xt79cn6xxs4c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79cn6xxs4c/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1964 journals 144 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.144 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.144 1964 2014 true xt79cn6xxs4c section xt79cn6xxs4c · ]OHN C. REDMAN
  , 7  ‘  · Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station
é?-¥1‘e°”"  yi`-.   ERRETT M. CONWAY
    4; >‘._;E·· "  {1 ff Central States Forest Experiment Station
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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY • AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT
STATION • DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECON()MICS
LEXINGTON • in c00perati0n with CENTRAL STATES FOREST
EXPERIMENT STATION • BEREA RESEARCH CENTER •

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BECAUSE OE THE STATE'S CENTRAL GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION, KENTUCKY'S
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AMERICAN PUBLIC.
 
COVER PICTURE--MODERN TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES INCLUDING THE
1
HIGI IWAY SYSTEM, EXPAND THE MARKET AREA POR KENTUCKY‘S LUMBER

   fw KENTUCK Y
]OHN C. REDMAN
Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station
L ERRETT M. CONWAY
T Central States Forest Experiment Station
n UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY • AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT
STATION • DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
p LEXINGTON • in c00pe1·ati0n with CENTRAL STATES FOREST
EXPERIMENT STATION • BEREA RESEARCH CENTER •
pnocnzss REPORT 144 smug Code 1-1

 '
   

 CONTENTS
Z Page
Foreword .............. 5
Variety of Tree Species ........... 7
· Kentucky Values Its Timber Resources ....... 9
Labor Trained for the Task .......... 9
~ Capacity to Produce Good Lumber ........ 11 I
Favorable Marketing Location ......... 11
Lumber Marketing ............ 12
· I Explanation of the Directory .......... 13
The Directory of Lumber Buyer Classes ....... 15
I - Sawmills and Planing Mills ........ 16 U
II — Dimension and Flooring Mills ....... 18
` III - Millwork Plants .......... 21
, IV — Veneer and Plywood Plants ........ 25
. V - Prefabricated Wood Products ....... 26
VI - Retail Lumber Dealers ........ 27
VII — Building Construction ......... 32
» VIII - Nailed Wooden Boxes and Shook ....... 34
_ IX - Wirebound Boxes and Crates ....... 36
· X - Veneer and Plywood Containers ....... 36
XI — Slack and Tight Cooperage ........ 37
XII - Wood Preserving .......... 37
_ XIII — Miscellaneous Wood Products ....... 38
XVI — Pallets, Skids, Dunnage and Bracing ..... 41
` XV — Wood Household Furniture, Not Upholstered .... 43
XVI — Wood Household Furniture, Upholstered ..... 49
XVII - Mattresses and Bed Springs ....... 52
XVIII — Office Furniture .......... 54
` XIX - Public Building Furniture ........ 55
POC - Wood Partitions and Fixtures ....... 56
XXI - Cabinets ............ 57
XXII - Brooms and Brushes ......... 61
XXIII - Morticians‘ Goods .......... 62
Codes Used in the Directory ,........ Inside Back Cover
Species Code ............ Fold—out, Back Cover

 
 FOREWORD
— Kentucky's sawmills are the bulwark of its forest-based industries. Thousands
of families receive all or part of their livelihood through employment inwoods or mills.
The sawmilling industry develops wealth where it is most sorely needed, in our hard-
pressed rural areas. Kentucky's forest resources are adequate to sustain a heavy
expansion in its forest industries.
- This directory is intended as a marketing aid for Kentucky sawmill operators to
enable them to find additional and better markets for their lumber. Information contain-
ed in this directorywas obtained through a mail canvass of wood-using firms in Kentucky
and portions of neighboring states with atotal haul distance generally less than 250 miles.
The data reported by these firms are for the 1962 calendar year.
, E The study was undertaken by the University of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment
_ g Station through its Department of Agricultural Economics. Financial and technical
assistance for the study was provided by the Central States Forest Experiment Station,
Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
- This directory is not a complete listing of wood-using firms in the study area.
Some firms requested that their names not be included in the directory. Some firms
__ may have been unintentionally overlooked; others provided insufficient information for
inclusion in the directory. Listing of a firm in the directory in no way implies its ‘
· recommendation by the University of Kentucky or the U.S. Forest Service.
William A. Seay, Dean and Director
_ University of Kentucky
Agricultural Experiment Station
R. D. Lane, Director
Central States Forest Experiment
_ Station
5

 {I

 ` MARKETS FOR KENTUCKY LUMBER
A Listing of Some Morkets For Lumber in Kentucky cmd Neighboring Stotes
- BY
JOHN C. REDMAN
. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station
and
ERRETT M. CONWAY
Central States Forest Experiment Station
Kentucky has over 400 commercial sawmills and dimension mills producing
" lumber and lumber items for sale to various wood-using industries. The sawmills of
the state are, by far, the largest users of the raw products of the forests and consume
over 90 percent of all the round wood harvested annually. In 1962, they produced an
estimated 466 million board feet of lumber. l
I in Kentucky's commercial forests occupy approximately 11-1/2 million acres and
t ` cover about 45 percent of the total area of the state. Almost half the commercial forest
area is in the mountainous, eastern one-third of the state. In this area, 76 percent of
the land is in commercial forest, with some counties having as much as 90 percent or
_ more of the land area in forest cover. The hardwood forest types make up about 87
percent of the entire commercial forest area in Kentucky.
` Hardwood lumber is Kentucky's leading forest product. Over 94 percent of the
· lumber produced in the state in 1962 was of the hardwood species. Yellow pine, white
pine, hemlock, red cedar, and cypress accounted for less than 6 percent of the total
lumber production.
The fact that Kentucky has the largest volume of live hardwood sawtimber (over
25 billion board feet) of all the states proves it to be a reliable source of hardwood
- lumber. It is also significant that the annual growth on the reservoir of hardwood saw-
timber is over one billion board feet, about twice the annual drain for lumber and other
products by the primary wood—using industries of the state. 2
· A VARIETY OF TREE SPECIES
Kentucky has variety in its tree species. It offers the lumber buyer a range of
commercial wood species not exceeded by any other state. From the flood plains and
bottoms of the streams and rivers of central and western Kentucky come the tree species
associated with the southern bottom—land hardwoods, including cypress. In the rich
IU. S. Bureau of the Census, Industry Division, Lumber Production and Mill Stocks - 1962 Series M24T
(62) 1.
2Timber Resources for America's Future, Forest Service, U. S. D. A. , Forest Resource Report No. 14,
Table 7, p. 512; Table 12, p. 524.
7

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FIG. 1. -— EASTERN KENTUCKY PROVIDES AN ABUNDANT SUPPLY OF MIXED
HARDWOOD SPECIES OF IMPORTANCE TO THE LUMBER INDUSTRY. (PHOTO--
BRUNNER STUDIO, BEREA, KY. )
coves of the eastern Kentucky highlands, the famed Appalachian hardwoods are produced
which are important to the furniture and other woodworking industries using fine hard-
woods. In between and intermixed with these two areas is a complex of topography,
soils, exposure, and moisture conditions that has resulted in the broad range of com-
mercial species, both hard and softwoods, that make up the rest of Kentucky's forest
COV€I`.
Kentucky is an important hardwood lumber-producing state, ranking prominent-
ly in the 10 top hardwood lumber-producing states in the nation. It has maintained such
a position for over a century. It ranked third in 1962 and 1963.
Of more importance, Kentucky's present forest resource and potential are such
that it can sustain this historical record and even improve upon it. Kentucky ranks
first in the nation in its live sawtimber resource of hickory and oak.3 It ranks fourth,
behind Missouri, West Virginia, and Virginia, in volume of preferredwhite oak species.
 
3"[`imber Resources for America‘s Future, Forest Service, U. S. D. A. , Forest Resources Report No. 14.
8

 It likewise ranks fourth behind West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin with regard
to the preferred red oak species. Only Virginia and North Carolina narrowly exceed
Kentucky in yellow poplar. New York and Pennsylvania are the only two states that sur-
" pass Kentucky in the soft maple—beech species group. New York and Wisconsin alone
are shown to have a better supply of the species combination of ash, basswood, and
black walnut than Kentucky. Kentucky even ranks well among the first 10 states in
respect to the important species combination of hard maple and yellow birch. Kentucky
does have a substantial forest resource with a wide variety of highly desirable species
for the production of lumber (Table 1).
KENTUCKY VALUES ITS TIMBER RESOURCES
Kentucky is aware of the importance of its extensive forest resource to the
welfare of the state and the nation. Forestry programs to improve the quality, through
protection, management, utilization and marketing, of its forest resource and its products
are impressive. The State Division of Forestry of the Department of Natural Resources
is well organized and staffed to provide protection from fire, insects, and disease for
_ the forests of the state. The Division of Forestry helps landowners improve forest
management and the harvesting, processing and marketing of timber products. The Di-
. _ vision also operates forest nurseries to provide planting stock for landowners. Through
the Wood Utilization Division of the Department of Commerce, the state provides assist-
ance to forest industries functioning or desiring to locate within the state.
V The federal government operates a national forest within the state, carrying out
the principles of "multiple use, *· and maintains forest research activities through the
Central States Forest ExperimentStation. The Soil Conservation Service, also an agency
of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, works closely with landowners in forest im-
* provement. The University of Kentucky, by itself and in cooperation with other agencies,
carries out forestry programs of research, education, and extension. Non-government
organizations in the state withan active interest in the state‘s forest resources and their
development include among others, the Kentucky Banker's Association, the Kentucky
Farm Bureau Federation and the Society of American Foresters . State—wide and regional
meetings such as the annual Conservation Congress, the Governor's Conference on
· Forestry, and Regional Development Programs accent the interest of Kentuckians in
their forest resource and forest industries.
. LABOR TRAINED FOR THE TASK
— Kentucky has traditionally been a lumber—producing state. The hard work of
A harvesting the forest products and sawmilling have been familiar to several generations
of Kentuckians. Whether by "spring tide" or modern highway, Kentucky has put its
forest products on the market. But, in this age of rapid change from brute strength to
mechanization and automation, the University of Kentucky has taken a step which is
singular in the nation in providing the wood industry with trained men. Now in its second
· year, the Wood Use Center at Quicksand is the focal point for the vocational training of
men for Kentucky's forest industries. Responsibilities for this program are shared by
the University with Educational and Economic Security personnel at state and local levels .
The Area Redevelopment Administration of the federal government, through its financial
· assistance, made this facility a reality.
9

  
   T   ~—-. v » l ` -    `   ’  8   -
_   ,   TABLE 1. - LUMBER PRODUCTION, iilfnasung-§’ 
  KENTUCKY, 1962   »-   ,&—"""""*······-_ M   ,
   O1um€ M  
  Hardwoods BOE-rd Feet  
.-...-.-¤¤¤Q1¤¤¤-• ASh 6¤ 072  
,,.,   Beeeweed 8» 888  
·····""‘ ‘ '‘`’ V O"   Beech 33, 533 _ . ,,
_-;¤$l_  Birch 1, 305  
  Bleekeem e» 000   e
YF `8 Black locust 168   »-,< ;   o _ _
   4* 0 Black walnut 11, 669   , ,  
¤ »· B00*».»4¤?*»..§Zf  - 4—=   “" 4...  
I        .`n@  Y
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%$ _    .  ·»·· S  .;.‘4     ;&é§
q FIG. 2. -- THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY*S WOOD USE CENTER AT QUICKSAND,
TRAINS TECHNICIANS FOR TI-IE STATE·S FOREST INDUSTRIES.
CAPACITY TO PRODUCE GOOD LUMBER
Kentucky's sawmills can and do produce well—manufactured lumber. The num-
erous small mills of the post-World War II days have, by large, been replaced by fewer
. but larger mills of greater productive capacity. Today, most of Kentucky's lumber is
produced by sawmills cutting a million to 10 million board feet of lumber annually.
Greater mechanization and specialization have taken place both in the mill and the woods.
Mechanical loaders and log carriers, better skidding equipment, live decks, automated
mills, debarkers and chippers are becoming a familiar part of the Kentucky sawmill
industry.
These larger mills offer a well-manufactured product and provide astable source
of supply of lumber for their markets.
FAVORABLE MARKETING LOCATION
l Kentucky's geographical location places it at the hub of the highly industrial
eastern United States. Its lumber resources are equally accessible to manufacturers
and markets of the East, South, and Midwest. Almost 70 percent of the nation's popu-
lation lives within the 500-mile area surrounding and including Kentucky. Fifty percent
or more of the nation‘s population is within 400 miles or less of Kentucky's forest re-
» sources.
All forms of transportation (rail, highway, water, and air) are available and are
being improved. The most dramatic improvements in transportation within Kentucky
and the neighboring states are the new highway systems completed and under construction.
They already greatly facilitate the movement of lumber and other goods to market.
1 I

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FIG. 3. —- MECHANICAL LOADERS PROVIDE A GREATER CAPACITY FOR HAN-
DLING LOGS.
The accelerated program calling for a better road system within Kentucky and other ‘
states of the Appalachian area will be a special boon to the marketing of Kentucky's
forest products in the near future.
LUMBER MARKETING _
Successful marketing is what keeps a sawmill in business. To produce a good
product is not enough. It must be sold-—and at a profit. A
Most lumber buyers seek producers who manufacture a quality product and afford —
a dependable source of su l . Fre uentl a bu er desires onl one s ecies of lumber
PP Y Q Y Y Y P
of a particular thickness, grade, and moisture condition. A knowledge of the products
and services required by the buyer is a big step in making a sale. Successful market-
ing means providing the buyer with the products and services he desires.
Having a well—manufactured product that a buyer needs is an important part of ··
marketing lumber and lumber products. Letting the buyer know you have the material
he needs through frequent sales contacts results in increased lumber sales. 4
 
4"How May Sawmills Improve Sales?" Alex B. Cole, Forest Economist, Central States Forest Experiment
Station, Berea, Kentucky. Unpublished paper, 1964.
12

 EXPLANATION OF THE DIRECTORY
_ The purpose of the lumber buyer's directory is to acquaint Kentucky lumber
producers with additional and perhaps better markets for their products. The directory
also serves to acquaint the saw mill operator with the species, grades, and moisture
and surface conditions sought by individual buyers. This information should enable the
producer to modify his products to meet desired market demands.
_ The directory is divided into lumber buyer classes. The individual buyers in
each class are listed in alphabetical order by state, for Kentucky and neighboring states.
The lumber grades and percentage of each grade usually purchased for a particular
lumber use are shown at the heading for each lumber buyer class and are listed in ·
Table 2. Accompanying each firm name and address, information is shown as to species
of lumber purchased, desired moisture and surface condition of the lumber, and an
_ indication of firm size based on number of employees. A numerical code is used to
identify tree species and appears on the inside of the folded edge of the back cover.
Moisture and surface condition of lumber desired by an individual firm is shownby
standard trade abbreviations. A further explanation of codes used in the directory
appears inside the back cover. In using the directory, it is suggested that a sawmill
operator have a good knowledge or list of lumber species he has or will have for mar-
- ket, by lumber grade and volume.
13

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I4

 C THE DIRECTORY
Q
LUMBER BUYER CLASSES
(Begins O1'1 page 16)
15

 I. LUMBER BUYER CLASS: Sawmills and Planing Mills
Principal Lumber Grades by Percent of Total Hardwood
Lumber Volume Purchased by This Group _
FAS 2. 8% No. 2 Common 10. 9%
No. 1 Common 3.. 5% No. 3 Common 2. 1% V
Mill Run 80. 7%
 
Lumber Purchased Size
State-Buyer-Address Form Moist. Condition Species Used Class
KENTUCKY
Dawson Lumber Co. , Box 8305 Rgh* Grn, AD* 2, 3,4, 7, 10, 11, 19,* B
Sta. E., Louisville 8, Ky. 20, 21, 28
Roy Gabehart, Gabehart & Gabehart Rgh Grn 3, 5, 7, 10, 18,19 , 20, A
Knifley, Ky. 21, 28
Keith Lumber Co. , Manchester, Ky. Ptgh Grn 28,33 B
Nunn Bros. Lumber Co. , Box 152 Rgh Grn 11, 28 C
Cadiz, Ky.
W. E. Partin Lumber Corp., Box 531 Rgh Grn, AD 20, 21, 28, 31, 33 B
Pineville, Ky. ‘
Roland Peterson, Rt. 1, Greenville Rgh Grn, AD 20,28 A
Ky.
Ray L. White & Sons, Morehead, Ky. Ptgh Grn 2, 3,4,7, 10, 18, 19, D
20, 28, 33
INDIANA
Phil Adamson Lumber & Sawmill Rgh Grn, AD 20 C A
Rt. 5, Brazil, Ind.
NORTH CAROLINA
Ellis Lumber Co., Rt. 3, Shelby, N. C. Rgh Grn 33 C M
C. N. Garland, Ilot Springs, N. C. Rgh Grn, AD 20,21,22%,32, 33 A I
Johnson—Chzu1dley Lumber Co., Inc. Rgh AD, KD 20, 21, 32, 33, 34, C
Box 5190, Biltmore Station, Asheville 36
N. C. ‘
Oakboro Lumber Co., Inc. , Box 679 Rgh Grn 32, 33 A
Lenior, N. C.
J. l\I. Pritchard, Rt. 5, Burnsville, N. C. Rgh Grn 2,18,20, 28,31 A
OlllO
II. R. Jarrells Lumber Yard, Box 55 Rgh Grn, AD 20, 21, 1, 33, 28 A
IIUVI Galena Pike, West Portsmouth,
Ohio
Donald Morris Sawmill, Box S4 Rgh Grn 28, 2, 19, 7,10 C
IIS Sixth St. , Maelisburg, Ohio
(continued on next page) _
* For explaination ot abbreviations see inside back cover.
I6 '

 I. LUMBER BUYER CLASS: Sawmills and Planing Mills (continued)
 
‘° Lumber Purchased Size
State-Buyer-Address Form Moist. Condition Species Used Class
TENNESSEE
Burroughs—Ross—Colville Co. Rgh Grn, AD 3, 5, 7, 10, 16, 18, NA
McMinnville, Term. 19, 20, 21, 28, 31, 33
W. I. Dooly Conasauga River Lumber Rgh AD All hardwoods NA
Co. , Conasauga, Tenn.
C. C. Cress Lumber Co. , 522 North NA NA 31, 33 B l
Main St. , Greeneville, Tenn.
_ Ray M. Johnson & Co. , Huntland, Term. Rgh AD 7, 28 NA
WEST VIRGINIA
Sliger Lumber Co. , Inc. Box 667 Rgh Grn 20, 21, 11, 28, 2, C
602 Jackson Ave. , Huntington, W. Va. 18, 19, 3, 4, 7, 10, 26
T7

 II. LUMBER BUYER CLASS: Dimension and Flooring Mills ·
Principal Lumber Grades by Percent of Total Hardwood
Lumber Volume Purchased by This Group 5
FAS 0. 2% No. 2 Common 10. 9%
No. 1 Common 0.5% No. 3 Common 47. 6% '
Min Run 40. 8%
Lumber Purchased Size
State-Bu er-Address Form Moist. Condition S ecies Used Class
KENTUCKY -
Estill Woodworking Co. , Box 14 Rgh AD 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 19, A
Irvine, Ky. 20, 28
Gamble Bros. , Inc. , 4601 Allmond Rgh Grn, AD 2, 3, 7, 10, 11, 19, F A
Ave. , Louisville, Ky. 20, 21, 25, 28
Grissom—Rakestraw Lumber Co. Rgh Grn, AD 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 18, E 0
Burnside, Ky. 19, 20, 21, 25, 28, 29,
31, 33
Kentucky Tie & Lumber Co. , Box 7063 Rgh Grn 2, 3, 7, 10, 18, 19, NA
313 Wallace Center, Louisville, Ky. 20, 21, 25, 28
Lanham Hardwood Flooring Co. Rgh Grn 4, 7, 10, 18, 19, 20, D
513 North Depot St. , Greensburg, Ky. 21, 25, 28
Lebanon Oak Flooring Co. , Lebanon, Rgh Grn, AD 19, 20, 21, 28 C
Ky.
Monticello Hardwood Flooring Co. , Inc. Rgh Grn, AD 2, 3, 7, 18, 19, 20, D
Box 638, Monticello, Ky. 21, 28
Wood-Mosaic Corp. , 5000 Crittenden Dr. Hgh AD, KD 7, 10, 20, 21, 28, 33 F
Louisville, Ky.
INDIANA A
R. S. Bason Lumber Co. , Inc. , Sunman Rgh Grn, KD 1, 3, 7, 9, 10,14, 18, D V
Ind. 19, 40
NORTH CAROLINA
Beam Lumber Co. , Inc. , Rt. 2, Vale Rgh Grn 21, 28, 32, 33 B
N. C.
Conover Lumber Co. , Inc. , Box 484 Rgh, S Grn, AD 4, 5, 18, 20, 21, C
Conover, N. C. 28, 33
G. C. Fox Lumber Co., Inc. , Box 738 Rgh Grn 1, 3, 7, 19, 20, 21, D
Hickory, N. C. 25, 28, 32, 33
Williams-Brownell, Inc. , Box 1091 Rgh Grn, AD 3, 4, 5, 7, 10,18, 19, E
.~\shevillc, N. C. 20, 21, 25, 28
Zickgraf Hardwood Co. , Inc. , Box 348 Rgh Grn, AD 20, 21, 33 C
Franklin, N. C. `
(continued on next page)
l 8

 II. LUMBER BUYER CLASS: Dimension and Flooring Mills (continued)
c Lumber Purchased Size
State—Buyer-Address Form Moist. Condition Species Used Class
PENNSYLVANIA
Scottdale Wood Products, Inc. , Box 36 Rgh Grn, AD 19, 20, 21 D
_ Scottdale, Pennsylvania
TENNESSEE
E. L. Bruce Co. , Inc. , Box 397 Rgh Grn, AD 3, 11, 16, 18, 20, H
Memphis 1, Tenn. 21, 22, 25
E. L. Bruce Co. , Inc. , 5400 Centennial Rgh Grn, AD 3, 19, 20 F
" Blvd. , Nashville, Tenn.
I Central Oak Products C0. , 501 24th Ave. Rgh Grn, AD 3, 19, 20, 21 C
N., Nashville, Tenn.
Cookeville Planing Mills, Cookeville Rgh, S Grn, KD 2, 5, 18, 19, 20, 21, D
Tenn. 28,32,33,34,36
. Cortrim Hardwood Parts Co. , Box 402 Rgh AD 2, 3,4, 7, 10, 18, 19, E
Bristol, Tenn. 20, 21, 28
Cumberland Lumber & Mfg. Co. Rgh Grn, AD 1, 2, 19, 20, 21, 28 D
Box 450, McMinnville, Tenn.
Cumberland Mfg. Co., Sparta, Tenn. Rgh Grn,