xt795x25dk9v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt795x25dk9v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19611215  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 15, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 15, 1961 1961 2015 true xt795x25dk9v section xt795x25dk9v gcTt

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University of Kentucky

Vol. LI 1 1, No. 49

LEXINGTON,

KY., FRIDAY, DEC. 15,

11

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Revision Of SC Budget
Drops Income $1,827
of the Student stltution did not approve the budby the members of
get as
Congress budget leaves the or- Student passed
Congress.
with $ 1,827 less than
ganization
The
reason was imwas counted on, Jim Daniel, proper primary
procedure in that the
of SC said Wednes-day- . budget had been set up on a
president
A revision

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When You See Me
Remember to slow down

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and live a I id If.

Julie Wardrup cf Harlan is reminding you to have a Merry
Christmas and hopes you'll be around to celebrate the New Year.
:MeMMmmmwrmmt.mmmmtmmmmxs

'Fair Ami EquituMe'

Dr. Dickey Comments
On UK Budget Drop
said
Frank

G. Dickey, University president,
I)r.
today that
although the state proposed budget for UK falls 13 million
dollars short of the requested budget, he feels that the University has Ix en treated "fairly and equitably."
Gov. Bert Comfcs aid Wednes- day at the UK convtcation that a
biennial budget of about 39 million dollars would be recommended
to the General Assfmbly.
When the l'niverity made the
$.V2,916.105
request. Dickey said
it was "an absolute necessity of
the University is to keep operating without loss of ground during the coming biennium."

million dothe
Medical Center (the University
as.;ed for 15 millicn). The outlay
for instruction and iesearch would
be approximately 20 minion dol- (the University asked for 22.7
million).
Dr. Dickey said the reductions
indicated would call for a
of financial plans for the
biennium.
"However," President Dickey
went on to say in his statement,
"in view of the financial demands
on the commonwealth at this time
and in light of the decline in state
Gov. Combs said

llar would

be

13

ricpoed

fr

revenues, we feel we have been
treated fairly and equitably."
"Now the task Is to bring prointo line with
grams for 1962-6- 4
available finances," Dr. Dickey
concluded.

The drop In the group's Income
resulted in a miscalculation of the
student fees.
In the original budget, Daniel
said, 50 cents was to be taken out
of the tuition of regular students
and 25 cents from the tuition of
summer students. This did not distinguish between full and part-tim- e
students.
If Student Congress would have
collected their allotment from tui- tions in this manner the 1961-6- 2
budget income was expected to
reach $8572.
However, the correct assessment is 50 cents for every full-tiregular student and "5
e
summer
cents for every
student. This cuts the Student
Congress income back to $7,100.
As a result cf the $1,827 cut- FirWe Committee
back the
was forced to eliminate four ac
tivities from their revised budget.
The student body will be unable
to support Stylus, a campus literary magazine; the varsity debate team; the livestock judging
team, and Law Day.
Nearly two weeks ago the administration officials of the UniBudget
versity Faculty-StudeCommittee, set up by the SC con- -

semester instead of a yearly
basis. The officials felt the organizations supported by Student
Congress would need to know
their allotment in order to plan
their year's activities.
The revised Student Congress
budget, now on a yearly basis, has
nine changes under "expense."
Only five student organizations
will receive yearly grants.
Associated
Among the five.
Women Students will receive $600.

SEC Integration
'Matter Of Years,
UK President Says

9

By KERRY POWELL
Kernel Managing Editor . .
It will be "just a matter of years"
until Negroes begin competing on
Southeastern Conference athletic
teams. Dr. Frank G. Dickey, University president, said yesterday.
"I hope the University can be
one of the leaders in bringing this
about," the president added.
HIs"reimvm id?re made dnriflg'
a press conference with News Reporting 501, a School of Journalism class.
"The University has done one of
the most outstanding Jobs of integration in all the nation," Presi11 Arts and Sciences students, dent Dickey said. "Negroes were
first admitted in 1948, long before
Kappa, scholastic honorary, at any other Southern state made
of the Student Union Building. this move, and long before the
1954 Supreme Court decision," Dr.
Crouch Chenault, history, 3.5;
said.
William Ray Crain, chemistry, Dickey
"We have moved slowly and
3.88; and Elizabeth W. DuMez,
social work, 3.634.
Norris R. Johnson, Journalism,
3.67; Beverly S. Kinkead, English,
3.69; Michael N. Morgan, English,
3.94; and Carol D. Nail, psychology,

Phi Bela Kappa To Tap
Twelve Students Today
Twelve scholars, including

will be initiated into Phi IScta
P"1, tmlay in the Music Room
Dr. Paul Sears, associate pro-la- rs
fessor of chemistry and president
of the organization, will conduct
the ceremony along with the other
officers.

$300 more than In the original
budget.
The other changes under the new
budget is the deletion of financial
support to Stylus, the debate team,
the livestock Judging team, and
Law Day.
I'nder the operating expense
section of the budget the Contingency Fund has dropped $500.
It was originally $800. Daniel
said that most of the reserves
would go into this fund to be
spent for SC projects during the
year.
Funds for the mimeograph machine were upped $50 and funds
for supplies, $200, and stenographic
bureau, $50, were added under operating expenses.

quietly in order to eliminate difficulties experienced elsewhere."
He added:
"We have made real progress,
but now there is a point beyond
which we could knock out the
props from everything we have
done.
"You know and we do too
what the outcome would be if we
had Negro athletes on our teams
at the present time.
"We have contracts with teams
extending through 1966. Some of
these teams will be extremely slow
in integrating. And we can't just
drop out of the Southeastern Conference that would be a violation
of contract."
The president said he believed
the most effective method of
bringing about integration of SEC
athletic teams would be through a
Continued on Page 2

The lone non-A- rts
and Sciences
student Is Patricia Louise Sumner,
an education major with a 3.78
3.8.
standing.
Sue Alice McCauley, English,
Other students to be initiated
3.79; Evelyn Frances Rupard,
are Steadman Thomas Bagby Jr.,
mathematics, 3.84; and Judith
Dawn Stewart, topical, 3.81.
3.9G8;
mathematics,
Mary E.

Scientific Reason Given
For Star Of Bethlehem
By DAVID SHANK
Kernel feature Writer
The Star of Bethlehem which Christians believe led the wise men to Christ's birthplace almost 2,000 Years ago, has been given a scientific
astronomers.
explanation by medtrn-du- y
This scientific account of the Christmas star
is given to the Descriptive Astronomy class each
year before the Yule holiday by Dr. Wasley Krog-dah- l,
and
associate professor of mathematics
astronomy. Various clubs and organizations also
request the stmy fu.m Dr. Kroydahl as the Christmas .season approaches.
Dr. Krogriuhl's account of the star may be
summarized like this:
The Hi hie says the wine men went to King
Herod and inquired of the I iitl) luce of the "Kin
of the Jews," saving that they had "seen his star
in the east." Herod's advisers said Christ would

be born in Bethlehem, as written by a prophet.
The wise men then followed the star, upon the
command of Herod, until "they were come into
the house" where they "saw the young child with
Mary his mother."
It is important to remember that In those days
the word star was used for almost any object
in the sky, even for events in the heavens.
Even more significant is th fct that the wise
men were the Magi, or magicians. They were
Persian priests of the Zoroastrian religion and
firm believers in astrology (which should not be
confused with the science of astronomy).
The Zoroastrlans divided the sky into various
imaginary regions. Each region was supposed to
control a certain part of the earth, a particular
race, a part of the body, etc. Their influence Mas
supposed to be partly determined by the arrange- Continued on Page 5

iYoir,

Santa lie Sure To Include

...

Pain Sn.it h. this week's Kernel Sweetheart, has a long list of
special gilts to whisper in Santa's ear. She is a freshman from
Winchester. Pain, also an Alpha Delta 11, is majoring in secondary education. Santa's really Robert Loci t ier of Louisville.

* 2-- TIIE

KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Iriday, Dec. 15,
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2 Ag Majors Are

DickeySpeaks
About SEC
Integration
Pate

Students-Of-Mont- h
Two Kentucky agriculture majors have been selected
for Decemher.
Anita Lester and Duane Latham entry was firt In the Ournsey
were chosen by a Student Union rlaw. and placed second in the

1
C'ontinurd from
Joint movement among the SEC
universities.

"V don't think it can be done by
any one school." Dr. Dickey said.
"Still, it would not have to be
unanimous. I should think five or
six schools would have enough
power to pull It off."

President Dickey was also asked
if he thought Medical Center expenses were hurting the growth
and development of the rest of
the University. He replied:
"One question to ask is. would
the extra money have been used
for anything else in the first place.
I personally don't think so."
"Prom the very beginning, we
decided we wanted not a mediocre
Medical Center, but one that would
rank In the upper 15 or 20 percent
of the nation. I think we have
that now."
Dr. Dickey. In addition, outlined
the University Is
making in coping with the campus parking problem.

the progress

He said approximately 700 more
parking spaces are planned for the
next two or three years If funds
are made available.
The plans call for lots across
from Rose Street in the area between Columbia and Clifton Avenues and across from the Chemistry-Physics
Building.
The president, in the course of
the press conference, also touched
;on these questions:
1.

Anita Lester and Duane Latham, both agriculture majors, have
been selected Students of the Month by the Student Union Board.
They were chosen for their contributions in agriculture.

New Spindletop Building
To Cost State $1.2 Million
A $1,241,900
contract for
construction of the administra- tion and research building at
Spindletop Research ' Institute
was signed Wednesday.
The contract was awarded by

scaping are included in the con

were higher than the early esti- -

8ad the foundation "The contract is $247,860 less than
work for the building is completed, a previous low bid of $1,489,760.
11 was started a year ago, but which was rejected by the state
work was stopped because the bids last summer,
trSJiham

-

SZSSSSl

designed by Lexi
C. A. Coleman Jr., is scheduled

for next October.
because of what Dr. Dickey called
the new
Beardsley Graham,
the ''superior quality and scope of president of the institute, said the
work order will be issued within
instruction at the University," tothe next few days.
gether with the fact that state
The new building will be a
have in the past accepted three-storcolleges
y
building, in reinstate aid for cafeteria and housing forced concrete and marble, with
unit maintenance.
about 40,000 square fert of floor
2. Dr. Dickey defended the state space. It will be used for offices
sales tax as seeming to be at the and laboratories, and eventually
it could be used for only adpresent time "the most logical, the
most satisfactory source of money ministrative offices.
that the University needs."
Parking lots and moderate land- -

Seeking Governorship

The president of Eastern Kentucky State College has
nied reports he may run for governor in 1963.

Prof To Present
Dr. W. D. Ehmann. assistant
professor of chemistry, will present
a paper at the 1961 International
Conference on Modern Trends in
Activation Analysis.
The meeting, which will be held
at College Station, Texas, Dec.
is sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Commisand the Activation AnalysU
sion,
at Texas
Research Laboratory
A. and M.

I'reclassification

de- -

his present capacity at the college.
Rumors have been circulating
in Richmond and Lexington indi
cating Dr. Martin would seek the
governorship in 19G3.
Gov. Bert T. Combs said Wednes- day he would support a candidate
who would uphold the principles
he set forth in his campaign plat- form and one who could win.
However, . the chief executive
he will remain in t&iled to give any indication who!
might be a gubernatorial candidate.

Dr. Robert R. Martin. In a telephone Interview yesterday with the
Kernel from his Richmond office,
said there was "no foundation" for
the report.
The former superintendent of
public instruction said he found
the report "flattering and interesting" but that he had "no
such plans."
He indicated

Reasons
IloLstrin and Oral
rlawes.
At the International contest In
Chicago, her entry was second tn
the Jersey class, missing first place
by one point.
Duane Latham. Hodgensville. resides in an apartment on Gibsou
Avenue.
Latham is a member of the I K
Meat Judging Team, which tied
for first place in the national
competition at Kansas City. Thi
was the first time I K has won
in national competition.
Latham was the highest Individual in the contest with 911 out
of a possible 1,000 points. He competed against SO other individuals
representing 17 teams at the contest.

Research Paper
At Conference

Sr2WTSr "r- College President Denies

Completion

University students pay high-

er prices for room, board, and tuition than state college students

Bonrd committee for their outstanding contributions in the field
of agriculture.
The Student-of-the-Mont- h
program honors two students
each month, a man and a woman, for praiseworthy contributions to campus life or to Lexington-campus
relations.
Anita Lester, Rose Hill, is a
resident of Holmes Hall. She has
been State Dairy Princess since
February and has made numerous
speeches throughout the state in
behalf of the dairy industry.
She Is a member of the UK
Dairy Cattle Judging Team.
Miss Lester has combined two
interests dairying and debate-inIn the Southern Intercollegiate contest at Memphis, her

Preclassification schedule for
spring semester:
Agriculture and Home F.ronom- -.
Irs: Jan.
Arts and Sciences: Jan.
Commerce: Jan.
Education: Jan.
i
OPEN DAILY

1

SO

P.M.

TODAY ANO SATURDAY!

SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER'
tliiabth Taylor Menty Clifl
"BROTHERS KARAMAZOV"
Y4 trynnar Marie Scheil

ADAM PEPlOT STUDIOS
Tour Portrait Deserves The Best"
Phone

Arms

Wellington

MEN ALI
IJmJ

The HILPlOCb
inside sttrv ul thejo
wild spnnj vacations!
VmS , ...

la f0$Mth 'IP
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Boy
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4

McLellan, and Ed Van Hook. Third row,
Jim Daniel, Roy Roberts, Harry Kurd, Jim McDonald, and Jim Stublrlirld. Absent from the
picture is Joe Wright.

TAYLOR TIRE CO.

LEXINGTON
YELLOW CAB
Inc.

Phone
"24-Ho-

Radio Equipped
2-2-

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a.

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MGM prtMnit... breathless.
incredible excitement I

CARY

GRANT

SAINT
JAMES MASON
EVA MARIE

'NORTH BY NORTHWEST

LEXINGTON'S BEST
KNOWN BANKING CENTER
4 Locations

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WEST SHORT

1330 HARRODSBURG ROAD
1100 WINCHESTER ROAD
1481 LEESTOWN ROAD

Emergency Road Service"

Complete Automotive Service
400

TWO BIG HITS

'Where

Ijimp And Cross Initiates
Dave

into Lamp and Cross, senior men's
honorary, are first row from the left. Larry West-rrfirlJerry YVesterfirld, Wayne Gregory. Second
row. Bill Smith, John Williams Dave Graham,
New initiates

Dial

-

NOW SHOWING

PHONE

LEXINGTON, KY.

CITIZENS UNION NATIONAL
BANK AND TRUST CO.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Eriday, Do.

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Social Activities

p

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15,

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counseling service spoke on scholarship.
An orphan boy, sponsored by a
Kappa Sigma
Beta Nu chapter cf Kappa Sig- ZTA alumna, was present,
ma fraternity recently initlatrd
gifts, and Joined in the
nine pledges. They Include: James festivities.
James Combs, John
Chapman,
Phi Kappa 11
Conner, John Cox, William Cox.
The members of Phi Kappa Tau
James Ennin, Patrick Hamlll,
fraternity entertained the children
David Nlles, and James Stathis.
at the Shriner's Crippled ChildPhi Gamma Delta
ren's Hospital last night with a
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity reChristmas party.
cently initiated eight pledges. They
The party was complete with
Include: Joe Coughlin, John
Steve Lariroore, Jim Lind-re- y. gifts and Santa Claus.

Initiations

Alpha Delta PI
Alpha Delta PI sorority enter12 children from the Lextained
ington Orphan's Home WednesMidnight Mass
day night at its annual Christmas
Christmas Midnight Mass will party.
be offered at th Newman Chapel
After a buffet, Santa Claus arat 12 a.m., Sunday, Dec .2 4.
All Lexington students and fa- rived and gave each child a toy
and an outfit of clothing.
culty, and thce who will be in
Lexington over the holiday are
invited to attend.
Pin-Mate- s
Bill Mautz, Dick Sweeney, Dave
Trisko, and Bob Vaughn.

Christinas Parties

IT.'

Travis, a. junior music
major from Maysvllle, and a memZeU Tar Alpha
ber of Delta Delta Delta sorority
Zeta Tau Alpha sorority held its
to John Curtis, a Junior engineerannual Christmas party .Wednesing student from Hartford, and a
day night.
Dr. Harold Rogers, head of the member of Sigma Chi fraternity.

Lfc

,&$mn mmtj-.-y-

She claims it is the most beautiful
city she has ever seen because it
is so big and so clean.
In speaking of the English people, Lynn said that she liked them
because they were so frank and
that they are not at all like most
Americans imagine Britishers to
be. Once you get to know them
you find out that they are "just
like Americans only they have
a different accent."
"English people appreciate the
simple things in life so much more
than Americans do," said Lynn.
"They lead a simple life compared
to ours but seem to be much happier."
Lynn stated that the British people are very "interested in what is
happening in the States even

in

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(

INSl RAN

nmn

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if

SPENGLER STUDIO
N.E. CORNTR MAIN
PHONE

t

LIME
.

FOR SALI
FOR SALE 19i0 Corvair. red
series 700. Radio, heater. Call Norman
H.irned at
4D2t

Wotch For

SALE New household
Items.
Electric skillet, card table and chairs,
electric blanket, dishes, linens, candle14D2t
sticks, etc. Phone
FOR

The First
Issue of

FOUND

Pair of men's glasses in case
by Quad Grill. Owner phone 7802. 1501t
FOUND

MOOT

WANTED

MAGAZINE

WANTED
Student to drive elderly man
to Braitenton, Florida around Decemfor details, 8 a rn.
ber 16. Phone
to 5 p.m.
12D4t

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE
IN THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

LOST
Men's heavy corduroy topcot.
MiKplaced
Frid.iy in the dnwiiMair
lounge of H.jkkim Hall. Phone 657S. UD4t
A liiiht
LOST
in plastic b.iK.

-

:

'

K

of security In yours through
Investment In life Insurance.
See Gene Cravens your NYLIC agent
now serving hundreds of UK graduates. Phone
or
13D3t

blue stain shoe wrapped
If it is found pleace i.'ill

12D2t

LOST- P.ur rey
ing silver charm
and MvVey Hull

"7

ii

Your Portroit By
Curtis Wainscott

ABSENCE
a small

7231).

J

i

For The Personal Gift

CLASSIFIED

though they are Jealous of the U.
8."
Lynn feels that the English
are some of the most
people she has met.
"They read so much it is unbelievable, and their libraries are
packed. There is a book store on
almost every corner."
One of the highlights of Lynn's
residence in London was her meeting Queen Elizabeth and Prince
Phillip at the London Polo Club.
Lynn was attending a party there
and had the opportunity to meet
the Queen and have a brief chat
with Prince Phillip.
Off all the people Lynn has met
she feels those of the British West
Indies are the easiest to get to
know.

'"'!

i iiir

i

entertained
children from a local elemen- tary school Mrs. Santa Claus brought them
trucks and dolls and the children were treated to
hot chocolate, rookies, and ire cream.

Kathy Cannon and Char
boys open their Christmas presents at the annual
Christmas party held by the Delta Zrta sorority
last night at the Delta Zeta house. The sorority

LOST

t

iii

i

Look What Santa Brought Mel
15
Davis watch as two small

Coed Tells Of Life In England
SIX

ENDICOTT
Few 18 year eld girts have seen
as much of the world or lived in
as many different places as freshman Arts and Sciences student
Lynn Russell from London, England.
Lynn was born in the suburbs
of New York City but she has
lived in five different states and
In five foreign countries. In addition she has traveled in all parts
of the world except the Orient.
Outside this country, Lynn has
lived in. the Azores, a group of islands off the coaH of Portugal;
Marseille, on the French Riviera;
the Dominican Republic; Antigua,
British West Indies; and London,
England.
Of all the places Lynn has lived
rhe says London is her favorite.
By

Tarawa

wool gloves and sterlbetween Miller H.ill
Tuesday, Dec. 5. C'.ill
12D3t

1

One size U'.a 1956 boys cl.iss
ling with red stone and initials B. H.
on sides. Reward. Call Chark-nLOST

13D3t

FOR RENT

RKN- T- Furnished house, 2 bed-- !
rooms, paneled den. 2 children, no pets.
$125 monthly. Phone
14D2t,
FOR

"miscellaneous'

DOWNTOWN

JAMAICA. West Indies. Azores.
and all of Eastern Europe, for student
rate, $1)80 round trip by air, summer of
I9K2.
Also Nn.ssau, spring vacation ul
'2. For mform.itn'11 call Raleigh Lane
HDT house,
or
at 330
BNtf
Clnton Ave.
GO TO

.J

7R; ,

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Irk

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A

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mm

Open Until 1:00 a.m,

TYPING Term papers, theses, fast, accurate. 50 cents per sheet. Mrs. Wheeler.
HDI
2ti Norway. Phone

119 South Limestone

Home of the College Folks

Phone

683 S. Broadway

fj.

Reasonable Prices
Private Rooms for Parties
"High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"
MR. AND MRS. JOHN

INriES,

Piopiictou

ICE

SKATING
4

Look At The
Linda JohnMn, phariMcy fctudent, fchows toys
to two UudenU from Jeffersoa Davia M'hool. These
were amour 3 underprivileged child re a entei- tained yesterday by students in the College of

ALEXANDRIA

PHONE

'

Special
Friday and Saturday

JS'eiv

Toyg!

DRIVE

"

Evenings

GARDENSIDE

PLAZA

$1.50 Couple
10:00 to Midnight

REGULAR SESSIONS:

of

Pharmacy. Dr. Howard Hopkins, professor
pharmaiy, acted as Santa C laus for the phar- macy Christmak and gave each child a lift,
refreshments, and aborted fruit.

Afternoons, 3 J0-0
Evsmngi,
Membership (Required)

75
S1.00

30 (sicepf Sunday)
(also Sunday afttineon)

SI 00

SPECIAL RATES

Skat

f OR PARTY CROUPS

Rental

S0

* The Kentucky Kernel
UNivrnsiTY

of Kentvcky

second clans nmttrr tinder the Act of March 3, 1879.
Entered t the jmt office lit l.eingtnn, Kentucky
Published .'our times a week hinnii the rt Riilir w hmil yrr eireiit during holidays and exams.
SIX DOI.I.AhS A SCHOOL YEAR

Ed Van Hook, Editor
Wayne Gregory, Campus Editor
Kerby Powell, Managing Editor
Ben Fitzpatrick, Sports Editor
Jean Schwartz, Society Editor
Rick McReynolds, CartooiUst
Dice Wallace, Advertising Manager
Robbie Mason, Arts Editor
Bill Holton, Circulation Manager
FRIDAY NEWS STAFF
Mike Fearinc, News Editor
Kyba Hackley, Associate
Bill Martin, Sports

Holiday Driving

Don't Be Outdone

Every year during the Christmas
season we are bombarded with information aloiit safe holiday driving.
We are told thousands are killed each
year in highway accidents 38,200
were killed last year. We are told
millions are injured 1,400,000 last
year. We are told billions of dollars are
lost from bodily injury four billion.
We are told billions of dollars are
lost from property damage six billion last year. We are told that 28.7
percent of the drivers involved in
fatal accidents are under 25. We are
told alcohol is involved in more than
50 percent of the fatal accidents.
We are pounded with this barrage
from all sides. We see it in the newspapers, magazines, on television, signs,
billboards, and we hear it on radio.
We are told to do this and that
when we drive. The National Safety
Council, safety officials, state and
local police constantly advise us how

to handle ourselves and our automobiles on the highway.
But, each year the fatality count
goes up and up ... . we drive faster
and foster . . . we continue to be
"butchers of the turnpike." We are
maniacal killers. A steering wheel
becomes as deadly as a firearm.
It seems this bombardment of
advice about highway safety falls on
stone-dea- f
ears. Murderers continue
to lurk on the highways, slaying,
mutilating, and causing grief. But
nobody cares. So why should we?
When you drive during the holiday season, drive as crazily as you
please, kill as many as you can, hurt
as many as you can, break up as many
families as you can. Fill up the hospitals and morgues. It ought to be
fun to keep a scorebook and see if
you can outdo your friends.
Oh, yes. Make sure you get them,
too.

Joinin' The Club?

The Seal Of

FEARING
Kernel Daily News Editor
The chairman was a
character all right. He mounted the
speaker's stand in front of me, and
as he turned to face us he gave me
a wink out of one blackened hollow
eye.
I wondered what the wink was for;
in fact, I wondered how I ever got
mixed up in this organization. Nobody recommended it. Thcjre had
even been a nationwide campaign
against it. Many persons had personally gone out of their way to warn
me against this chairman and his
ruthless ways.
Then the chairman stepped back
from the rostrum to whisper to one
of the other dignitaries on the stand.
I noticed how thin he was. He looked
almost like what some would call a
"living skeleton." And that black suit
didn't help either it made his skin
look pastier. . . .
Why did I have to be so stubborn
about joining this group? There were
enough members now. If I'd been
just a little more careful and examined the charter and its membership
requirements. . . .
How stupid could I be? Once
you're in this "choice club" there's no
getting out. I can't believe I literally
forced some of my friends to join!
There they are, over there behind
one of the columns. I guess they'll
never speak to me again. can't blame
By MICIIELE

weird-lookin-

1

g

...

them much they wanted to spend
Christmas with their families, not in
this huge drafty hall.

Oh, the chairman seems to want
me on the speaker's stand maybe
that's why they put me on the front
row. . . .
As I walked up the steps of the
stand my knees began to wobble I
could feel all their eyes on my back
the eyes of my friends boring
through me.
The chairman addressed me in a
deep but distant voice:
"I would like to present this membership scroll to you for the superior
job you have done in fulfilling the
entrance requirements of this universal organization.
In fact, I would like to personally
congratulate
you for your quick
thinking in bringing five of your
friends with you."
I slowly opened the beautifully
printed scroll; the huge audience was
dead silent. The scroll read:
"To an individual who through
his own initiative, in spite of tremendous amounts of propaganda against
oiir organization, not only became a
member himself, but went far beyond
his duty and brought in five other
members. To him we give a vote of
confidence and a distinguished place
in the After-LifClub."
It was sealed with a skull and
cross bones.
e

I

'Wl, W

Killed in Htt'ty

Cartoon by Rick McReynolds

THE READERS' FORUM
Baker's woik is petty anil more study
needed. Uufortunately, neither of
us can woik up enough intestinal
fortitude to attempt further reading.
We fetl the opportunity that Stylus
presents to the UK campus should
not be denied to future generations.
someone
We since icly hope-tha- t
will be interested enough tr buy a
Stylus and correct us if we have
offendt d them or feel the need to
refute our stand.
Linda McDowell M.jon
Lee Allen McMillan

Comment On Stylus

is

To The Editor:
After Charles

W. Baker's noteworthy beginning in last semester's
Stylus, we were keenly disappointed
Fire."
by his story "A
As
English majors,
we have long accepted the fact that
many new forms of writing must
have some small elements of sex or
perversion so that their perpetrators
(excuse us) authors can earn enough
to live.
While we are not adverse to realistic obscenity if it is necessary to
the thread of the story or at least add.,
interest, we feel justified in condemning Mr. Baker for what seems a needless descent to nauseating vulgarity.
While he certainly can place his
story in the "harmless" idiot genre
more successfully applied by Steinbeck in "() Mice aiul Men" it is
strange that he should choose a title
reminiscent of Jack London. Beyond
its giving a more folksy tone to the
story, we could not feel it was a valid
choice in furthering understanding or
appreciation. Another English major
informs us, however, that titles are a
superfluous remnant, and that soon
we may look forward to works entitled "Opus 1," etc.
Perhaps our criticism of Mr.
Fresh-Lighte-

strong-minde-

d

d

An Apology

The editor feels he has done an injustice to his fellow journalists on the
stall of the Kernel sports department.
In the editorial (Had An Award, Lately?) which appeared on Page Four
yesterday, the editor thoughtlessly attempted to treat in a lighter vein the
giving ol Intramural Awards by Kerne!
sports writers. It was not an attempt to
criticize his own stalf, as it may have

It was not the editor's intention to
east aspeisions upon ti.e sports depait-lnent- 's
vendue, hut from the reaction,
this was the geneial consensus. For this,
he apologizes.
On the contrary, the editor is highly
pleased vith the efforts of his spoils
writers in promoting intramural spoils
this semester.
Van Hook

appeared.

Jehu!' You? No Christmas,
II Kings

20

llf you
il not,

boo-hoobp

i

!

this apace niter the holidays, you made It;
will give you a proper notice here Jan. 4, I'Mi)

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, friday, Dcr.

ll-- .f

15,

Professor's Book Tells
What 'Ivan' Knows
By SARAH

POWERS

American stmlents have a
serious lack of education in
many fields, according to Arthur S. Trace, author of "What
I v a n Knows That
Johnny
...
u
ixaiiuwin ii u II si',
i'niMi i.
$3.03, 213

pages).

is studied

thoroughly throughout
their education whereas In U.S.
schools literature is neither emphasized nor taught nearly enough.
Trace urges .students, parents,
and edurators to Investgiate their
ficnooIs
d request improvement
hi uic ruutauuiiai sysinn.
In his book, Trace gives suggestions on how our schools can
be Improved to provide a better
education for American children.
He feels that I. S. school need
to have students study more,
continue subject matter at successive grade levels, train students to read efficiently in the
primary grades, and have textbooks carefully written by competent scholars.
He also emphasizes the fact that
If America is to remain the leader
of the free world the young people
must be prepared to take over
leadership responsibilities.
My own experiences bear out
many of Arthur S. Trace's statements on American education. I

Utilizing his knowledge and ex- peiience as a professor, author cf
numerous articles on education,
and faculty member of the Institute for Soviet and East European
Studies at John Carroll University,
Trace has produced a clear and
objective book on American and
Russian education.
Trace's comparative
studies
reveal that Rons! an students, by
the time they are graduated from
high school, have five years of
physics, four years of chemistry,
sis years of biology, one year of
astronomy, and are two to four
years ahead in mathematics.
All Soviet students study a for
eign language for six years, hts- - attortHuri
a tmru
.Vw
gegraphy through the ninth grade. This in- Zy!?JZll KrS'
stitution did not offer any geog- American students usually study raphy, foren language, algebra
biology, chemistry, or physics for or higher mathematics, and only
one year, history for three years, three years of history. However,
geography for one year, and not I was more fortunate than many
even 25 percent study a foreign students because I attended an
other high school which offered
language for two years
better academic background.
Reading and literature.
I was able to study mathcording to Trace, are two of the There,
ematics, foreign language, and
most neglected aspects of Amerigeography, and therefore was betcan education.
Fourth graders
in the Soviet In ion have a ter prepared for college. The ac
ademic
which I had
vocabulary of 1,800 words- In missed subjects
through my first nine years
their readers.
left a scar which has been very
Literature in the Soviet schools difficult to remove.

Nancy Kwan and Jack Soo are