xt79cn6z0135 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79cn6z0135/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660223  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 23, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 23, 1966 1966 2015 true xt79cn6z0135 section xt79cn6z0135 Inside Today's Kernel

r&iErra
Vol. LVII, No. 88

Student Center enhibit offers visual adventure: Poge Three.

Li

University of Kentucky
FEB.
KY.,

LEXINGTON,

WEDNESDAY,

23,

M

mJ

Editorial commends
Poge Four.

withdrawal of University

Second of four part series discusses

19GG

Eight Pages

financial aid horn

YM YWCA:

varied views on Castro's airlift: Poge Five.

Goldberg's visit contrasts President's visit a year ago: Poge Seven.

Picketers Met
With Jeers,
Egg Throwing
(

'M

5

Bv JOHN EH
Kernel News Editor
About 23 pickets protesting U.S. involvement in Vietnam were
peltered with several do.cn eggs and man more insults outside
Memorial Coliseum prior to L'.N. Ambassador Arlluii J. Coldbeig's
speech Tuesday afternoon
Those caught were pulled out
The pickets, many of them
of the crowd by officers and weir
members of the campus Students
asked to go into the Coliseum.
for a Democratic Society, were
surrounded b) approximate!) 200
During the picketing, two students, David Holwerk and ban)
onlookers shortly after they began
Arnett, carried signs ncarb) sa)-intheir protest about 1:30 p.m.
"Interval" and Chi)san-theinum.- "
Just belore 2 p.m., students
Holwerk, ancngineer-inwith eggs concealed in their
freshman, explained the)
pockets infiltrated the crowd,
were marching in opposition to
aud the barrage began.
the egg throwers. Arnett is an
Shells cracked on the heads,
arts and sciences junior. The
clothes, and signs of the pickwords w ere chosen as a mock
and
eters, oozing yellow yolk
protest against "the Univcrsit),
sticky white. Most of the missiles
broke on the sidewalk, as the which has been planting its
throwers sacrificed accuracy for chrysanthemums at the wrong
anonymity. Arms looping hook intervals," Holwerk said.
shots could be seen alxne the
Planners of the pickets had
crowd, but campus police had a
expected a
hard time telling whose arms
"but not like this,"
were whose.
g

g

Unilcd States Ambassador to the United Nations,
Arthur Goldberg, center, told students, facult)
and townspeople at the concluding Centennial
Convocation Tuesday that the "national debate
on America's Vietnam policy has shown a rcmark- -

Go. Edward T. Breathitt, left,
and UK President John Oswald, right, also part it -'
patcd in the convocation. This picture was taken
at a press conference before the convocation. '
able consensus.

Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

UK Envoys To Thailand
To Propose Ag Project
ByCENECLABES

Kernel Staff Writer
Two University representatives returned home Tuesday'
night from a month's stay in
Thailand with a "favorable" report for the U.S. State Department on possible agricultural deKaen
Khon
in
velopment
Province.
If a
proposal is accepted by the
U.S. State Department's Agency
tor International Development,
UK could be in the running to
supply manpower lor such a program, according to Dr. William
n
Jansen, coordinator for the
exchange program. Dr.
Jansen and Dr. William A. Seay,
dean of the Col lege of Agriculture
Indo-nesio-

jfciiwf

n

later this month will submit are-po- rt
concerning their sta in Khon
Kaen Prov ince and the feasibility
of initiating a crop development
program for the prov ince.
This will be done at a "debriefing" in Washington conducted by the Agency for International Development according
to Dr. Jansen. Results of the
study will then be forwarded to
the Thailand government for
study, he said.
final decision as to
whether or not a program of the
type we recommend is possible
must be handed down," he said.
"However this does not mean, if
the governments (Thailand and

ijimLKQMww.

"The

niiiiinnr..

I

:

U.S.) accept the proposal, UK'
will be the school to supply the
man-powe-

Four provinces in the northeastern portion of the country are
being entered by theCommunits,
Dr. Jansen said.
"Klion Kaen is at the farthest
point from where the Communists
are entering, he said.
The major problems confront-in- g
crop grow th are climate and
rainfall. It rains about 50 inches
a year and all of that lulls w it liin
one month, he said.
Khon Kaen is one of the least
agriculture!) inclined provinces
in the counti). The land is the
most pood) developed in Thailand, Dr. Jansen said.
The studv conducted bv Dr.
Jansen, Dr. Seav and Dr. Howard
Beers, UK staff member in Indonesia, revealed a need for a
fundamental program.
"We don't want to mislead
anyone and make them think the
program would be a large one,"
Dr. Jansen said. "If accepted by
both governments onl) eight to
10 scientists would be needed."
Most ol the program would be
centered around "hard work he
said. The cost would not be high.

li

counter-demonstratio-

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;

.

,Ktt
i

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57

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3

Several protest pickets greeted the Convocation gatherers veslerdav
afternoon. One group of protesters was,' in turn, greeted with a
barrage of eggs.

World Law Emphasized

lJ

Kernel Photo by Rick Pell

Ambassador Goldberg was guest at u short reception at the Law
Building follow ing his address ut the Coliseum.

Speaking at a short reception
at the Law School Tuesday.
United
Ambassador
Nations
Arthur Goldberg told students
the great challenge facing all
of us is getting law into the

woild."

The ambassador spoke ol his
in the UN as one not di
vorced from law but close!)
bound up with a greater law
that must be a "guide in rule
of the world. "
"The woild will not survive
a great international mistake.
rol

Either we do what )ou're being
trained to do create some inles
of law or we're all doomed,"
Ambassador Coldberg said.
"Kvei) da) at the UN an
agreement is made we re making
International Law. It is a different kind of law than the great
writers wrote about when the)
talked onl) of treaties," he explained.
Mr. Goldberg cautioned the
students to be neither "too critical about other countries
new ones" nor to be

"too superior" in viewing them.

He suggested thai when such a
temptation arose a perusal ol
American legal practices disregarding law be taken.
Discussing w hie h ol his jobs
he felt the easier 01 moie difficult, the Ambassadoi said he
followed a soit of "Paikmson s

Law:"
"When I was Sccictai) ol
Lalxu I lound that moie difficult; then I thought being on
the Supieme Couit was moie
Continued On Page 2

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 1906

2

U.N. Ambassador Relates

Importance Of World Law

Continued From Pare 1
difficult, and I now led this

job is."

The lormer siipreineeourt justice admonished the law students
to do two thills. First, "always aeeept every client who
the
will pay the lee-th- at's
British system and that's what
it whould he " and secondly,

don't

let the client tell you how
to represent him.

In a speech given earlier in the
Coliseum, Ambassador Coldberg
said it would be a grave mistake
lor North Vietnamese and lied
China to interpret the "national
debate" in the U.S. as disagreement with U.S. objectives.

if

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Ci.iloUiti;il1filllII1
oiMn-o-

Ambassador Arthur j. ColdbcrK, in his address
before the concluding Centennial Comocation

a
Tuesday afternoon,
should be free to choose thc.r ,m

Positions
Applications Available For Kyian must be made

Applications are now beinu
accepted lor editor and ma naintf
cditor of the 1967 Kcntuckian,
it has been announced by Miss
Linda Gassaway, Kcntuckianad- -

r

-

ism Huildinu.

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The Kentucky Kefriel
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Linda Gassaway,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894, became the Record in 1900, and the Idea
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

New

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Freshman engineering major, David Ilolwcrk, earrics a sign bearing

the words "chrysanthemum" on one side and "interval" on the
other. Two students earried the signs in a moek protest against
the way the University is planting its chrysanthemums.

Applications

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Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

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* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Wednesday, Fob. 23,

190i- -:l

Student Sculpture Exhibit
Offers Visual Adventure
and is as good as any show to
be found in an art department.
Bryant, former associate curaA visual adventure in contor at the Whitney Museum of
temporary American sculpture is American Art in New York, added
in store for viewers at the stuthat the exhibit exemplifies condent sculpture show now at the temporary sculpture as it has
Student Center Art Gallery.
emerged in a "tremendous resurgence" in the last decade.
stuCompletely assembled by
Recalling the fur, velvet, and
in the UK Art Department,
dents
rusted metals used in the various
the show was coordinated by
Mr. Bryant pointed out the
James Woods, graduate student works,
variety of materials that arc being
in art.
used in contemporary sculpture.
A fee was collected from each
He indicated that the traditional
participating entrant to proide materials arc still being used,
the money for prizes for the but these new materials are being
Mike added to the
three best sculptures.
variety of comgraduate student in art, ponents used to construct a
Sweeney,
was awarded first prize, with sculpture.
Phil Bare and Anne Fryc receiv"You can expect a use of
ing honorable mention.
new forms, ideas, and materials,"
he said. "There are no longer
Edward Bryant, visitinv; assisto be set
tant professor in t he Art Depart- the limits that used
of
old definition
the
by
ment, and judge of the exhibit,
commented on the fine quality sculpture."
Even the casting technique
of the show as a whole. He
of sculpture has been
feels it is "indicative of vitality
in recent American sculpture" for new ideas.
By KAREN BOYER
Kernel Arts Writer

s

S

fv M

Anne Fryc's entry in the Student Sculpture Show is labeled with
its "honorable mention" award by Jim Woods, art graduate student
while Phil Bare, who also won an "honorable mention" stands
looking on. The show will be on display in the Student Center
Art Gallery until March 3.

Senior

"It takes both talent and drive
to be a good pianist," Mrs. Hyatt
said. It is evident that she has
both requirements.
Mrs. Hyatt is the wife of
Jack Hyatt, UK instructor of
trumpet, and needless to say,
they have a musical household.
"It's music, music, music all
the time, of course," laughed
Mrs. Hyatt. "But it works out
perfectly. Jack inspires me to
practice even harder."
Mrs. Hyatt and her husband
have played together in 14 concerts in the past year, including

Kernel Arts Editor
A senior recital is a big event
in any young musician's life,
and for UK piano major Ruby
Hyatt, this is no exception. UK
faculty and students will have
the chance to hear this Honor's
Recital soloist at 8 p.m. Friday
in Memorial Hall.
Mrs. Hyatt admitted that she
chose the pieces she will perform because they are "what
I like," but a glance at the program indicates that she did not
choose easy favorites.
The program will begin with
Bach's "Chromatic Fantasy and
Fugue;" continue with Beethoven's. "Sonata in E Major, Opus
109," a late work written while
Beethoven was deaf; and conclude with Scriabine's passionate
"Sonata No. 3 in F Sharp Minor."
How does a performer build
up the endurance and control to
manage such long, difficult works
in one program? Mrs. Hyatt has
been working at it for 16 years,
since she began piano lessons as
a first grader.
During high school, when
most teenagers worry about getting a car or a date, Mrs. Hyatt
was practicing the piano five
hours every day. Since entering
college, she admitted she's had
to cut down this amount to about
supplefour hours a day-a- nd
y
ment this with some

at UK

s

several performances
community colleges.
Getting her master's degree-inext on the agenda for Mrs.
Hyatt, and she plans to study
at UK for it.

Hyatt is the daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. Maurice A.
Hatch. Dr. Hatch is an associate professor of English at the
Mrs.

University.

Nlrs. Hyatt is already a seasoned performer and has been
heard in numberous recitals in
Lexington and throughout the
state as a soloist' and accompa

Russian Movie To Premier Here
g
Russian movie will
The American premier of a
be held at 7:30 p.m. March 2 in the Student Center Theater.
of the year in 1961, when
"The Cranes Are Flying," picture released.
it was
is a screen drama about a RusThe movie will be shown
sian family during World War here
only at the 7:30 showing.
II. Dubbed the "best movie to The movie is in Russian with
come out of Russia since the
English subtitles. Tickets are 75
second world war" by Saturday cents and
may be purchased
Review, the movie won the Grand at the door or in the Modern
Prize at the Cannes Film FestiDepartment
Foreign
val in 1961 and First Prize at office on Languages floor of Miller
the third
the Brussels Film Festival in Hall.
the same year. The New York
Times cited the film as the best
prize-winnin-

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When a juror judges a sculpture, he looks for something he
has never seen before an independent idea and an authority
of statement. This new visual
encounter is difficult to find,
Bryant said.
Contemporary sculpture is not
-just a type of arrangement it is
work, the same as an
expressive
abstract painting is expressive.
The art is intended to reach out
to the spectator, and involve
him with it.
The exhibit will remain at
the Student ('enter Art Gallery
until March 3. Gallery hours are
11 a.m.
until 1 p.m. Monday
p.m.
through Friday, and
Sunday.

nist. In high school she won the
regional music contest and she
has been pianist with the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra
since 1963.
Even with such an impressive
record, Mrs. Hyatt said, "I still
get nervous."
But Mrs. Hyatt has learned
to put her nervous energy to
work; and for her audience, this
means that extra bit of enthusiasm and concentration which
makes the difference between
an ordinary perfornia nee and a
truly inspired one.

THURSDAY of

Phone

prize-winnin-

Event For Honors Soloist

Recital-B- ig

By MARGARET BAILEY

The three
sculptures, especially, represented an
original concept, skillfulness in
execution, and were persuasive
in idea, said Mr. Bryant.

'BIG B't
One Hour Cleaners, Inc.

* Beneficial Separation
Supposedly there exists in this
country a serration of church and
state, but many universities, especially state universities, often have
imbued their programs with a
Christianity while
no such support to persons
offering
of different religious faiths.
Although the campus YMCA and
YVCA include
in
their programs, one of their purposes is the spreading of the Christian doctrine, not an unbiased presentation of various religious view s.
University support of the cam-pY's in allowing them free office
space in the Student Center and in
paying the salaries of fulltime
YMCA and YVVCA advisers constituted an indirect linkage of the
University (and consequently, the
college-

-supported

non-Christia-

ut

Into The

state) to a certain religious group.
The University could not justify
maintaining the Y's unless they
also maintained similar organizations representing various
faiths.
Most colleges already have
withdraw n their official support for
Y organizations, and vvc think the
recent move by UK administrators
in withdrawing financial aid is long
overdue.
The separation should actually
act to the advantage of the Y groups.
Servering their link with the Administration should give them greater
power to act as a free student group
in planning their own programs and
choosing their own directors.
Under the old system directors
were hired by the Offices of the
Dean of Men and Dean of Women.
Now the student members themselves and their advisory boards w ill
have the final voice in selection.
This is, we think, a far better
system.
But most important, the move
has severed a questionable link
univerbetween a
and a group identified with a
sity
particular religious group.
non-Christi-

5

Vlct-Dcii-

w

Ami

15

' he

Vict-Uami-

Off

w

;

state-support- ed

Dean's Tactics Criticized

More Heresy
The British House of Commons
has taken a giant step toward the
reform of its laws governing homosexuality when it passed on second
reading a bill which would repeal
all criminal penalties against homosexual acts if committed by
consenting adults in private.
What is progressive in England
is heresy in America. In the area
s
of sex,
of the states
in the Union have laws which
equate sin with crime, and which
are not confined to homosexual
activity alone, but seek to regulate
heterosexual actions as well. According to the late Dr. Alfred Kin-se"There is practically no other
culture, anywhere in the world,
in which all nonmarital coitus,
even between adults, is considered
criminal."
But the day when politicians
in this country will speak out
against such unusual laws is, unfortunately, far in the future. It
seems that, no matter what his
private beliefs and actions, the
area of sexual legislation is one
into which the prudent public man
does not venture. The politician
is not entirely to blame for his
faintheartedness, however, since
sexual laws receive wide
from many of those who feel no
about
violating
compunctions
them.
And, as evidenced by the growing furor about the upcoming ref
three-fourth-

y,

lip-servi- ce

erendum on contraceptives at CU,
the older generations are apparently made very uncomfortable by
anyone who is willing, not only
to talk about matters related to sex,
but even to vote on those matters.
It is always painful to be confronted with one's own hypocrisy.
The real question involved is
simply this: Does the State have
the right to regulate the sex life
of John Doe and his wife, or John
Doe and his girl friend, or even
John Doe and his friend George?
The answer is no, so long as whatever they do they do as consenting
adults in private. That the State
has an obligation to nuisances
and the like is uncontested.
The American Law Institute,
Model Penal Code,
No harm to the secstated:
ular interests of the community
is involved in atypical sex practice in private between consenting adult partners," and also
warned against state interference
in matter which do not harm others.
It has been estimated that if
every piece of sexual legislation
in this country were strictly enforced, some 90 percent of the
male population would have prison
records.
As old Barry used to say, "You
can't legislate morality."
The Colorado Daily
University of Colorado
in its 1956

"...

The Kentucky Kernel
The South' s Outstanding College Daily

ESTABLISHED

University of Kentucky
1894

WEDNESDAY,

Walteh Chant,

FEB.

23, 1966

Editor-in-Chi-

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Tehence Hunt,. Manuring Editor
John Zeii, News Editor
News Editor
Kenneth Cheen, Amu-lutJudy Cmsiiam, AssiKiate News Editor
IIenhy Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Mahcahet Hailey, Arts Editor
Caholyn Williams, Feature Editor
Business Staff

William Knapp,

Advertising Manager

Mahvin

1

1

ungate.

Circulation

Manager

of the Kernel:
The article in the Kernel of
Feb. 16, accusing Dean Doris
Seward of intimidation against
Margret Wadsworth, raised a point
which I am sure many students,
including myself, would like to
have clarified.
The article read, "Miss Wads-wort- h
claimed she was questioned
partly because, 'Dean Seward said
the impression I presented to the
Lexington community was unfavorable to the University.' " A similar
statement was made to another
coed last semester by the Dean
in an investigation not involving
the question of dope.
Is Dean Seward implying that
creating a favorable impression on
the Lexington community is a duty
of the UK student?
Perhaps Dean Seward would be
so kind as to explain why I, or
anyone else on this campus, should
conform to the narrow-minde- d
and
backward habits of the City of
Lexington.
DAVID J. CROCKETT
Commerce Senior
To the Editor

civilized thought and behavior.
Sadly enough, the conduct of these
was a cruel commentary on the extent to which
the concepts contained in those
books have pentrated their somewhat less than open minds.
ROBERT F. BENNER
Graduate Student
Patterson School of Diplomacy

Likes 'Right9

Congratulations on being right
(instead of Left) for a change. I refer
to the editorial of Feb. 18, "The
Right to Work."
Organized labor, though originally brought into being to correct
glaring wrongs, has itself become
one of the most glaring evils of our
time. Now that "Big Business" has
been reformed, unions are as anachronistic as dinosaurs, but lack the
good grace to withdraw from the
scene. Big Labor is as potentially
dangerous- - a threat to individual
freedom as Big Business and Big
Government. It is not subject to
antitrust laws as is business and is
Not Open-Minde- d
all the more threatening for being
In full view of U.S. newsmen unregulated.
(I stood next to a cameraman from
One should realize that labor
CBS news) a mob composed of itself is one of the biggest businesses
University of Kentucky students in this country, and the managing of
pelted fellow students, who were unions is a very lucrative occuprotesting U.S. policy towards Viet- pation.
nam, with eggs and inarticulate verA union offers a service to an
bal abuse. As a student of this Uniindividual in return for payment, as
versity, I cannot but recall with
does Joe's Bar, Grill and Bar.
regret this infantile and brutal behavior on the part of a handful of Unions should not be allowed to
students who, by their conduct, coerce individuals into doing business with them any more than
displayed a classic ignorance of or
a contempt for the principles of fair should Joe. Just as Joe hawks his
wares in the open marketplace, so
play and tolerance of diversity upon
should unions sell themselves to
which this nation rests.
the workers on their own merits, if
Paradoxically, most of those they have
any.
students carried, in addition to
HANK DAVIS
eggs, books written to advance
A&S

Junior

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Feb. 23,

Opinions On Airlift Vary
By BETSY CO! IN

hey are mostly active in uni
vcrsilics, and minorit groups,
sik It as civil rilits iiiovciim nts
in whih the work to gather
sympathizers. They work also
to weaken the tree enterprise
system and to eventually destroy
the productive wealth of our
nation," Mr. I'ucnlc said.
To Haol MeiKKal.ane-m.io- r
of Havana, "the aiililt t an onl
mean something had an) understanding with Castro is
had
We are going to have
trouble," he said. "The Conn
munists are infiltrating our universities, causing students to
with Communist
sympathize
methods and raising antagonism
against their government."

aUtut their fates in Cuba."
Conzalc said.
Mr. Gonzalez, who has traveled to various American
explained how he I Relieved Communists get into the
various rcvolutiou.it)
groups
causing dissension b) taking legitimate gripes and creating
conflict among group members
themselves.
"They arc able to create the
most dissatisfaction amoiu: civil
riglils groups since many Latin
American are of Negro or Indian
blood." Gonzalez was quick to
point out the importance ol Americans, cspcciall) college students,
alxiut Cuba.
leing
Castro, and Communism.
At the present time refugees
Mr. Monocal cited an example
claim there are close to one
a lecture he had recently atmillion Cubans still trying to
tended at theUniversit) of Miami come to the United States; once
at which a political science
they get here they will probably
spoke on "The Heusous
join with the other exiled Cubans
in planning for their ret m n. Lxile
Why ('astro Was Not a Communist."
groups distribute propaganda,
In discussing the recent airbroadcast over "The Voice of
lift, Alfred Gonzalez, an
Cuba." and write letters to those
in the Bay of Pigs, said,
still left behind encouraging
"Fidel did not calculate the them, inciting them to rebel and
dimensions: he thought only a asking them to come to America.
few people would want to go
At the present time, the Cuout," (since the airlift began ban refugees are strongl) in favor
in December, 3,3.) 1 Cubans have of President Johnson s polic) in
entered Miami; it is predicted
Vietnam and see it as "the only
that during 19(16, 40,000 loGO.000 solution." Cubans at the present
will be flown from Varadcro to time also suppoi t President JohnMiami. As the airlift continues,
son strongly.
so do the clandestine small loat
One Cuban political science
Eighty-fiv- e
Cubans,
student summed up a popular
escapes.
males, escaped refugee outlook,
"Americans
mostly draft-ag- e
the island in 11 small boats must pay a price for being world
leaders; they must be able to
during December.)
"Now Mr. Castro is trying back one fact ion completely, they
to put a stop to these airlifts must have a leader who is a
as they have demoralized the statesman as well, one who can
country. He did it as a show make a decision and stick to it.
for the free world as well as So far the only statesman the
for the Cubans who were beUnited States bus produced is
ginning to become apathetic President Johnson."

LITTLE

196f- -5

MAN ON CAMPUS

I

Tlic Collegiate Tress Service
During the week of Jan. I
(the seventh ammersary of Castro's victory) 500 delegates t
parley, of
an
a group culled thcTricontincntal
Conference on African, Asian ami
litiu American Hcvolutionary
Solidarity met and harangued
the United States, with Mr. Castro sounding the keynote.
At the same time as Mr. Castro was denouncing the U.S..
thousands of Cubans were waiting to be airlifted to an 'imperialist'' haven in the United
States.
"anti-inicrialis-

series.
Second in a four-jwMiss Cohn is a staff writer for
the Michigan Daily.
rt

To many Cubans exiles in
Miami, Castro's airlift means
trouble. To Jose Gon.alcx, an
in Cuha, the airlift
is "another means of infiltrating
Communists into the United
Stales. These people hac been
penetrating the country for years;

J

kj

....

mm

d

pro-less-

IT HA 0c6N CAllEP TO MY ATTENTION, MZ. PHl LLI P$0N, THAT
N Y0UZ CiTlCl5M Or
YOU HAVE PcEN VEfZY

ouft

ecHooi nxicr on cmruz attizz."

Yale Alumni Letter
Knocks Lynd's 'Antics'

Yale Alumni Fund described
NEW HAVEN. Conn. (CPS)-T- he
the activities of Staughton Lynd as ' indefensible and damaging to
Vale" in a "sample letter" sent last week to some 500 fund raisers.
The letter is intended to be
said, "You've always got critiused by fund raisers as a possible
cism of one kind or another."
response to potential donors who
Mr. Castles writes in the introof
are critical of the "antics
duction to the packet that "his
Staughton Lynd."
(Lynd's) actions have put Yale in
Accompanying this letter was a very difficult position. Yet it is
an explanatory note from Jolin
that you have some
Castles III, chairman of the fund, important which to reply, if you
basis on
FIDEL CASTRO
which is responsible for soliciting wish, to the comments of your
unrestricted donations for the classmates.
university. A copy of President
In his letter Mr. Castles warns
Kingman Brewtcr's statement of fund
Rowland Evans and Robert Novak
raisers, "It is not unlikely
remarks
By
Jan. 19 which criticized
if you have
made by Dr. Lynd in Hanoi was that you will receive,
not already received, comments
also included.
from v our classmates on this subThe model letter states that ject."
"it is most unfortunate that he
The Alumni Fund Office has
discount rate boost
in ir
The interest rate boost deWASHINGTON The fact
(Lynd) has seen fit to abuse his already made a "few individual
or still a third increase later
Federal Reserve Board creed by the Fed three months
Yale to further
that the
association with
responses to agents" who were
this year.
is intent on still another interest
ago in defiance of Mr. Johnson
his own political interests.
worried about adverse comments
shows up in Mr.
This caution
has failed completely as an
rate boost is bringing President
fund
fill a vacancy
"While Dr. Lynd's actions are from potential donors, one
device, just as critics Johnson's failure to
again with
Johnson
said. "We have reHeserve Hoard created
indefensible and damaging to spokesman
the historic question of whether
predicted. Instead, it started a on the
of
ceived a lot of phone calls from
chain reaction in interest rate Jan. 31. when the term
Yale, I would hope that none of
he or the banking industry shall
us about Mr.
Halderston. a Martin
C. Canby
us will permit our judgment as to the agents asking
boosts. And though orthodox
determine major economic polPresisaid.
this increase
ally, ended. Although the
Yale's fundamental worth and Lynd," the spokesman
bankers deny it,
icy.
dent could take control of the
the irv alue . . . to be colored by
in the cost of money has been
Mr. Castles said that sample
Th