xt795x25ds3n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt795x25ds3n/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Press Association Kentucky Press Service University of Kentucky. School of Journalism 1988 Call Number: PN4700.K37 Issues not published 1935 Aug - 1937 Oct, 1937 Jul - 1937 Aug, 1939 Oct - Dec, 1940 Jan - Mar, 1951 Aug - 1956 Sep. Includes Supplementary Material:  2005/2006, Kentucky High School Journalism Association contest 2004-2005, Advertising excellence in Kentucky newspapers 2003-2005, Excellence in Kentucky newspapers newsletters  English Lexington, KY.: School of Journalism, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Press Press -- Kentucky -- Periodicals The Kentucky Press, February 1988 Vol.57 No.2 text The Kentucky Press, February 1988 Vol.57 No.2 1988 2019 true xt795x25ds3n section xt795x25ds3n i
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- InSIde° KPA Better News a er Contest
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‘ 93°”th " Volume 57, Number 2 7 February, 1988 .
A s u on ° era :
Newspapers 101 SNPA t dy lit cy .
" me fie: ‘ "’ 3 abOUt econom I C lmPaCt
- ‘ r . ”3;; , _; ‘ ,3? ,3 em; 4y“ n While long-range consequences for newspaper circulation j
“w," , . ' w : . '1- :5 concern SNPA publishers, the primary concern they have about i
r ‘ l , 7, gt?“ ' . , i§"vgcé;&ff adult illiteracy is the economic impact it has on their 1,
'_ lme 9g x . communities.
. -» - .. ., {f A"; , e55” Respondents to a recent Southern Newspaper Publishers '
.1119 , a {as i :13 . .v s, Sf ' ,.~ ' I. Association survey about illiteracy also are concerned about the 1'
{eyewww . , r" 33 7 m I; 1‘3”; connection between crime and illiteracy, the impoverished life of j
' X‘s.“ wNm {I ._ g? t" ,. 'M/V *3 “a the illiterate and the demoralizing effect illiteracy has on current j,
‘ 7 .1 . wa _. .é f: f ‘t g” flaky; & f 3 Among the comments expressed by respondents: .
‘ 7 *‘ “ ‘ “1&5 2.. ‘ E” ‘3‘? , ' .- f’ 0”Our primary concern is the difficulty in reaching meek
Eli]. .. C i .. f“ ~ “i3 - :M 3”“ . grim» illiterate segment 0f SONNY HOW do we find out. who they are : 7"".
ee- ,-' ipxm _,,_.. ‘jfl ‘"'jf"’"é‘-. , " ~- § 0 “its relationShip with high unemployment, economic devel- .
’J .- 5 WW *’ w " r” ' ,. 3 3% . opment, quality of the community in general and newspaper 5‘
if”); ’ %"w*~“" ', e W " ' ' - ‘ 3%“ circulation.” (Selma, Ala.) ’.
”gm was: 3% lt‘iln a amily, illiteracy tends to perpetuate .itse. j
" c' ‘ MM .. w ' " ' gm“ "‘2‘: Associated social problems drain public funds and charitable . i
Courtesy 0‘ the Herald'leader contributions.” (Nashville, Tenn.) i
A Fayette County student works on an assignment that involves a copy of the Lexington Herald- The survey—to which 125 member newspapers responded—- i
Leader. The Herald-Leader’s Newspapers in education program places 37,000 newspapers in was conducted by the SNPA Literacy Committee, chaired by j
. participating schools every month. National studies show that the use of newspapers in the Robert j. Hively, president of the Knoxville (Tenn) News-Sentinel.

‘ classroom can increase reading skills by as much as four grade levels. The Herald-Leader recently The committee was appointed last fall by then—President Creed C, ‘ i
received the 1987 Charles E. Scripps Literacy Award in their division. For the story, see page 8. Black, then-publisher of the Lexington Herald-Leader. ‘
___________—————————————-—-—-—-——'——-—-_ During a recent meeting in Atlanta, members of the commit— 1

tee reviewed the preliminary results of the survey and discussed 1

' F0 I 0 the role that SNPA should play in fighting the problem. After !

. additional data is collected from members who have not yet 5

responded, a final report will be issued. 2

. . . The preliminary results show that more than half of the :

HOW to get advance meetl ng notl ces respondents have (or currently are planning) a literacy promgram.

Thirty-five papers have programs; 29 are in the planning stage; '

and 59 do not have a program. Two did not respond. :

By Kim Greene special meetings of the public financial loss to a public agen Of the papers that do “Gt have a formal literacy program, i

What Obligation does a agency? cy or the likejjhood of such some Cited their small staffs as the reason. And, a number of i

' newspaper have to fulfill before . . injury or damage or financial papers urged SNPA t9 develop a program that COUld be used by V,
. a bl' - ~ d KRS 61-825 reqwres a PUbl'C ~ - _ all members but articularl b smaller a ers.

.pu ic agency is reqUIre to a enc to ive 24 hours rior loss, when the time reqUIrVe . I P Y Y P P ‘ I.

give the newspaper notice of g . y f g h . p. ments of such notice of speCial Only. We newspapers have a staff person ‘whose primary i

., notice 0 eac SPEC'al meeting meeting would make such no- responSIblllty is literacy; 71 have someone who includes literacy . i

_ j: j j 7 . - called. _ tice impractical and increase as part Of h'5 or her JOb- ‘ . ._ . . i

lNSlDE . . ’TO each local newspaper of the likelihood of injury or dam- Of those whose. partial. .rPSPOV‘S'P'l'tY '5 literacy, 28 are i

, .1 j _;_—_-_,-_;l general circulation, each news age or financial loss.” employed in the editorial diViSion; 22, newspaper'in education; ?

. .5 , . _ , g . service and each local radio or 18, marketing/promotional; seven, community affairs; SIX, educa- j.

QThe Tin-land Daily. "Press television station which has on Although the statute does tion'al services; three, administrative; two, circulation; one, public j

meivsmper study deadline file with the public agenrya written not Specify how Often a news— affairs; one, promotion/education; and one, not speCified. .

ffor :paflieipatibn. is‘ Mafch request to be notified of special paper’s request to a public Editorially, 68 papers are covering literacy more frequently

7 , 1i2;-See page 1&1 _ 1 ‘ 1-: . 7 meetings.” agency for notification of spe- than they were a year ago; 52, about the same; and three, less v

f3; . , , . ‘ cial meetings should be re- frequently. Two gave no response. ' j

first.JAmEHdrnentjjfreedom The Statute contains an tPX- . newed, we recommend that Over the past year, 80 respondents used news and feature j

',-§adyertiseménts have 3. been: A; ception t0 the 24 hour notice you renew your requests an- articles to examine the literacy problem only as a special focus. 5

vdeveIOPéd?fair-ineWSpapersi rule where the meeting is nuajjy‘ That way there can be Twenty—nine papers wrote about the problem monthly andseven

seepagEB. is j called 'tO deal Wlth an emer' no question that you have an lUUChed 0n the SUbjeCt every week. SIX newspapers dld nOt I

_ j:._;: . .. . :ency involvmg injury or dam- up-to—date request on file, in 1 over the subject at all. Three did not respond. 3

g ‘ " ' 3 i ' 5 ‘ .‘ . 7 " l - age to personal property or accordance with 61.825. ' Please turn to page 7 ,3

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Launne Wells Lovett, former land. .23: A.» .‘ _ Time magazine and was affiliat— He was a CO'fOUHder and i
society editor of the Murray Survivors include two sons, " i _ _ . ed with First National City Bank former president of the Win- 3
Ledger & Times, died Jan. 30 at Wells T. and John D. Lovett, * of New York when he was chester Community Concert
Hermitage Village Nursing both of Owensboro; and six ”it ' younger. Association and a charter ]
Home in Owensboro. She was grandchildren. at“ ‘ . Tatman was a graduate of member of Winchester Lamp— i
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She was society editor of the TATMAN ,, 6, E... “f; ,; 1 Choate SthOOl ”:1 Wailingford, Surviving are a brother, l
Murray Ledger & Times when James 5- Tatman, the PUb' . is ”g? Conn., an 'Nort western and George S. Tatman of Conners- l
her‘husband, the dlate Joe T' gill? :fbtheWWinchSester 5”? V‘ Wrw‘ Yale univerSities. ville; two sisters, Elizabeth Neal 5
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first board of regents at Murray He had been publisher and i.» .5 . ' m' itarry Zeb/S or P” 'Ca :30”- f great-nieces and great— i
State University. Murray State’s an owner Of the Sun since 5%? .. .. He a een a meme] er. 0 nephews. 4
main auditorium, Lovett Audi- 1936. During his tenure at the a? .5». .;:,::’A':',:i§>‘ several organizationsyinc uding . 1.
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Contest Rules . 3,
. 5:22;“,
.2 . Categones
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' 5 ' D dl' - M h 15 1988 =
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A .. ‘ A.“ k ‘ V "I - w A ‘ A ' V V 7| "V ‘7 2 '2' ' Av - »~ ”7 , _ . .~ '._ , -.. _. , .. . V , ...' g? M'fll‘fljfijfifi

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cmsafs 10. All entries, except winning entries, will be retained by the
judges. Winning entries can be viewed at the summer convention .
Weekly Division ' Published One Day Per Week when critiques of winning entries and presentation of awards will be
Class 1: Weeklies with a certified circulation of 3000 or less made.
Class 2: Weeklies with a certified circulation of 3001 to 4700
Class 3: Weeklies with a certified circulation of 4701 or more 11. The judges will use the current Kp A Yearbook and Directory to
4:: , determine any points upon which information is desired. “
Multi-Weekly Division
». I Class 11 Weekly newspapers published 2 or 3 times per week 12. Appropriate plaques and certificates will be awarded to winners
regardless Of a circulation amount in each contest category, plaques going to the first place winner and .
.. certificates to second, third and honorable mention. Honorable
Daily Division ' Published Four Days Per Week or More ‘ mention is not necessarily awarded in each category. ~ »
Class 1: Dailies with a certified circulation of 10,000 or less '
‘ ‘ 3 Class 22 Dailies With a certified circulation 0f 10.001 to 25,000 13. In the event only one entry ismade in any contest category for a
- q ,‘ Class 33 Dailies With a certified 930111350" Of 25,001 or more specific class, an honorable mention certificate only will be awarded
. in that category. '
é . Col/test RII/es .
E35? 1. All entries must be postmarked no later than March 15. 6M,“ .
H 2. Contests are open only to paid—up members of the Kentucky Press
. Association. To be eligible, individuals must have been full- or part- CATEGORY ONE: TYPOGRAPHY ,
. time employees of the newspaper submitting the entry at the time the Submit as your entry two issues, plus one issue published during the
‘ material was published. week of October 5. Entries will be judged on quality of type, neatness, ‘ ‘v
. \ layout and press work. =
. 7 3. A newspaper's entry must beraccompanied by payment for all
" entries in the contest. Please compute carefully. There will be no . '
t refunds. CATEGORY TWO: COMMUNITY SERVICE _.
g? _ ,g. ,, This category is defined as any effort of the newspaper to perform a‘r . _ .
: j :« . 4. Contest publication period for entries in the spring contest includes community service. The project must have been developed, promoted .3 i
. 3 issues between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 1987. and completed by a newspaper's own efforts. The entry Will be judged
7 on the service performed by the newspaper and the effectiveness of the
7’ 5. Separate sets of tearsheets or complete copies of issues must be project. The entry maybe submitted With an introductory letter and can. _7',
3‘ furnished as indicated in each of the individual contest categories. Do also include newspaper clippings, background letters and letters from *
_¢_ . not send clippings or scrapbooks. Machine copies of entries are not officials in the community. No more than two entries per newspaper.
42*“ ‘ permitted without specific authorization in advance of the judging. (Example: One recent winning entry developed an employment semi- :.
.7 ‘ Newspapers must anticipate the submission of entries by saving issues nar for its community. The entry included types 0f applications used by .
. or tearsheets as prospective contest entries appear. , employers, ideas on preparing for job interviews, and a job seminar to f
> get applicants ready for interviewing.) 7
6. Be sure to fill out the entry form and return it with your entries and ' ,1 I
. i g ' payment.
. CATEGORY THREE: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION , ' _
. g '1 7_ Type in formation'for each entry on the appropriate enclosed label for Submit as your entry a tearsheet of a story, series of stories, or editorials .
3*“ '. ’ * each category and affix securely on the upper right-hand comer of the indicative 0f efforts to carry forward the fight for the public's right to *
» ’ page above your entry. Make sure it does not cover some important know. Entries should be based on local situations and may be accom- - 4,
' ' area. On each identification tab, enter (a) Name of Newspaper, panied by a brief report 0f some of the obstacles faced in getting the
a (b) Contest Category Number, (c) Division, ((1) Class. information j
' g 8. Package all entries into a single packet and mail before .
.«s. March 15, 1988 to: ‘ . CATEGORY FOUR: FRONT PAGE ’
q Contest Committee Submit as your entry full-page tearsheets of any two issues plus one ' '
7 ' f - Kentucky Press Association from the week of October 5. Judging will be on the factors of
:””‘f;‘.":.: 332 Capitol Avenue appearance and content of the front page. Newsworthiness and good -,
g; . _.' » Frankfort, KY 40601 writing are of prime importance. Pictures will be judged on quality and ’
1.5.}: .1; f ' .. ‘ . newsworthiness, not on size alone. Factors to be considered include ,
_r : r_ . 9. A contest entry fee of $10 is required of each newspaper for entering, general appearance and reader appeal, including typography, pictures I
'-’ "‘ regardless of group ownership. In order to be eligible, each newsaper and other ilhlStraliOHS, headlines, use Of White space, layout and I
e, f ‘ must enter separately. A fee of S4 is to be paid for each entry in each proofreading. The pages will bejudged as a whole, all factors will b3 -
‘ . contest category. These fees go toward payment for plaques and considered. ' - '
: 7 " ‘ ' judging expenses. . , . ,-

 - . vases ;- -' '
CATEGORY FIVE= EDITORIAL PAGE CATEGORY TWELVE: LOCAL FEATURE PICTURES l
. Submit as your entry full-page tearsheets from three. separate issues. Submit as your entry three Separate and complete issues with especially . I ' '
The editorial page will also be judged as a whole: Quality of writing and interesting local feature pictures which have been plainly marked. This. T '
importance OfSUbjeets locally wrll count. Localized editorials are most is to judge the use of feature pictures. The judging will be based on all . i
desired. Local work, writing, columns, cartoons are more desrred than feature pictures throughout the newspaper. Judging will be based on .. » i
syndicated materials or other outside material. Layout and style of page appeal, cropping and balance. . _ i
.. is also a factor. Advertising will not detract from the judging, providing - .
it occupies mOre than one quarter of the page. CATEGORY THIRTEEN: LOCAL SPORTS PICTURES ‘ ” '
' - Submit as your entry full-page tearsheets of pictures of three different i .
. CATEGORY SIX: NEWSPAPER PROMOTION sports (both active and spectator sports, and arena and field sports are a »
Submit a maximum of Six individual tearsheets that may includeionly eligible). Submit no more than one tearsheet Of pictures for each sport. _
. . one promotional series (such as First Amendment Contest, or National This contest is designed to encourage the use of more diversified sports ~ .

* Newsaper Week), if desired, which most effectively and originally coverage. Pictures will be judged on appeal ofthe picture, balance and i '
promoted your newspaper during the year. Tearsheets may consist of cropping. ' '
house ads, related news stories, editorials, photographs, graphics or , » ’

- feature stories. The award will be given to the newspaper which, during CATEGORY FOURTEEN: SPECIAL EDITION 0R SECTION ' 2'

_ ~ the past year, most effectively and originally promoted the newspaper Submit as your entry a full copy of one special edition or section run by ._
1 industry, its aims and objectives. ' . your newspaper. This entry must be an individual newspaper's own ‘ i
efforts-must have been locally produced-mot a canned section such as i :1
i CATEGORY SEVEN: SPORTS PAGE a Christmas edition solely written by a news service, a highway safety - ' XE
‘ Submit as your €11th tear sheets Of your page OI pages from any three section or a state parks edition. This special seetion of special edition .» : , ‘
separate iSSUCS- AdVOITISIIIg is 110‘ a detriment to the judging 0f the will be judged as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on editorial content, s ' ‘i i i
contest, but such advertising should be not more than half the page and makeup, photographic excellence. A reasonable blend of advertising ‘ ' ’ ' ,’
should be appropriate to the sports page. Sports pages will be judged will be accepted. 5
7 on layout, writing Style, pictures and other illustrations. A variety of ' _ . e .
,. coverage is encouraged. CATEGORY FIFI‘EEN: ORIGINAL AD IDEA f :
Submit as your entry full tearsheets showing a local ad or series of ads 5 _
7 CATEGORY EIGHT= AGRICULTURE PAGE based on an original idea. (House ads are not eligible). Only ads that .
, Submit as your entry tearsheets 0f your page or pages from any three are locally generated and produced are eligible, although use of ad __ V
.. ._ .. separate issues. Advertising is not a detriment to the judging of the service artwork and illustrations is acceptable. iLiI'nitjone-gentrypct‘a???

‘ ‘ ”contest. but such advertising should be not more than half the page and newspaper. Judging will be bas e. on originality ofthought, adaptability ' « , . , .
should be appropriate to the agriculture page. Agriculture pages will be of the idea to the advertiser, makeup and appearance, and other l
judged on layout, writing style, pictures and other illustrations. A typographical devices which, taken as a whole, give a total overall 3 i
if“ variety of coverage is encouraged. appearance and appeal to readers. ' . i

CATEGORY NINE BUSINESS PAGE/SECTION CATEGORY SIXTEEN: DISPLAY ADVERTISING ?
is Submit as your entry tearsheets Of your page or section from any three Submit as your entry any three separate issues. All local display ads will ' i
7 separate issues. Advertising is “Oi a detriment ie the judging Of the be considered in judging. National ads will not be considered and . l
i ' contest, but such advertising should not be more than half the page or neither will use of color in judging this category. Ads will be rated on
section and should be appropriate to the business page. Business pages the basis of typography, graphics and illustrations, layout (including . .
' . will be judged on layout, writing style, pictures and other illustrations. balance and use Of white space), borders, and other typographical j _
" A var ieiy 0i coverage is encouraged. devices which, taken as a whole, give a total overall appearance and i i i
, appeal to readers. ‘ ‘ ’ . ”l
' ' CATEGORY TEN: LIFESTYLE PAGE = . «g; . ’g
' Submit as your entry full-page tearsheets of the Lifestyle or Family GENERAL EXCELLENCE ' ’ , 7 , . l
. Section Of three separ ate issues. This page is i0 be J'UfiIng 9“ its appeal General excellence awards in each circulation class will be awarded on - i . : ‘

‘1. ‘0 the family and ‘is general appearance. While advertlsmg is pennltted, the basis of standings in contest categories. Each first place award will ,i 5'

it should not be more than half of the page and it should be appropriate count (3) three points, each second place (2) two points, and each third '

' ie the page. Points to be conSIdered are use Of photographs, news, place(1) one point in determining the winners of the general excellence - .
features and brief personal Items. awards. Honorable mention awards will be considered only if needed ~ ‘ ‘

to break ties. ' ' . v

, , CATEGORY ELEVEN: LOCAL NEWS PICTURES ‘ , ,

Submit as your entry only three separate and complete issues with . , ‘
especially newsworthy local pictures. This is to judge the use Of news . . '“ iii” ‘

i . photos. All local news photos will be judged. Pictures will be judged .- ,. . .2 ii

on cropping, balance, newsworthiness and appeal. Emphasis will be ' ‘ . i -

, placed on how the picture added to the effectiveness and balance. ‘ g ,

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,3: E Kentucky Press Associatlon , g: 55:;
' 72; . ~ ' Lang
s E E 332 Capitol Avenue hL
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. . Frankfort, KY 40601 3g:
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.s -—-——————Across Kentucky—M»—
: LILLIAN M. ”SALLY” MYNES, Some changes have been Sentinel-News publisher been promoted to production tography, is now assistant edi-
? 2 business manager of Landmark taking place at the Journal- JAMES EDELEN has been active manager of The Kenton Coun- tor. KATHY YOUNG, who has-
i Community Newspapers of Enterprise this month. CHARLIE in Shelbyville’s education ty Recorder. She is a 1985 been at The Enterprise for
._. Maryland Inc. since March HUST, who has been filling in scene lately. Edelen and several graduate of Morehead State more than five years, has been
1985, became business and as the paper’s managing editor, community business leaders University and has worked at _ promoted to copy editor.
f5: personnel manager of the officially has the title now. urged the school board to set The Recorder since November. ‘
i g company effective as of Jan. 1. MARK HOLLOWAY is the new up a community advisory pan- DAWN STRATTON joins The
E :35, In her new position, Mynes will editor, taking the position el which will broaden commu- Two staff members of The Anderson News to help with a
We manage the company’s buSi— Hust’s father, EDD HUST, has nity involvement in how Lebanon Enterprise have new first-ever mini-tab due out pro-
i 3 ness Office, will supervise and held since 1963. Edd Hust and schools are run. The school titles. NINIE GLASSCOCK, who moting the county in March.
4’6 review the performance of his wife, SUE HUST, will still board agreed at its January has been at The Enterprise for Stratton, 22, is a December' ‘
business office staff and will be own the paper; he will remain meeting. eight years and has received graduate of UK- and has a
E}; responsible for administering publisher while his wife contin— ' eight first—place awards from degree in marketing and
:5 all personnel programs. ues as head bookkeeper. JENNIFER A. REDMER, 24, has KPA for her writing and phO- advertising.
i ll' ' ‘ t d f' d ’
i l Iteracy worries papers, 5 u y In s
r: Continued from a e 1 and alcohol abuse problems. greater than 30 percent. Thirty- want SNPA to take on illiteracy gram, and copies of any litera-
i‘ 5', - p g 0 Computerized literacy pro- two papers either did not know is an active one, and a number cy materials they already have
When asked about the grams to boost the reading or did not specify the of papers—particularly small developed. 5
E methods they used to cover abilities of potential dropouts. percentage. circulation members—asked . “7'
El literacy, 97 said they used 0 Attention from Child While the definitions varied that SNPA develop a model This spring, SNPA will issue a! - '
li “.ews a‘ritcles; .951 feature 5t0' Study Teams of counselors and slightly, most’newspapers de- program and materials for their final report on the survey find-
ii ”es; 78,.edlt0hal5ie9i wrre ser— psychologists. fined a dropout as any high use. if185. In addition to statistical
Ei Vice articles; 50/ 'h'h0U5e ads; OSmaller classes for stu- school student who leaves Almost all of the respon— data, that report will focus on
{E 29/ ah'TOUhCemehtSI‘ five, spe- dents having trouble in lower school for any reason other dents pledged to commit their specific programs being used
ll cial sections; and four: paid grades. than death and does not trans- resources to SNPA if a worthy by SNPA members to fight
EE ads.‘ . 0 Expanded summer school fer to another high school. project could be identified and illiteracy in their own commu—
i: N'netY'S'X papers are ”very” programs. The number of communities structured to help the region. nities. ; .7
E‘ concerned about the effect of o ln-school suspension vs. that have a citizens’ committee ' ’ ' .
,‘r illiteracy 0” the” community, out-of—school. working on dropout prevention The resources they offered After the data is thoroughly
‘ EN 28 are “somewhat” concerned, 0 Retrieval programs to is about evenly split. Fifty-sev— included space in their news examined by sub-committees
._ ' «dTOhé gave ”0 response. bring dropouts back to the ,, ,en, harm,5.irhegwmnfijfiadmmgrcolumnsgper: oftheSNPALiteracymgggi 5.3,
figh‘l-:rira-thh—T’TTTSYSEETH. " . ,7 *' " ”not. " W” -" " ' " sonnel» to work on the local" teefthe rfullf’rcehfi‘ffiittéé” fl?
fled; about the effect on 0 Learning center activities Ninety-two papers said their level, money to be used in the’ again meet to formalize an i
. l- letlegf‘3’4aare' somewhat to meet the individual needs of communities have a citizens’ development of SNPA’s pro— agenda of action.
: $522?ng I an two did net Stuff/Es'net schools committee that addresses illit- _ - ' ' ” U
., Th SNPA Lit r C m i _ 8 - ' . eracy; 33 do not.'And 85 have . ,
. e eacy 0 mt The rate by Wthh high a Citizens’ committee on eco-
‘ tee also wants ’tO explore the sthool students in the SNPA nomic improvements 40 do Instant Info
impact ' 0” a community 0f region are dropping out of not. I
gggilggnfigogrggws'én pr'sginihRG—T- SChOOlS varies widely Some The numbers also are about
‘, u ”1 Cl res 58' eir cities are raduatin nearl all evenl 5 lit t - -
. neWSPaper market area has of their stfidents. iii othery ar- pers ythzft hbaevgvefg‘nfhisifffl "“0“?” AGR'CULTURE
‘ _’ either a county, state or federal eas, the dropout rate is greater member to a literacy workshop Chevron USA, Inc. Kentucky Farm Bareau ‘
. . prison. Thirty-three do not; than 50 percent. , or conference in the past two .1527 Starks Building 120 South Hubbard Lane .
E: 5.”.(ty of the 125 papers have Forty-seven respondents years. Louisville, Ky. 40202 Louisville, Ky. 40207 .
. a brErntgual cogmumltcy En their said the dropout rate for local nity-eighi papers have done , Cary Huddleston » -
mar e area. 05