xt79kd1qjn9n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79kd1qjn9n/data/mets.xml West Virginia Works Progress Administration. Division of Women's and Professional Projects. 1938 Historical Records Survey (U.S.) United States. Works Progress Administration. Division of Women's and Professional Projects.1938  249 p.; 28 cm..UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program libraries. Call Number Y 3.W 89/2:43 W 52v/2 books English Charleston, W. Va. : Historical records survey This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed in accordance with U. S. copyright laws. West Virginia Works Progress Administration Publications County government - West Virginia West Virginia County Formations and Boundary Changes text West Virginia County Formations and Boundary Changes 1938 1938 2019 true xt79kd1qjn9n section xt79kd1qjn9n I ~;E:E:§::;{E:::""xiii/Z ‘1 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY '
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3-5 ,'- . 1 ;

 WEST VIRGINIA 1
. COUNTY FORMATIONS AND BOUNDARY CHANGES
1 Prepared by ‘
- The Historical Records Survey
Division of Women's and Professional Projects
Works Progress Administration
Charleston, West Virginia
The Historical Records Survey
December, 1958

 ' 'I
5
5
l
The Historical Records Survey 1
_ c
- Luther H. Evans, National Director 3
Eva Margaret Carnes, State Director 5 l
1 I
1
Division of Women's and Professional Projects
1
V
Ellen S. Woodward, Assistant Administrator E
Florence H. Wilkinson, State Director n
C
a
i
d
WORKS PROGRESS ADEINISTRATION f
5
. S
Harry L. Hopkins, Administrator R
= Joseph N. Alderson, State Administrator r
C
a
t
i
C
D

 PREFACE

I

The Historical Records Survey, as a part of a nation—wide
undertaking, was initiated in West Virginia April 17, 1956.
Operating as a part of the Works Progress Administration and
under the national direction of Dr. Luther H. Evans, the West
Virginia project came into existence under the immediate super-
vision of the Federal Writer's Project, of which Mr. L. W.
Burns was then state director. In November 1956, the Survey
became an independent part of Federal Project No. l, and Mrs.
Eva Margaret Carnes, formerly assistant state director of the
Federal Writer's Project became the state director of the Survey.

Although the principal objective of the Survey is the
compilation of inventories of county, state, and other local
records, the research necessary for these publications has

\ produced much interesting material. The West Virgini§_County

I Formations and Boundary Changes here presented grew out of the
research for county changes so essential in the preparation
and understanding of county records.

Because West Virginia existed for many years as a part of
the State of Virginia it has been necessary to include in this
volume the acts forming many counties which did not become a
part of the new state when West Virginia was created in 1865.
These counties have been included in the alphabetical arrange-
ment of counties and are followed by the word ”Virginia.”
Counties are arranged alphabetically, each county showing the
act creating it and all acts which added to its territory.

The opening paragraph of cross referencing will lead the reader
directly to the counties which contributed territory toward the
formation of this county.

I Research for this volume was done by Lawrence Gresham,
Survey worker, under the direct supervision of Hebert W.
Richardson, Survey attorney, and the compilation and cross
referencing is largely the work of the state director.

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance given us by Dr.
Clifford L. Lord of Columbia University in checking the materi-
al included in this volume and his kind cooperation throughout
the work.

State ireotor
The Historical Records Survey

3
Charleston, West Virginia
December 20, 1958

 Blank Page(s)

 -1-
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I Page
Introduction ................................,....r....... 5
Abbreviations and Explanatory Notes ...................... 8
Acts Creating Counties and County Boundary Changes .

Alleghaney County (Virginia) ......................... 10

Augusta County (Virginia) ..............¢............. 15

Barbour County ..................,.................... 15

Bath County (Virginia) ............................... '19

I Berkeley County ....................................,. 21
Boone County Iboqonlt’tnuogotooall0000lnvbviaoiliiliio 25
Botetourt County (Virginia) .......................... 26

Braxton County ....................................... 26

Brooke County ........................................ 50

I Cabell County .......,................................ 51
I Calhoun County ....................................... 55
Clay County .......................................... 57

Craig County (Virginia) .............................. 59
Doddridge County ..................................... 40

Fayette County .......(............................... 44
Fincastle County (Virginia) .......................... 47
Frederick County (Virginia) 48

Giles County (Virginia) 49

Gilmer County .....................................;;. 52

Grant County ......................................... 54
Greenbrier County ..............................;;.... 55
Hampshire County ..................................... 62

Hancock County ....................................... 65

Hardy County ......................................... 70

Harrison County ...................................... 72

Highland County (Virginia) ........................... 75

I Jackson County ....................................... 79
Jefferson County ..................................... 81

Kanawha County ....................................... 85

. Lewis County ......................................... 90
Lincoln County ....................................... 95

Logan County ......................................... 101

Marion County ........................................ 104
Marshall County ...................................... 107

Mason County ......................................... llO
McDowell County ...................................... 112

Mercer County ........................................ 116

Mineral County ....................................... 119

Mingo County ........................................; 122
Monongalia County .................................... 125

Monroe County ........................................ 150
Montgomery County (Virginia) ......................... 154

I Morgan County ........................................ 157
Nicholas County ...................................... 159

Ohio County .......................................... 142

 -2-
'Table of Contents
3 ’ Page
3; Pendleton County 142 )
” Pleasants County ..................................... 144
Pocahontas County .................................... 146 t
Preston County ....................................... 148 f
Putnam County ........................................ 152 f
‘ Randolph County ...................................... 157 n
Raleigh County ....................................... 160 a
E Ritchie County ....................................... 165
Roane County ......................................... 169
Rockingham County (Virginia) ......................... 174 m
smers County unto-cucqnuoo-auuunaco-iov-Ivoq-no-nouo 175 a
Taylor County ........................................ 177 w
Tazewell County (Virginia) ........................... 181 m
Tucker County ........................................ 182 p
Tyler County ......................................... 186
Upshur County ........................................ 189
1 Wayne County ..................................;...... 19l ; t
3 “labs-her County cant-'IUOOODIIIIODIItoitl'lalaocuvavaul 195 g
3 Wetzel County ........................................ 201
; Wirt County .......................................... 205
1 Wood County .......................................... 210 n
wyoming County ;...................................... 212 b
c
1 Addenda IIIUIll‘..l.......ll'I’DOIQIIIIOD‘IICDIIOCCOII'OI. 216 t
E a
3 Bibliography 218 W!
s
Topical Index ............................................ 225 w
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 v_5_
INTRODUCTION
1

County formation in Virginia seems to have grown from cus—
tom rather than from laws and the method of creating new counties
from the demands of the residents of the sections rather than
from governmental agencies. As early as 1654 Virginia found it
necessary to divide her territory into eight counties, or shires,
as they were sometimes called.1

In 1655 the general assembly gave an order to three com—
missicners of Nansemund and Isle of Wight counties to meet and
attempt to agree on the boundaries of the two counties.2 This
would indicate that at an early date the government was leaving
many of the matters of county formation and boundaries to the
people and the courts of the county.

While no acts are available which point to a definite sys~

5 tem of county organization a number do give an insight into the
growth of the custom which.became a law.

Hening, in a footnote to an act passed Feb. 1645, says:
“This is the first time that the county of Northumberland has
been mentioned in any of the acts. It would seem from this
circumstance that the power of forming new counties was at that
time vested in the governor and council”.U In 1660 the assembly
again gave their attention to the counties and passed an act
which read in part: ”That for the prevention of the frequent
suits and differences betweene county and county and parrish
and parrish (sic) all counties and parrishes within this country
shall within two years att furthest from the date hereof be
limited within certaine naturall bounds and precincts (if they
may be had) either by consent of the inhabitants or the judg—
ments of the quarter courts, and where naturall bounds are
wanting to supply that defect by marked trees which are to be
viewed and renewed every three yeares by the nearest bordering
inhabitants of each county and parrish in Easter weeke” 4 Five
years later we find an act ”Whereas there is a law that binds
us to the bounding of our lands, Be it enacted by this grand as—
sembly and the authority thereof that the game law be in force
to the bounding of parishes and counties”.

As the frontier moved westward and the demand for more
localized seats of government grew the assembly turned its
attention to the border counties. In 1705 we find the assembly
1. 1 Hening, p. 224, Act of 1654.

2. P. A. Bruce, Institutional History 2E gigginia in the 17th
ngtiry, vol. 2, p. 295. New York, 1910.

5. 1 Hening, p. 294.

4. Ibid;, vol. 2, p. 18, Act III.

5. Ibid., p. 218.

 1 _4:_
Introduction
1 passing an act for the encouragement of the land frontiers.
f This act in its entirety is as follows:1 I
1. "Whereas the counties on the land frontiers in this

‘ colony, are exposed to many dangers, from the in—

3 cursions of Indian enemies, whereby the trouble and

1 charge of the inhabitants of those counties are far

greater than others of the inland parts of the
country; and whereas the augmenting and enlarging
the said frontier counties will very much add to
their strength and safety, by increasing their
militia, and thereby render the duty they are often
obliged unto, less burthensome to the inhabitants

in general: Therefore, as an encouragement to the
aforesaid frontier plantations.

‘ 11. ”Be it enacted, by the governor, council, and bur~

gesses, of this present general assembly, and it is ,
‘ hereby enacted, by the authority of the same, That '

no county on the land frontiers, shall hereafter be

divided, unless there shall be left in the upper

1 county, at least eight hundred tithable persons;

, and unless the whole county, as it stood before the

' division, be obliged equally to contribute to the
' building a decent church, court—house, and prison,
" in such frontier county, after the form and manner “

1 ,2 now generally used within this colony.

111. ”Provided always, That if the upper inhabitants of
' any county, shall seek the division of themselves,
‘ they shall not then be intituled to any privilege,
by virtue of this act."

1 ‘It became the custom for petitions to be presented, either

1 to the governor and his council or to the assembly, by resi-

‘ dents of the section desiring the formation of a new county.

. The petition, when accepted, gave rise to a bill which was
passed by the assembly, the act creating the county setting up
definite boundary lines, naming the county, and usually naming

' the location for the county seat. Most frequent demands came
from the fact that original counties were so large that some
inhabitants found it impossible to reach the county 'seat. As

' the frontier people seem to have used the courts to settle the
smallest personal disputes, court attendance was an important
part of their life. ,

Although Virginia wrote a constitution in 1776 that
document ignores the formation of counties and the customary
petitions continued to establish counties. That the mother
_n_._______l_.__.l________._________l___n____nn___n_~.nl__l.__.__

i l. ~lbidu vol. 5, ch. 17, p. 284.

1

l

1

l .

 -5-
Introduction
county did not always approve of the separation was evidenced
5 in the petitions and counter petitions which were presented
by the residents of Greenbrier county both before and after
the county of Monroe was formed from that territory.l

It was not until 1858 that a definite method of petition—
ing for and creating new counties was written into the Virginia
laws. In that year the assembly enacted a general law on the
subject under which it became necessary to do more than file a
petition with the legislature. Thereafter it was necessary to
follow a prescribed mode of applying, That law stated as
follows:

”When, hereafter, it shall be the intention of any person

or persons to petition the legislature for the formation

of a new county out of a part of any county or counties

tin this commonwealth, it shall be the duty of such person
5 or persons to publish their intention by advertisement

stuck up at the front door or doors of the courthouses

of the county or counties from which the new county is

intended to be formed, for at least two months next pre-

ceding annual election of delegates to the general as-
sembly, distinctly describing in said advertisement,
the lines by which it is intended the new county shall

.5 be bounded, and the site for the seat of justice for
said county".

At the ensuing annual election the sense of ”the peOple
residing within the limits of the described boundary“ was as-
certained as to the formation of the new county. Such vote
was then certified to the clerk of the house of delegates at
,least ten days before the commencement of the next general
assembly. This result of the vote must not have been obli—

’ »gatory upon the assembly for it was expressly provided ”that
this act shall not affect the right to petition to the next
legislature for any new county in the same manner and under

3 the same regulations as if this act had never passed”.2

E The Code of Virginia, 1849, incorporated this act in

’ the codification of the Virginia laws. The primary change
made, however, was in the method of voting upon the forma~

_ tion of the new county. Whereas the Act of 1858 gave the

,he right to vote upon the question to those peeple "residing ,
within the limits of the described boundary“, the Code now
gave the right to those people ”residing within any of the
counties from which the new county is proposed to be formed”,

u. ____ "H_.l_-_i__-_~l_l~______
l. lpygntory 9f County Archives pf West Virginia, Monroe County
._ fig; él, p. 5.
2.‘ Virginia Acts, lggg, ch. 58, p. 51.

 ...15.. 4
Introduction .
1 stipulating, however, that "the names of such of fine voters as
1 reside within the metes and bounds of the preposed new county, 1 1
shall be distinguished from the rest”.1
(
The first constitutional provision came in 1863 when the
West Virginia Constitution said: '
“No new county shall be formed having an area of less
1 than four hundred square miles; or if another county
be thereby reduced below that area; or if any territory
be thereby taken from a county containing less than
four hundred square miles. And no new county shall be
formed containing a white population of less than four
thousand; or if the white population of another county
be thereby reduced below that number; or if any county
containing less than four thousand white inhabitants be
thereby reduced in area. But the Legislature may, at
any time, annex any county containing less than four ;
thousand white inhabitants to an adjoining county or
counties as part thereof.“2
1 An act of 1867 required that notice of intention to apply 1
to the legislature for the passage of an act to create a new C
county be published four successive weeks in some weekly C
newspaper published in the county or counties from which a t
‘ portion of the new county was to be taken. If no such news»
1 paper was published in the county or counties, such notice
was to be posted at the front door of the courthouse of each C
- of the counties affected, and at one or more of the most public a
places in the county, at least 50 days before the application t
was made. Such notice was to name the counties affected, the S
mates and bounds proposed for the new county and the place at S
which it was proposed to locate the seat of justice. If only a . t
county line was proposed to be changed, it was sufficient to ~ e
1 post such notice at the front door of the courthouse of each p
1 county whose line was proposed to be changed, for at least t
» thirty days before making application therefor.5 n
c
Since the Constitution of 1865 required no less than four 0
hundred square miles and no less than four thousand white popu— G
lation it became necessary to enact laws to give effect to such b
provision. Laws were enacted providing for the taking of a 0
census and the making of a survey before permitting a petition 0-
to be filed with the legislature. A certified copy of the plat P‘
representing the survey was filed in the office of the secretary U
o
1. Code of Virginia, 1849, ch. 47, p. 240. 1‘
2. ConstT: W. Va., 1865, art. 7, sec. 12. ' ' ' 2 2‘
j 5. Acts g: fleet Virginia Legislature, 1867, ch. 110, p. 145. 5‘
l
1

 -7- ,
Introduction

; \ of state and similar copy in the office of the recorder of such

, i new county. The surveyors of the counties losing the terri~
tory made such survey. Within three months after the creation
of the new county, the surveyors of the counties out of which
the new county was formed, made out attested copies of all en-
tries for lands and delivered such entries to the surveyor of
the new county.1

The Constitution of l872.provided as follows:
“No new county shall hereafter be formed in this State,
a with an area of less than four hundred square miles;
nor with a population of less than six thousand; nor
shall any county, from which a new county, or part there—
of shall be taken, be reduced in area below four hundred
square miles, nor in pepulation below six thousand. Nor
shall any new county be formed without the consent of a
, majority of the voters residing within the boundaries of
the proposed new county, and voting on the question."
The legislature of 1382 enacted that every application to
the legislature for the formation of a new county, must be ac—

, companied by duly certified copies of the survey, census and
order of the county court, declaring the result of any election
the sentiment on the question of formation.“

The law has continued unchanged since 1832. Today it is

L codified and reported in the Code of West Virginia, 1957, Hichie,

, as chapter 1, article 5. Each step from the notice of in—
tention to apply to the legislature, through the survey, cen—
sus, submission to voters and the certified copies of the

.t surveys, plat of the proposed new county, census and order of

_ the county court declaring the result of such election are

. ' enumerated in separate sectionS- All expenses attending the

L publication of the notices, the surveying and the taking of '
the census are paid by the parties applying for the proposed
new county. The expenses incident to the election in each
county are paid by it. However, if the proposed new county is

. created, such election expenses are paid by the new county to

__ each county making the original payments" After the county has

‘h been created a certified plat of its boundaries and certificate
of survey showing the courses and distances of the boundary line

‘n of such new county, and the streams and other natural objects or

.t points referred to in the act creating the same, are filed in

my the office of the secretary of state and a similar copy in the
office of the clerk of the county court of such new county.5

. i ____--___n__n_-______m.a_._a~_
l. gfiaig g: flb_j§a., ggyig, ch. 58.
‘ 2. acts 9f W. Va., 1882; ch. 40, sec. 4.
5. Code gf W. Va., lgéz, Michie, ch. 1, art. 5.

 ~8-
: LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
. 1‘
Abbreviations

1 011' IIIIOICOIOOIOCOIUFIOCIIOIIOIIIOIIOIIID Chapter-V

? const. ................................. constitution
pl, pp. OICI'IO!IOIII‘llIIIIIVQIJIOOICIQ'CUCII page(s)

1 VOl.(S) ..-.....-c.....--n.--....cu.p...u...-VO:LUIT18(S)
Va. CICCIIOIIGIOll'...IIIVIIIIFOIOOOJOI'I Virginia
Virginia Acts ................ Acts of the Virginia Assembly
VV. val CUIIOIOIIIIOIOO'COIIOIIOIII’IIOO West Virginia

Explanatory Notes
Counties are arranged alphabetically by name, those bear-
ing the notation "Virginia” were not included in the counties

1 which became a part of West Virginia in 1865. Under each

§ county heading is listed the act creating the county and all

1 acts which added to the territory of that particular county.

1 All territory taken from it will be found under the county to
which it was added and by the use of the cross referencing

‘ paragraph the reader will be able to follow every change af-
fecting the county.

, The cross referencing paragraph which directly follows
the title of the county is used to show all changes affecting
the territory which has formed a part of this county. Thus
under Harrison we find the following notation:

Created from Monongalia (p. 125), May 1784; Randolph

1 (p. 157) formed from, Oct. 1786;...part of Monongalia

‘ (p. 125) added to, Jan. 1, 1800 (for act see p. 75);...

i part of Barbour (p. 15) formed from, Mar. 5, 1845...

1 By following the page numbers shown here we can readily

. locate the act which created the original county from which

1 Harrison was taken in 1784. By following the references further

; we find the act creating part of Barbour County from part of
Harrison in 1845 and so on until all territorial changes are

‘ shown.

' Under each act given is shown the citation to the source
material. Further explanation of these citations will be
found in the bibliography on p. 218.

i Citations here given are to the acts and statutes as
found in the Supreme Court Library and the Department of Ar-
chives and History Library of West Virginia. Page citations
may vary as re—binding of old volumes often result in re—

1 arrangement of pages or volumes. However the dates may be

followed in using other copies.

2

a

i

 -9-
List of Abbreviations and Explanatory Notes
3 All acts creating counties have been copied in their en—
‘ tirety exactly as they appear in the original volumes. No
corrections have been made in phraseology or spelling of words.
3 Acts which pertain to other subjects in connection with county

r ' changes have been partially copied so that all material in the

n last named group is given.

)

) The index (p. 225) has been prepared primarily to place

a names and persons whose names appear in the acts. As the cross

y referencing paragraph shows all territorial changes it is be—

a lieved that its use, together with the tepical index, will pro—
vide an adequate guide to the volume. Place names are spelled
as they are used today and any variation is given in parenthe-
sis.

her

f

e

 -10-
A
‘ ALLEGHANEY COUNTY (VIRGINIA) '
. g . 3
Created from Bath (p. 19), Botetourt (p. 26), Monroe q
. ”(p. 150), Jan. 5, 1822; part of Monroe (p. 150) add— A
ed to, Jan, 11, 1845 (for act see p. 11); boundaries P
changed between Mercer (p. 116) and, Mar. 15, 1847 l
(for act see p. 118). t
Act Creating Alleghaney County . 4
(Virginia Acts, 1822, ch. 28, pp. 28—50) :1
(Passed January 5, 1822) s
1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly, That all that part E
of the counties of Bath, Botetourt, and Monroe, contained with—
in the following bounds, to wit: Beginning at the top of the E
middle of Pott's mountain, where the road leading from Fin- 6
castle to the Sweet Springs crosses the same; thence with said 1
road to the top of Peter's mountain; thence a straight line to Cj
the Greenbrier County line, on the tOp of the Alleghany moun- %
tain, so as to pass between the Sweet and Red Springs; thence . i:
with the top of the Alleghany, or Greenbrier line, to a certain t“
point, so that a straight drawn thence, to include in the new ‘
county Captain Henry Massie's planation, in the Falling Spring :3
Valley, may also include Archibald Morris‘s planation, on Jack~
‘ son's river, in said new county; thence a straight line from 6
said Massie's across the Cowpasture river, immediately below B<
William Griffin’s, on said river, to the Rockbridge county line; 1
thence with said line to a point in the Rockbridge and Botetourt 21
line, that a line drawn thence, will pass at or near the junct- 0'
ion of Jackson's and COWpasture rivers, to the nearest part of ii
theMBich Patch mountain; and this line to be so run as to leave
the house and yard of Captain John Jordan, in the county of 7
. Botetourt; thence with the highest points of the said Rich Patch ;
‘ mountain, next Craig's creek, so as to include the inhabitants £<
, of the Rich Patch in said new county, to a point at which it a:
, unites with Pott‘s mountain; thence with the top of said moun- *
‘ tain to the beginning, shall form one distinct and new county; 8
; and be called and known by the name of Alleghany county. st
‘ 2. A court for the said county of Alleghany shall be held by i:
the justices thereof on the Monday after the second Tuesday in or
every month, after the same takes place, in like manner as is
provided by law for other counties, and shall be by their com- 9
missioners directed; and the courts of quarterly session, shall oi
be holden in the months of March, June, August, and November, in be
every year. NIC
5. And, the more impartially and correctly to ascertain the 2;
most proper place for holding courts, and erecting the public ti
1 buildings for the said county of Alleghany; John JOrdan, Joseph s"
‘ D. Keyser, Henry Massie, Philip Rogers, and Robert Kincaid, G
g gentlemen, shall be, and they are hereby appointed commission—

 -11-

Alleghaney County (Virginia)

era, a majority of whom may act, for the purpose aforesaid; whose
‘ duty it shall be, after having performed the services hereby re~

quired, to make report thereof to the court of the said county of

Allegheny; whereupon, they shall proceed to erect the necessary

public buildings at the place so fixed on by the said commiss—

ioners, or a majority of them; which, when completed, shall be

the permanent place for holding courts for the said county.

4. The said commissioners shall be allowed each the sum of three

’ dollars per day, as a compensation for the duties hereby imposed

on them, to be paid out of the first levy to be collected in the

said county of Allegheny.

5. The justices to be named in the commission of the peace for

the said county, shall meet at Covington, in the said county,

upon the first court day after the said county takes place; and,

having administered the oath of office to, and taken bonds of

i the sheriff, according to law, proceed to appoint and qualify a

'o clerk; and, until the necessary public buildings are completed

” at the place pointed out by the said commissioners, or a ma—
jority of them, to appoint such place within the said county for

1 ' holding courts as they may think proper: Provided, alWays, That

v the appointment of a clerk, and a temporary place for holding ,
courts, shall not be made, unless a majority of the justices of

_ the said county be present.

6. It shall be lawful for the sheriffs of the counties of ,Bath,

_ Botetourt, and Monroe, to collect and make distress for any

1 public dues, or officers' fees, which shall remain unpaid by the

j inhabitants of the said county of Allegheny, at thettime it takes

;_ place; and shall be accountable for the same in like manner as

; if this act had not been made.

;h 7. The governor, with the advice of council, shall appoint a

: person to be sheriff of the said county of Allegheny, who shall

i continue in office during the term, and upon the same conditions

’ as are appointed by law for other sheriffs.

; 8. The courts of the counties of Bath, Botetourt, and Monroe,
shall have jurisdiction of all actions and suits depending be-
fore them, at the time the said county of Allegheny takes place;

1 and shall try and determine the same and award execution there—

3 on.

‘ 9. The said county of Allegheny shall remain in the same judi-
cial circuit with Botetourt county; and the courts thereof shall

1 be holden on the third Monday in the month of May, and the third
Monday in the month of October, in every year: and the militia
of the said county shall be attached to the thirteenth brigade.
Tn future elections of a Senator and elector, and a representa—
tive in Congress, the said county of Allegheny shall be of the
same district as the county of Botetourt,

 -125
Allegheny County (Virginia) 1
1 10. This act shall be in force from the passing thereof.
Act Annexing Part of Monroe County to Alleghaney
(Virginia Acts, 1845, ch. 56, pp. 40, 41)
(Passed January ll, 1845)
1. Be it-enacted by the general assembly, That so.much of the
county of Monroe as lies next to and adjoining the county of
Alleghany, and is contained within the following boundary lines,
to wit: Beginning on the top of Peters1 mountain, (sometimes
called and known as the Sweet springs mountain,) at the point on
the line dividing said counties, where Price's turnpike road A
ceases to be the line between the said counties, (which point is
designated in the act creating the county of Alleghany, passed
January the fifth, eighteen hundred and twenty-two, by the words
. ”thence with said road to the top of Peters1 mountain; thence a
straight line," &c.;) thence a straight line crossing Pott's A
1 creek to a sugar tree in James Wiley's yard; thence a straight i
line to a point at which such line will strike Price's turnpike
road, (which road is the present line between the said counties 1
1 of Monroe and Alleghany,) at the first ford of the run below 1
the residence of Andrew Wilson, shall be annexed to and hence— 5
' forth a part of the county of Alleghany. I
1
1 2. The county court of the counties of Monroe and Alleghany Q
respectively, shall direct the surveyor of each of said coun— 8
ties, whenever they may deem it necessary, to meet at some con—
venient place, and run and mark the said lines; and the said 1
surveyors shall make report in writing to the county court of E
each of said counties, of the manner in which they shall have 6
1 executed such duties, with such remarks and explanations as they a
‘ may deem necessary; which report shall be recorded in the clerk's c
’ office of each of said counties. And the county court of Alle— h
1 ghany county shall allow the surveyors aforesaid a reasonable s
1 compensation for such services, to be paid out of the county levy. V
e
1 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the t
sheriff or other collector of the county of Monroe, to collect t
1 by distress or other lawful mode, any public dues and officers’ C
fees which may remain unpaid by the inhabitants of that part of k
the county of Monroe which will be in the county of Alleghany C
after the commencement of this act; and the said sheriff or 1
other collector shall be accountable for the same in like manner _ 5
as if this