xt795x25bt6x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt795x25bt6x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19430108  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January  8, 1943 text The Kentucky Kernel, January  8, 1943 1943 2013 true xt795x25bt6x section xt795x25bt6x Best uopy Available

The Kentucky Kernel

ON PACK TWO
Infantryman
A Letter

Jot-Write- s

Z246

l.LXINC;

Kuhlman, University Baritone,
lo Sim At Sunday Musicale
Adcle Gensemer
Will Accompany

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Voice Instructor

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MEN

SPECIAL COURSE
Meteorology Work
May lie Taken By
Enlisted Reserves

TO BE DEFERRED

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University men able to meet the t
qualifications outlined are eligible
to apply for special training in the
field of meteorology at the Univer
sity or Chicago. Colonel B. E. Brew- er. or the Military department, has 10
announced.
Civilians, enlisted men of the
Army and those in the Enlisted Reserve Corps or the Army may apply
by reporting
to Colonel Brewer.
Those In l,
and 7 are not
eligible, he said.
No qualifying examinations are
given; all candidates must be rully
qualified by transcript or scholastic
record to receive consideration. All
subjects in the three programs are
given at the college level and credit
toward a degree is likely to be
granted at most or the participat- -

28 ARE NAMED
UNTIL MARCH 20
Dr. H. L. Donovan FOR ADVANCED
Receives Notice
ROTC TRAINING
From Washington
Students Listed
University students in the United
Eligible To Enroll
States Army Reserve Corps will not
be called into active service until
At Spring Term

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they have completed the winter
A list or 28 students selected ror
quarter in college. This was the as- the advanced ROTC course at the
surance received by Dr. Herman L. University has been released by of- Donovan, president of the Univer- ficials or the military department,
The students named will be el- sity, from Washington during the
toihic m mroH in the advanced
Christmas vacation.
class at the beginning or the spring
The quarter ends March 20.
quarter, provided that they have ilg institutions.
The information sent to Dr. Don- completed the basic course and pass I The requirements ror the courses
ovan was contained In a communi- to Junior standing in the University
e as follows:
Course C: Basic
cation from the American Council at that time.
on Education which had been so ad12 months.
Course starts February
Those eligible are:
vised by the War Department. The
William S. Haughaboo. William O. 1, 1943. Academic requirement: 2
order also Includes youths who Leslie. Jack T. Pryor, Harold B. years" high school algebra. 1 year,
t.
joined the Enlisted Reserve by Jan- Wright, D. M. Baird. Marvin T.
plane geometry, 1 year; high school
uary 5.
William H. Finnie. C. T. Manie. srienie. Must be a high school gradpart.
21 years or age.
18
Deferments for at
T. Roszell.
Two numbers by Barber. "I Hear
CLUB quarter also will be least one school C. Lewis. H. W.Oscar C. Wright. C.- uate betweenper and plus allowmonth
given
Meador, J. A. Hod- Pay $50.00
R.
an Army." and "Dover Beach" will
students,
students, skins, V. R. Thurman, William R. ances or $2.75 per day ror rations
compose the fourth section of the
veterinary students, and those ma- Thomas. John A. Palumbo. Charles and quarters; rree tuition and
program.
ASKS STUDENTS
joring in chemistry, physics, bac- R. Hoffman. Jr., Carl Leasure, Tom clothing.
The last group of songs will in6
teriology, and engineering.
Course B.:
W. Gamett. Jr, Howard W. Smith,
by Charles;
clude "Disenchantment."
In a letter to parents of Univer- John W. Hudson. Henry H. Hagan. months, course starts March 1. 1943.
Flame," TO SUBMIT WORK
"By the Bivouac's Fitful
sity men students. Dr. Donovan urg- Roy M. Kirchoff. Earl J. Farrell. Academic requirements: 2 years'
from "Drum Taps" by Hanson: and
1 year
nign scnooi science,
"At the Well" and "Miranda" by Freshmen and other men students ed that they cooperate in the move- Marvin B. Meyers. Joe T. Foley, algebra.college mathematics, success- have been invited to participate in ment now approved by government Ben H. Pumphrey and Shelby N. 1 year
Hageman.
ful completion of one year or col- Kuhlman came to the University Patterson Literary Society's quar- and educational leaders to keep jett. f ..n,,.;
-o
tka luiiining e,,Horte wnm. u. Imp- Pav same as fthovp with free
J,"",,,
lie
September as instructor in terly competition for membership. their sons in college training as
last
lected for the advanced Signal corps tuition ana doming,
voice at the music department. He This is the first time in the history long as possible.
course, and will enroll at the begin- - r Course A.: Advanced Meteorology,
is a graduate or Ohio State Uni- of the organization that membernlng of the spring quarter under 8 months' course, starts June 21,
ship has been open to freshmen.
versity where he studied voice under
Editor
the same conditions as the advanc-- j 1943. Academic requirements: Dif-e- d
Requirements for membership inLouis H. Diercks and Dale V. Gilli-lanferential and integral calculus. 1
Infantry classes:
clude a standing of at least 1 and Takes OWI Office
Joseph O. Maupln. Fred Jackson, year college physics, successrul
While in Columbus, he made sev- the submission of an original paper
H. Carrier. R. G. Schneider. pletlon of 2 years' college. Pay $75.00
Dwight L. Bicknell, rormer editor
eral radio appearances and appeared of at least 2.000 words, or an equiva
$2.25
presentations lent In creative writing.
or the Kentucky Kernel and 'tele- L. I. Abraham. W. J. Gordonwood, per month plus allowances of
as solois in numerous
W. A. Prlbble. F. L. Milburn, G. G. per day for rations and quarters.
Redempgraph editor or the Lexington Herof "The Messmh.'t.'The
Papers Due Feb. i
free tuition and clothing. Status
tion," and "The Seven Last Words,"
ald ror the last two years, has been Barnett and D. R. Durbin.
cadet.
Aviation
course:
during
Papers or other work should be named information officer in charge
and sang the role or Escamillo in a
Ground Crew, U. S. Army Air Forces,
concert presentation of "Carmen." turned in before noon. February 6. of the Office of War Information
of
completion
successful
After
Before coming to the University, he Interested students should contact at Louisville.
course, commission as 2d Lt Army
Prof. J. Huntley Dupre, Prof. Kon-ra- d
music in New Hampwas director of
As a reorganization of the unit had
Bekker, or Prof. John Cutler,
Drops ' of the U. S., Army Air Forces.
shire. Ohio.
faculty
advisors;
Bob Amnions, been ordered recently by the Cleve
In addition to his duties at the
land, Ohio unit, the Louisville Of
Total enrollment tor the winUniversity. Kuhlman is voice in president; or Jay Wilson, secretary. fice of War Information, located in
Recent UK
ter quarter had reached 2.2,09 at
It has been stressed that the the Federal building, had been with
structor at Sayre college and solo
the close or the regular regisRecognition
ist at the First Presbyterian church. papers must be prepared especially out a head for the last six weeks.
tration period Wednesday, Regfor the occasion and can be on any
Bicknell, who came to the Lexingistrar Leo M. Chamberlain anUniversity's recent reprint of
The
subject lending itself to serious disshows a
Cinnounced. This
ton Herald two years ago
to the Kentucky Im-AND CROSS cussion. The equivalent in creative cinnati where for a numberfrom years drop of only 487figure the final "The Pioneer John Magill, has beeni
from
of
migrants," by
writing would include short stories,
enrollment of 2,756 attained
chosen by the American Institute of
plays, or a sufficient amount of he was a member of the editorial
last quarter.
staff of the Cincinnati Enquirer,
Graphic Arts as one or the Decem- poetry to indicate a talent for that
Registration figures for the
mill be in charge of releasing to
ber selections or the Trade Book
type of expression.
second semester of last year,
newspapers and the radio in Kenclinic. Selections are based on the
Discussions Held
while not strictly comparable to
tucky information concerning optypography and general Jorm of the
CABARET DANCE
Candidates submitting papers will erations of various war agencies in
these results, reached 2,800.
nnhliration.
t be asked
dis the state.
to eive a
rw ' T r
v.,..,l ,.H , , ,.J
TV.
Further Increases in the enSeniors
cussion of the subject treated, and
is expected since sturollment
Clark acting head of the history
those offering literary works will be
dents may register until Janudepartment. Is the second number
To Be
ary 14, the registrar's office reasked to discuss their production,
reprint series
In the University
berore a meeting or the society.
vealed.
At Union Formal
which has received national recog-- !
To
No tabulations could be obThe literary group, open only to
nition.The University committee on
The most popular senior man and men students, conducts
tained at press time concerning
feeling the artistic
Appearing as the Letter of the
publications,
the proportion of men and woemail will be presented at Lamp discussions on matters or interest, Week in the January 2 issue or the
need for the preservation in atmen students nor of the differseveral Saturday Evening Post is an article
annually sponsors
tractive format of the early writand- - Cross' Cabaret Dance to be and
ent classes and colleges.
ings of Kentucky authors, inauguheld Saturday. January 16, in the speaking contests for members and written by Weller R. Gary, ft rormer
University student.
for the general student body.
rated the series of reprints in 1939.
Blucgrass room of the Union buildwill be
ing. Pictures or the couple
included in the 1943 edition or the

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Tal-bot-

LITERARY

Velia Hedermu'i . junior fiom
icill ait as munagnm
editor of the Friday editions of
the Kernel for the winter quarter. Jim Carroll, senior from
tJiiabet litou n. null be manag- .
.
.
,.
rill.
ititr ftltliir nt tlii .r
lions. Baxter Mellon, junior
from C.orxilon. will suinise
s sorts.

arroll

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Former

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Jim

Crlia Bederman

pre-dent- al

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The University can care for approximately 2.000 of the tentative
figure of 150.000 young men to be
trained in the nation's colleges by
the government after they are inducted into the armed forces. Dr.
Herman L. Donovan, president of
the University, has stated.
University officials reported that
figure to the government in a questionnaire returned recently
to
Washington. The questionnaire wa
: ser.t to the country's leading colleges and universities in an attempt
to determine facilities for training
enlisted men in physics, engineering, bacteriology, chemistry, mathematics, and other allied sciences.
Enrollment ttnp Seen
Dr. Donovan said that the University could accommodate
1000
service men now and that since the
drafting of 18 and
is
expected to take at least 1.000 of
the present students from the
school, a total of 2.000 service men
eventually could be trained here.
Contracts similar to the one now
held by the University for the training of engineering students in the
1525th Service Unit, housed at the
Phoenix Hotel, will be entered into
by the government for the additional special courses.
Men Expected
Because of the tentative limit of
.': 150.000 trainees set by the questionnaire, and the fact that between
i 200 and 400 schools are competing
for the contracts, it is expected that
(
hardly more that 1.000 men will be
sent here. Dr. Donovan stated.
"It's still too early to know exactly
what they want." Dr. Donovan said.
"and I believe it win be February
before we know many of the details
here. It takes a lot of time to work
out such things."

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Colleges To Train
150,000 Young Men
In Army Service

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Students Called

corn-Rob-

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Students who wish to participate
in the competition for affirmative
and negative places on the debate
teams which are to take part in the
contest sponsored by the American
Economics foundation must be prepared to deliver their preliminary
arguments at 3 p. m. Tuesday in
Room 231, McVey halL Prof. W. R.
Sutherland, debate coach,

Winter Quarter
Enrollment

Reprint

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Sergeant York,
Baxter

Rates

World War Hero,
To Speak Here

Mrlton

LAMP

"Train" Akers Reports

WILL SPONSOR,

Holiday Court Activity

Popular
Presented

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point-gette-

received hon- - wilUams. briUiant soph center, with
15
aced tne McCrackenmen
nonors- 40
Ohio SUte
By Marvin AJiers
Before a capacity crowd that
Kentucky 45 Washington I'. 38
jammed into every available space of
The Kentucky Kage Kats slowed Alumni gym. the Kentucky Wild- down the fast breaking Washington cats faltered in the stretch and
University Bears and went on to were defeated 45 to 40 by a gallant
win their second victory of the sea- - band of Buckeyes from Ohio State,
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son. 45 to 38.
The Bucks were paced bv a cou- At the start the boys or Adolph pie or forwards. Fred Miller and
Rupp were hotter than a burglar's little Max Gecowets, who scored 14
pistol, and were leading 0 at the and 11 points respectively, but it was
end of two minutes or play.
Dick Shrider. Buckeye guard, that
Center Mel Brewer paced the Cat dealt the Wildcats the knockout
attack with 13 points. Bloom bios- - blow when the blue chips were on
somed out with 14 tor the visitors. the line.
Kentucky M Fort Knox Z
Indiana 58 Kentucky 32
Indiana's Hoosier Hot Shots, after
After playing a listless first half,
trailing for the first 29 minutes, fi- - the Kentucky Wildcats came back
nally climbed on the firewagon and strong in the second canto to derail
outdistanced
the Kentucky Wild- - a band of Fort Knox Annoraiders
2
cats.
before 5.000 fans at 64 to 30 before a scant crowd of
Louisville's Armory.
1.500.
The Hoosiers refueled at the rest
Milt Ticco. Kentucky's
came back driving harder topped forward, took charge of the
and shooting with much greater heavy artillery
"d wound up the
marksmanship. The Hoosiers sliced evening with eight direct hits and,
the Wildcat lead to 1 with 14 a free toss for a total or 17 points.
Adams,
minutes to play. After the 'Cats
Pvt. George
In- - three inch tenter led the A r mora id- pushed their advantage to
ers with 14 in addition to playing a
diana started rolling.
Brewer and Ticco led the Cat bang-u- p
rebounding game.

aP,ain- - wh
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hair-raisi-

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tires began to get scarce. . . . A ' . . .
students and
Kernel reporter snapped a profs pleaded "Don't lug In overdue
picture or 100 girls In John Taylor's papers at the last minute" and "Go
dormitory room.
Scandal? No! to your desk and rest yourseir."
Incidentally Taylor's War hysteria was blamed as dorm
Petty
rnnm H , " c nnt have nna Ckf t o Inn,- - man r ,1 1m naiamac cVvnrtc nr
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ceiling treatments. . . . Someone towels, staged mass demonstration
- on campus, shouting, singing, and
finally caught on and held convocation in the grill. . . . Darn shame building bonfires in the craziest
breaking so many student's "never places. . . . Largest group of persons
ever received degrees at UK's long- have been to convo" record.
SGA established a war fund. . . . est commencement ever, 7:30 to 11
Which still hasn't any money In it. . . . but it didn't rain.
Sugar
. . . Kentucky
JUNE, JULY, AUGUST
bowed to Dartmouth
In finals of NCAA after debating got shorter. . . . Tires got scarcer,
favored University of Illinois in the . . . More men enlisted. . . . Co-eeastern round. . . . Fort Knox sol- - worried. . . . Will any men be back.
diers began a series or visits to cam- - . . . Will our dance be a flop.
Will we really have to study.
pus weekend parties.
Ouignol presented the
SEPTEMBER Freshmen, and we
APRIL
art department's Rannells as "The do mean men. returned, as
Rush- Man Who Came to Dinner" beard breathed a sigh or relief. .
As usual parties
and all. . . . Kernel took top honors ing began.
at the state press meet and sports started off with formal teas. . . .
ed Steinfort was named KIPA Drexv Then Aloha Xi's and KD's intro- of the convention. . . . Amnions duced bartenders, and cocktails. . .
made the classic remark "The best Chi O's staged a mock wedding. . . .
thing about a convention is the Tri Delts brought the climax with
lack or it." . . . Senior edition plans a Hell, Heaven and Earth party. . . .
were shrouded and embalmed. . . . Accoiding to the story "The first
Charlie Barnet sax sensation nearly floor will represent hell and tomato
raised the SUB roof with his juice and heaven will be on three."
In honor of the Dear
"Pompton Turnpike." . . . Page 3 . . . Lull.
of the Kernel was devoted to plat- - Departed. . . . Enlisted. Graduated
forms of SGA candidates. . . . Worn- - or Drafted. . . . Frosh blunders.
..
. . Open house.
en held banquet and presented out- - Pep rallies.
standing honors in traditional tap- - Membership drives. . . . Classes.
ping ceremonies. . . . Monkey bus- - Amnions got after the personality
iness in SGA voting, committee boys. . . . Notice seekers stormed the
says, reelection scheduled. . . . Ker- - news room. . . . Lines formed at the
nel turned Roto witth pix of entire rear of Memorial Hall for Kylan
new staff. . . . PR's crack drill unit pix. . . . Library listed new books as
"Get Thee Behind Me." "Drivln'
dood it again.
MAY President Donovan told in- - Woman."
auguratlon crowds what he sees! OCTOBER Men getting scarcer.!
prv-- s
won
tih ten, tcfi w. .jnop
from his
Exam-harrie-

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Guiqiiol Announces Players
For "Arsenic And Old Lace"

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Fes-aft- er

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Seven Students
To Take Parts
In Broadway Hit

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Kampus
Kernels

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NOVEMBER Gulp! faadie
Not very many
kins is in again.
nien to chase though. . . . Thanks-the- lr
giving holiday cut to one day. . . .
Uniforms became the style, bell bot-rtorn trousers, stripes, bars, khaki,
waacy. .
Barbara Rehm scored
again in "Claudia" and Mary Louise
Knapp sang as guest artist on the
20 students
Sunday musicale.
were named to Who's Who. . . .
Dean Holmes
serves worried
w" hog calling contest at Ag
tival. . . . Julia Johnson reelected
PR sponsor. . . . Ted Weems sche- duled for Christmas formal. . . .
Twenty-fiv- e
Women's defense activities filled 32
murders are featured
inches of Kernel.
"Arsenic and Old Lace." a coin-- I
DECEMBER Alums arranged tojedy in which three persons vie for
send monthly news resume to for- - murdering honors, opening at Guig- nol. Jan. 18. under the direction of
mer students in armed forces.
Co-esay service men on campus Frank Fowler. Seven of the 13 parts
"not wolfish." . . . Colds threaten a will be played by University students.
wet Christmas. . . . Gals walk
The role of Jonathon Brewster,
ingly on dates, columnist says. .
say. .
Gamma which Boris Karloff made so popuWhat dates,
lar In New York, will be enacted by
Tau Alpha goes national. . .
van squelches rumor that UK may Don Irvine, instructor of English.
Leonard Cohan, Paris, arts and
be operated only as a military train-th- e
ing center. . . . Clyde Johnson takes sciences freshman, will play the
Re part of Teddy Brewster, an unsusberth as
serves worried. . . . Julia Johnson pecting accomplice to twelve ot the
Exams murders.
named Kyian queen.
The role of Elaine Harper, the
in quarter time. . . Off to the home
Do'o-reign-

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Sgt. Alvin C. York. Pall MalL
Term., hero of the first World War.
will be one of the notable speakers
at the annual Farm and Home con- vention at the University during
the last week in January. ThomMm
R. Bryant, assistant director of the
program c o m m 1 1 e e . announced
today' Vork
nome-vi- n
sf8lt
makers meeting at Memorial hall on
Thursda''- - Jan- - M- - and also l a
session for farmers in the Livestock
pavilion.
Bryant said that the other speak- ers will include Roy Hendrickson of
Washington, administrator of the
Agricultural Marketing Administra- tion. who will discuss "Food Ra- tioning." and Mrs. Grace Overton of
Ann Arbor. Mich., who will speak
on "Normal Living in Abnormal
Times."

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getting worried. . . . Iron beds,
phies, tences admit students to
Homecoming! Less
scrap dance.
noisy, rewer alums. Tewer students.
Football used In
same spirits.
, ..
,
ame
ar
Ior
ent
; ' ' Bkstole coke machine
tH'rserK- - passea out a cokcs ior a
nickel, who said slot machines never
ot-

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Kernel News Editor
brought worry.
brought war war brought
shortages shortages in everything
everything includes men men went
to war college students are men
college students went to war
shortages worry women men worry
1942 brought
women
therefore
worry.
War rorum discus- JANUARY
sions were inaugurated to make the
conscious of world events.
. . . Sororities responded by trading
annual dances ror war bonds,
. . . PM was launched
in the grill
weeknight dancers. . . . $400,000
was allotted UK ror the "capital
outlay" or a long sought field house,
. . . Men began to enlist in the re- A miracle in the last
serves.
Cat- seconds of the
game saved the score.
. . . UK decided to graduate seniors
12 weeks' work IT drafted . . .
Rumors of a "Quarter system."
Defense program
FEBRUARY
for women got under way with
frontier nurse Breckinridge giving
the opening speech. . . . Men began
enter- to be drafted. . . . Co-ethe state legislators and or
vice versa with a reception and
dance following the Kentucky-Geor- gia Tech game. . . That week ar- again and everyone survived
it again, actives, pledges, even in- dependents. . . . Caroline Conant
at the Military ball and
Barbara Rehm was reelected to lead
Best Band in Dixie.
MARCH Wildcats took SEC title
by beating Florida, Auburn. Missis- sippi and Alabama. . . . Profs began
appearing on the campus with coat
tails firing nd scarves flanptnie as

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1942 Was Worry Year Here
1942
1942

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Former Student
"Post"
Writes

By BETTY JANE

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note:
Editor
The following
tame accounts were written by Mar- with 10 points apiece
- ,hile Hamilton with 18 and Ward
Akers. Wildeat guard and

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Kcntuckian.
The first formal of the year and
the first "night club" dance in two
years is being sponsored by the senior men's honorary with proceeds
to be used for its scholarship fund.
Tables will be arranged around
the ballroom and sandwiches and
soft drinks will be served during the
evening. Reservations may be made
by fraurnities or by Individuals.
Kill Cross To Play
Bill Cross and his Blue ar.d White
orchestra will play ror the dancing.
No fioor show is being planned.
Each men's organization may
one candidate ror the most
liopular man contest for every 20
tickets sold. Each woman's organization may select a candidate for
lie most popular woman contest
for every ten tickets sold.
A committee composd of Dr. T. T.
Jones, dean of men; Miss Jane
assistant dean of women;
Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes, dean of women; and three students selected
by Mrs. Holmes, will select the winners from the candidates named.
Tickets On Sale
Tickets are SI and each admission ticket includes 25 cents worth
cf food. Tickets will be distributed
to sorority and fraternity houses
and will be on sale at the Union
information desk. Donald Lail is in
charge of sales, and organizations
candidates
wishing to nominate
should see him.
Chapcrones will be Dr. and Mrs.
Herman L. Donovan. Dr. and Mrs.
Thomas Poe Cooper, Dr. ai.d Mrs.
T. T. Jones, Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes,
Mits Jane Haselden. Mr. and Mrs.
Frank D. Petersen, and Dr. and
Mrs. Leo M. Chamberlain.
The committee in charge of the
dance is Donald Lail, Jim Crowley.
Jack Jackson. Hugh Morehead,
Ne! and Robert Kiblr

BLR

University Can Accommodate
About 2,000 Of Army Quota,
President Tells Government

MAY APPLY FOR

Because he has brought honor
to the University, the Kentucky
Kernel dedicates this issue to
Clyde Johnson, Wildcat tackle,
by the Aschosen
sociated Press.
Turn to the inside pages for
the complete story and pictures
of Johnson.

ARMY RESERVES

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FRIDAY. JANUARY

Johnson Issue

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Robert Kuhlman. baritone and
A
voice instructor at the University,
:
will be soloist at the regular Sunday afternoon musicale which will
be given at 4 p. m.. Jan. 10. in Memorial hall.
Miss Adele South Gensemer. head
I
resident of Patterson hall, will be
Kuhlman s accompanist. In addition, she will appear as soloist presenting two piano numbers. "The
Lark." by Balalcirew and "Etude in
E Minor." by Bortkiewics.
ill be composed of
The program
Bongs stressing the music of the
Allied Nations of England. Russia
and the United States. The first
part of the program will include two
selections. "Calm Repose. Contentment Smiling," from "Diedamia"
and "Why do the Nations So Furiously Rage?" from "The Messiah"
Robert Kuhlman
by Handel.
. . . will aifeur on thf first
Kuhlman m ill sing three composl- lions by Rachmaninoff. "Field Be- - Sunday afternoon musicale of
loved," "Sorrow in Spring," and the winter quarter.
"Floods of Spring," for the second

ON. KENTUCKY.

UNIVERSITY

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They Pay Tribute
To Clvde Johnson

OF KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXXIV

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KENTtCKV ARtHtlLOOKAL...
. . society will meet at 7:30 o'clock
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tonight in room 201. Physics building.
TR VOLTS . . .
for "Watch on the Rhine." the
third Gulgnol production of the
year, will be held 5 p. m. Sunday
In the Ouignol theatre.

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FIRST WAR I'ORLM . . .
of the year will be held at 4
p. m. Wednesday in the Music room
of the Union under the chairmanship of Dr. J. Huntley Dupre.

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LAMP ASO CROSS . . .
an
. . . will have a dinner meetuig
played by Wanda Au.-tiMiami. 6 o'clock tonight in room 23b. Union
building.
Fla.. arts and sciences senior.
William Huckuday. Jr.. Levingion.
ALL STLDENTS . . .
must register at the University
Lexington, arts and
Peiuuxk.
ences sophomore, have the roles of post office for boxes.
Officer Brophy and Lt. Ruoney.
BLOCK AND BRIDLE . . .
d
The shortage of men on the
. . will meet at 7:30 p. in.. Monday
pus has necessitated the changing of
some minor male roles to female in the Card room of the Union.
roles. Two of thee parts. Miss Klein ALL GERSHWIN . . .
ill be enacted
and Miss Brophy.
. program
will be presented at 7
by Frances Rowland and Marjorie
o'cloik tonight in the Music r'wxu
Freeman, both arts and sciences of
the Union building.
sophomores from Lexington.
James Snyder. Lebanon Junction, VWCA CABI.NET . . .
arts and sciences sophomore, will
p. in Tuesday in
will meet at
play the part of Dr. Einstein, an- - tne YW office of the Union buildiiuf
other accomplice in the murders.
The remainder of the cast, which ALL VW G ROLFS . . .
will be announced at a later date, . . . will hold their regular meetings
will consist of townspeople familiar at 7 p. m. Tuesday in the Union
fliliynol :,!Hll.'tl.
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cam-taine-

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* Best Copy Available

The Kernel Editorial Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY

OFFICIAL

prmUSHED BEVIWEFKLT DTJHINO TrTK SCHOOL TKAR
f XOKPT HOLIDAYS OR EXAMINATION PERTpDS
KMerMI
t th Post Office at LtxtnfMin. Kentucky,
..., a rlasa nmttrr under the Act ot March I, U7.

AITtlCIA

Cvn.ru

M

Newt Editor

Wilson

Rusinest Manager

J--

Prcsa Association

Islington Bfl.ri of Cmiwra

Oi

Kentucky Press Association
National Editorial Association

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BAXTER MELTON

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Semerter

2

oo One Tear

Ail riffned articles am coiumas are to be considered the
of the rriterg triemseipes, aad do not uerettttarup
f.iert ihe opinio, o The Kernel.

Mrma

Sports Editor

long-await-

society Editor

to mem ion l lie .")HI kind. Tlien tltcre was the
rat hunt, said rhase taking plate in tlx- kitchen,
lit
ImiIioohi. and dining rmiiii. with
one poor rai pursued hv lour women, a soldier,
and a neigh lor lxv. Neetlless to sav, tile rat
was taught, hut onlv alter tire intrepid editor
Miunled him out of the springs in tlx- Itatk of
the touch.
Ihe tai, smart Ixast. hid uitdtT tle si'Rai"hest (an antiiic. no sugar in it) ttntil loiif".
after the furor was over.
It was a good
while it lasted, and after
this week ol limlx i ing up is over, we sliall all
get hark into the harness again, latin' its go.

lime in mr incnuMv, we art
starting a mv iar and a new wlntl term at
the same time. It is a jkiIccI time l make new
icv)liiiiin to (11 inio i lie newness ot thirt-is- .
(ill we are not.
Christ mas was iiiet. lint not as cjuiet as we
had expected. We had planned l stav at home
all the time, and not even haxe anv cnmanv.
but our plans vent 10 itou;;hi. There were die
usual relatives' dinners that kc hadn't counted
on, hut they were so ;ood it more than made
idea.
nj for the
unexpected furlough of a cousin sent us
The
visit,
rating down to an aunt's lor a two-daduring which time we played pin rummy. noi
lh-

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first

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iiT-rooi-

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Pfc. Joe To Brother Mike
Vi: Joe. Inf.
V.

S.

and I really
liked that tard (Army insignia and all) you
etulosed in the tarlon of eigaixlt.es. Thanks a
Ie menlot. lo. Iniause Christmas here isn't
food wasO. K though,
tioned at this jHiint. The
even if it couldn't measure up to what yon and
hear from

yoti

the lamilv had.
I'm not going on a complaining spttv aid I
ain't giv ing out with a h story hut the Iwdiday
season just wasn't at all very lestive. Was on
I slept most all of the
dun Christinas eve
eve tinned out with the
next dav. New Year's
same assignment mi while you were out greetM.l vour brother was watching
ing little lx
over the humble alxnle of 3r.WI sons of I'tttJc
S.nn.
Nav, Mike, in mother's last letter she mentioned that vim weren't planning to go ba k to
school noxt
u:iilcr. What's the matter, son.
c
to Ik draltcdr Well. I exiett it too.
lint great guns. guv. vou've still got somewhat of
a tliaiuc to grab as iniuli education as vou can.
lake a Utile adxitc and go on back. Ma!c it's
just a (.. I. rumor, but 1 hear they'll let most
ol vou Imvs at least finish out this tpiarter and

Civil Serviee Commission Savs
College-traine-

inntniUff
ihr uiU'lt-riitDear Mr. Marcus:
How often have you eaten in the
cafeteria .which you claim charges
so much for its food i ? Did you ever
choose a molded fruit salad, bowl of
vegetable soup, crackers, glass of
milk, and a piece of pie a rather
satisfying lunch and pay 20 cents.
Well, that's what it comes to in our
ihr

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p.nm,g,

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cafeteria.
It seems rather obvious that the
fourth recommendation that meals
tsliould be better planned and better
balanced, could only come from a
group of people whose nutritional
education consists of a few high
sounding phrases and fewer facts.
A first grader at the University
training school can tell you what
you should eat. He could lead you
through the line and select several
well balanced meals from any day's
offering at the cafeteria.
Really, Mr. Marcus, surely you've

New
Cream Deodorant
under-ar- m

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N'on-com-

that education and learned anything Vou ought
to Ik' able to go up rapidly.
l ake all the hard courses next tiuarter. studv
even if vou do vearn 10 do a lot
f plating. You and 1 and quite a few more
......
In
11 11 ni
1
1 "in till
,i,iii'' uvu.ln iw. 11, 111 ,ill 1n.MI .I.......1 .1 .
,
.
lim-iit Imiri ti tilJ'
's
rl unit till ihn u .1.'
"
'
is clone.
T ill vo.ir time ron.es in m 10 lwvl
ni w.t,.
up wi ll the bugle, stav m sc hiHil and work. . im
'
won't regret it.
No offenses, son, I'm not giving vou the big
'
broihcr song and dance for nothing. Please take
it in he same spirit 1 m sending n.
Your brother,
JOK.

a

whale of

a lot

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AAV.

H'oorfs irllri. if niw-nrhr rnts in Ihr 7 raining t htxil

All's

llml

Ihr onr in ihr
I'uimi huilrlinji. At Ihr I'mVm
ihr meal nirnliiinrH tifnild rtisl
J mli. irr rrl sure, unlrss Ihr pritr
fiW hat rhavgrd siiwr ihr lat
nf lHicatinn. AIo Ihr men at Ihr
would pnihnhly hr rating nmrr
lunch than Miss Wnnd. This nnlr is
riof In a u lrrlhrr or not ihr rar-Irrisrr.-rhalantrd mrals at a
rtasonahlr prirr. hut to drlrrminr
is
It
ahonl u liiili rairlrria Alf
writing. I
than

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gineering- activity- which may lead
to an engineering career.
be titled as a
Tne wrker
luii ivi ,ciiKiinxi, aim viic ,i 1111 uim.
,
, i in , im, u,iuu- aaini j 10 (i..inii
ing payment for authorized over- rtain co"di- time' wnich under
tions, may amount to as much as
M pmmt of the year,y MtaT por
those who have not had previous
training in engineering, a war train- ing course has been specially planned, covering the fundamentals of
junior engineer work In a Federal

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Stude