xt79gh9b873r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79gh9b873r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670303  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1967 1967 2015 true xt79gh9b873r section xt79gh9b873r 4
KIE
Vol. 58, No. 110

Inside Today's Kernel

1M

A page of pictures on the UK Karate
Club: Page Two.

IL

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KY., FRIDAY, MARCH 3,

1967

Reviewers

production
Three.

Editorial discusses the student rights
code and its amendments: Page Four.

Eight Pages

rs

ly

professor said.

The constitutional law authority also voice disapproval
with the third section of the
report as a whole. He said discipline should be administered
through the authority of section
two of the report, which relates
to the University as a community of scholars.
The second section defines
10 disciplinary offenses and two
academic offenses which an individual may be subject to. Prof.
Goldman said individuals of organizations should be punished,
instead of the organization.

Baker

wonders

if

.

.

.

ond

jumbles history
Page Five.

:

With two games remaining, the Cots
eye a ?ery bad season: Page Six.
tutorial workshop is planned here
Saturday: Page Seven.

A

Stravinsky Visit
Will Be Highlight
Of Arts Festival

Amendment
Challenged
By Goldman
A UK constitutional law specialist said yesterday that sections of an amendment passed
Monday to the student rights and
discipline report may be unconstitutional.
Akin L. Goldman, asistant
professor of law, said the new
requirement of groups to inform
the Administration of the purpose of demonstrations of picketing "would be likely to succumb
to a constitutional challenge."
The amendment in the third
section of the report "the student as a member of an organization" changed a parenthetical suggestion that groups give
prior notice of time and place
of demonstrations to a requirenotice of time,
ment that
place, and purpose of the demonstration be given.
Proposed on the floor by Dr.
Wasley E. Krogdahl, the amendment is intended to prepare the
Administration for possible volatile reactions to demonstrations
and thus allowing the Administration to better plan protection, the sponsor said.
The question of constitutionality was first raised by VV.
Garrett Flickinger, chairman of
the Senate Committee which
drafted the report. "I don't think
the University can require notification of intent," he said. "I
don't think they need it."
Mr. Goldman said he thought
the first two requirements of the
amendment notification of time
and place would stand a constitutional challenge.
"However," he said, "I
find them unnecessary
and I think they are unwise."
Mr. Goldman said the new
regulation also inhibits groups
but not individual students
from participating in spontaneous demonstrations.
If an individual student were
to picket in front of the student
center in a spontaneous reaction,
he would be free from Administration sanctions, Mr. Goldman
said. However, if a group participated in a spontaneous reaction, not giving prior notice
of time, place, and intent, it
would subject to sanctions, according to the new provision,
he noted.
Mr. Goldman said the first
proposal of the committee, suggesting notification of time and
place for demonstrations, was
"free of any taint of unconstitutionality."
Prof. Goldman agreed with
Mr. Flickinger in his disapproval
of the amendment. "I find it
especially obnoxious," the law

praise the Opera Theatre
of "The Medium:" faqe

Russell

By SANDRA HEWITT
The University's first Festival of the Arts, beginning April 5
s
comand running through April 22, will feature
visit to the campus.
Igor Stravinsky in a
poser
Stravinsky s visit will be high- - great artists of the time and at
lighted by a concert at which the same time showing them
he and his associate, Robert
what is happening in the arts
Craft, will conduct the Lexingtoday," Clarke said.
ton Philharmonic. The
All events held in Memorial
musician whose innovations Coliseum will be free to stuhave influenced forms of music
dents with identification cards,
Clarke said, and other events
varying from jazz to opera, will
be on campus, "answering queswill have student prices. "We
tions and visiting informally."
really hope the students will take
The festival, which will bring advantage of the opportunity,"
to the campus many
he said.
figures in the fields of art, music,
Three committees have been
and the theater, "represents the working on the festival since
desire by the University to celelast May the faculty commitbrate the establishment of its
tee, the student committee, and
School of Fine Arts," Harry
an honorary committee of promClarke, director of Fine Arts Serinent citizens. The faculty convices said yesterday.
mittee consists of .a representa- Also behind the establishment
tive from each "art:" Edward
of the festival is the "growing
Bryant, director of the Univercommittment of the university
sity Art Gallery, chairman; Harry
to be a patron of the arts, Clarke Clarke, secretary; Dr. Hubert
said. This committment, he said,
Henderson, director of the School
"is not only to the student and of Fine Arts; Leo Sheer, profesthe University, but to the state
sor of music and director of
in general."
the Lexington Philharmonic; and
Opening the festival on April
Raymond Smith, associate pro5 will be the Department of
fessor of theater arts.
Theater Arts' presentation of
"The student committee was
"The Good Woman ofStezuan,"
used more or less as an adby Bertolt Brecht and translated
visory body," Clarke said, "since
to English by Eric Bentley. The
we were planning the festival
show will run through April 9
for the students."
and opens a fast paced three
Although the appearance of
weeks with some event schedIgor Stravinsky sets the pace
uled almost every day.
for the musical aspects of the
"We'll be giving the students
festival, the University has comand the University a look at
missioned works from three important American composers. The
first of these by John Vincent
will be performed by the Heritage Quartet on April 8.
Later in the festival, on April
12, an organ recital by Haskell
Thomson, organist from the
Oberlin Conservatory- of Music,
will introduce the second commissioned work by Vincent
Then, on April 16, a
concert by the University Choristers and the University Symphony will premiere the third
work, by John Barnes Chance,
a member of the University stuff.
Music won't be all that is
represented, howev er, as on April
9 the University Art Gallery preWi
kZ
The
sents "Masterpieces from
world-famou-

five-da- y

Saving The Trees
Workmen this week have been digging up and replanting the trees

and shrubs around White Hall and the Carnegie Museum. The two
buildings, along with Patterson House, are slated to come down this
complex.
spring to make way for a classroom-offic- e

SG Gets Two Plans
Two plans calling for revised methods of electing Student Government representatives and greatly increasing the size of the
legislature were introduced Thursday.
hither proposal, if passed, bly, Panhellenic . Council, and
would alter the present consti
Interfraternity Council.
tutional makeup of the assemThe remaining five represenbly by allocating seats on the tatives would be selected from
basis of interest groups or resiexecutive councils.
dence units. Both proposals are
The other proposal, written
being reviewed by the SG rules by Rep. Ralph Wesley, would
committee and may be returned increase the size of the legisto the assembly for consideration lature to 60 members, 10 of which
would be selected in a campus-wid- e
Tuesday.
SG also amended its constielection.
tution to incorporate the sugAccording to Wesley's plan,
gestions of the student rights 30 representatives would be
and discipline report, approved drawn from Men's Residence
by the University Senate MonHalls Council, Women's Residay. Implementation of the redence Halls Council, Interfrater-nitport awaits action of the Board
Council, Panhellenic, and
of Trustees at its March 17 meetthe Off Campus Student Assoing.
ciation.
One of the representation proEach council would be guarposals, sponsored by Hep. Sheryl
anteed at least four representaSnyder, suggests increasing the tives and the remaining 10 seats
size of the legislature to 45 memwould be distributed among the
bers, 20 of whom would be segroups according to the proporlected in a campuswide election.
tion of students represented by
Twenty more representatives
the groups.
would be elected by housing
Twenty more representatives
councils alter the campus elecwould be elected from "the five
tion, including representatives
major divisions of campus infrom Women's Residence Halls
terest groups," including the
Student
Council,
areas of academics, athletics,
e
Association,
political, and physical.
Assembly, Haggin Assembly,
.

y

Off-Camp-

ser-vic- e,

Donovan-Quadrangl-

Cooperstown-Comple-

Assem- -

Continued On Page

n

-

On Representation

x

well-know-

8

m
'if

Courier-Journ-

IGOR STRAVINSKY

on Pace

3

Senate Report Favors Present Calendar

A report set to go before the University
Senate Wednesday strongly supports continuation of the present academic calendar.
Drawn up by the Senate Calendar committee and dated Feb. 20, the report specifsemesters the
ically calls for two
first ending before Christinas with the second
beginning no more than 24 days later.
The summer session would also remain
as an
period.
In addition, a holiday including the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving was
recommended by the committee. Spring vacation is set for the third week in March
each y ear.
If approved, the calendar will be in
effect for at least three years, alter which
it may be reviewed by the Senate.
Other academic holidays include Labor
Day, Independence Day, and one day each
semester for a President's Convocation.
eight-wee-

k

First in the Calendar Committee's report is a recommendation that the Senate
"develop a policy statement" providing a
framework from which the academic calendar may be built.
Changes in the calendar may be made
by submitting a policy amendment to the
Senate for approval, effective with the next
calendar construction.
The report describes its findings as only
a "first step toward the devising of an
optional policy for this institution with respect to the calendar."
Appointed last Oct. 27, the committee
was charged with devising and drafting a
calendar by March 1.
e
The report calls for setting up a
Senate committee to specifically identify and interpret changes in educational policy
in accord with the new Academic Program.
long-rang-

Its primary concern would be with matters of educational policy bearing on the
learning process for students and forming
the basis of a calendar policy.
Both the colleges of Medicine and Dentistry are excluded from the regular calendar
due to special scheduling problems based
on instructional needs within those disciplines.

Special consideration was given the College of Law in the report and a study committee made up of six law professors was
recommended to develop a calendar policy.
Stipulated is that full consideration be made
to the opinions of law students.
Provided the committee cannot reach an
agreement, the Law College will remain on
the general University calendar. Any final
approval for a calendar nuit be approved
by the Senate.

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, March

3,

17.

Speed, Technique
The who recently received the red belt in Karate
the highest in the world for his style, concentrates in
Sin

silence for several seconds (lower left), slowly raises one
square blocks
hand, and with a yell breaks two
of pine.
six-inc-

h

The says speed, technique, and strength arc
equally important in Karate. A person who lacks strength
can compensate for it by speed and technique.
Sin

These pictures, taken at a practice session of the
Katate club, shows Dowe Tay flying through the air over
the hands of Bob Sheray (top right). Russell Norton
(lower right) practices kicking Alan Abraham in the
face. The center picture is a triple exposure of a throw.

The club will hold

a meeting for beginners at 9 p.m.
in the Taylor Education Building gym.
Tuesday

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Photos by Dick Ware and Randy Cochran

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Music: MenollVs Opera Opens

By TOM CRALER AND

ROD OWEN
Hit- - Theater
Arts Depart- nunt's production of Clan-Carl..
..
t
Me Medium
.Menom s
would
have pleasctl the Pulitzer Prize
winning composer: I.
superb musi- I
I
and excellent drama,
iiunsiup

Till; Cast
medium, nn opom by Gi.- Musical Direction by
Shcll.i
Kt.icrrt
House;
by Charles
Dickons., staff production: Technical

1

.

.

Phyllis Jcnncss portrays Ma- dame Flora, a medium. Her tbree
regular clients, Mr. and Mrs.
(.obineau and Mrs. Nolan, bave
firm faith in ber power as a
medium.

llO-

At One Seance,

W-

i
adame flora teels a
"not that of a man" on

TlAm 'InisK

Manager, Susan Cardweii; Lights,
Howrd Enoch, Jill Geiger: Properties,
suzanno Fister; choreocraphv. Dawes
M"r.-- At
Laboratory Theatre.
Kav Carter
"ica
nryan Harrison
Toby
M;idame FIora ,nlba,f Phy)lis Jennrss
Mrs. Gobineau
sherree Zaiampas
Mr. Gobineau
Luther stripling
Naomi Armstrong
M. Nolnn
Doug Cornell, nnd
Accompanists
Nancy Wake

Tension prevails throughout
The band so frightens her the plot; Flora distrusts and
she decides the fraudulent se- - blames Toby for her emotional
antes must end, and it is at this and psychological upsets; Toby
point the opera reaches a climax, loves Monica and Flora doesn't
Madame Flora (Raba) tries approve. Flora, too, is a fraud
to convince her customers she but can't convince her clients
is a fake, but to no avail. "How of the fact even by show ing them
could it be?" they ask her in her deceptive apparatus.
When tbc piano accompani- what is one of tbe most throb-bing, pounding scenes tbc boards mcnt began and tbc lights dim- of the Lab Theatre has known, mcd, an atmosphere of mysticism,
her neck.

Aliril Al'U KVlivll IMllllWwl
Continued From Page

'"t

'

m.mIi :, im7-

-.i

..

caused in part by the minor
of tbc mihic, was etident
and prevailing during the entire
performance. Een the romantic
and dreaming solos ot Monica
"ore covered by the someubat
supernatural music.
,
key

TMF

o

"-- '"

"

W-

In scenes where Madame
F,()ra was .n a slatc () lnnita,
tNVO pian()S ili(ed
lonUNioMj
,
feelmn ber
in the audiences
anxiety. Tbe increase in tempo,
t,e risf in volume, and then the
()f ,)()
,,t ,(1
sk1(1c1
.
,
d
in making the most intense
incuts of the opera exciting and
mo-han-

significant.
ljss Jenness's characteriza- is
excellent.
tion
Having
established herself as
thoroughly
a super!) comic artist of the
operetta in former productions,
she here shows herself a troubled,
tyrannical alcoholic, dour and
phony. Her voice is as forceful
and dominating as her stage

Sunday, March 5
Sermon

some-onl-

At

472 ROSE ST.
SERVICES
8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m. 2nd Sundays
Rev. Charles Lawrence
10:30 a.m.

SUNDAY

SERVICE

Lexington.

Episfip.i

K v.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
WEST HIGH

at

UPPER ST.

RUSSELL
R. PATTON, Minister
College Class
Services at 10:50 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
or
Transportation provided for students Call

9:35 a.m.

252-034- 4

277-669- 4

ALDERSGATE METHODIST CHURCH
1881 EASTLAND

ORIN M. SIMMERMAN,

PARKWAY

JR., Minister

9:50 a.m. Church School; College Class: Sam Davis, Teacher
11 a.m.
"Inward Journey of Faith", Rev. Russell Bow
7 p.m.
"Outward Journey of Faith", Rev. Russell Bow

y

CENTENARY METHODIST CHURCH

1

..

Episcopal Church

a.m. WORSHIP

11

.

.

1

CANTERBURY HOUSE

by

Rev. Fornash

watch-festiva- l,

".

CHURCH
METHODIST
High at Clay Avenue
DR. J. T. HARMON,
Pastor
Dr. W P. Fryman, minister, visitation
9:45 am. Church School
11 a.m.
"Open Window"
7 p.m.
"God Of Our Fathers"

MAXWELL

E.

"THE MEDIUM"

PARK
East

University
Methori'st Chapel
151

will be a performance by the
Merce Cunningham DanceCom- pany on April 19. This company,
known for its avant garde dance
to the
expression, performs
"music" of John Cage, who
On the opening day of the writes music on graph paper
exhibit, guest lecturer Peter Selz, scored for hammers, eerie sounds,
director of the University of Cal- - and electronic noises.
iforniaat Rerkeleys ArtMuseun,
the following evening, April
will speak on the significance of 20, a lecture will be given by
Cage himself.
university art galleries.
"Alter the
pro-Concluding the musical por- gram on April 11, a series ot tion ot the festival will be a per- creative films will be shown on formance of Beethoven's Ninth
April 15. These films often Symphony by the Lexington Phil- classed as experimental were harmonic and the Lexington
I
made by the staffs and students Singers on April 21.
1 lie annual UK Alumni Sem- of American universities.
A performance by Actors The- - inar, to be held April 21, this
atre of Louisville, Kentucky's year will be directed toward the
resident theater company, arts. 1 here will be sessions and
nr f
will be given April 17. They will panel discussions centering on
As mus'l director, Shelia
present two short plays, "The the University and its role as House maintained a well de- Dumb Waiter" and "The Mar- - patron of the arts.
The concluding event of the fined b,cnd n her singers but
riage Proposal" in matinee and
festival will be the presentation for a sIl8ht ,ack of balance in
"Miss Julie" that evening.
Still in the field of the theater of "An Evening's Frost" by a duets between Monica and Flora.
vocaI and dmatic
professional New York theater BV and ,ar8e
were
highly com- in residence at the Uni- - taction
The Kentucky Kernel company
versity of Michigan. The dra- - pbmentary.
The Kentucky Kernel. University
of Kentucky. Lex- station, university 40506.
Had the piano tuners only
matic presentation of the works
Second class
ington, Kentucky
and lite ot the poet Hobert r rost been called, then an ideal blend
postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
rheblschec2i yTareTceprhoHdayand
has been hailed as "a warm of set, music, lights, and actor
exam periods.
would have been achieved.
portrayal of Robert Frost."
versity Collections." This show- ing will include "master" paint- ings from universities around tbe
country on special loan for the

I

KAY CARTER AND DRYAN HARRISON IN

presence.
Bryan Harrison in bis role
as Toby is easily the most cap--

tivating character of the cast.
Plastically moving liis way about
the small stage, his every muscle
assumes the characterization of
a silent mute's fear of Flora and
his poignant joy in quietly
ing Monica.
Monica, played by Kay
Cart
tects the Gypsy Toby
from her mother's tirades. Her
charact
more stable than the
rest is consistent aml we (k.
,
ve,o
V()cal,
Carter
ls always clear and sometimes
lyrical
The touch ol Charles Dickens
direction is unmistakable. It is
alive, dynamic, and achieves an
almost unbearable intensity is
those scenes where Mrs. Nolan
Gobineaux bave sur
rounded Madame . Flora in
.
,

1

(r'.

I
,

Donald VV. Durham.
lime (Next to Hospital,
J. K. Wood, Fastoral
Sanders, Associate Minister
in Rear of Church)
Samuel Morris, Youth
(I'arkinf
9:50 a.m. Sunday School
"Am I My Brother's Keeper?"
9 a.m. and 11 a.m.
7:30 p.m.
"Lord Is It I?", Mr. Sanders
(Parking in Hear of
Nursery for all Services
I7I

Minister
Minister
Minister

S.

Church)

SOUTHERN HILLS METHODIST CHURCH
DONALD R. HERREN, Minister
10:50 a.m. Morning Worship

2356 HARRODSBURG RD.
9:30 a.m. College Class
"THE
TRANSPORTATION

PROVIDED

CRAVED WORD"

Call

FOR STUDENTS

277-617- 6

or

277-402- 9

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

RICHARD T. HARBISON, Minister
College Class. Mr. Jack Matthews, Leader
Service at 1 1 a.m.

MILL ST.

174 NORTH

9:45 a.m.

WOODLAND CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Elmore Ryle, Minister
Ave.
Miss Mary Hulda Allen, Minister of Education
Church School 9:30 A.M.
Morning Worship 10:45 A.M.
"GOD WAS IN CHRIST"
Sermon

East High

i

at Kentucky

Youth

Nursery provided during Morning Worship

Glen PlaiJ Troiisers

16.00

5.00 P.M.

CRESTWOOD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1882

DRIVE

BELLEFONTE

Sunday Worship

REV.

10:30 a.m.

Sunday

For Transportation

We have just received a new shipment of
polyester and wool trousers. The striking
colors and bold patterns are the perfect
compliments to your favorite sweaters
and shirts. Colors: grey, olive and rust.

Groups

'What Makes
By

A

Call

JAMES A. LOLLIS, Minister

College Seminar

9:30 a.m.

277-378- 9

Happy Family?'

Harry S. Smith, C.S.B.
of Atlanta, Georgia

Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts

in
HENRY CLAY HIGH SCHOOL

AUDITORIUM

(TO

701 East Main Street

at Walton Avenue

MONDAY, MARCH 6, at 8:00 p.m.
Under the Auspices of

First Church of Christ, Scientist
340 West Main( Between Broadway and Mill

Park one hour free right across the street while shopping at Meyers

Lexington, Kentucky
Nursery for small children provided ot church, 606 Eost Main Street
Park Avenue Entrance
Open 7:30 p.m.

* The Kentucky Kernel
The Smith's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

1894

FRIDAY, MARCH

3, 1967

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walter

M.

Grant,

Editor-in-Chi-

William KsArr,

Stkve Rocco, Editorial Tagc Editor

Business Manager

Faculty Incongruity
J
J
The University Senate has taken
d
dramatic and
step
in adopting its student rights and
discipline report and sending it to
the Trustees.
But even as the faculty group
was writing one of the most memorable chapters in the history of
a

long-awaite-

relations, those
who refuse to recognize the dawn
of a new day attempted to place
a restriction on student demonstrations.
Dr. Wasley Krogdahl presented
the Senate and gained final approval for an amendment that requires student groups to give 24
hours notice to the Administration
prior to any demonstration. The
amendment also requires notice of
time, place, and purpose.
This amendment clearly goes
far beyond the intent of the committee which drafted this report. For
its whole purpose was to lead the
University from the restrictive relationship with its students which
is so much a part of the fading
in loco parentis doctrine.
university-studen-

t

The University will indeed be a
leader among the nation's institutions of higher education when
this report is accepted by the Trustees.

It is unfortunate that so bright
a moment in the University's history is to be discolored by a single
amendment which harks back to an
era long forgotten.
Dr. Krogdahl's amendment is
more restrictive than any now on
the books and as such is the main
incongruity of the report. While
the document in the main is liberalizing the rules, Dr. Krogdahl's
portion of it only makes the regulations more restrictive.
We fail to understand how the
Senate could have committed this
logical error.
As proposed by the committee
which drafted the student rights
report, it was parenthetically suggested that groups give notice of
time and place before demonstration.
No mention of purpose or intent was included.
An amendment such as Dr.

Krogdahl's has no place in such
report, and indeed, is incongruous with the intent of the report's framers. The indictments
against the amendment are strong
a

and provide grounds for its rejection, we feel.
The impositions of the regulation are in opposition to one of
the statements of an AAUP report which served as the guiding
philosophy in framing the UK document: "As constituents of the
students
academic community,
should be free, individually and
collectively, to express their views
on issues of institutional policy
and on matters of general interest to the student body."
Also from the same report is

the statement: "Students and student organizations should be free
to examine and to discuss all questions of interest to them, and to
express opinions publicly or privately."
The amendment prevents any
type of organization from participating in a spontaneous demonstration. With a requirement for 24
hours prior notice, any spontaneity is lost.
The amendment is also quite
probably unconstitutional. A UK
law professor, an authority on constitutional law, opined that the
section requiring notification of
purpose "might succumb to a con-

stitutional challenge."
Were a group to demonstrate
without giving prior notice, it is
unlikely that the Administration
would have any recourse, for to
take action against them would be
an infringement on the rights of
free speech and assembly,
However, such a misleading regulation stands on the report as it
goes to the Board of Trustees.
We would encourage the Trustees to adopt the student rights
and discipline report as a whole.
But we cannot ask their sanction
of a cumbersome,
restricting
amendment, such as Dr. Krog
dahl's. We would, in fact, ask the
Board to consider the question and
eliminate the amendment, or at
least, again make it a parenthetical suggestion.

t.? r

LA

b. SI1

"Excuse Me, Sir
More-Far-lleaelii-

1,!..

Nostalgic Memories For Foreigners
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Three years ago a meeting was
held at the International Center
for discussing the question of the
lack of communication between
Foreign Students and the Host
Community. Issuing a supplement
to The Kernel was suggested; but
like many good suggestions, it was

stillborn.
Last December the Center was
pleased to record positive steps
taken in the right direction. The
old suggestion was picked up again;
and the result was published in
Thursday's Kernel.
We hope that You will not be
too hard in judging us (this is
the reason for the complimentary
Capital Y): meagre as the outcome
was, no effort was spared. Do
you remember how many Members
of the Faculty Senate attended
an important meeting the week
before last week? Apathy seems
to be the activity, rather than the
disease, of the age. The effort,
however, is a first step.
As editor of the special supplement, I would like to dedicate it
to Kenneth Harper, Kathy White,
Ben Averitt, and Sally Mullen.
Foreign Students who know them
will eventually return home, and
the small affairs of daily life will
obliterate many a cherished memory; but when they remember these
fine people, their unfailing care
and understanding, they will realize, once more, what nostalgia
Issam Safady
Grculuate Student

Wants Flcron Defeated

V
PICKETERS

A

i

MAY HAVE TO ANNOUNCE

PLANS IN ADVANCE

Non-Step-U-

Letters To The Editor

is.

f

ng

How High Docs This
p
Go?"

So Dr. Fleron and his colleagues are "morally outraged" to
learn that officials of the American
Political Science Association have

been involved with the CIA. Well,
Dr. Fleron, I too am morally outraged.
I am morally outraged that an
American citizen cannot help to
preserve democracy without so offending his fellow countrymen. I
am morally outraged that there
are citizens of this country who
would prevent it from fighting for
the principles for which it exists.
I am morally outraged that one
who enjoys the freedoms guaranteed by this nation would object
to their defense.
Yes, Dr. Fleron, it is not the
APS A or the CIA which angers me,

but you, and others like you, with
your double standard morality.

For it is due to the efforts of
people such as you that we must
fight with our hands tied in Vietnam; that we must obey the "rules
of war," and forgive our enemy
when he does not; that we must
only defend against communism,
and not fight for democracy.
But in spite of you and all the
other Dr. Flerons, I still see hope
for our country, for I see Julie
Anne Beasley and others like her.

These are the true Americans, who
are proud to say, "I believe in
my country, and I will stand up
for her and give her all the support
I can!" Hooray for this kind of
American, though few they must
be.

So go ahead, Dr. Fleron, submit your petition. You may succeed; those officials may be im- 11
peacnea as you desire. But you re
going to have a fight. And I pray
to Cod that you are defeated.

Karl Swartz
A

6c

S Senior.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, !ril.v,

l!H7-- .r,

MjimIi :i.

How George Broke The News To Martha
"It

By RUSSELL BAKER
Nw York Tlmf Newt Service
WASHINGTON -- Scrambled

History.
It was nearly midnight when
George returned to Mount Vernon. He stabled his horse and
quietly entered the house, hoping that Martha would he asleep.
She was waiting for him in the
parlor, her eyes still swollen from
the tears she had shed,
had shed.
"Oh George!" she cried, rushing to embrace him. "I saw it
all on television."
"I'm sorry, Martha. I'm really
sorry. I know how much you
wanted to be the First Lady,
but by the time the balloting
started on the convention floor
I didn't have enough votes left
to even swing a deal for the
vice presidency. Randolph says
it was my false teeth that ruined
mc. Apparently, on TV these
teeth made me look like I've
just bitten into a lemon, and
that's what started all those jokes
about, 'would you buy a used
horse from this man?' "

"I couldn't stand it, George
when they laughed at you."
"It was my own fault, Martha.
Jefferson thought it would get
me a little publicity if I held a
press conference and threw a
dollar across the river. I should
have known it would produce
those headlines saying, 'General
Throws Money To Winds.'
"And that Ben Franklin! He
didn't even try to hold the Pennsylvania delegation for you,
George."
"Don't be unfair, Martha. Ben
did his best in the caucus. After
it was over he came to me with
tears in his eyes. 'George,' he
said, 'I know and you know that
you're the best qualified man for
the presidency in the country
today, but running in Pennsylvania you couldn't even beat
Franklin Pierce.' "
"It's the
crowd,"
said Martha. "They'd never forgive you for being a
civil-righ-

ts

slave-owner-

."

was everything, Martha.
The
people were
me as a slaveholder.
against
Lalxr wouldn't take me lx'cause
I'm a capitalist. The women were
against me Iwcause I cuss and
drink whisky. The peace crowd
fought me lx'cause I was a military men, and the intellectuals
were against me lecause of my
southern accent. Even the
lx)sses lost interest in me."
civil-right-

s

big-cit-

y

"But why, George, why?"
"It was that old cherry tree
story that Time dug up in its
cover story on me. One of the
bosses from Boston told me,
'George, the country won't soon
forget what you did at Valley
Forge, but these are tricky times
and most of us feel that a President who never tells a lie is
a luxury the country just can't
afford right now."
"Disgusting!"

us southerners caught on the
weak side of a pretty nasty Civil
War in another 50 or 60 years.'
"Oh George, I could try."
"There, there, Martha. The
only thing I feel bad about is the
new
they're going
capital
to build. I'd sort of hoHd it
would be put right here on the

tracts. No gunM)wder plants, no
shipyards, no big army camps,
no
centers, no
cannon
big government-financeWithout all these
industry.
things, the South will have
nothing to do but go ahead growing cotton with slave lalor.
"As Mendel Rivers told me,
'General, you racked c!d Cornwall up real good at Yorktown,
but your kind of thinking about
foreign entanglements could get
musket-assembl-

y

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Potomac and named Washington.
Now, I guess, they'll put it out
there on the Pacific Ocean and
call it Heaganton."

LEXINGTON'S

FATHER OF THE COUNTRY
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"The bosses weren't the only
people who felt like that. Art
Sylvester remember him? He
used to be assistant secretary of
colonial information. Art tried
to talk me out of letting them
put my name in nomination.
" 'General,' he said, 'sometimes a President has to cut down
a cherry tree and tell the press
somebody else did it.' "

SHIRTMAKERS

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"But even the South refused
to back you George. Your own
people turned against you. I can't
understand that."

if-

"That was my own fool fault,
Martha. When my horse pulled
into Phildelphia, I found a stable
full of reporters waiting for me.
One of them asked what advice
I would give to the country at
the end of my presidency if I
were elected, and without thinking I said I'd urge it to avoid
entangling alliances. That immediately soured Florida, Alabama, and Georgia."
"I can't see why."
"Don't you see, Martha? If
we don't get entangled in alliances, it means no defense con- -

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