xt79kd1qgb82 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79kd1qgb82/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 191606 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 7, no. 6, June 1916 text images Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 7, no. 6, June 1916 1916 2012 true xt79kd1qgb82 section xt79kd1qgb82 l ~     
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I UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY i Q  
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VOL. VII. JUNE, 1916. No, 6     . ·
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THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS ’     I  
_ '   _ 3 {E; _  ¢
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Tenn. CONTENTS . ’ 3   1.1; ’= ~
Eo1roR1AL CoMMRN·r— . P upil   l
Announcements . . .~ ......................... 5 ; · i    
Class ,16 ........ T . ................. . . . , , 6 i 1     ’i I
. The Association ..... ` ....................... 6 .· I; i·   li = I  i
The Alumnus ........................... . 7 il I `      v` l
3 A College Wise Man . ........................, 8 ' i I   ‘
' Portrait of President Emeritus Patterson ................. 9 — K `   ‘
Sketches of the Origin and Growth of the University of Kentucky . ~ r pill ~ ,
Dr. Jas. K. Patterson 9 i *  Wi,  
Track Season 1916 ............................. 11 . Q I   _ ,
Review of Base Ball Season ........................ 12 · P ¥‘¤ Fill`? 9 l F
Department of Athletics and Physical Education . ...........,. 12 1 l ..·@f;‘·L   ’
Mechanical and Electrical Silver Jubilee ................,. 12 _”· . · all   ¥
Senior Inspection Trip . .......................... 13 ». i `    
Civil Engineering Prize ........................., 13     {ij?  " A
Senior Loan Fund ..4................... . ....... 13 A l, ,‘ iglil A I
Professor J. T. C. Noe Addresses K. E. A.. ................ 13 { ·'   IE5! _. YI
Key- Thirteen. .............................. 14 A yl,     y
Arbor and Tap Day ............................ 14 ,i " [ $¥,'L§l:M;€TiY 
Rousing Audience at Stroller Production . ................. 14 V {   I  higégi ' 
McBrayer Wins in Oratorical Contest ................... 15 fl ;.· Y   ` · K
Professor Jones, ’O2, Editor of Latin Text Book .............. 15 ix` gi l·§ ,g?._§j"~‘
New Pan-Hellenic Council in Charge . . . ` ................. 15 c   i    lil   ,
William Shinnick Represents State. .................... 16   i   iiqlilgi ·
Union .... . ........ _ ..................... 16       J
Kentucky Y. W. C, A. Council Adjourns . ................. 16 »_l$;i I,   ;
Kathleen Sullivan Gets H. E. Position ................... 16 "iil gl ;;‘=fl,5gg .
S. J. Caudill Gets Unique Appointment. .................. 17   T gj   gi? y'  
Y. M. C. A. ............... . .... . ............ 17 ‘l;r_lY   ·"r.;"·,.i,’ V =
The 1916 Kentuckian . ........................... 17 Ulgii  ;¤   li ,
Marriages ................. . ............... 18 Uri l` :i—,;;*?j?‘ E _
Births . .................... . ............. 18 [ `5 ·   ililyf 5
i Deaths. ._...................... . ......... 18 ;}        
Directory of the Alumni .......................... 19 { 1  { V =‘· i `
Index to Directory . ............................ 75    I _‘   r 1
The next issue of the Alumnus will appear in September, 1916. -   I   il   1  
To Alumni the dues and subscription are $2.00 per year; to former students S. `  l       f
and friends, $1.00; single copies, 20 cents.     `   1 .
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J. D. TURNER, Editor.   L  " fg;} f
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    _.   OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
        A     Alumni Representatives on Board of Trustees
;·;  ·»f  — .  
   gg   " _   ’ GEORGE G. BROCK, London, Ky.
ii —¤*_·S ¤§` .:»   JOHN E. BROWN, Shelbyville, Ky.
RI . · 5.   jj  PHILIP P. JOHNSTON, IR., Lexington, Ky.
V .   ·i Igig rt, I. I. LYLE, New York City.
‘  ih jj ` T ,.¤;,3"   ,4, SAMUEL B. MARKS, Lexington, Ky.
L   .—». ,i ;V‘ T.;   I. F. BATTAILE, Lexington, Ky.
1 . . , E_,,.·vly{ ` ·§é,·1t|
_ ,f,‘  A .     General Association
’ :‘ ‘-i.. Te     . .
  *_, 4. ‘_ , ,iQzf_;;i ‘  I. M. GRAVES, President, Pittsburg, Pa.
,1 ~   ‘·  fyi.  I. H. GARDNER, Vice-President, Tulsa, Okla.
Ki   Q ·—   I. D. TURNER, Secretary-Treasurer, Lexington, Ky.
  `{ *1  .  TSW
  .`    °¤¤g;j{i#*j.% Executive Committee
  V    2%* - . .
      1   W. E. FREEMAN, Chairman, Lexington, Ky.
.,*4;} '   giiiijiiig FRANK BATTA1LE, Lexington, Ky.
 i_ `       L0U1S F. H1LLENMEYER, Lexington_ Ky.
  ,.  Q.   Mrss LUCY K. HUTcHcRA1=T, Lexington, Ky.
ling: } . { ig '*  MRS. CHARLES I. SMITH, Lexington, Ky.
   4; .  ,1 V Lg WALLACE HOE1N0, Louisville, Ky.
_. It -  ,,.  I   PRESIDENTS or THE CLUBS.
It at M1; _ » . .
 4  Li Egg, A, , PRESIDENT AND SEcRETARY, ex-officio.
‘       .   Class Secr t '
_ _ $,,,1 7 e aries
 . 2*;   ..i‘ .   ‘ _
, IN ;   1915 CLYDE TAYLOR, Nicholasville, Ky.
I  i h} fg 3 ” 1914 R. C. DAENEY, Lexington, Ky., and E. H. NOLLAU, Office of Experiment
{ " g, hi;   Stations, Washington, D. C.
,  ,5   · , 1913 A. T. BRYSON, Ashland, Ky.
‘  {rf   ~ 1912 I. R. DUNCAN, State University, Lexington, Ky.
i j,   . 1911 OLLINE CRUICKSHANK, Georgetown, Ky.
  §Xf‘§»`_   1910 D. V. TERRELL, State University Lexington Ky.
  {   ` , 1909 H. H. LOWRY, 401 Eighth Aveniie, LaGrange, Ill.
i .   1908 FRANK BATTA1LE, Lexington, Ky.
i _ ’¤g¢.‘_Q   1907 L. E. HILLENMEYER, Lexington, Ky.
    _Q 1906 ANNA WALL1S, 326 Aylesford Place, Lexington, Ky.
    ‘ 1 1905 HARRY EDWARDS, R. F. D., Lexington, Ky.
  `,   ‘ . 1 _ 1904 W. E. FREEMAN, State University, Lexington, Ky.
AR  .
rzqugi, ry ¥ jj 1903 MARcUER1TE MCLAUGHLIN, 226 E. Maxwell St., Lexington, Ky.
 ‘ ·  I ti ·_ 1902 T. I. BARR, State University, Lexington, Ky.
 ·. Yin - __ 1901 G. H. HAILEY, Cleary-White Construction Co. Chicago Ill.
,;    _   1900 L. K. FRANKEL, State University, Lexington, Ky. ’
 jj  3;;   1899 GEORGE ROBERTS, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.
  ;;j_ .; ; ` `_ I 1898 HENRY CLAY WILSON, Lexington, Ky.
  i,J—.;$‘;., j , 1897 MARY E. CLARKE, Lexington, Ky.
 #3} `   . di 1896 I. I. LYLE, 39 Cortlandt Street, New York City.
  I $§§.i:iQ.   1895 MARY L. DTDLAKE, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.
  .   ,{   1894 MRS. P. F. KESHEIMER, Madison Place, Lexington, Ky.
  i ` ; TT;]   1893 I. R. JOHNSON, Richmond, Ky.
    _;j»;;   1892, 1891 and 1890 (To be selected).
   Ii    .·_;,§gije 1889, 1888 and 1887 H. E. CURTIS, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.
  I ,  if 1886 to 1869 A. M. PETER, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.
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' Alumni Clubs        
Birmingham, Alabama. i;i.l,l   `
J, Miles Sprague, ’07, President, Ensley, Ala, lljhi   ‘
H. J. Wurtele, ,04, Vice-President, Ensley, Ala. iI‘jz,§ all ?
A, B. Haswell, ,15, Secretary-Treasurer, Ensley, Ala. li i·,g   Y
Chicago, Illinois.   `     · {
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J, B. Sanders, ’l1, President, S. Stone Ave., La Grange, Ill. §   =[
G. K. McC0rkle, '08, Vice—President, 1100 E. 5th Place, Chicago, Ill. ‘ l 1 A  
_ C, A. Johns, ’09, Secretary-Treasurer, 5206 `W. 23rd Place, Cicero, Ill. U V, y _}  y _ l
Columbus, Ohio.   ,       l
A. E. Waller, ,14, President, Department of Agronomy, O. S. U., Columbus, O. l   lf " ii`, A -
Phil E. Richards, IIS, Secretary, Dept. of Agronomy, O. S. U., Columbus, O. ` J  ,,y§·'_,   ,
Cincinnati, Ohio. ,   ~   3
Paul S. Ward, ’98, President, 1646 Cedar Ave., Cincinnati, O. E é J   __``    
W. P. Sayers, Vice—President, 219 W. Fourth St., Cincinnati, O. =j   l  all i. “‘§` l
J, J. Thompson, ’03, Secretary—Treasurer, 201 Pearl St., Cincinnati, O. §Y i   if  J
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Detroit, Michigan. » ,   €
J. E. Bolling, 'I5, Secretary, 212 Medbury Ave., Detroit, Mich. ,   :   , ,
Eastern Kentucky Club, Ashland.   .  
Lee Hunt, ,13, President, Ashland, Ky. ’ T     ,3
Richard Garred, ,12, Vice—President, Louisa, Ky. , i ‘ i!i,i 
ldie Lee Tumer_ ,I4, Secretary-Treasurer, Ashland, Ky. ~` 3 Z,;§,_*'_ lL§`*‘? 9
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Lexington, Kentucky. Q ll  `l‘  .4
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S, B. Marks, ,99, President, Lexington, Ky. ‘·‘ ~’·  V  
Experiment Chas. L._Straus, ’98, Vice-President, Lexington, Ky. _ 2 `  ,  J `
Marguerite McLaughlin, ’03, Secretary_ 226 East Maxwell, Lexington, Ky. ·— `~!* ’ lyjgu' *7 ;! ~
Mary L. Didlake, ,95, Treasurer, 481 East Main St., Lexington, Ky. · ,, ; ~ t‘];;|; 
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Louisville, Kentucky. ’ {je-, l;, ,,_,*{T _ .
S. L. Pottinger, ,92, President, 627 E. Broadway, Louisville, Ky. l,   Ei  
Eugenia S. McCullough, ’06, Secretary, 2304 Alta Ave., Louisville, Ky.     W
Nashville, Tennessee.         ,
J. M. Foster, ’11, President, 1909 Division St., Nashville, Tenn.     {,1;*5 
Eugene Gilliland, ’o4, Vice-President, 845 Meridian St., Nashville, Tenn. ;_,`;  ;  
John J. Tigert, ’o9, Secretary—Treasurer, 1905 West End Ave., Nashville, Tenn.     l",  ,
v. New York City.   »‘   t
L. L, Lewis, ’o7_ President, 39 Cortland St., New York.   ’    i
A. Akin, ’05, Vice-President, 193 North 16th St., East Orange, N. J. · f, 'ig ,.‘ `wy,. 1‘g{,-  A
R. T. Taylor, ,15, Secretary, 588 St. Marks Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. ln     Iii  W
Phtzaoezphu, Pemyzwma. { ”   ,1  l
Frank Daugherty, ’01, President, 2109 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. _ ll  , `   ~
K. F. Anderson, ’07, Vice-President, University of Pa., Philadelphia. ~  .l   ·;     ‘ Y
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania   jj Y EQ,   { ,
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l. M. Graves, President, Pittsbugh, Pa.   ·?_  l, l-,~   
Ky H. S. Fry, ’o4, President, Box 247, Rochester, Pa. _ l .—  y j»1.?. G ;
` D. C. Estill, ’07, Secretary-Treasurer, 1312 Oliver Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa. -g_  y  ~ ·
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THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS W   r r
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ANNOUNCEMENTS.   i   i i
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All signs of the University for 1917 read: “This way to the Golden Jubilee.” _l i     : ,
i‘“’“°"’·" A   i' §?°l* i;.2-`  I
_ ____   f .   l
If you do not appear correctly in the Directory, kmdly look mto a mirror   g_` ,  
n€S’ Wash` and do your talking. Ei}   i   i
Bureau of U   i   , E
The Alumnus desires to acknowledge the receipt with thanks and appre- .,    .*· ` 
gt0¤» D· C· riation of two life subscriptions to the Association—Dr. Philip L. Blumenthal,     fyi   l
’09, and Raymer W. Tinsley, ,12,   ,  
     
The 1‘€SultS of the Alumni election of officers for the Association are; yi   I
President, J. M. Graves, Pittsburg, Pa.; Vice-President, ]_ H_ Gardner, Tulsa,     1
CYEQYY will Okla.; Secretary-Treasurer, J. D. Turner, Lexington, Ky., and the Executive     _,;
,,0, Committee, J. F. Battaile and Louis F. Hillenmeyer, of Lexington, Ky.       '
*10. For Board of Trustees of the University, J. F. Battaile and S. B. Marks.   _‘_,, L.  ,§
$. iii. T-fil ii   A
,111;,1 The fifth installment of the “Early History of Athletics," by Prof. A, M. Qj,,; ~‘€j ',j,§ 
Tn: qi; Miller, does not appear in this issue, due to the lack of space on account of the     {A ,  ·
¥,1‘,u_ Directory. This installment will appear in the next issue. ·    
Katia. . . . iii  i ··rr  eifw i ii
*12; The Alumnus 1S pleased to announce the formation of two Alumni Clubs- ,l}#*J.`,@i ,*‘·  3%; ,]% ,
  The Oklahoma Club, with headquarters at Tulsa, Okla., and The Eastern   is  2;;-,,gi<{,· 
,3.. Kentucky Club, with headquarters at Ashland, Ky. Also, others are in process    Y    
;4{14_ of orgar|iz3,1;i0n_       ,
, *14.   J   ,
,1iis, The Alumnus has been sent to all Alumni for the past year, whether they    , {·i;zlt,,g?‘·l i
paid their dues or not, to show them that we are making a determined eiiort to i=    g  
succeed—to help the Association and the University. It goes without saying   i'   _
that this was done at a considerable sacrifice. All must appreciate this. It was         i
done to interest you—to put aglow that little spark of loyalty, love and gh i  
devotion for the University that still smoulders and lingers, and we feel that Q'.; l, _;   Q
it has brightened the spark in the memories of many for they have told us so.   L·       Z
Beginning with the new year—the next issue—The Alumnus will be sent   ‘   _
to only those who subscribe or pay dues to the Association.   `i_   il l?
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    V ’» T 6 THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS  
  j Class of 1916, We greet you and welcome you  
‘," i · glu, qq; into the ranks of loyal alumni. Commencement  
  is a great day in your lives. It is a day of great  
ffl, ~ achievement, but it is the achievement of having successfully begun your C
l _fy _ . education. You have been laying the foundation and have laid the comet--  
  ` stone. You are commencing now the superstructure.  
  Your stay in the college has or should have prepared y0u to become a  
i, student. You have the means at hand now by which you can acquire knowledge,  
it wisdom and culture.  
i Every experience and adventure in life, whether of joy or sorrow, of  
~   success or failure, of ease or pain, will contribute to your strength of  
_ - character and joy of living, if only you keep your faith unimpaired and your  
’ i heart filled with charity.   `
l If only truth and right be your guide, no circumstance can ever defeat  
you, but if ever the love of power and material gain make you deviate from  
; the path of rectitude, then you invite defeat; indeed you will have already been  
‘ defeated. Remember the State has educated you to be strong men and  
{ women, not mere machines for creating or accumulating material wealth. The  
world needs you and is waiting with open arms to receive you, but will first try  
you out, and then to permit you to serve.  
l vit
T} The constitution of the Alumni Association  
, The _A,,,¤.;,,e;,,¤ states: “The object of this Association is to  
  promote the best interests of Alma Mater and  
` the professional welfare of its members and to strengthen the bonds of friend-  
ship and social fellowship among the alumni of the University."  
, Every college or university worthy of the name has a body of alumni, who,  
Q individually or collectively, have for their purpose the object set forth above. iii 
It is their duty and privilege as alumni, the children of the institution, to be  
interested in their Alma Mater. They would not be true to themselves, nor the  
friends of education, nor the institution that gave them their training, their  
. ~ intellectual birth, their vision of the future, their equipment for life’s service if  
they were not. And, it is befitting, for they are the only permanent body of the  
' institution, the professors, the officers and members of the board of trustees are  
merely transitory. It is very natural that they watch and guard with jealous  
J interest the welfare of their Alma Mater.  
»' If the alumni have not that interest, love and devotion for the institution tg 
Q that has given them their training, they have failed to get somet/zing from the  
B 5 institution which is justly theirs and a very important factor too in their  
make-up. If the institution cannot give the boys and girls——the alumni, its  
‘ ( finished product, that something and thus command the love, respect and  
devotion of the alumni, it is not doing the kind of work that is expected  
of it and living up to its opportunities.  
 . The alumni of the University of Kentucky, individually and collectively,  
f 
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THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS 7         .
2 l j iqls
ome you feel that they have not received the full measure of that something which they     l   .
encement were entitled to when they graduated—that something which inspires sentiment     Q
of great -love—devotion——enthusiasm for Alma Mater. The older and more exper-       ’
;un your ienced they become, the keener they feel and realize it. Proof of this may be  tl]?   ` y
2 corner- obtained from the results of hundreds of other colleges and universities which   :_     j `
should not be any better than the University of Kentucky and most certainly   i I      
>ecome a have no better young women and men as material. » · = i   ‘  
1owleclge, The University is no better and can be no better than its finished product-     t wif ; _ (
, the men and women, the alumni, it turns out, and the character of this     i     i
irrow, of finished material depends entirely on the ability of the institution to mould and    ·    l
ength of shape the youth of the Commonwealth into good citizenship. The University       J
and your therefore must have proper guidance; it must have men and women to teach      `  l
‘ and to teach right; it must be free from selfish and political blight; it must   `_ M K   
er defeat have facilities and equipment; it must have the ability of arousing and waking   §_:     ‘
late from up its pupils and setting them forward in the path of accomplishment and     l
zady been duty. When these things are, there will be wholesome and proper spirit, love, “* g   i'    
men and respect and support of the alumni and people of the State generally.   E g` J ll!  3 »  
.ltl1. The The alumni appreciate this as never before as their own families grow up         if `
ll first try and the time comes for them to take a college course. Q   ,~_   _ 
"gifj   ;
In enunciating the policy of The Alumnus in   i,       I
.ssociation The Alumnus the December issue, one of the principles set   ‘‘``     ig"
zion is to forth is: "To speak plainly and without color on {lm}?     ‘ .:<
Jlater and all subjects under consideration affecting the Association and the University."     ll ,/W
of friend- This, The Alumnus has endeavored to do—in other words, to state facts, to tell ·  ph    ~
the truth, thus assuming that the truth would not, at least should not, hurt any  ii?    
mmiy Who, One, but ethereby hangs the tale," In acknowledging the truth and being frank   `kw ill g 
rth above. enough to state it, The Alumnus has incurred displeasure.   t_ ,,= s r,  ‘
ion, to be The Alumnus is the oiiicial organ of the Alumni Association with no  "    `
as, nor the desire for reward except the consciousness of duty well perf0rmed—and duty  jj if f   i
iing, their well performed is a hard task these days. Nobody knows this better than   t
service if The Alumnus. r i    ’l ;',lj,  
ody of the The Alumnus refuses to advance the propaganda of any faction or interest      i? *
rustees are and is subservient to no cause except the betterment of the Association for` illliili     ‘
th jealous service to the University. In doing this, it believes that it reflects the sentiment       2  .
of the Alumni, old students, professors and the true friends of the University. {iff;  l $i¥,,§l;;,§§;‘? ·
institution For being true to its principles, The Alumnus has been severely criticised    if   ~
7 from the and taken to task by some of the authorities and it has been requested that it be    I _·`—     E
o in their taken from the bulletin series of the University publication and that the editor   `L tg ;H.‘g,,,j·i   l
alumni, its resign, to both of which the editor yields. This issue therefore carries the   I  [·"r,i5fl[·?f. ‘
aspect and change in the title page necessary to remove it from the bulletin series of the     i·;i’;i`    f
s expected University. The present editor’s term of service expires with this issuer    {   ’
s is Qi  l» i•*z,§e, .
:ollectivelY, {K Q    
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_ '   F   8 ‘ THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS .
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2, T .` élkgqft
  tl     From the January number of the Purdue
"   `=’*i' »·*   A "ctnisge wan M....·· Alumnus it appears that there is a situation at
. » a _ . §_   . .
  ~ Y   Purdue which may be of some interest to us. It
I '_ if   arose over the President declining to re-employ a foot ball coach, after his con-
 ‘   · \ lg}  tract had expired. Tliis was the occasion of some hard feeling among the student pu
$ » lf  ity;   ‘ body and alumni against the President. When the President’s reasons were
··   M-,`··%z· 52%  , . . lat
i   _ ‘ }l·`ji’;§ij ,;! i  made known, however, it appears that he had good reasons for his 3.Ct1OI1. The Ur
r ‘ _ if   unpleasant situation arose more from a lack of information than from any— of
’ T   V  thas else ti
I .   `     The results are instructive, as showing how those who have the direction of O?
fi- l _`·` Q `   I affairs may get into trouble by not taking into their confidence the peoplewhose Cel
T`, N   affairs they are directing. A clear understanding among all concerned about Ur
if °‘   what is to be done and what is going on is a good thing and conduces to a tm
  r `f”`i"i' Tiili:i’l s irit f c - er ti n and general ood feelin
Q , ~  _ §£·,;; p o o op a·o g · g ' g.
  »t._ ,.'  itil In a long article upon the situation, Prof. George W. Monroe suggests a
  _ `   bureau of publicity as a remedy for such misunderstandings in college affairs.
 gi]?   Some plan of this sort may be worth consideration, so we quote this part of his
inf ’* _·g··,_ at   g   . _
  _  _,§;t  : lp article.
 .  liz"  fi?  ;é;Z ( 3 . . .
 Q Q I El igiv". #*1* "What is needed seems to be vehicle, a ‘_College Wise Man,' who shall be
 Qi. » .    .%=.;_`;.fl , close enough to the students so they will _drop in to his office to talk freely and tt
  l `     F: man thoroughly informed on all university (affairs. This rsfuggestioln came front
  ¥;’.`_,t .   a student to the President, w1o mentione it to me. o get t e matter lll
        ‘ A concrete form for discussion I have elaborated it as follows: _ _
 {V   “Assuming that the truth though known will injure no_man, the publicity
    » agent should have every means of knowing the_facts regarding every phase of Un
ii T;_.t‘%’» , ` : university activity. He should attend the meetings of fthle Eoard of Trustees, M,
  IXSEQI ; and the faculty and should be notified of all meetings o ,t e acu ty committees
      Z and have the privilege of attending. His access to university records and V1
  ‘ iuzéii if *_ correspondence should be unquestioned. He should be furnished with proper S?
$15    V stenographic and clerical assistance and have a fund for publicity work such ns
his  `     - sending news letters to the alumni or the press of the State. That he be free ES
    · from even the suspicion of undue influence, he should be responsible only to CO,
'     .· the Board of Trustees direct. He should be answerable only for the truth ot d 4
gg {ifi? r his statements and judged only by the results obtained in completeness of O·
  ;€,\_g§ ‘ H understanding between the university authorities, the students and the people for
    .; of the State. His door should have a sign reading, ‘PURD JE IS A PUBLIC AS
TY id  i` INSTITUTION AND ANY MAN IS ENTITLED TO KNOW ANY
 y l’¥·Q ‘ FACTS REGARDING ITS CONDUCT OR MANAGEMENT FOR ANY
.·  ‘lf_ .· REASON OR FOR NO REASON. IT IS MY BUSINESS TO KNOW
  yl ` THESE FACTS. ASK ME.’ U
- F`? `. . . . . 1
" i€§·,,_ = “In short, my remedy for the present lack of understanding is "P1t1less dg
..    ‘ ‘< Publicity.” TL
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E THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS 9 l , Q    
rt liglll   A , .
it PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT EMERITUS PATTERSON   `l   ‘ I
. _ _ 5;-i-ri :.9} l
it Through the generosity of a number of alumni, we have been enabled to li ill   ,
_€ purchase a splendid portrait of President Emeritus Patterson painted by the WE  ill}  L l
le late Mr. Charles Hooven, of Chicago. This portrait is to be presented to the 3 l `*.·ii ,` ,<
I University by the alumni at the iiftieth anniversary celebration of the founding ` E     ` l
` of the University next year. It is a most fitting and appropriate recognition of ~— _; g     {
f the distinguished services of Dr. Patterson to the University and to the cause     , .:*, QQ ,   ~
{ of higher education in Kentucky, extending over a period of well-nigh half a ‘     { jp  J  
  century. By this gracious and appropriate act, the Alumni Association of the `   li   j  
University honors itself in thus honoring Kentuc ’s oldest and most dis- `·   lr? i§=`· i._ A  ¤
a . .  lr .  l
tinguished scholar and educator. 1 ,     I
.i·       ..¤j ‘
a ·Y· ·—     l
- { ‘ .. -"l 
A SKETCHES OF THE ORIGIN AND GROWTH OF THE    is    l
IS A ~. E`   =€` .
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, W,    .p·;} g
z r   >
be By james K. Patterson, President Emeritus. . l. "V   _
:1 `¥ " *'l`1.?   ¤ °
wl   E l
in CHAPTER IV. l' ‘· ‘.  l