xt79kd1qjf8r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79kd1qjf8r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680401  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1968 1968 2015 true xt79kd1qjf8r section xt79kd1qjf8r ISC

K EMUEL

HTHJCKY

The South's Outstanding College Daily
Monday Evening, April

1,

19f8

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LIX, No. 12fi

Johnson Will Not Be A Candidate,
Political Situation Is Scrambled
By MERRIMAN SMITH
UPI White House Reporter

WASHINGTON (UPI)-Presid- ent
cision not to run for
Vice President Hubert
of White House contenders
The Chief Executive s bomb- shell announcement Sunday
night, coupled with his order
to halt immediately
all but
limited bombing of North Vietnam, lent an unprecedented authority to what he termed "this
new step toward peace."
Turning aside from personal

k
VJ

Y...:

.

Mr.
ambition, the
Johnson told an impromptu news

W

VTT
President Johnson sat with head bowed at a
prayer breakfast in Washington earlier in the
year. He prayed then for strength of purpose
at a time "when we are tempted to turn from
the tasks of duty and lay down the work that is

ours to do." The President seemed certain to gain

the Democratic presidential nomination, but Sunday night he vowed he would not accept a second
full term and called his decision "irrevocable."
UPI Telephoto

conference after his
radio and television address: "I
would hope that by what I did
tonight, we can concentrate more
of our energies on trying to bring
about peace in the world and
that we would have a better
chance to do it."
The initial reaction to his
decision not to run, both at home
and abroad, was stunned disbelief. Several prominent Democrats
spoke of organizing a draft.
"There is no one else" who can

Johnson's "irrevocable"
second-in-comman-

ir nnmininn

A&S Endorses
By ELAINE STUART

cautious first step has been
taken toward some kind of pass-faA

il

system for UK.
efThe climax of a year-lon- g
fort by the Arts and Sciences

than

Bulletin
PARIS

Minh would agree to open
peace talks.
The officials said Hanoi
may answer the President's
overture as early as Tuesday.
Speculation swept Paris today that the French capital
might become the seat of even-

Faculty Council to draw up a

il
program came last week
when the group voted approval
of a specific proposal.
Under the plan, a maximum
of four pass-fa- il
courses could

pass-fa-

Snowballing Rumor Says
Oswald Will Quit Tuesday
and
the
By DICK KIMMINS
A rumor that President

local Lexrumor Friday
John ington newspapers mentioned it

VV. Oswald would
resign revived
last weekend began circulating
two months ago. Officials in the
University administration said in
late January that if "Dr. Oswald
doesn't resign in the February
board meeting, then he will in
the April meeting."
The prediction came immediately after a student protest demonstration against Defense Intelligence Agency recruiters here.
President Oswald was criticized
for allowing antiwar protests,
though the administration later
barred sit-i- n demonstrations.
When the February Board of
Trustees meeting passed and Dr.
Oswald did not resign, the rumor subsided and did not reappear
until Dr. John Summerskill, president of San Francisco State College in California, resigned under pressure from politicians and
.
SF State regents.
It was rumored in March tiat
Dr. Oswald would take Dr.
job.
By Friday, the rumor of Dr.
Oswald's resignation were widespread. Contacted by the Kernel
Friday morning, four separate
administrators identified Dr. Lyman Cinder as the chosen interim
president, and felt it was "pretty
definite" that Dr. Oswald would
resign Tuesday in the poard meeting.
A local radio station aired
Sum-merskil-

tual peace negotiations, because the key llano! diplomatic mission in the west
is headquartered here.
But the North Vietnamese
representative in Peking said
today in an unofficial statement Hanoi would not agree
to peace talks "because American aggression in Vietnam
continues' Japanese correspondents reported from Pe-

40

Sen.

Tass-Faf- l'

in Saturday editions.
The rumor comes in the wake
of a Rational Council meeting
of Students for a Democratic
Society meeting here last weekend. Strong criticism was aimed
at the University administration
for permitting the council tomeet
on campus.
University officials reasoned
that the increasingly conservative
mood in the state was a prime
factor in influencing Dr. Oswald's alleged decision to leave
UKrThe recent session of the
Ceneral Assembly, for example,
gave birth to an investigative
committee to look Into
activities in Kentucky.
It was felt by some administrators that the creation of the
was directly
new committee
aimed at the University in reaction to protests on campus in
February and a series of antiwar
meetings here.
Some department heads reacted with strong criticism when
informed of Dr. Oswald's reportedly impending resignation. "I
came here because of Dr. Oswald's reputation as an outstanding educator," said one department head on campus. "If he
leaves, then I will follow."
"You tlon't have to put up
with what Dr. Oswald has,"
said another faculty member. "I
Continued on Page 7, CoL 1

(D-Ark-

nt

.i'l

L:i

J

t

king.
his own chances for the White
House.
The Chief Executive's eyes
were
and his voice
appeared to break as he told
the nation and the world of his
decision to step down at the
end of his current term.
He recalled the day 52 months
ago when he assumed the presidency upon the assassination of
Continued on Page 2, Col. 1

r,

V.

.

'hZTx

r

y,;tsw

course."
He said there would be no
"pass with honors" grade in the
program, and termed as a "hoax"
those pass-fasystems that nuke

Viet-

(UPI)-No- rth

nam is carefully studying President Johnson's latest peace
offer, North Vietnamese officials in Paris said today.
They refused to predict
whether President Ho Chi

a friend for more

years.
J. William Fulbright
.)
an outspoken critic of
the President's Vietnam policies,
termed Mr. Johnson "a great
be taken by upperclassmen only. patriot." He said he thought
Crades in the four courses would the bombing halt and the Presnot affect grade-poistanding. ident's decision not to run were
the proposal has "hopeful gestures" toward peace.
Although
been approved by Arts and Sci- Other Vietnam "doves" exences, it still must be sanctioned pressed similar sentiments.
But politics takes no breathby other groups.
er, and on the heels of their
"It will go to the Undergrad- expressions of astonishment and
uate Council, and possibly the tribute, the various presidential
Craduate Council also will con- contenders immediately turned
sider it; then it will go to the to assessments of their own
University Senate for final conchances now that Mr. Johnson
sideration," explained Dr. Wil- had acted to remove himself from
liam K. Plunknett, professor of contention.
chemistry and chairman of the
Former Vice President Richard
Arts and Sciences Council.
M. Nixon, the odds-o- n
favorite
Dr. Plunknett said he is op- in the Republican presidential
timistic about the ultimate suc- race, predicted that "someone
cess of the proposal.
espousing the Johnson philoso- If the University Senate apsystem, it
proves the pass-fa- il
could be in University wide effect by "possibly next fall, although it may not be until
spring," Dr. Plucknett said.
He termed the proposal "a
cautious start," but said its scope
might be expanded if an initial
1
pass-fa- il
program were successful.
If
Pass-fai- l,
in terms of the present recommendation,
could be
elected only for nonrequired
courses and in areas outside the
upperclassman's major.
'
Dr. Plunknett said such a
plan "should encourage students
to sample in areas where they
;doubt their confidence, but still
be interested in taking the
may

pcJ,iv

K

country," thought that the President's decision had enhanced

Pat-ma-

On A Limited Basis At First

i

place,
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy,
while praising Mr. Johnson as
a man "who has given so many
years of public service to his

handle the job of being Presin
dent," declared Rep. Wright
(D-Tex- .),

de-

d
today catapulted his
H. Humphrey into the forefront
phy would seek the Democrat.

i

.

tori ....r
..
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il

use of three or even four grades.
In other Arts and Sciences Faculty Council business, the English Department recommended
that students. who earned B or
alwve in advanced freshman corn-posion (English 105) be exempted from taking a second
composition course.
it

Final Confrontation
Friendly cries of "peace" were the only reactions from SDS members
herefrom across the nation as two UK Rangers walked through the
Student Center Grille Sunday afternoon after returning from maneuvers. The SDS National Council had just closed its four-da- y
meeting at UK and delegates were relaxing in the grill, talking
tilings over and waiting to begin their long trips home. (Story on
Page3.)

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

IStonday, April 1,

19G8- -3

SDS Council Ends 'Peaceful' Stay

ic

By DAIUIELL RICE
The Students for a DemocratSociety (SDS) National Coun-

cil meeting at UK closed down
Sunday afternoon after a more
or less uneventful four days here.
The University's fears of possible disorder, which prompted
a closed meeting and barring of

Ncivs Analysis
the press, proved unfounded. No
outside groups showed up to
disrupt the council, and the only
outward reaction from
UK-stud- ents

was curious gawking.

?

The press ban, which the University had hoped wouldnotonly
reduce the chances fordisruption
but also protect its image from
conservative elements in the state,
seems largely to have backfired.
Members of Lexington commercial media succeeded in entering the National Council meeting in spite of the press ban,
and other media, such as the
Kernel, managed to get around
the ban "legally" by talking to
council participants outside the
meeting locations.
What resulted, then, was that
the meeting was probably publicized just as much as if there

TODAY and
TOMORROW

JL

Announcements for Unlrerslty group
will be pabllihed twice once the Amy
before the event and once the afternoon of the event. The deadline It 11
a.m. the day prior to the first publication.

Today
Final tryouts for UK cheerleaders
will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday at Memorial Coliseum.
The Lexington Singers will perform
at 8:13 p.m. at Memorial Hall. Admission is free.
A film on birth sponsored by Alpha
Sigma Delta,
honorary,
win be shown at 7:30 p.m. at Student
Center Theater. A discussion led by
Dr. John Green Jr., chairman of the
Department of Obstetrics, will follow
for women at the Medical Center.

Tomorrow
Eta Sinma Phi. national classical
hmnuuui's honorary, will meet and
elect oiucers at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
"The noor," Ulysses Kay's Opera,
will be presented by UK Opera The-;it- ir
as purt of Festival of the Arts
;it 8:15 p.m. at Memorial Hall.
The Poetry Guild will meet at 7:30
p.m. in 119 Student Center.
A film on birth will be shown at
7:30 p.m. at Student Center Theater.
A discussion led by Dr. John Greene
Jr.. chairman of the Department of
Obstetrics, will foiiow at the Medical Center for men.

9
lor the
academic year
should be made by April 5 in Room
109, Kinkead Hall.
Registration for fall semester Is now
taking place. See your adviser.
Information and applications for
summer projects, study and travel
abroad and in America are availab.e
in 2C4 Student Center.
College of Business and Economics
students are invited to hear Joseph
Kirkham of the Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service address the
YMCA Executive Roundtable at noon
Thursday.
Prizes of $50 each will be awarded
to the best poem or prose piere published s;nce April 1967 by a UK student. Entries must be submitted by
April 15 to English Department Committee. McVey Hall.
Pelow are the job interviews scheduled ior Wednesday.
Contact the
Placement Service, second floor of
the Old Agriculture Bidg. for further information.
e
Co.
Summer
employment for Junior Chem., Mech.,
and Ind. E. students. Opening in
Indiana.
Faultless Caster Co. Bus. Adm.,

curs

1968-6-

had been no ban. And the

country. More fundamental
change is required."
He said SDS decided in the
council meeting to join in a
lawsuit against the draft.
The lawsuit will challenge the
issue of an individual's right to
"selective" conscientious objector status. The immediate case is
the war in Vietnam.
McCarthy said a person should
be able to object to specific wars
"on moral and political grounds,"
and not just to wars in general.
The group does not necessarily
expect to win the case, although
it feels its cause is right, he said.
While the case is pending,
he said, the SDS can file an
injunction against draft boards
who try to induct people wantstating to file for selective C-us.
This delay is valuable, McCarthy said, because it means
that people in the movement who
would otherwise be drafted can
spend additional time working
on draft resistance and so on.
A resolution on the "black
liberation movement", was also
passed which said SDS should
take the responsibility of making
visible the underlying reasons
and actions of the "black move-

Uni-

versity was made somewhat suspect because it had tried to impose on press coverage.
This seems to have resulted
in more adverse publicity than
might have been expected with
no ban at all.
And the SDS National Council itself how did it fare?
Tim McCarthy, SDS assistant
national secretary, described the
council as "not especially exciting, but remarkable for the
number of people and for the
similarity of feelings about the

group's direction."
By the end of the council
meeting, more than 400 people
had registered. Many of these
came from across the nation
from California to .New York.

view of the black movement presented by the national news
media.
An amendment to the resolution said SDS sliould join with
the black movement to make
it more broadly based.
The issue that produced the
most division among SDS members was what course the group
should follow during the election
campaign. A few suggested work-

ing within the established political channels and expressed support for candidates such as Sen.

Robert Kennedy and Sen. Eugene
McCarthy. Others wanted to work
within the Peace and Freedom
party and similar organizations.
Many expressed the view that
liberals such as Sen. Krnnedy
and Sen. McCarthy were capitalizing on the efforts of radical
groups to further their own aims
but without getting to the core
of what SDS feels should be
changed within American society.
No real consensus could be
reached, however, and all resolutions on the election campaign
were tabled.
The council ended peaceably.
The UK campus gained little
new exposure due to the essentially closed meeting other than some
diversion.

O

McCarthy said Sunday afternoon that discussion and resolutions on the draft provided the
council's main issue.
The main resolution on the
draft adopted by the group, he
said, encouraged SDS chapters
to organize around the issue of
the draft on campuses and to use
it as a tool to reach other issues.

"The war and the draft both
point to basic traditions in our
society," McCarthy said. "These
aren't mistakes but logical extensions of the direction of this

ment."
McCarthy said the action
would counter an "anarchistic"

s"

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Registration is taking place for
soror.ty open rush in noo.n 3ol Administration B.dg. until April 19.
Chrt Foti.'ht'f, coordinator of student
cnip.uyinciit, is accepting applications tor
tun- - and part-tim- e
in Room
empioy.tit-n- t
10, Ailmitustr.it. on lililg.
Suzuki Art d.sp.ay will be showing
n ihe S.utient Center Art Gai.ery
:rom 11 a. .1. to 7 p.m. until Apr.. 111.

9
Kernel
Applications for the
are available in Koom
and Koom 109 Journalism Bldg.
Deadline is April 1.
Advance
application for student
parking permits and registration of
1968-6-

editor-in-chi-

113--

Bookstall

5:00 European Review
5:15 Sports Burt Mahone

5:30 It Happened Today Bob Cooke,
Rick Kincaid, Mark Withers
6:00 Evening Concert
7:00 About Science
7:30

Search for Mental Health

7:55 News
8:00 Viewpoint
9:00 Masterworks Bob Cooke
12:00 News Sign off
TUESDAY
12:00 Music 200 Sign on
1:00 Hodgepodge
Lynn Harmon
1:55 News
2:00 Afternoon Concert Bob Cooke

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- TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Monday, April I, 1068

Politicians Iieacl Willi Confusion
--

Johnson Will Not Seek A Second Full Term
Continued From Tage

1

John F. Kennedy, and he quoted
from the late President's Inaugural address that "this generation of Americans is willing to
pay any price, bear any burden,
meet any hardship, support any

friend, oppose any foe, to assure
the survival and the success of

liberty."
"We have kept that compact,"

Mr. Johnson said, tears welling
in his eyes. "I shall continue to
keep it, whatever the trials and
tests ahead. The strength of this
country will lie . . . in the unity

of our people."
The President's decision was
a well kept secret from all but
his most intimate associates. Significantly, the only cabinet member standing by in Mr. Johnson's
White House office during the

speech was Defense Secretary
Clark M. Clifford, a friend and
adviser since the President's congressional days.
Mr. Johnson informed Mr.
Humphrey of his decision not to
run during a brief visit to the
Vice President's apartment shortly before the vice president's departure for Mexico City early
Sunday. Later Mr. Humphrey
said it was no surprise to him.
There seemed little doubt
that, if Mr. Johnson chose to
play the role of kingmaker at
August's Democratic national
convention, it would be Mr. Humphrey who would receive his
blessing and considerable support.
Ever since that day in 1960
when John F. Kennedy decided
to ask Mr. Johnson to be his
running mate over the objections
of his brother, Robert, relations
between the two strong-wille- d
men has been civil at best.
in- - the years of John Kennedy's presidency, the bad blood
between Robert Kennedy and Mr.
Johnson grew, in 1964, President
Johnson ruled out his entire cabinet, including Atty. Gen. Robert
Kennedy, as possible vice presi- -

dential running mates. Many
thought the action was directed

solely at Mr. Kennedy.
Mr. Johnson's family was with
him in the oval room office as he
delivered his address. Their eyes
were fixed on him during the
speech, anticipating the announcement they knew was coming. Only at the end did they
smile for him.
The President's historic statement was not included in the
prepared text of the speech distributed to newsmen about 90
minutes before he went on the
air. But White House Press Secretary George Christian, in the
understatement of the year, said
Mr. Johnson might have an additional announcement.
"I have concluded that I
should not permit the presidency
to become involved in the partisan divisions that are developing in this political year," Mr.

At Funeral Service
said slowly and emphatically. He wiped at his eyes
and his forehead.
"With America's sons in the
field far away, with America's
future under challenge here at
home, with our hopes and the
world's hopes for peace in the
balance every day, I do not believe that I should devote an
hour of my time to any personal
partisan causes or to any duties
other than the awesome duties
of this office.
Accordingly, I shall not seek
Johnson

APPLICATIONS
FOR STUDENT GOVERNMENT

5

Elections will be held April 10

For a delightful, relaxing, carefree weekend, a
pleasant evening, or when parents and guests
come to Lexington, visit the Imperial House,
Lexington's most elegant motel where gourmet
foods, wines, and fine service prevail. Entertainment and dancing nightly for your pleasure. Our
rooms ore spacious, elegantly appointed and
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ready to seek an honorable peace

and ready to defend an honored

cause, whatever the price, whatever the burden, whatever the
sacrifices duty may require."
With a final "Good night and
God bless all of you," the Chief
Executive concluded his speech.
The clock on the wall of the oval
room read 9:41 p.m. (EST).
Mrs. Johnson rushed to his
side and threw her arms around
him as he rose from his chair
behind the huge mahogany desk.
Lynda, who had returned to the
White House only hours before
after seeing her husband off to
Vietnam, followed with a hug
and a kiss. So did Luci.
Luci's husband, Airman l.C.
Patrick J. Nugent, who is expected to go to Vietnam himself
soon, strode up to shake hands
with the President.
Mr. Johnson smiled broadly,
comforted by the warmth of his
family. Linking arms they walked
out of the office to the second
floor White House family quarters.
Outside, along the Pennsylvania Avenue side of the White
House nearly 250 persons gathered, many of them wearing
McCarthy buttons. Three were
arrested for disorderly conduct
when they refused to move across
the street to Lafayette Park.
"Thanks LBJ" read the signs
carried by several young men.
"This is the first decent decision Johnson has made," another
sign read. There were noisy arguments between
n
and
factions. But
others in the crowd merely stood
there, their eyes fixed on the
brightly lit executive mansion,
as if being there put them that
much closer to history.
The President did not put
any time limit on his partial
bombing halt.
"Tonight I have offered the
first in what I hope will be a
series of mutual moves toward
peace," the President said, and
he outlined these further steps:
Plans to send an additional
13,500 troops to Vietnam in the
next five months.
anti-Johnso-

will be available in SG office

if

At New York
and will not accept the nomination of my party for another term
as your President," he said.
"Let men everywhere, however, know that strong, confident, vigilant America stands

pro-Johns-

GENERAL ELECTION

March 27 until April

A callup of reserve units to
produce some of the additional
new manpower.
A request to Congress for
$5.1 billion in addition to sums
already appropriated or requested
to pay for armaments. Of that
sum, $2.5 billion would be for
the current fiscal year and $2.6
billion for the fiscal year that

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Americans

generally

agreed

"it was Lyndon Johnson's finest

hour."

Backers of the President, like

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252-172-

2

an-

nouncement "the greatest shock
I've ever had in politics. This
is like a Pearl Harbor in poli-

tics."
When Texas Cov. John Con-nall- y
was handed a note telling
him of President Johnson's announcement, one of the governor's aides concluded from the
look on his face there must have
been a death in the family.
Richard M. Nixon, the only
Presidential
major Republican
candidate, said he had not expected President Johnson to withdraw. He predicted that Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
or "someone espousing the Johnson Philosophy" would seek the
Democratic nomination in the
President's place.
Vice President
Humphrey,
reached by newsmen in Mexico
City, saidthePresident'sdecision
was "a sad moment for me."
But he said President Johnson's
speech will "serve a great cause,

the cause of peace."

At White House
Rep. Spark M. Matsunaga,
felt President Johnson
in announcing he would not seek

had made "the

ulti-

mate sacrifice for world peace."
Critics of President Johnson's
Vietnam policy, like Sen. J. William Fulbright,
viewed
the President's decision as "an
act of a very great patriot."
The overwhelming congressional reaction to the President's
surprise announcement was summed up by Sen. Jacob K. Javits
(R--

Y.).

"In such a

grav e hour of war

and national doubt, the President
has lifted the presidency to its
proper place far away from politics."
Sen. Frank Church
like Sen. Javits a critic of President Johnson's policies in Vietnam, said: "it was Lyndon Johnson's finest liour.
"Every American tonight
should honor the President of
the United States," Sen. Church
said. "He is taking those steps
best suited to bring an end to
the war in Vietnam, and he is
making the supreme political sacrifice to further strengthen his
search for peace."
President Johnson, whose penchant for keeping his plans secret
is well known, was 100 percent
successful concerning his decision not to run for another term.
"I couldn't have been more
surprised if I had read my own
death notice," said Sen. Phillip
Hart
Rep. Wright Patman (D- -

NEW MANAGEMENT!

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starts July 1.
A call to Britain and the
Soviet Union, as cochairmen of
the 1954 Geneva Conference,
"to do all they can to move
from the unilateral act of
I have just announced
toward genuine peace in Southeast Asia."
The designation of veteran
U. S. diplomat W. Averell Harri-matodiscuss the means of bringing this war to an end."

Texas) a close friend of Presi-

dent Johnson's, termed the

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Room 201

Placement Service
Old Agriculture Bldg.
April 3 and 4
4:00 sharp.

Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy's
youthful volunteers reacted yesterday as though they had driven
President Johnson from the White
House, but the Minnesota Democrat said any such conclusion
would be unfair.
Sen. McCarthy also believed
that Vice President Hubert H.
Humphrey, who has supported
President Johnson's war policies,
would become a candidate.
Sen. McCarthy, now the only

announced Democratic

conten-

der in Tuesday's Wisconsin Democratic Presidential Primary, said
the New Hampshire Primary and
Wisconsin campaign showed that
the "spirit of America is changing", and that this change was
sensed by the President and by
news media.
But he added he thought it
would be "an unfair judgment"
to conclude that President Johnson withdrawal from the race
Sunday night, was based on the
probability Sen. McCarthy would
defeat him in Wisconsin's
Sen. McCarthy, after his initial shock when he learned at
Carroll College in nearby Waukesha that President Johnson had
removed himself from the race,
showed little outward emotion.
But he did say he got a "double satisfaction" from the announcement. He explained that
it not only removed the chief
obstacle in his campaign, but
indicated his criticism of President Johnson's Vietnam policy
was gaining support.
Sen. McCarthy's assessment
of the dramatic turn of events
came at a late night news conference in theSheraton-Schroede- r
Hotel, where that afternoon
15,000 persons had turned out for
a reception for Richard Nixon,
the Republican front runner.
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy,
buoyed by Lyndon Johnson's
withdrawal, plotted fresh campaign strategy deep into the early
morning Today with the brain
trust that charted President John
F. Kennedy's route to the White
House.

The Kentucky

Kernel

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since 1819.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

1, 19G8- -5

Hill Carries 'Ominous Implications'

'Subversives Committee9 Under Fire By AA UP

RICHMOND

(Ar)-T-

Commit-

tee on
Activities
came under fire Saturday by an
organization of college professors
meeting at Eastern Kentucky
University.
A resolution expressing concern "with recent developments
in the state which imply limitation of full freedom of expression and association" on campuses was passed by about 100
members of the Kentucky con- -

CLASSIFIED
T

eUaalfleJ

m

place

UK

pfcene

extension tSlt r tUp In t ike
111 Jearnsllssn, tram
ta Been,
1 te &, Manila r
Friday.
Rates are fl.tstkra(h wards. $3 Ur
far
three eensecaUve Insertleas ef tame
a er $3.79 er week. Deadline la 11
a.m. day prler ta abUcatlen.
Ne advertisement may cite race, religion er natlenal ertfla as a
far renting ream er far

f

en

qaali-fleatl-

FOR BALK
FOR SALE
Golf clubs, brand new,
still in plastic covers. Sell for half.

Phone

of the American Association of University Professors.
Dr. William Plucknett, the
new president of the group, said,
ference

new-

he

authorized Kentucky

ly

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1958
ATTENTION
FRATERNITIES
Cadillac ambulance.
all power, good condition, good tires.
MOO. Call
27Ftf

Solid state transistor car
radio. Built-i- n speaker.
positive or negative ground. Ideal for
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134 High St.. Versailles. Ky.
26M5t
FOR SALE 8' x 46' Star mobile home.
Excellent condition. $1500. Call
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"this bill carries ominous

im-

plications that we must watch
carefully."
Legislation creating the committee

AAUP committee into allegations that three faculty members at Kentucky VVeslcyan were
dismissed "at a very late date
and witliout cause." The three
were senior faculty members but
did not have tenure.

Also on Saturday Illinois Gov.
Otto Kcrner commended
for obtaining a stateKen-tuckia-

wide open housing law, some-

thing he has been unable to accomplish in Illinois during two

terms.

Mr. Kcrner headed the President's Advisory Commission on
Civil Disorders, and he told a
of Kentucky law
University
school audience that an open
liousing law "is psychologically
very important."

to look into subversive

activities was passed by the General Assembly earlier this year,
but Cov. Louie B. Nunn has
not yet appointed any members
to the group.
Some opposition to the AAUP
resolution was offered during the
meeting, but a move to revise
it was defeated.
Dr. Plucknett, speaking in favor of the resolution, called it
a matter of principle. He also
pointed to the pressures being
brought to bear on University of

The E(entucky Review
UK's ONLY LITERARY MAGAZINE

IS NOW

ACCEPTING CONTRIBUTIONS FOR
THE SEPTEMBER 1968 ISSUE

SHORT STORIES

Kentucky President John VV. Oswald to cancel a scheduled speaking appearance at UK by Communist Herbert Aptheker.
Dr. Plucknett predicted that
a showdown may come soon.
Gov. Nunn, who addressed the
professors at a luncheon, declined to comment on the subversives committee, but said he
would express his opinions to the
UK Board of Trustees of which
he is a member.
In another action, the group
ordered an investigation by an

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Critical or Scholarly Articles or Translations from

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26

416

Bradley Hall

4.

26MSt

Pontiac 1960 Bonneville
Convertible. Burgundy with white
top. Radio, heater, white wall tires.
Excellent condition.