xt79kd1qgp5t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79kd1qgp5t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590724  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 24, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 24, 1959 1959 2013 true xt79kd1qgp5t section xt79kd1qgp5t immwk il

Weekend Weathtcr:
High

77-8- 3,

Weekend Showers

America's Nevr,
Ideal, Status:
See Ed, Pago

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, JULY 21,

Vol. L

No. 123

1939

Aboiit 600 DroBBed
.Because Of Grades
By BOB ANDERSON

dents were dropped. Of these, 73
were .freshmen. Dr. Carpenter
stated. As in the other colleges,
Approximately 600 undergradthese figures have varied as late
uates were dropped from the Uni- grades come In and
students are
versity last semester for scholastic
reinstated, Dean Carpenter conreasons, according to estimates
gathered from the various colleges. tinued.
Education dropped a total of 38.
Figures taken from a report by A breakdown by classification was
Dean of Admissions and Registrar not available, .but it was learned
Charles F. Elton last July show that three of those dropped have
that In June, 1958. 418 students been dropped permanently because
were. dropped from the University of previous suspensions.
for low academic standings.
As in Arts and Sciences, definite
Although the comparison Is not figures from Engineering were not
conclusive because of approxi- available. The only estimate that
mated figures in Arts and Sciences could be made was that the Coland Engineering, it would appear lege of Engineering ' suspended
that the Increased grade standards somewhat less than 200 students.
have begun to take their expected
Pharmacy reported that eight
tolL
students were dropped in June.
breakIn a
In the two colleges where the
down, Agriculture and Home Eco- lists were broken down into classinomics reported 47 students were fications. Ag and Home Ec and
dropped for unacceptable scholas- Commerce, the figures showed
that
tic standing. Of this number, there these groups were made up of 64
were 30 freshmen, 7 sophomores, per cent and 71 per cent
freshmen
6 juniors and 4 seniors.
respectively. Figures taken from
Dr. M. M. White, Dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, said
that because of the tabulation of
late grades, figures in Arts and
Sciences change often. Because of
this fluctuation. Dean White could
only estimate the number dropped
from A&S this June at approximately 200.
"The teacher is more important
College of Commerce Dean C. C.
than administration or form of ed- Carpenter said 106 commerce stu
ucatlon," Sir' Ronald Gould, presi- dent of the World Confederation
of Organizations of the Teaching
Profession and British educator,
said Wednesday at the UK educa- tion convocation.
Speaking on "The. Status of Teachers in England." Gould said
teachers in England are never satplayed pro ball and hatt three isfied with their position, but "if
years experience in high school teaching is to be a profession, it
coaching.
demands more than Just making
Broyles, who has been called one more money," he said. "It mast
of the nation's outstanding young provide people with moral qualicoaches, has had a full career ties demanded to provide them
ranging from Georgia Tech
with' means to a better life."
quarterback and 10
In England, teachers have a
years as an assistant coach to higher standing in the eye of the
head coaching assignments as Mis- public than ever before, the speaksouri and Arkansas.
er said. "Teachers' jobs are secure
as far as. they. can be In an insecure world." He also pointed out
that teachers have greater religWatermelon Feast ious and political liberty than ever
before. A teacher's practice of
. The Baptist
Student Union religion, or lack of it, can have no
will have a watermelon feast tobearing on his standing now, he
day at 6 p.m. in Blue Grass Park. said. A teacher also can take part
Transportation will be providCommunist, Fascist,
in Liberal,
ed from the Baptist Student Tory or Whig activities, he said.
Center and all watermelon Is
Gould explained that "no one
free.
can Instruct a teacher in our counA short vesper service will be try what he will teach or how he
held at the park.
will teach it." Speaking of planning
for the future of education.
Kernel

New ID Cards

University photographer John Mitchell Is presently In the process
of making next year's student ID cards. Because of the treat size
of the job, Mitchell enlbted the aid of several Journalism person-ne- t.
Shown at work on the cards are, from left. Perry Ashley, Miss
Florida Garrison, Airs. Lynne Owens, VV. E. Mitchell and John
Mitchell.

Mobley Invited By WBKY
In Compliance With FCC

college-by-colle-

as was riven to Democratic nominee Wilson W. Wyatt on a recent
WBKY Roundtable broadcast.
At that time, the Federal Communications Commission held that
7.
any use of a station by a candidate
a letter to Donna Reed, in any capacity entitles his opponIn
Toundtafcle producer
at WBKY, ent to equal opportunities.
Mobley indicated he would be preAlthough plans have not yet
sent at the discussion which will been completed, others expected to
be transcribed for a later play? participate in the' roundtable are
Attorney. General Joe Ferguson,
back.
of Public.
State Superintendent
The Invitation was extended In Instruction Robert Martin and a
order to offer the Republican nom- - member of the State Department
.
inee equal and equivalent time of Health.

Pleaz W. Mobley. Manchester,
Republican nominee for lieutenant
governor, has accepted an Invitation from WBKY to appear on a
UK Roundtable discussion on Aug.
-

Co-Edit-

or

ge

day Thursday as well as Friday
morning. In addition to Cajnevale
and Lancaster, coaches of the East
teams and high
and West
Paul Coop of
school coaches
Campbellsville and Tom Ellis of
Covington Holmes will also be on
all-st- ar

12-1- 5.

Ben Carnevale of Navy and Harry Lancaster cf Kentucky will be the program.
Football discussions start Friday
featured . basketball lecturers, and
Frank Broyles of 'Arkansas and afternoon and continue throughout
Blanton Ccllicr of Kentucky will the day Saturday. Broyles wiiJ ex- -,
plain his system of offence and dediscuss football.
The clinic program directed by fense on Friday. The grid
Bernie Shivery, Is planned to cater roaches, high school coaches Jim
to the basic Interests of attending Pickens of Bowling ' Green and
coaches with "tips of the trade" John Hackett of Ft. Knox and
offered by outstanding collegiate Coach Collier and his staff are
coaches as well as by successful scheduled for talks on Saturday.
high school tutors In both football
The traditional dinner and TV
party again will be held on Friand basketball.
Wednesday, Au?. 12. will be
day evening and the Kentucky
basketball and
voted to the prevention and recog- high school all-stnition cf- - athletic injuries a new football games are scheduled
topic sponsored by the Kentucky Saturday night.
Medical Association with the asCarnevale is a veteran. of 13
sistance of the Kentucky High years as basketball coach at the
School Athletic Association. Lead- Naval Academy and shows an all-ticollegiate coaching record of
ing physicians will take part in
233 wins and 103 losses. A graduate
panel discussions.
Basketball will occupy the entire of New. York University, Carnevale
all-st-

ar

ar

.

me

University To Play Host
To Housekeepers Institute
Members of the staff will include
The third annual UK executive
housekeepers institute will be held Otis L. Wheeler, director, Jewish
July
in the Ouignol and Hospital, Louisville, who will lecture on "Why Hospitals Costs are
Laboratory theaters.
by High," Russell Luf,es, Lexington inThe institute la
the Kentucky chapter of the Na- terior declrator and William Corntional Executive Housekeepers As- ish. United States Public Health
sociation. .Membership la that or- Service Hospital, Lexington.
ganization la not necessary for atOthers are Frank A. Petrie, director of training. Sheraton Corp. of
tendance.
Topic to be discussed will be America, Boston; W. I Spencer,
new trends In Interior decorating, LF-GInspection Bureau. Frankthe' art of communicating Ideas, fort; Dr. Juan O. Rodrlgues, asexecutive housekeeping education, sistant professor of agricultural
employee training, linen control, entomology,
and Dr. Maurice
biology and control of household Hatch, assistant professor of
27-3- 0,

as

jests and fire safety.

June.

Academic standards in effect in
June, 1958, called for the dropping
of students from the University if
their scholastic averages fell below a 1.4 for two consecutive se-

mesters.

Under the academie standards
put into effect last fall, freshmea
who entered UK in the fall of 1959
are required to make a 2.0 standing
In one of their first two semesters.
Freshmen falling to make a 2.t
after the second semester ara
dropped from the University.
Students who do not have a 2.0
cumulative standing at the end of
the third semester are also to be
dropped. The new 2.0 ruling does
not yet affect students who enrolled in the fall of 1957.' Thesa
students have until next fall semester to have the 2.0 overall
standing.

Gould Outlines British
Education In Speech

College Coaches To Be
Feature Of UK Clinic
Coaches from Navy, Arkansas
and Kentucky will be featured at
the annual UK coaching clinic for
high school and college coaches to
be held at Memorial Coliseum Aug.

Dr. Elton's 1958 report show thaH
freshmen and sophomores accounted for 78 per cent of all students who went on probation la

-

-

he said "we don't believe in free)
"enterprise in Just the way you do,

therefore we can pjan our educa- tion ahead of time.. In dead, it
would be difficult in a country as
vast as your to have this planning."
Although considerable advances
have been made in the British
teaching profession, Gould pointed
out. there' are many weaknesses.
"Education is a service with a high
social purpose in a modern state,"
he said, and distunity of teachers
is one of the major weaknesses.
"Teachers often are not proud,
enough of their professions," ha
said.
"We've still got to get our teachers to think of themselves as members of one big profession," Gould
said. "A strong teaching profession
is needed socially, nationally and
.

.

Internationally.
Sir Ronald and Lady Gould are
now In Washington, D. C. attending the annual international meeting of WCOTP. He. is the first and
only president of the organization
which was formed in Copenhagen
in 1952. Gould is a member of the
Body
for Education of URESCO and tha
United Kingdom Committee foe
URESCO, and was a member of
the British delegation to Interna-

international

tional Labor Organization conferences in Geneva in 1956 and 1958.

Carr Has Taught Sixty Years
A University instructor, who
came to UK in 1949 as a visiting
professor, has completed 60 years
of classroom teaching.
And, for Dr. W. L. Carr, profes- sor in Ancient Languages, it has
been an enjoyable, experience.
Dr. Carr, 84. began teaching In
1899 at Drake University, where he
worked toward his Master's degree. , .
His first classes were the same
courses he has at UK today-Gr- eek

as of June. He will begin his 11th
year here next fall
in many ways," he says, -- it
(nis stay at, UK) has been the
most peasant of my experiences,
And I have been at quite a few

T"

colleges."
He has been associate editor of
-The Classical Outlook," one of
the most well-rea- d
classical magazines in the nation, since 1938 and
has been director of the Classical
League Service Bureau since 1943.
and Latin.
He is a member of the editorial
'
l.;'.'r-..,- .
Since then,' he has built up an board of the "Kentucky Foreign
I
.'
extensiveknowledge of the classi- Language Quarterly."
cal languages and has established
Dr. Carr has taught, at Drake,
... .
...
a wide reputation for himself in University of Chicago, . Oberlin
the ancient language field.
College, University of Michigan,
Dr. Carr has been a visiting pro- Teachers College of Columbia Unifessor at UK for the last 10 years versity and Colby College.
DR. W1LBEKT L. CAIltt
--

.

M

"-

* 2-T-

1IE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Juljr 21, 1939

by Dick Dibler

LlTtLE MAN ON CAMPUS

r M!s

'

r2

(Will

Sorority Housemother Must Be
Hostess, Chef, Wizard All In One
affections go so deep." Many marry
before or Just after leaving school,
The sorority residents share
duties such as closing the house
at night, phone duty and preparing
for social events. The head
dents reciprocate, by keeping th?
kitchens open at night during
exam times to give the girls
les which they seem to need to
give them study energy.
xhe housemothers agree one of
the biggest compliments they ran
receive Is when one of "their" jlrU
how she can become a house- mother. "The blessings flow both

sorority housemother's Job Is all of their time to the girls. must
"Just as sorority members
by no means simply wearing a corsign out when they leave the house
sage and standing in line at teas,
going, so
Dean of Women Doris Seward said and tell where they are be loyal
do the housemothers. 'To
recently.
to our Jobs, we have to be available
First and foremost, the houseDay and
we are
mother or head resident, as they night we must'.needed.booted and
stay
are called at the University must spurred." she said. But serenades,
be a hostess. But next, she must
services ' and social
also be a public relations expert events make life glamorous."
'
"
and a chef.
The housemothers are 'sold' on
Financially, a housemother must sorority life. Mrs. Beatty said the
be a wliard, because often' the girls "go out perfect ladies, and
social buet rans ouv and mast be thf n Wf fer ottJ we can have
absorbed by the regular household tufm another two years." She said
budget, the housemother reported, during her previous business ex- Mrs. Louise B. Beatty, house- nrrienre before she came to the
mother at the Kappa Delta house, University six years ajto, she had
explained the head residents must seen so many who didn't know how
feed the girls on a little more than to live with others.
But, as Mrs. Bright pointed out.
70 cents per day and, considering
nourishing meals served, only sorority life teaches orderliness
the
and pride In the appearance of the
a real expert could do this.
chapter house. "Tidy house, tidy
So naturally, the housemothers
like to swap recipes and tell one minds," she said,
Mrs. Hibbs said often the head
another which domestics are the
cleaners, cooks, and so forth, residents worried because girls as- best
KUIT1C SO much resDonslbility on so
.
tt
v
uouauj vims
Ca.u IBll uninlln Kr4rtTC a font no " many
student committees, and yet
head residents to the campus and
the housemother's club, formed by they are very proud of them.
All of the women agreed you can
Dean Seward, sees to it that each
new person is assigned to another never give the young residents a
housemother, or big sister, Just as hasty answer. They also agree that
.they never go to Dean Seward or
sororities do pledges.
Mrs. Ruby A. Hibbs, housemother her assistant, Mrs. Sharon Hall,
at the Alpha Gamma Delta house, without getting a good answer to
cftid that een thourh the work is their problems. Actually, all resi- Mr Hint, there are man v eomoensa- - dence halls are directly under the
tlons. "Activities are varied, and dean and serious matters must be
no two days are ever alike," she referred to her, day or night.
"We deal with the boys as much
added.
as the girls," Mrs. Beatty pointed
Mrs- Elizabeth M. Bright, Kappa
Ainha Theta. Dointed out however, out. because they often visit the
fhnr hnmpmnthers "almost have girls at the house. "Sometimes we
to glve up friends In town," be-- are amazed at how quickly the
cause they must devote practically young women mature and their
A

resi-wh-

.

-

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FO,

MUST &2SfWNT TO POSE
MI55 VZfX.
tTTUflP rMOfc. GOT AKOJNPWE WKeNTfWM5

SEEMS A

Top Fraternity In Grades
Is Farmhouse With 2.55
n's

ways," she said.

Library Schedule
The Margaret I. King Library
the following schedule from the end of the summer
session until the beginning of
the fall term, Sept.' 21:
Friday, July 31, the library will
will observe

at

Close

8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m.-noo- n.

ys

Air Conditioned

Euclid

con--curre-

Rhonda Fleming

Bob Hop

Wendell Corey (Color)
"THE SILENT ENEMY"
Laurence Harvey Dawn Addams
Sun.-Mon.-T-

July

u.,

24-27--28

"IT HAPPENED TO JANE"
Doris Day Jack Lemmo
Ernie Kovaca (Color)

1H'.,'?J.1S3 1

Randolph

g"".yyf?TT'

nt

Chase

y

Avenue-Chev-

'Now Showing!
"ALIAS JESSE JAMES"

AIR CONDITIONED

ScrVlUg
Alumili
n JiuSame Army Reserve Unit

y,

4

The library will be closed Sun-daand Labor Day. On Sept.
21. the library will return to it
regular schedule.

-

ve

p.m.; Monday-Fridap.m., and Saturdays.

5
--

TXT

average increase of onlv
Farm House- - fraternity finished
top of the fraternity grade .04, Proffltt stated.
on
standings for the second consecuProffltt said six fraternities will
tive semester with a 2.55 semester be on social probation flext fall for
average.
failing to equal or exceed the an- Second with a' 2.54 was Delta men's average of 2.30. Although
Tau Delta, which tied with Farm these fraternities will retain rush
House last spring. Phi Kappa Tau privileges next fall, they will be
iiad a 2.51 while Sigma Alpha Ep- - unable to schedule any. social
siipn and Kappa Sigma uea lor functions, Prorntt stated
fourth with 230 standings.
The all fraternity average for ?
NOW
the campus was a 2.4, much higher
than the fall semester'
Assistant Dean of Men John
fit said comparison between
The' 2148th VS. Army Garrison ketball official.
semesters is not as indica- Reserve . Unit of Louisville, now
Hornback, Public Relations
tive as comparisons made between
for two weeks training at rector at Morehead State College,
the standings of the same semes- Camp Breckinridge, Ky.', has a is also a native of Louisville. He
ters in different years.
strong University t of Kentucky holds the A J3. .degree in. Arts and
Prof fit 'pointed out that the
and was managing edi- average for the spring flavor. members of the unit at- - Sciences columnist on the Kentucky
Five
tomnd
of 1958 was 23, an increase of .1
tended the University. Sp5 Daniel Kernel. He was a member of the
'
point. This increase Is more sig- Boone, Sp5 Bill Surface, Sp4 Joe Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, Sigma
nificant when compared with the Hayes and PFC Ray Hornback, Delta Chi and Lamp and Cross,
members of the class of '56 and and an elected member of the Stu-Sp- 4
Waves Save Walk
Bob Bennett, '57, are in their dent Government Association,
DENVER (AP) If you wave to second week of summer training . Hayes, from Glendale, Ky., re- ceived a degree in commerce and
a girl on the balcony at Denver's at the western Kentucky camp.
Boone, a native of Elizabeth-tow- n, is now In the insurance' and real
Union Station, she may toss you a
was a member of the UK estate business In Elizabethtown.'
note. But it's strictly business.
girl is following a
golf team, Sigma Alpha Epsilon He was a member of Omicron
The
system designed to save a long fraternity and received a degree Delta Kappa and Beta Gamma
walk.
in commerce. He Is now working Sigma and president of Delta SlgMiss Jessie Frank of the
with his father in the laundry and ma Pi.
trn Union office on the station's dry cleaning business in Elizabeth-tow- n, Bennett was a starting guard on
main floor explains It: Whenever
the UK football team and was refa secretary in an office on the secSurface currently is a sports cently, named head coach at
ond or third floor has a telegram writer on the Chicago Tribune and Franklin County- High School. A
to send, she presses a button which writes for national magazines. A native of Russell, he formerly was
buzzes in Miss Frank's office.
native of Louisville, he formerly an assistant football coach at Male
Miss Frank walks out into was a sports writer for the Lex- -, High School in Louisville.
Then
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The prethe waiting room to catch the ington Herald and the Louisville
He was student ceding article was written by forfolded message. But if she is busy Courier-Journa- l.
she may say to a customer (or a manager of the UK basketball and mer Kernel staffer Hornback, who
man waiting for his train:" "Do baseball teams, assisted Sports is valiantly guardinr his country
you see a girl up on the balcony? Publicity Director Ken Kuhn and against foreign Invaders with type- was a college and high school bas- - writer and paper.)
Please wave to her.
all-me-

good-candleli-

"WESTBOUND"
Scott Virginia Mayor

Wed.-Thu-

Jury

n.,

29-3-

0

DARK"
"HOME
Rhonda Fleming
Jean Simmons
"HOUSEBOAT"
.
Cary Grant Sophia Loreir

Dl-meet-

BEFORE

TODAY '

STARTS

.

Rains

Claud

(Technicolor)

Jean Simmons

Rock Hudson

all-frater-

--

Dorothy McGuire

Fri.-Sa- t.,

in

.

"THIS EARTH

July

"SOME "CAME

31-Ao-

o,.

1

RUNNING"

Dean Martin,
(Color)
MacLan
"LA PARISIENNE"
Brieirte Bardof Charles Boyer
Henry Vidal (Color)

Frank Sinatra

IS MINE".

Shirley

.

.

Technicolor

v
.

m

Home of the College Folks
'Air - Conditioned for

Your Comfort"

-

''''-ri-rfl-

-

ifiiVn

DINNER

LUNCH

BREAKFAST

683 S. Broadway

us

PHONE

4-43-

73

Reasonable Prices
Private Rooms for Parties
Your Dining Pleasure"
"High Fidelity Music for

imVun'" 'jmii'a'

wYr'ite

m

ijWMn.rVii'n

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ifttlintfn

'lull

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wttw

'PORE!
v a.

frnT 'ill

mm

I

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.......

Sandwiches and Short Orders .

ux.

Lexington's Newest,
Most Modern Golf
Club . . NOW OPEN

v

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PRESCRIPTIONS
COSMETICS
'

PAR 3 GOLF CLUB
Mason Headly Road

Revelon, Coty
Max Factor, DuBarry

STATIONERY
MAGAZINES

18 Hole Par 3 Course

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CLUBS FOR RENT

Open 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.

WILL D

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Co.

en

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July

7

21, 1939

UK Student Is Sunday Flyer, Not Driver
fP mmmmr oil..
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On wrrkrnds when most

umm

studfnts

re thinkinc

of taking to the highways, Al Royster Is taking to the
wild blue yonder. Al is a member of the Lexington Fly- -

Ing Club and he does his flying in the club's

.....,1

a

"

two-seat- er

plane. Above Al Is shown, left," checking the map prior
to taking off on a
flight. He boards the
plane, center, and before' taking off, checks with the tow- er for clearance. Al has been flying since 1956 and this
cross-count-

ry

The 1959 Kentuckian will be distributed next Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday mornings fr6m
and excavate for the storm sewers.
Kentuckian business manGood humor prevails.
ager Perry Ashley .announced WedTexans remember this city of nesday.
about 70,000 for two things: The
Ashley emphasized that only
Model
high curbs downtown
those who have 'already ordered
and the Texas it Pacific Railroad
tracks which split the business their books and candidates for the
Bachelor's degree who have paid
district
their $9
, The curbs were so high
that receive &senior graduation fee may
Kentuckian. A bursar's
car doors couldn't be opened, exreceipt for payment of the gradcept on the dangerous street side.
,
They also scraped chrome and" uation fee is necessary before-- an
paint from expensive modern cars. annual will be issued to graduatThe streets were so narrow that ing seniors, Ashley said.
A number of Kentuckians may
diagonal parking was Impossible.
be available next January for peoThe railroad tracks discouraged
crosstown shopping. Underpasses ple who have not yet ordered one.
built several years ago helped. The
new "downtow'n Abilene" program
includes widening of one of the
Regular Size
present underpasses and. construction of a third which will go under
two streets' as well as the tracks.
with
c
It will have the effect of unifying
1
Fritd Onions
business districts on both sides of
the tracks.
To Go, 7 for $1
Downtown ' Abilene .figured it
couldn't expect local taxpayers to
ARCHIE'S
bear the whole cost of the $1,309,-59- 6
program. More than $350,000 of
the cost is being paid by downtown
Phone
propertyowners themselves, at the 106 W. Euclid
rate of $16 per "front, foot." The
rest is being paid out of bonds ap-

By TIM PARKER

ABILENE. Texas (AP)

"We're

light here at the corner of

Ex-

cavation Avenue and Storm Sewer
Alley," said Burgess Brown's newspaper and radio ads.
two
"Jump
ditches, oiimb
through a half block of sewer
knee-dee- p
pipe, wade . through
gravel, shake the dust out of
your hair and come in."
Castoaieri of Brown's Melody
Shop came, they enjoyed the Joke,
and they bough enough television
tts, recordings and hi-- fi
sets to
keep his business alive.
It's a good example
of the
troubles and ingenuity of Abilene

T-a-

rrerrhants during an. unusual project to erase "downtown blight."
Every street and sidewalk
in
42 downtown blocks is being torn
up and replaced. Big storm sewers
are going under the streets. The
whole job will take all summer.
-- As the work progresses,
streets
and sidewalks are blocked off.
Dust and dirt are "whipped
through the streets by the high
winds of West Texas. Merchants,
who atreed the project was

to stop downtown decay,
must be resourceful to keep their
businesses alive.
"Back alley sales" are held by
tome stores when street entrances-arclosed off by construction. One
store which- caters to a 'quality
trade" will erect a canopy over Its
.

-

alley entrance. . All are pushing
sales by telephone and home deliveries.
Sales continue good, partly be
cause of the curiosity which brings
tTioppers downtown to see huge
machines tear out old streetcar
tracks, rip up paving and sidewalks

UK Bureau
Lists Top

:

ge

Jt

OK

proved by city voters.
Not all downtown property owners wanted the revitallzatlon program. Some said slipping down
town real estate values entitled
them to lower taxes.
"The city can't afford to lose
that tax revenue," City Manager
Henry B. Nabers said. "More important, the real answer U to do
what's needed to get downtown
teal estate values back up. A city
as a whole can be no better than
its downtown section."

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NO ADDED COST

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Phono

iM4HfcUr..

3-02-

35

265 Euclid Ave.
Next to Coliseum

Discount
Cash & Carry
15

1966 Harrodsburg Road

GRELL

880 East High Street

the unique Gerber Blade

.

D? CAQVES AHD SBCN7E.S
Snickersnee is a real innovation in delightful carving. Its
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then you serve the slices with the
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a LARGE Variety

'

Near Coo pen town

The University Bureau of School
Service has released its second annual report, ."Talent Versus Op-

portunity." The report lists 272 students, the top 10 per cent of the
1959 graduates of 74 Kentucky high
schools, who do not plan to go to

Open 8 to 8 Doily
Also Open Sunday

--

BROWN'S GROCERY

127 W. Main

Corner Oldham and
Columbia

Phone

34

10 Jr.

K2

Store Hours: 9 to 5 Dairy

.

The names of the students,
grades, percentile rank on college
qualification tests If. taken and
reason given for not going to college are also Incladed.
Each college in Kentucky, both
ttate and private, is listed, giving
pertinent information concerning

fsolar ships,

f

3i PAY

A Small Store With

1959 Grads

college.

i.

the air."

--

Hamburger

e

,

-

,

grants-in-ai-

d,

Summer Means Extray Laundry
Extra Laundoring. Means Becker!
' We Serve th e Un iversity'
Save 15

purpose for releas-U- :
The
the study is to inform qualified
h.;h school graduates of college
rejp available to them and to
coUeges of
high
tchuol graduates who wbh to attend college but are financially unable to do 60.
two-wa- y

in-lor-

top-ranki-

ng

9

work-fcj- ps

and loan funds.

m

Ml

.,VA.

CORNER LIME AND EUCLID

,n

j

year got his private flying license. Asked If he is ever
nervous in a plane, Al quipped, "Only when I'm In.
;

Curing 'Downtown Bliffht9fySuDtim
Is Very Hqird On 'Patient9'

,

On Carry Qut

--3

LAUNDERERS

Ui

DRY CLEANERS

* The Kentucky Kernel
X4red tt tb

Port Ofic

University of Kentucky
wcood
t Umtto, IwlocVr
of MtcIi 3, 1879.

el

Art

mttc

naJ

Dr. Wright Reviews 'Carmen5

mon.
during the mmm-- r
SIX DOLLARS A SUiOOL TKAR

PublitSrd

to Guignol circles, was a convincing CarKENNETH WRIGHT
Bict's venerable sorc to "Carmen'' men, visually as well as musically. James
glowed once more Wednesday evenfrrg ...King, Music Department member and
of the Opera Workshop this sumand filled the Guignol theatre with its
mer, was mightily'succcssful as Don Jose,
radiance as this summer's opera produchc,r tormented lover. Richard Merrill as
run.
tion began its four-daEscamillo, the toreador, and Patricia Her-rc- n
A joint production by the Guignol
as Micaela completed an able cast of
Theatre staff and the Music Department's
All the familiar songs Car-- ,
Opera Workshop, this year's offering is a principals.
men's "Habanera," Don Jose's "Flower
tribute to the collalxuation of many exSong" and that baritone's delight, the
perienced hands. Good ojnra must alsong received the expected
ways be good theater and the swift pacing "Toreador"
warm applause.
of Wallace Briggs' direction coupled with
The breezy English adaptation may
the colorful sets of Arch Rainey along
cause a few wrenched eyebrows for tradition-with the musical foreground "were imminded
opera lovers. But Carmen is
portant ingredients in this presentation.
still Carmen even if she docs snarl at one
First and foremost must come the musjoint "Shut up, and get out!" to her reic of "Carmen," the convulsions and strictreating gypsy friends. A few vocal in-years have
tures of these past eighty-fou- r
accuracies and blurred c hot us entries may
not dimmed the beauty of this imperishbe atrributcd to first night blues, and will
able score. Over 4000 original performcertainly disappear during the week.
by
ances, adaptations and
The only musical factor really niising
the carload, movie versions, musical comis that most successful catalytic agent in
edy versions, instrumental extracts and
this oj)cra the orthestra. Those ravishnumerous parodies only serve to enhance
ing woodwind solos, the soaring strings
the magic of the original.
and the blaring brasses in the martial
Its tunes have by now almost taken on scenes all defy substitution by any odicr
the mantle of folk music. But this music medium despite the devoted efforts of the
is more than just a parcel of Jiaunting
team oi Helen Dingus and
melodies. "Carmen" is essentially a story
Sallis.
Harrilyn
of character degeneration and the music
Numerous curtain calls testified to the
mirrors the plot with an uncanny sense success of a production whipjed together
of theatre another reason why "Carmen"
in six short weeks. There should have
is so often called the "greatest of all
been a last and final curtain call for a
operas."
man who unfortunately could not be
An effective chorus, and competent there to receive it a tidy, precise Frenchminor-rolsingers backed up the princiman named Georges Biet. After all these
pal characters. Lynne Smith, a newcomer
years it is still his show.
By

tb

wkly

co-direc-tor

Bob Anderson and Sxjtt How,
Editorial Assistant
Annk Fnx and Chrmta Finx-et- ,
Perm Ashley, Business Manager
Bill Nnsrnuc, Editorial Writer
Hank Chapman, Cartoonist
Fhotogropher
John Mitchell,
Co-Edit-

y

Steel And Free Men
The issue is basically one of power. The
An authorized history of the United
States Steel Corporation published several
handful of desperate men who fired on
ago asserted "the right of free men
yean
the strikebreakers at Homestead in 1892
to form unions of their own choosing for have been replaced by organizations
the purpose of collective bargaining."
in authority with the great
Nothing in the current steel strike, we parable
In this particular instance the
may presume, has changed that position.
evidence is that the steel companies have
The steel companies have rejected the
proposals of the United Steclworkers of concluded that the union steelworkers of
America have too much" power or are
America, but they have not questioned
the right of the steelworkers to combine asking too much power. The companies
are accordingly not so much refusing
and to make proposals.
If we look back over the history of monetary benefits as they are moving to
curtail this power.
the steef industry since the United States
Our Russian contemporaries will make
Steel Corporation's organization