian
OOprak OUI"ht

;

-

-

"I was sinking .deep in sin
Wheel"

it

'P

.none

who Ims not hid
for the !!".
by coming
m.iv do

ri'ture taken

Km-ItirVi.-

in

t

Koom Ceti. J..orn.liM

P. nMln;
fiom 9 a. m. o . p m. lod.it.
Photos will be taken on a firl
oine. first served b.isis.
I his is
absolute!
tl.f .it
(h.inre to set photos in the
No pictures will l taken
n- - clatrs
after this lime n
will not be extended.

in-

of

the Invitational Hill. MaMi In Id
at Xavier University on Nov. 21
and Nov. 22.
Harmon : hot 20.1 rut ol a possible ?.imi oints in the individual
compet

itiS -- 7;

I)

!.

KrtiturLiati I'hotos

UK Sltidenl
ins Xavier
Kille Makh

Sh' likes Latin Air.eiican nra-i- e
becauv "it's K"t mre," the cliDonald Harmon won the
mate because it st.ns the .same all dividual hoii'Ms compctit ion

I'm

I.

ion tin Nov. 21.

The Kifle Team took first place
in the seven-teameet with a
m

score of 1 !(:. '.
Tho UK team was composed of

Donald Harmon. Mar-hal- l
Turner.
Tommy Mm iirr. Jerry Wade. Win-frrCampbell, and Lowell Srevetis
In the
Ohio mid
Kentuckv
League, I'K holds nrt place with
a score of 1387. The in-- t round
match 's were laid on Nov. H at
Dayton I'mver- ity.
In the competition, Donald Harmon is in first pl.n-and Jerry
Wade in second pla e in the
i
idiial competition.
.The. v.u.itv team, in the Intercollegiate Rifle League, is in third
place with a score of 13VJ. irailuiK
'
Ohio State and Dayton.
Donald Harmon ia first in the
individual rompct ltion.
Any student can be a member
of the varsity team, while only the
AFROTC team fires in the Ohio
and Kentucky Leagues
The coach of the rifle team Is
M. Sgt. John W. Morgan; while
Lt. Col Glenn Zarger is chief
adviser.
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Two.Vwk()lc
Seal Conkl
Vole "Is Close
Marilyn Muse.
Kapp lv:?a,
representing Sigma Alpha Fp.sd .:
Fp.Mlon ha a
and 'I'au Kaim
three-vot- e
lead in the second week
l
of the
"Miss Christmas
balloting
In second place is Ann Woodward, Chi
Omega, representing
Kappa Alpha
and Alpha Tnn
Omega. Nancy Lowe. Kappa Alph.i
Theta, represent iiu; Iaimlxl.i Cht
Alph.a and Phi Sigma Kappa i in
S.-a-

third place.
I'K students

earn support their
favitrite candidate by sendinj tlu-ieontrihutinns and ballots to the
Tit Association office. 1110 Forbes
ICoad. Contributions may also be.
snt to the I.exington-FavettCounty Tn Assoeiation. Ro
alidnight, Dee. IX. is the contest
deadline.
A display board, with pictures
ar.d names of all contestants, lias
been placed in the SUH so that,
students can follow U rcmit
r

Systems in the
The march ofelectronics into the Space Age is being quickened
as a result of Hutrhes work in airborne electronics systems.
One such development is the Hughes Electronic Armament System, which pilots high-spejet interceptors to
ed

guided missiles,
enemy targets, launching Hughes
and flies the pfanc home. Even more sophisticated Electronic
Armament Systems completely outstrip those presently released for publication.
air-to-- air

Working on space satellites, Hughes engineers are active
in the preliminary design of guidance and control systems,
communication and telemetry systems, sensing devices using
infrared, optical and radar techniques.

--

R

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Information resulting from Hughes study in the fields of
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FROM OCTOBER

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For Information, wri'e

DIVISIOIJPARKS
DIPT. OF CONSERVATION
FRANKFORT, KY

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* The Kentucky Kernel
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University of Kentucky
tlM
Lwitfnn, Entoky iwnt hool mMtw omW th Act ef Muk
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Ih regular u
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HWK CHAPMAN

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MX DOLLARS A SCHOOL TEAR

Jim Hamtton,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

La but Van Hooe, Chic Sport$ Editor
RonfTHTS, Society Editor
v
Nobman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Hank Chatman, Carfounfef
Marilyn Lyvcw and Judy lYnnebaker, Troojreadcrt

Ant ErrwsoN, Chief Netct Editor
Ann
Aurarr, Businea Manager
Fmrr
rhotoprapher
Sffl
CenvoN-Bahi- ,

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan
Ai.mx.

Millott,

Buddtnc, Associate Editor

Editor

Paul Scott,

Spcrls Editor

Tlie Editor Answers

The Cadets' Petition
A group of 108 Army ROTC cadets
Jus signal and presented to us a petition requesting that wc resign as
Kernel editor. While we respectlully
decline to do so, we should like to

comment on the petition's allegations
and on the editorial which caused it
to be drawn up.
was originated after
editorial, highly critical
our NovL'O
of the Army ROTC's disciplinary
pushups, was published. When it was
delivered to us by MS II Cadet
Michael Brown, he pointed out an
error of fact which we hereby ac-

The petition

knowledge.

ollicer. We sincerely regret that our
cartoon was taken as a personal caricature; it was intended to portray an
idea, not a person.
The petition continues that we have
undermined the principles of national
security by our excoriation of the
ROTC Department. This is a nebulous and presumptive statement and
could be argued ad nauseam, depending upon the tenacity of one's
belief in the intrinsic worth of collegiate militarism.
" Another of the petition's clauses accuses us of the "continued publication
of malicious and unfounded opin-ion-

"J feel so listless today. 5J

The Readers9 Form

s.

tVe stated that pushups had been
introduced by the ROTC itself, when
in fact they were chosen by MS II
cadets as an alternative to early morn- ing drill. These cadets, as their peti-

We think the petitioners are in
'error in their terminology in that
clause. One editorial cannot constitute
"continued publication" and an opintion shows, rather strongly disagree ion, which is based on one's views and
with our statement that pushups are beliefs, can hardly be "unfounded."
If they meant that we were guilty
"embarrassing, embittering and an afof an omission of fact, that already has
front to one's
"
We were unfair, then, in accusing been admitted. But our "unfounded
the ROTC of forcing pushups ujon opinion" is that pushups are absurd
the cadets. This fact, however, still and should not be tolerated. Docuwould not have altered our editorial mentary evidence is not required to
very much. Instead of criticising it for support that belief.
The petition's concluding stateoriginating pushup discipline, we
ment asked that University authorities
would have criticised the ROTC Department for even allowing them. No curb future criticism of the ROTC in
matter who asked lor them, we still case we failed to resign as requested.
think pushups have no place on the This plea.is interesting because its implication is the rather portentous one
University campus.
The petition alleges that we have of censorship something the Kernel
of
attacked the staff of the ROTC De- has never known in its
partment in an unsportsmanlike and publication.
On the other hand, that request
destructive manner. It lurther contends that these attacks have "time holds the key to the only possible
cause of our resignation. For the
and again appeared in the Kernel.".
Both allegations are patently un- moment censorship enters the Kernel,
true. We were caustic in our one and we and our entire stall will leave.
only criticism of the Army ROTC, but
"we criticised only the department and
KERNELS
its discipline never an individual.
There's not the least thing can be
Cadet Brown said our editorial's said or done, but people will talk and
accompanying cartoon was taken to find fault.
-- Cervantes
be a caricature of one of the Army
A close mouth catches no flies.
ROTC instructors. This is an unforCervantes
tunate misconception, because neither . 'Tis ill talking of halters in the
we nor our cartoonist would even house of a man that was hanged
recognize the supjosedly caricatured
Cervantes
self-respect-

."

half-centur-

y

"

Our Editorial Award
Recognition is rarely more gratifying, no matter what one's calling,
than that which comes Irom other
members of the same profession. For it
is within professional tanks that judgment is most critical, competition
most keen and achievement the hardest won.

Knowing this, we are deeply honored that the Rand's editorials were
awarded lirst place in Sigma Delt.Y
Chi's national college newspaper contest. This professional journalistic
fraternity, whose membership includes
many of the nation's top newspapermen, annually presents awards in lour
divisions: editorial, feature and news

writing and photography. The awards
represent, to the competing schools,
one of the most sought alter honors
in college journalism.
Credit lor the Kernel's award goes
to last year's editors, Jim Bland and
Frank Strunk, since papas are judged
each summer lor the past academic-yearThis latest award is the third
lor the Kernel in as many years, two
lrom Sigma Delta Chi and another
in a national highway' salety contest.
We are proud to have been eho-.cloi this latest honoi, not only because
it is a cliiect achieu-iiien- t
lor the
paper, but also because it brings credit
.

n

to the University as a whole.

Banana Boat

.

that you

should go to the blackboard and write

To The Editoi:

500 times: I wouldn't iceognic editorial
sarcasm if it barbed my face in." THE

Re AP wire report "Britons Get BaSouth Africa." Although
nanas From
"Britons" inhabit an island in somewhat
northerly latitudes, they are not so unaccustomed to Ircsh fruit as to find it
"exotic."
Thanks to modern media of transportation and communication, the natives of
this remote land are becoming acquainted
with the latest scientific methods of Iruit
growing. That this simple people can
now enjoy the luxurious residts of suth
an enterprise is still another tribute to
American "know-howand, by extending
the American Way of Life, must be seen
as an important step in winning the dramatic idcalogical conflict for men's minds.
. It is, moreover, interesting
to note that
"the first cargo in the freighter 'Winchester Castle' was pronounced a success."
Surely this initial trade impulse is fundamental in the rise of an underdeveloped

EDITOR).

ROTC Defended

'
1

To The Editor:
would like to cjuotc I.t. Gen. James
M. Gavin in his book, "War and Peace
in the Space Age," in reply to our editorial in the Thursday Kernel:
". . . one of the truly great contti-butioiof the prewar (training) system was the ROTC. An army is not
one mite better than its leaders, arrd
t without the ROTC we would never
have had the leaders that we needed
so badly. T have known thousands of
young ROTC ollicers and 1 consider
the nation owes them a great debt of
gratitude. It does not take long memory to recall the troubles the ROTC
had in continuing the support of its
program between the wars.
the object of campus puns, it
was not appreciated until war came;
but when war did come, the ROTC
came through."
I do not claim any debt is owed to the
ROTC cadets of toady, but I do believe
that the ROTC program ought not be
viewed in the wrong light. I believe any
effort should be judged by its accomplishments and not by its side effects as long
as such effects do not increase the value
ol the accomplishment.
I would like to take issue with the
Kernel on the point that discipline is an
adverse effect. An army must have discipline and leamwoik lo function properly. The United States Army is one of
the necessary instruments to preserve the
Irccdom and privileges we enjoy. I do
not believe discipline imposed by a
American is an unbeatable burden to
pay lor these licedoms.
I cannot imagine anything, as you put
it. so embarrassing, ernbiltei ing and an
allront to one's sell respec t, as a Russian telling me what 1 can and cannot do.
II you dorr't believe me, ask a Hungarian.
II. L. Smiiii
I

u

"

nation.

Frc?-cjuent-

Anne
.

soul searching and concluded

Vane-Wric-

ht

(We'll save these heathen British yet.

-- THE EDITOR)

Dead Sportsmanship
To The Editor:
The hullaballoo set up by some of my
fello