xt79p843rx26 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79p843rx26/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19551104  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  4, 1955 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  4, 1955 1955 2013 true xt79p843rx26 section xt79p843rx26 Poeo Invades Campus
b
Afler his wrnduitmn. Krllv lu Id srvrtal o.M
l.id;i:.
wraj-p-cloth vr.ip.
At .i!ou tunes he
ui.vitiwe.ir f.utoiy. Mn.iied faultv switihe in
('.ri!:!r appli ituc pi. int. and h.i .M ra m tl.i
ol an .1!
...tiv !.;.!'.. ' win
i
I'.'-- '
I
.:;'".
Hr.d
o:i 'l.e
(

nill.lP

MrlXTOSII
t hr (nmpus!
Ymi ran see hun
Poto has invaded
of the week in the lover of the t'K I.ibraiv
anv dav
Walter Crawford Krllv. creator of ivn. has given
Po:o :iip
sketch ot
the library en oiK-ina-l
published in Il.ost HeW S .ip. l o( til.- which
Hjr

X

(f

iXC

.

K.

Avocol

oi::it:

-

1

v CVi

I?

ci-r-

1

'Iff

1

llrar.

--

prize of one ticket to the next Ouicnol production will be given to the Mudrnt who submits the
be.st paniKiaph on. "Why is Poio Funny?" Fntries
may be left at the desk in Room 402 on the fourth
11
floor of the library.
Poro is basically a satire with characters so inno-- i
cent the satire never bites. Pojo's round baby head
foyer of the Margaret I.
The above Togo display can be seen in the
nose, instead of the usly snout of the
of
Kin. It L.r lodes an original sketch by artist Walt Kelly, creatorand and upswept are due to Kelly's determination to
real possum,
Pogo. The display was arranged by the Department of Archives
make his characters friendly. Kelly himself thinks
Special Collection's of the IK Library.
his strip is popular because his readers see some-thin- s
of themselves in the characters.
Walt Kelly was born in Philadelphia. Penn.. Aug-T)1913. When only two years old. his parents
moved to Ci idiicnort His parents now live in Stratford. Conn. Kelly's father was a theatrical-scen- e
painter nnd taught Walter Jr. .to draw.
While attending Warren Harding Hish School,
Kelly was editor and cartoonist of the school paper,
A hill
ov in Congress to increase tlu subsistence pay bli- wrote poet?y. and acted as news reporter for the
nt

Pogo Display

Veteran's Education Bill
Faces Possible Defeat
the kort

.;:)

v

1

A

111

f:-Wil-

t

i

Building.

II

.

.

,

tio:is of t li t K
r '..ives
s- Oej .irtnH nt is ii lercstt d in o!l. i liiu all
I
pi- - face,
ihle information on printing pilars.
tvposrraphy. etc.
An iir.piev ive dip!ay has been Lir.lt around 1h;
sketch and can be .seen in the foyer of the I ibrat
C II

-

vr

part ' r.r a t,
t
jrt-.riIn pt'.i. tclh st.irtdl workiiK j
:irti-tDimki. Hen-- iiihmi; the Une Dinr
Nftrr m
e.ir. Krlt
Kel'. tn .n to lake sliiT
birrl to do
ork wlirrr br
b eU tn
cv
'
b Ibr Wrstrrn Prtnlin; and
hili'rrno .nie
I u'n";r.
h'r ; Citno.no. t Ibis ii.b he crc.Ucl a
modern sriies of fairy tale's in which Pojo. a
was a minor character.
In 1SM3. K. llv wi nt to u.ik .is a civilian cirplow-o- f
a s;
the Amn's Fo:cu;n Kmuiiawe Cmf
line, he studieil a bit of American dialects Here, la'
acquired the (tcorma aaent" used s often in lut
comic strip
loiter. Kellv decided to retire the hero of hi" fairv
tale series and replace hun with Poco Incident allv.
the name "Pouo" means nothing tn particular; it
inertly sounds well with possum
the publication carrying Kelly's work
In
folded. For the next two years, Kelly did commercial comics and in l!MS was offered an additional
job on the New York Star. He was hired as art
director, political cartoonist, and political advisor.
As art director, he directed himself to do a daily
strip called Poro.
However, the New York Star folded in P.M9 and
Pouo was homelcsN once mote A few mouths later
Kelly was hired .by Post Hall Syndicate Mhen Po-- l
Syndicate' and Uan the fantastic climb to lui
present success. In 1!.Y2. Kelly was elected cartoonist of the year by the :UH) memlters of the National Cartoonist Society.
.

tlivs tol jf; car, Ih. p.r-- :
UIttili
krtc!i of Churchy l.afcinnn's s.
triil.ir
tlic Hr..rl ncnt f
lintirt rress n ,s reqiifstci

1

-

h--

.

m-

!"
Potto himself
".

jiul Nnri.il

fr

-

.

.

.

veteran's education and training program faces Bridgeport Post.
at through tlu general lack of interest or knowledge

--

possible i !
of its existence.

The pn;'sal sks for an increase of 2,5 tu $45 a month to all
veterans r.cv. enrolled in the education and training" program under

Guignol Players
To Open Season

C

rublie. Law No. 550.

Veterans drawing SI 10 a month
would receive S145 a month; those

The Guignol players open their
receiving; SIIj would receive S175;
fall schedule with a program of
S1G0 would reand those receiving
plays. Wednesday.
three one-aceive 8i05 if this bill wcer passed.
through Sat- -

J

ct

The effective date upon passage
ot this bill would be the first day
of the firs; month which begins
10 days fcJIcwing the enactment
of this law.
administrative as
d.tant' in apVrvnnpll nffinp stated
v-- Oi- -i inn
aii
that interest expressed to repre- sentatives and senators would be
effective in cettin the increase
passed bv Concress.
The bill S number S. 533.
The chairman of the Senate
Committee e n Labor and Public
is also prettv responsible
passaee of the bill.
for
For further information on this
bill contact William Bass, in the
Administration Building.

ilVl.

j

;

and running

Nov. 9.

r

will be open
Guignol
Monday and Tuesday from noon
until 5 p.m and Wednesday
throuah Saturday noon until 9
p.m. Reservations can be made by
phone by calling University
tension 2396.
Directing the plays are Dudley
Saunders. Sonny Kirchdorf fer, and
Nancy Niles. president of the
Guignol players.
box-offi-

ce

y

is being established on the second
floor of the Journalism Kuilding.
It is scheduled to be in operation
The
bv the first of December.
microfilm laboratory will be super-vi- ri
hv Miss Pollv Warren, as- sisted by student help. Lawrence
S. Thompson, director of the Mar-sir- e
garet King Library, will be director
of the project, assisted by an
visory board of the officers of the
Kentucky Press Association and
- --Dr. Niel Plummer. director of the
Srhool of Journalism.

The nroiect will provide for the
microfilming of every member
newspaper in the state for the
year 1954 at no cost. Back volumes
of newspapers will be microfilmed
with the cooperation of the pud
Ushers when time permits in the
luture All newspapers which de- to take part in the project
will be microfilmed.
officials and mem- .
i
- ...
" ..rriii nt
uris mjh- nui u King ...... .
Library to
I.
ih Alariraret
make this project of use to historians, studying the past, present,
and future, in the state and nation. Aided by an appropriation
to the library by Governor Lawrence W. Wetherby and his advisory committee, the necessary
equipment has been purchased and
a complete and modern laboratory
..?,-.- ,i

Present plans include the micro- -

IT'

W

"

sit

"s

"If the University is to continue
operate Northern Center at
Covington, we will have to find a
new home," Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain, vice president, said.
With more than 800 students enrolled in the Center, which is lo- cated on the second floor of a
Covington uracle school, it becomes
daily more apparent Mi.it a
to house the Center v.:il have
to be tound. Chambe: l.en added.
Not only is Northern (enter
overcrowded, but the students jo- ing in and out to classes make
operation of tlie grade school difto

ciaVc

V'

new-plac-

WVM vr' V
r

A

1

i

e

;

ficult.
t-

Northern Center was Parted as
an experiment bv the University.
At fir.-- t most of the studitit- - weir
veteran.-- who found it dilfl'iilt to
attend the University. When the
veteran enrollment slacked olf the
enrollment of the Center continued

fx1

'VST!.

,

Cute, Eh?

to rise.

Who says Homecoming ain't what it used to be? If there's ever been
a cuter Homecoming Queen than Ann Wenninger . . . well we Just
don't believe there has been. The pert young miss represented the

Alpha Gamma Delta sorority.

Crofl's Condition
Termed Critical

I

A student may attend Northern
Center for two years, but to get .
degree, he must come to the I'ni- -'
versitv for the last two years.

Panhcllcnic Plans Dance
And Pledge Presentation
--

.

and her sorority and home-tow- n
will be announced.
Panhcllcnic will present the foreign student which, this ear. is
Haum June I.ee. They will also
award the S500 Panhellenic scholarship which will be given to one
or more girls here on campus.
Scholarship trophies will be presented to the sororitv with the
highest overall standing, the sorority with the lunhest house
standing, and the independent
house withthe hmhest tandinu.
Tall Sigma, modem dance society.' is schedub d to provide the
intermission entertainment.
Dave Parry will provide the
music for the Panhellenic spon.. .
sir
sored dance which will follow the
presentation. It Is a
) vrsion
dance.
This wtll be the fitlst year that
December i opening
the Wildcats Tuesday for their
n
a dance has followed the pledge
game with I ouisiana State I'niversity.
is to be no
polls list Kupp'k charge as contender for the num- presentation. There soi ui iti h
ie
adn iiun since the
ber one spot in the nation.
...

no-flow-

liasLvtball
years of coaching basketball at one
is a long time. Hut Coach Adolph Uupp.
third from the left, is still going strong. Uupp and
assistant coach Harry Lancaster began preppuue
uni-vtrsi-

x

No. 7

- Dr. Lyle L. Crott. director of the
filminir of 1951 files of all state
connewspapers, with the exception oi Personnel Office, is in critical HosSororitv pledge presentation and dance will !e held Nov. I.
at the Good Samaritan
certain papers already using this dition
followed
method of preservation, at no cost pital. Dr. aCroft was admitted Pledge presentation will he at 7 p in. in Memorial Hall
kidney condition and
to the newspaper except that of earlier with
was hv the dance from ) p.m. 12 midnight in tin Student Union
the positive film. Contracts with until Thursday Ins condition
listed as serious.
Halhoom.
(Continued on Page 2)
assessed for the dance acAt the presentation each pledge been
1
T"77
cording to the number of pledges
'YHsWT
will be introduced to the audience
they

1

Twentv-si-

!)."."

North el n
UK Center
Needs Home

....

8:30 p.m.

ears of planning have resulted in the establishment
of Kentucky
of the Kentucky Press Association-UniversitMiemfilm Proiect in the journalism Ihiildin'j;.

...

1

ul

Three

.....

University of Kentucky. Lexington. Ky., Friday, Nov. t.

Vol. XLVII
urday, Nov. 12.
program consists of "No
The
Sarte. "The
Exit" by Jean-PaQueens of France" by Thornton
Wilde r, and "Purification by I en- ,v
ncssec .Williams. Curtain time is

Microfilm Project
Established Here

rwt

ie mwm XL

tv

ITe-teaso-

er

have.
Illanket bids have been sent to
all sorority and fraternity houses
and to all independent residences.
Although the pledges will be in
formats the general dress for the
dance is
semi-forma-

l.

ID Cards
Temporary ID cards will be
ID
for permanent
e hanged
tiiday. Nov. II in the lob- ards
bv uf the Coliseum from J a.m.
to
n.ni. and from 9 a.m. to 1!
noon on Saturday.
persons with the temporary ID cards are asked to bring
the cards with them. Aftrr neil
weekend the temporary ID card
will no longer be honored.
All

* till

2

KKNTIICK

V

10"

KKKNKL. FHfl.iv. Nov. t.

i

Tryouts For
Pae
'Country Girl'
To Be Ilclil
important

Dr. Vandenbosch Speaks
To Transylvania Chapel

!
(Continued from
interested newspaprrs will be made
for the mUrofilminft of future

volumes from
Sri- Dr. Amrv Vandenbost h. hesul n f the Department of Political
As operator time iHTinits in the
rnce. spoke on "The U.N. Alter Ten Years" at the Transylvania t napei. future, back files of
newspapers, many defunct for
Nov. 2.
years, will be filmed. Publishers
trends, chief differ- CovertnR
will cooperate in meet ins 'the cost
rm-eand hazards that have faced '
.
Win
major UK
The negatives
of this
the organization, lie listed
will be stored in a temperature
of today. Special points
problems
II
and humidity controlled vault.
he considered in his speech were
action in
the group's protective
The library has complete files
Three UK students have been for 19.i4. with a few missing- numK( rea and the effect of the
Club champions. bers, of all but 4.) of the state's
crisis on it. He also dis- made state
problems of unequal They have also won trips to the newspapers. The missing files will
cussed the
Club Congress held be picked up later by Professor
representation, the snag in admis- - National
of the each year in Chicago, 111.
ftions. and excessive use
Bennett Wall, fieldman for the
,

s

Student
Championships

l--

Israel-Esiypti-

oH-ration-

an

4-- H

4--

veto by the Russians.
Therr have brtn 22 states who
have applied .for entry Into the
I'nited Nations. Russia has vetoed
tin admission of those countries
in which the I'nited States is especially interested. The Communist-ltatke- d
candidates have not been
approved by other member nations.
The charter ot the United Nations stipulates that no mer.iber
may have more than one vote Im
the General Assembly and one in
the Security Council. This puts
the Netherlands, with an estimated population of 2.500.000. on the
.same rank as the USRR. who has
about 198,802,000 people. IJ.v this
.system the 4.000,000 people of
Syria equal 150.000,000 Americans,

Snky, CJirrrlriHlcrs,
Leave? Tor Nashville

The three winners are Carl
Haunz, Erma Jean Hammond, and
Buford Parish. Carl Haunz, presClub, was
ident of the UK
state champion in the farm and
home electric projects.
Crma Jean Hammond, home ee
major, won the furl's record championship. This is Riven for the
d
best overall project records.
Parish, treasurer of the I'K
Club, was champion in beef
production.
James Whitehouse. head of KenClubs, announced that
tucky
those and other state winners
would leave for Chicago on Friday,
Nov. 26. The group will travel by
chartered bus.
These winners have gone through
local, county, district, and stale
eliminations. A winner may make

1

4--

i

I

THE
"SCHOLARLY
DRUG STORE"

H

A. B. in Fountain Service
B. S. in Cosmetics
M.A. in School Supplies
M.S. in Prescriptions
Ph.D. in Service

TEXT BOOKS
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
ENGINEER'S
SUPPLIES

w

AT

KENNEDY
BOOK STORE

being

1869-1910-

;

DUNNS

f

James K. Patterson served as
President of UK for forty-on- e
"
"
).
years

Tryouts for
the Agricultural
production. Clifford Odets' "Coun- nomics Convocation receniiy.
try Girl." will be held Sunday
Home economics and agriculture
6. at 2:30 in majors voted by secret ballot for
afternoon. November
Ho
nr oirl nf their choice at
the Fine Arts Building theatre.
j
meeting. The results will be
the
"Country Girl." recently a movie 'announced Saturday night when
success with Grace Kelly and Bing the king and queen are crowned
Crosby, has a cast of two women at the Fall Festival.
Candidates tor queen are Elizaand seven men.
Helen
Students and faculty are en- beth Ayres. Allice J. Boggs.Beverly
Hoover. Norma Weiss, and
couraged to read for the roles. A Botsford.
special invitation is extended to
Those nominated for king are
in the technical Glenn Adams. Norman Downy.
those Interested
Ray
(and design aspects of dramatic Smith Mitchell.Woeste, Gray. Gene
J. Kimbro.
Cravens, John
production.

4--

at Vanderbilt and return to cam- pus at 12 o'clock Saturday night,
are

H

Historical Records Project which
is sponsored by the library and
the History Department.
This Historical Records Project,
in process for the past two years.

Candidates for king and queen
of the Fall Festival, sponsored by
were chosen at
the next Guignol Block and Bridle, and Home Eco

Hu-for-

Suky members and cheerleaders
will leave at G a.m. tomorrow to go
to Nashville for the Vanderbilt
game.
Since this is a homecoming
game, Suky plans to stay all day

Shakers and posters
made for the game.

H

4--

Block And Bridle
King And Queen
To lie Crowned

Microfilm

,

405

Dunn.Driio

C

LIME AND MAXWELL

S. LIME

ACROSS FROM SUB
;

AVAW.VkV

V

v

f

&

t&.

,

9

I

J

-;rp

Open Every MondayTil 9 P.M.
i

;

Arrow

4

...

i

i

J ..........

A
..A

y

v

.

NEXT TO UNION STATION
I

McGregor
Enro

'nation

t.

cr

:

j.V.

71
t

r

Spire
of California

SPORT SHIRTS...

that speaks a man's language

VMM

Plaids

.

.

checks

stripes

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

solids

.

.

.

small

and patterns to suit your mood and

brighten your leisure hours.
Priced from 3.95 to 12.95

L

* Till: KKNT1TKY KERNEL. Friday. Nm.

Welch To Alleml
UNKSCOMeetinp
i

Frank J. Welch, rtrnn of the Col- lege of Agriculture, will attend the
fifth national meeting of UNESCO
in Cincinnati. Nov.
At the convention entitled. "The
First Nine Years An American
3--

I

UN Fellow
To VisilHere
fur

El-D- in

9.

j

rnrim

r

ff

Art Professor
To Give Talk
A public talk on Realism and
Impressionism will be Riven by
Clinton Adams, professor of Art.
in the Fine Arts Gallery, at 3 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 6.
Paintings now on exhibit in the
gallery and other significant works
of the period will be used to illustrate the talk.

Central Kentucky's Largest
UP TO

Designed Especially for
UK Faculty and Personnel

PAYMASTER LOANS

Near 3rd

257 N. Lime

$300

PERSONAL LOANS

WE BUY
SELL OR TRADE

BOOK STORE

..i.

IM... Phi
.Mtrls Tliiiixluv
:iii

i

Chi Delta Phi. women's li'n.uv
honorarv. will meet I'hursdav. N .
r .1
10. in RiH;n JOt of the Ht'H
manuscnp reading session
Women students intnested Hi
joining Chi Delta Phi vhouKI r
a member of the it roup oi Mi- Jane Haselden. assistant dean of
women, this week
f- -

ct

New-Yor-

i

j

USED BOOK STORE

DENNIS

iv'-- .

Incorporated
Dial
117 Cheapside

AVAL

'

j

office.

The Name That Means Quality
and Service!
O Complete Laundry and
Dry Cleaning Service
O 7 Hour Service

Mothproofing
O Fur and Woolen Storage
o 5 Convenient Locations

O

549 South Lime
(Aenras from

Mmrial

Hall)

504 Euclid Avenue

it

864 East High

265 Midland Blvd.

1439 Leestown Rood

24 Hours

Foreign Language
Group- Announces
Ninth Conference

Join The "Huddle Crowd

Chef's Delight!

SIZZLING STEAK

$1.00

...

HUDDLE

and Lee.' It

stands for 'Withered and
--

Lumpy.'"
Or. That
'Howling Green.' It stands for 'JSadly
'V,G' does not stand for
Gangrenous.' "

26-2- 8.

or to class . . . The
No need to be Ute for a
people in a burry . . .
HUDDLE service it built for
For anything from a cup of good coffee to a tasty
steak . . . We're FAST!

II

'Washington

.

er

Been Late To Class Lately?

Let's All Meet In The
l

VV&L'
'

.

d.

a Day Of Fast Service!

French Fries, Salad,
Bread and Butter,
and Hot Coffee

Or. -- That
does not stand for

'Poorly.' ".

is.no large task. Uut that
So, you see.'getting the letter-sweatThe 9th Foreign Language ConIlMOC-hooAnother, and equally important,
ference, held each spring at the is only a part f
been set lor April part is to join the right fraternity. Let me emphasi.e-th- e
r'niht
University, has
announced Dr. Jonah W. D. fraternity. Joining tiie icrony fraternity is worse than joining
Skiles, head of the Ancient Lanno fraternity at all.
guages Department.
How ean you be sure that the fraternity you join is the right
The theme of the conference
this spring will be "Foreign Lanone? Very simply. Just ask the rushing chairman. After all.
guages and World Leadership." why should he lie to you?
Subjects such as modern and anOnce the IJMOC is estabcient languages, linguistics, teaching of languages in elementary lished in the right fraterand high schools, and folklore, are nity, the next step is to get
to be discussed at the meetings.
irl. A ILMOC's
the
Directors of the conference are girl must be beautiful,
Dr. Skiles; Daniel V. Hegeman, shapely, and go well with
Modern Foreign Languages Department, associate director; and all his suits.
Giria juasweriDg this deHobart Ryland, Modern Languages
Department, associate director.
scription are admittedly not
easy to find. If you should

4tt

i

?,

Jlmmie Wood aid. staff
number of the national YWCA.
She
will bo on campus Nov.
Is nixmsibh1 for the recruit Inn
and trainlnK of employed personnel for student YWCAs throughout the country.
Besides working with volunteer
ndisrrs and faculty members.
MKs Woodward has had a varied
YnmlfiilioM'li SjifaUf
carter in social work and religious education.
refresher experience In creative ( ) IluIolK'MU till W WW
She has formerly been executive rhythms. Ringing games, and foU
Dr. Amry Vundenbosoh. head of
director of the YWCA in Ardmore, dances for children.
Okla., the student YWCA director
will be of interest to Political Science Department,
Section II
speaks In Atlanta this weekend mi
College. the beginning folk dancer.
at Randolph-Maco- n
Foreign
Lynchburg, Va., and director of
Section III will be for the more "Indonesia Gropes For A
Policy."
YWCA work at the University of experienced dancer and leader.
North Carolina at Chapel Mill.
He will read this paper before
The workshop will be attended
While she was with the USO by recreation leaders from all over an annual meeting of the South'
YWCA staff during the war years, Kentucky and bordering states. em Political Scleivce Association.
she served as program director of
the Mart ret Louisa YWCA in
New York City.
uith
Since 1942 Miss Woodward has
been on the national fctaff of the
College and University Division
of the National YWCA. serving in
the southwest region, the
(Author of ' Barefoot Boy lif Chtek " ttr.)
region, and in. the headquarters staff.
directed the
Miss Woodward
work-stud- y
seminar for American
HOW TO BE A BMOC
students on several summer trips
to Europe. She was the leader of
show me one who
Any man who wishes to he a ilMOC-yo- u
college students from this country
do well to folwho studied sociological and eco- - doesn't and I'll show you a misspent youth-w- ill
noinic problems in Europe under I low the few simpN' rules listed below.
the sponsorship of the national
The first requisite of a HMOC istof course, a letter in athletics.
student YMCA and YWCA.
This presents no jrrcat problem to the bip. the strong, and tint
In the summer of 1948 Miss hulkine;. Hut what do you do if you are a puny little chap with
Woodward was one of the directors
of a leadership training project at a concave chest and muscles like tallow?
Union Theological Seminary where
I'll tell you what you do: You go' to the nearest letter store,
she taught leadership in Christian buy a letter, sew it on your sweater, and wear it.
'
associations. She directed a similar
This, perhaps, is not
course in the summer of 1950 in
strictly ethical, but chances
the Pacific School of Religion in
are slim that anybody w ill
Berkeley, Calif.
question you about it. If
A native of San Antonio, Tcxas
Woodward is an Episcopalian. x
Miss
someone should, you have a
degree from:
She holds-arrA- .B.
perfectly logical explanaSouthern Methodist University and
tion. Simply say. " That
a Master's degree in Christian
on my sweater does not
Education from Columbia Uni- versity.
stand for 'Iowa.' It stand
-Anyone who wishes to talk with
for Infirm.' "...Or. That
Miss Woodward may make an ap-- i
'1" does not stand for
by calling the YWCA
'
'Princeton.' It stand for
7-- 8.

Appraisal and Forecast." leaders,
representative of American life,
will discuss new aspects of international cooperation and the part
UNESCO plays in it.

laii c;roii

The eighth annual Folk P.uu-Workshop at the University will be
held Friday, Nov. 4, and Sat unlay.
Nov. 5. it was announced by Miss
Jean McConncll. director of 'he
music program for the College of
Adult and Extension Education
The pi oi am for the two dav
period will be divided into three
sections. Section I Is planned for
leaders who need new materials.

Miss

a.

5.

An Egyptian teacher will be visiting UK on Nov.
Saad
Hussein Aly is in the United
States on a U.N. Fellowship on
Fundamental Education.
He has taken an active part in
the work of the Arab States Fundamental Education Center, and
he has worked with Dr. Fred Harris of the College of Education.
Aly is visiting Indian schools in
Oklahoma now, and he will go to
the University of Tennessee and
the TVA area before returning to
Egypt.

Folk
rr

National YWCA Staffer
To Be Here November

l!..r

I.

Restaurant

CORNER ROSE AND EUCLID

riht

discover that all the suitable
girls on your campus are
already attached, do not
despair. There are several
things you can do.
You can, for example, cut
your throat.
Or you ean pick one of
the less attractive ladies on
campus, veil her, dress her

in houri pants, and tell
everybody she is an ex

i

change student from Istanbul. (A fellow I knew in
Hardtack Sigafoos
scluu!
by name -- did just that. After several semesters he discover",
to his surprise that he loved the girl. Today they are happily
married and run one or the Diggesi lurKisn uanis m
Grove, Iowa.)

-

We arrive now at the question: What docs a BM0C smoke?
Philip Morris, of corris!
And the answer ew
Anybody-b- ig
man on campus or little man, big woman or
little woman -- any body who is able to discern between harsh and
gentle chooses new Philip Morris. Gentle is the word for Philir
word for
Morris. (Actually, of course, it isn't. Ciyarrtte is the felicitou-blendinadmirably the
Philip Morris. Uut gentle describes
is-n-

g,

the smooth, mild, pleasureful flavor, the nobly bon:
onb
and delicately nurtured tobaccos, that Philip Morri-an- d
you.
Philip Morris-brin- gs
Fhilip Morrit, uho bring you thl$ column rrery rrk
The makr$
duriu ihe n htnt yrart cordially intite jm l try toJuy't ucu tvgult
I' luli p Morris in the bright nrie reJ, uhite eurf gold packagr,
or tUtart king

i.

* s

'r--

THE KENT1TKY KERNEL. Friday. Wv,

4

Rebuttal

Dear Mr. Helm.
r:i on your
Mrase allow me t congratuLt"
f
Kentucky
h tt( r in the October CSth issue
of a
i point out the
Kerne! m v Iileli
previous editorial on respect to the r.Vc. It is time
concepts of
for us to realize that the ontmo.l
loyalty, patriotism, and respect for the ideals of
others have no place on the campus.
Yen have made us aware that. :.s .diversity stuto have our
dents, we rare all adults, and, in or
;,dult status recognized, we must ir:e evidence of
wr ind'v:d"al;sm and freedom fnre t.v.ditional ties
oen though it may be necessary to acrifice our
feelings of honor and decency. Furthermore, we
suppressed
must not allow this individualism t
presentative,
"th- - univcrsitv lrcrarchy" or its
Kentucky Kernel.
I
congratulate yon on t- '- terary stylo
i
;:s ' ij:vdless
vsvid phrases v
uu
1, ,.;! s
.ier-liter.. rf debie!.'" and
'
mpress th
,',.io;(m!s head salutes" cannot h.i'
d abilities.
,.
,
ow extraordinary
paisi-- .
oi yonr alliterative
leader to
cause the intt
:,,;,.s
.
defined by
tli.' fad tint "parsina
Dietion::r ;. "..:eful in th"
... ,
n.oney or immateri.d tV :$;.; sting"
eriation of
iirectiv contradictory to your ch
",
art:ee' . "no viless and heede - .:i the same
..b-urdit-

i

'
;

).
.

'

!

.
.

(

-

r

.

1

a!--

o

t

:

'

--

;

'

:

r-th-

:

.

)..!
.

k

,.r.''

encourage
am c t: tin that your eloquence
..nv ( tli r students to express t::-- ' disapproval
.i'it.trism' and
i the Univcrsitv - trend toward
.
desire that
:cudo-patrinti.s:n- "
as shown b
1

.

enoug'i
strive toward ' r goal, you ra
.indents from their lethargy to force :.V University
to ban the display of the America) flag on the
c.impus.
Finallv. I would "ike to express r admiration
indeed fortufor your courage. The Univcrsitv
criticibe
nate to have a student who will
- :s it beneficial
respect to the flag when he consieto the community to do so. despite ii.e fact that
those members ot the student bo,; whose frien.ls
that flag
and relatives have died fighting t
natter with
waving mav not he able to regard
reserv ed. ; r 'eftier minds.
the'intellectual
'
v
Bernard W". S ; tlrg ite
i

.

Forward Step

,

Donovan opened the door this week
to organized weekly University social activities.'
Dr. Donovan said he "heartily supported" the plan
to create a student recreation spot similar to the
one suggested by delegates at the recent "Leadership Conference.
The program agreed to by Dr. Donovan would
open either, How man Hall Lounge. Keeneland Hall
Lounge, or the SUB Grill on Friday nights. ()1)K.
one of the leading honoraries on campus, quickly
backed up Dr. Donovan's proposal and offered
financial support to the project.
Admittedly this is a compromise. The Leadership Conference asked for Little Commons, but
the President said this would be impossible because
the Geology Department has most of its twenty
thousand dollar rock and mineral
or twenty-fiv- e
collection stored in the little frame building on
Limestone.
But the compromise is a forward step by the
.Administration. Never before have University
allowed the SUB Grill to be open at nights.
In fact there is a ruling against it. This is definite
President

of-fici-

'!

proof that the Administration is becoming more
receptive to' student ideas.
As outlined by the President, any or all three of
the lounges would be made available on Friday
nights. The University would operate snack bars.
Although the University does not have .:.; en:
funds to support it. a band would be perm:ssn!t

Kentucky voters next week will decide whether
or not the Commonwealth's constitution" ought to
citizens to vote.
be changed to permit lS- - ear-olThe Kernel favors lowering the voting age to IS.
A citizen does not reach complete maturity
abruptly upon reaching his 21st birthday, but this
arbitrary age limit hampers him from the very
beginning of his adult life.
in Kentucky may begin a lifeAn lS- - ear-oltime career, enter college, drive, and in general
assume adult responsibility. He may not, however,
be permitted to vote.
Soon after his ISth birthday, a male citizen must
register for the draft. The draft and military Seriee
aie seritMis. and they lequire responsible citizens.
And et the same male who must register for
the draft cannot register to Not.' for public officials.
Many women, especially during the last 10 years,
have become married or engaged Ix fore they were
'
21. It seems ridiculous to tell a woman who has
.assumed the duties of a wife and mother that she
is not mature enough to vote.
lave already jeccixeJ
I lii most cases

p

wcll-to-d- o

President Donovan is greatly interested in providing wholesome entertainment on campus tor students. He realizes new students sometimes have
truble integrating themselves into the University
The Administration has gone half way. Now it's
up to the students to work out the details and carry
the plan through to completion.

d

!

ds

all of the formal e.lueation they will ever g- t. ).
a handful, it must be remembered, go to eo'!'ge.
-

70-vear-o- ld

l

.

K

1

age-limi-

-

future lectio:..

n

.

issue will .t be brouj
At least one loiig-Tougah ut no- That is the pi- up again in SG
smoking in the library. SGA went .:s i..r as it
ht

cod

to get tlu: nile changed; the' Hoard of Trustei'.ssVd
"no." Smoke outside, weed fiends; SGA di.( its
bt'st-b- ut
.
a rule's a rule, or so it ste-- s.
o

o

o

Ptemember the card section con!:r.Tsy of last
.
year? SGA and Suky agreed to Work en the proi)-lemThey came up with a plan th.it would supposedly bring back the card section nd solve the
problem. But neither organization
d this year.
ai have lollowxd up their
card-throwin-

.

g

.

What's the reason."'
l.ast week thn was a pep ral'y spe:'.kjig. T!.r- football team ..
'
.. u rs wre thi re. but the i!i,t,
b .dy was eoi;vi,-.auby their ab-- :
Ys not too suave to be seen at a jr ' "
like a p.-- r..':y. But lets i
'
h.ill team and
a big tiiiii t

in a maun i
th- - che:
ya! student
Of ,our -.

y

ga!

!

'..'r we ive
we h

.

'"-ani-

voting citizens
go bracket' n ho haNe nVeivi
little or no education. The new generations, however, have increased the ratio of grade and high
school graduates in the state.
Politics and government are taught j.nore than
evir Ik fore in Kentucky schools. The
ot today are better informed than the
citizens wi re in 197.
Whv should Ke!ituck block intelligent eitiens
from Noting with an archaic age restriction.- Georg'a was the first state to lower age restrictions. The adinrndii.eiit in Georgia was pass, J
shortK after 'World War il with the ei
enough to fight. "Id enough to Note."
t
question
Kentuckv n ' d not make the
.aemotional issue. Hut citizens should consiitj
that passage o the amendment would give leg.:
:ting responsibility.
privilege equa t
..:;eiduie:it would bring a larg"
Furthermore.
numler of cv .... t rt ion's, informed vott rs i:.n.
"of

th-

i

n

k---

o

social life.

There are hundreds

e-.?-

d;sp,-.ss