xt79p843tn9x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79p843tn9x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660329  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1966 1966 2015 true xt79p843tn9x section xt79p843tn9x Inside Today's Kernel
Who't hiring study reveals demand
tor college graduates: Pogt Two.

Barry Porter discusses John O'Brien's
candidacy In the University Soapbox:
Page Five.

Young Democrats charge a political
deal In the Student Congress race:
toge Three.

tditor

IE IE. WW.

Tommy Kron will play in Kentukiana
games this weekend: Page Six.
UK's

discusses

AWS and

a

'liberal-

izing step': Page Four.

fraternity system has kept up
its growth pattern: Page Eight.

Vol. LVII, No. 107

University of Kentucky
MARCH
KY.,

Eight Pages

J

J

LEXINGTON,

TUESDAY,

29, 19G0

Porter-Field- s

Slate Enters
SC Campaign

V
ft

By TERENCE HUNT
Kernel Managing Editor
Carson Porter and Marsha Fields announced today as the second
slate for executive positions in the Student Congress elections,
April 7.
SC reprePorter, a two-terrepresentation lor the student
sentative who made an unsucbody, Porter said.
cessful bid for the presidency
Student representation is, in
last year, will run against John fact, the name of the first plank
O'Brien, another presidential of their platform. Proposed under
candidate and current SC vice this heading is "better utilization of the representation authopresident.
Miss Fields, a member of the rized to the student body on
Congress Judiciary Board, will faculty committees concerning
oppose Oscar Westcrfield for the student affairs."
said delegates
Porter
to
vice president's position. The
two slates arc the only ones to student-oriente- d
faculty committees have not always been
announce so far.
slate will
The Porter-Field- s
run on an eight-pa"student
Young Democrats charge a povoice" ticket aimed at improved litical deal in the Student Congress
race, page three.
rt

British Debaters
To Argue Here
Debaters from Great Britain

and the University will join forces
tonight to argue the merits of
United
nam.

States

The

policy in

Viet-

visitors are Michael
Hartley-Brewe- r
of the University
of Birmingham
and Richard
Calder Jose of Nottingham University. One will team with UK
debater Carson Porter of Louisville in supporting the American
position, and the other will join
John Patton of Ashland in opposing it.
The debate, sponsored by the
UK Student Congress, is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. at the College
of Law Building. It is open to
the public.

appointed, and often are not
appointed for representation dur-

-

t

"y

!

'Care For A Light?9
"Care for a light, Herr Biedermann?" firebugs
Jim Stacey, left, and Bill Stakclin, right, ask the
harrassed B iedermann played by Albert Pvlc.

lj

Photo By Sam Abell

center, in Cuignol's production of "Biedermann
and the Firebugs" which opens April 13. See
story, page eight.

20 Candidates File ForSC Election
With one day left to apply,

20

candidates filed this morning

to run for representatives in

Stu-

dent Congress.
Of the 20 students who have
applied, 17 are fraternity and

sorority members.
Only one incumbent, Steve
Cook, sophomore political science major, had filed this morning.
Independents who have filed
are Rodney Page, sophomore, political science; Herbert Bill
Deskins, second year law student;
and Charles L. Lamar, first year
law student.

the University

Bookstore is owned by the University but not on a nonprofit
basis. Porter proposes to somehow eliminate the profit factor
Continued on Page

(

One Day Left To Apply

ing the full term of the faculty
committee.
"We intend to lake full advantage of that offer," Porter
said, "even if it means appointing representatives for January
to January."
Porter and Miss Fields also
propose to investigate the possibilities of turning the campus
bookstore into a nonprofit bookstore. "I'll grant you that this
might not be possible but no
one has ever looked into it,"
Porter said.

Currently

c

7

Of those with Greek affiliation four are from Delta Zeta
Kathleen Ann Petry,
sorority
junior in psychology; Julia Ann
Kiser, junior in elementary education; Cheryl Fegley, sophomore
in elementary education; a nd
Ruby Clonts, junior in elementary
education.
Three students from Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity have filed.
They are Joe Westcrfield, freshman in Arts and Sciences; Ralph
Wesley, junior in economics; and
Tom Post, junior in mathematics.
Three filing from Phi Gamma
Delta fraternity are Frank King,

junior in Mechanical

Engineer-

ing; Marvin Wachs, junior in
chemistry; and Steve Cook.
Other candidates are Jack
Cunningham, sophomore in political science and a member of
Delta Tau Delta; Sheryl Snyder,
sophomore in political science
and a member of Sigma Chi.
Martha Ann Cash, freshman
in English, Chi Omega; Linda
J. Cornett, sophomore in English,
Chi Omega; Marianne Banta,
sophomore in English, Kappa
Kappa Gamma; and Mickey
Miller, sophomore in agriculture,
Farmhouse.

Local Board Has
Test Applications
4-

The Lexington draft board today reported that it has been
giving out applications for the college draft deferment test since
Thursday, but not as many as it had expected.

-

"r..

ed,"

V

t

1

:

17

r

t

ikl

J

I

Is
:

Alpha Chi Omega Ceremonies

Mrs. John Sanders, chairman of Alumnae District
Nine, talks with Linda Bodwell, national field
adviser, at the initiation ceremonies for the 104th

chapter of Alpha Chi Omega sorority which were
held this weekend at UK.

l

a spokesman said.

Any male college student or
high school senior may get the
applications from any local board
in the state. This means, for instance, that UK students will
not have to wait until they get
home to pick them up. The Lexington board, where they are
available here, is at 190 N. Upper
Street.
There is no chance whatever
that they will become available
on the UK campus, the spokesman said.
The tests, as reported earlier,
will be given May 14 and 21
and June 23 at 1,200 locations
in the nation and 10 in Kentucky.
The Kentucky centers include
UK, the University of Louisville,
Western,
Morehead,
Murray,
Brescia, Pikeville, Eastern, Cum-

berland, and Paducahjunior
lege.
Composed of

150

Col-

questions,

hours to complete.
Local boards may use the test
scores and class standings to
determine who will be deferred,
but they may use neither if they
so desire.
As Col. Everette S. Stephenson reported last Thursday, when
his State Selective Service office
was in the process of releasing
the test applications, the local
board can use anything it wants
to in reaching its final decision.
At that time, some had hoped
that recent increases in voluntary enlistments would remove
the need todrait college students.
Col. Stephenson allowed thisjMis-sibilitbut reserved some doubt.
"You know who's enlisting,"
he pointed out. "Those we've
already examined ami approved
for service." This, he implied,
should keep the college student
in sufficient danger to encourage
him to take the test.

* tii, tru iw
Who's iriinj Who
Study Reveals Demand For College Graduates
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CKOLLEY
CLEANERS

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Tuesday, March

29,

IWio- -3

Condemn COP Hndorscmcnls Of Slate

Young Demos Hint At 'Deal' In SC Race

WIUJAM KNAM'
Krrnrl Staff Wriirr
The campus Young Democ r;it s
unanimously passed a resolution
Monday night condemning the
recent e ndorsement by their Republican counterparts of the
ticket in the
upcoming Student Congress election.
"Such endorsement is wholly
out of place in campus elections,"
Chris Gorman, chairman of the
executive board of the Young
Democrats said.
"This endorsement introduces
the clement of statewide and
national politics into a nonpartisan election which is to he
held on state property," lie said.
Traditionally,
campus elections hae been nonpartisan
rather than identified with national oriented political groups,
such as Young Republicans or
Democrats.
"The Young Republicans,
however, have endorsed the
d
ticket in
what the Young Democrats feel
is a 'you scratch my back and
I'll scratch yours' type of deal,
instigated by some amateur Greek
politicians," Gorman said.
The Young Democrats believ e
there was a political deal made
between the present officers of
the Young Republican club to
d
endorse the
ticket as payment of a political
favor owed to O'Brien and
for previous support in
Young Republican elections, Gorman added.
The type of deal suggested is
one "in which my fraternity and
my girl's sorority will support you
in the Young Republican election
if your fraternity and your girl's
By

O'Brien-Westerfiel-

d

O'Brien-Westerfiel-

O'Brien-Westerfiel-

Wes-terfie-

Bulletin Board
Students interested in looking
over literature obtained by the
Student Congress pertaining to
e
sumpossible places of
mer employment outside of the
Blue Grass area should go to
Room 115 of the Student Center
from 3 p.m., Monday-Frida9.
March
full-tim-

y,

Pitkin Club has been perusing
Christian morality from many
denominational perspectives this
spring. This week Pitkin Club
presents Rev. Don Eliem who
will speak on Christian Morality
from a Luthern viewpoint. The
club meets at the Presbyterian
Center, at 412 Rose St. each
Wednesday at noon. Reserv ations
can be made by phone
before noon Wednesday.
(254-188-

The Philosophy Club will
meet at 4 p.m. Wednesday in
Room 309 of the Student Center. Robert W. Fleishman will
read a paper entitled "On the
Problem of 'National Personality' in Historical Writing."
Applications are available for
president, vice president, and
representative of Student Congress in Room 102 of the Student
Center. The filing deadline is
March 31.
Newly elected Delta Zeta officers are Cheryl Mathias, president; Diane Beck, pledge trainer;
Rena Ilorton, rush chairman;
Chert Bradley, assistant rush
chairman; Terry Miller, historian; Ruby Clouts, recording secretary; Carol Ott, corresponding
secretary; Cheryl Fegley, treasurer; Rosemary Cox, treasurer
in training; Gail Wartman, social
chairman; Janie Barber, activiDiane Davis,
ties chairman;
house president; Susan Lintner,
.standards cha.ir.iuan; and Jane
'
,Bray 'scholarship chairman. '

sorority will support mc in the
Student Congress election," Gorman said.
"I would like to emphasie
this Is no attack on the Greek
system as such, as I am a proud
member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. However, it shocks my
conscience to see theseambitious
young men let their petty ambitions give the Greek system a
black eye," Gorman said.
The Young Democrats called
the endorsement "sham and fri- -

vilous," and cited another recent
"uninformed and naive effort"
the failure of the Young Republicans to rise above party
factionalism to support the bond
issue in the past statewide election.
"Last September the Young
Democrats wrote a letter to the
president of the Young Republicans, Steve Young, asking for
support of the bond issue. The
bond issue is a nonpartisan measure to benefit all the people in

the slate, not just the Young
Democrats, or the Young Republicans," Gorman said.
At that time the Young Re-

decided to rectify their ostrichlike behavior of the past, and
get their heads up out of the
sand, but it is unfortunate that
they have chosen this occasion,
which introduces the element of
partisan politics into an election
which is not among Democrats
and Republicans, but rather one
conducted
students,"
among
Gorman said.
"Both O'Brien and Wester-fielare registered Democrats,
too," he said.

publicans could not support the
bond issue even though every
Republican leader in the state
had endorsed it. "The Young
Republicans gav e no concrete reasons why they were unable to
support the bond issue," he
added.
"It is pleasing to see the
Young Republicans have finally

ALASKA

d

NORTH CAROLINA
Fayetteville: Hatcher's Jewelers
Gastonia: Morris Jewelers
Goldsboro: Garris Jewelers
Greensboro: Schiffman Jewelry Co.
Henderson villa : Gordon's Jewelers
Hickory: The Bisanar Company
High Point: Perkinson's Jewelry Co.
Jacksonville: Walton's Jewelers
Kings Mountain :Denffer'j Jewel Shop, Inc.
Lincolnton: Rankin's Jewelers
Lumberton: A. J. Holmes. Jeweler
Morganton: Gregory Jewelers
Raleigh: Johnson's Jewelers
Raleigh: Jolly's Jeweler s- -2 Stores
Reidsville: Mace's Jewelry Gifts
Rocky Mount: Gehman's Jewelry Store
Salisbury: Bishop C. Leonard, Jewelers
Sanford: Wagoner's Jewelers
Southern Pines: Perkinson's Inc.

Anchorage: McKinley Jewelry

Fairbanks: Ralph W. Perdue, Jeweler
ALABAMA

Anniston: Couch's Jewelry Co.

Auburn: Ware Jewelers
Birmingham: Bromberg's
Birmingham: Bromberg's (ML Brook)
Decatur: Diamond Jewelry Co.
Johnston St. 4 Gateway Shopping Center
Florence: Rogers Fine Jlry Dept.
Fort Payne: Martin's Jewelers
Gadsden: C. F. Hoffman a Sons, Inc.
Huntsville: Bromberg's
Mobile: Claude Moore, Jeweler
Montgomery: Bromberg's
Opelika: La Mont Jewelers
Talladega: Griffin's Jewelry
Talladega: Raff's Jewelers

Wson:Churchwell's

ARKANSAS

Winston-Salem- :

Camden: Stinson's Jewelers
Crossett: Elliott's Jewelers
El Dorado: Elliott's Jewelers
Fayetteville: Underwood's College Jlrs.
Jonesboro: Purvis Jewelers

Cincinnati: Herschede Jewelers

DIAMOND

RINGS

TENNESSEE

TEXAS
Austin: Joe Koen 4 Son
Caldwell, Jewelers
Bryan:
Dallas: Everts Jewelers
2
Dallas: Owens Bros. Jeweler
El Paso: Holdsworth Jeweler
El Paso: Sheldon Jewelry Co. Inc.
Fort Worth: Haltom's Jewelers
Garland: Oglesby Jewelry 4 Gifts-Ri- dge
Wood Shopping Center
Garland Shopping Center
Henderson: Mitchell's Jewelers
Houston: Billings Jewelry 2 Stores
Houston: Walzel Jewelry 2 Stores
Killeen: Keen's Jewelers
New Braunfels: Willis Jewelers
Pasadena: Michaels Jewelry
Port Arthur: Turnbull's Jewelry
San Antonio: Leopold Jewelers
San Antonio: Shaw's Jewelers Gunter
Shoppers City
Shopping City
L. S. James Jeweler
Temple:
Waco: Armstrong Jewelers

INDIANA
Madison: Oscar C. Bear 4 Son
New Albany: Ray's Jewelry
KENTUCKY
Bowling Green: Howard Jewelers
Covington: Motch Jewelers
Hopkinsville: Joy's Jewelers
Lexington: Victor Bogaert Co.
Louisville: Lemon & Son, Jewelers

LOUISIANA
Alexandria: Schnack's
Bogalusa: Gayles Jewelers
Breaux Bridge: Robert's Jewelry 4 Gifts
De Quincy: E. W. Rodger s Co.
Morgan City: Besse Jewelers
Opelousas: Mornhiveg 4 Castille. Jlrs.
Ruston: Grigsby's Jewelers
Shreveport: McCary's Shreve City Jlrs,
Shreveport: McCary Jewelers-Downtow- n
MARYLAND
Annapolis: Tilghman Co.
Chevy Chase: R. Harris and Company
Wheaton: Winthrop Jewelers

CONTE8SA

Biloxi: Elliott Jewelry Co.

Corinth: Waits Jewelry Store
Hattiesburg: Parris Jewelers
Hattiesburg: Rollings Jewelry Company
Jewelers
Jackson: Strauss-Stalling- s
McComb: Hainer Jewelers
Natchez: Butts 4 Yoste Jewelers
Oxford: Crouch's Jewelry
Pascagoula: Felts Jewelers Co.
Vicksburg: Strauss-Stallin- g
West Point: Rowell Jewelers

FROM

$150

VIRGINIA
Alexandria: Winthrop Jewelers
Clifton Forge: Hodges Jewelry Store
Covington: Hodges Jewelry Store
Danville: Hodnett 4 Speer Co.
Falls Church: Winthrop Jewelers
Harrisonburg: John W. Taliaferro, Jlrs.
(Wilson's)
Lynchburg: Phillips Bros. Jewelers
Norfolk: D. P. Paul Co.- -2 Stores
Richmond: Schwartschild Bros. 2 Stores
Roanoke: George T. Hitch Jeweler
Staunton: H. L. Lang 4 Co., Jewelers
Suffolk: Brewer Jewelry Co. Inc.
Waynesboro: Hodges Jewelry Store

WASHINGTON. D.C.
Washington: Fan's Jewelers
R. Harris and
Washington:
Company-Downto-

wn,

Georgetown 4 Chevy Chase
Washington: Chas. Schwartz 4 Son

WEST VIRGINIA
Charleston: Galperin Jewelry Co.

Clarksburg: Williams Jewelers
Fairmont: Ray's Jewelry Co.
Morgantown: Robert A. Yagle, Jewelers
Wheeling: Posms Jewelers

NORTH CAROLINA
Albemarle: Starnes Jewelry
Asheville: Lee's Jewelers
Asheville: Gordon's Jewelers
Canton: Gordon's Jewelers
Charlotte: Fields Jewelers, Inc.
Durham: Jones & Frasier- -2 Stores

BY

SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston: Hamilton Jewelers
Charleston: Charles Kerrison, Jewelers
Columbia: Gudmundson and Buyck
Columbia: Reyner Hamilton Jewelers
Lancaster: D. L. Robinson Co.
Orangeburg: Cleo's Jewelry and Gifts
Summerville: Dorchester Jewelers
Fischer-Evans
Jewelers
Clarkesville: Joy's Jewelers
Cleveland: Pinion Jewelry Co.
Dyersburg: Lewis Jewelers
Gallatin: Blue's Jewelry
Greenville: Lancaster's
Henderson: Galbraith's Jewelry
Johnson City: Beckner's Inc.
Knoxville: Bowen's Jewelry
Bearden Center
Knoxville: Kimball's
Lawrenceburg: Downey 4 Jones
Lewisburg: Downey 4 Jones
Jewelers
Memphis: Graves-SteuwMurfreesboro: Aultman Jewelers
Nashville: George T. Brodna.
Green Hills Village 4 Madison Square
Nashville: Phil Brodnan6th Avenue
Shelby ville: Henning Jewelers
South Pittsburg: Hall Jewelers
Springfield: Downey 4 Jones
Tullahoma: Henning Jewelers

GEORGIA

SOLD

Stores

Chattanooga:

Albany: The Mayfair Jewelers
Atlanta: Maier A Berkele Inc.
College Park: Travis M. Harbin, Jeweler
Columbus: Kirven's Fine Jewelry
Decatur: Maier & Berkele Inc.
Douglas: Wilson Jewelry Store
Gainesville: Mintz Jewelers
Gordon: Dennis Jewelry Co.
Macon: Kernaghan Inc. Jewelers
Rossville: Brody's Rossville Jly. Co.
Savannah: Desbouillons2 Stores
Savannah: Levy Jewelers 2 Stores
Valdosta: Girardin Jewelers

MISSISSIPPI

OHIO
4

OKLAHOMA
Bartlesville: Joseph Derry berry Jewelers
Durant: Gem Credit Jewelers
Enid: Morgan's Diamond Shop
Idabel: Anderson's Jewelry
Miami: Williams Jewelry
Oklahoma City: B. C. Clark Jewelers
Oklahoma City: fl. C. Clark, Mayfair Inc.
Norman: Good no's Jewelry
Shawnee: Sperry's Jewelers

FLORIDA
Clearwater: Trickels Jewelers
Lawton 4 Co. Jewelers
Daytona Beach: Wm. A. Ritzi & Sons
Fort Lauderdale: Carroll's Jewelers
Fort Myers: Fishel 4 Dowdy Jewelers
Fort Pierce: Charles G. Rhoads & Son, Inc.
Fort Walton Beach: Ratcliff Jewelers
Gainesville: Robertson Jewelers
Haines City: Frank Angle, Jlrs.
Hialeah: Mayor's Jlrs. 4 Silversmiths
Hialeah: Snow's Jewelers
Hollywood: Mayor's Jlrs. 4 Silversmiths
Jacksonville: Underwood Jewelers Inc.
3 Stores
Kendall: Mayor's Jlrs. 4 Silversmiths
Miami: Mayor's Jlrs. 4 Silversmiths
Mulberry: Mulberry Jewelers
North Miami Beach: Mayor's Jlrs. 4
Silversmiths
Orlando: Lawton 4 Co. Jewelers
Orlando:
Jewelers
Orlando: San Juan Jewelry Co.
Panama City: Cogburn's Jewelers
Perry: Wells Jewelers
Plant City: Crescent Jewelers
Tallahassee: Putnam Jewelers
Jewelers
Tampa: Adams-Magno- n
Tampa: Yates Jewelers, Inc.
Titusville: Chambers Jewelers
St. Petersburg: Bruce Walters Jewelers
2 Stores
West Palm Beach: Gillespie Jewelers
Winter Park: Ivey'sSwalstead Jewelers

Inc.

McPhails Inc.

PUERTO RICO

San Jaun: Pascual, Inc. -- HO Cruz Street

FINE

JEWELERS

THROUGHOUT

AMERICA

* Liberalizing Step

The Associated Woman's Student Association at Purdue University lias come up with a simple
solution which would seem to
counter the University AWSs
perennial excuse that for personnel
reasons, late hours could not be
considered.

I? T,,r liU il ,s
Tin; Wav I
Free Flections For Americans

Women's government implies
the assumption that women college students are mature adults
and in this context AWS's beliefs
that they should be watched over
seem ludicrous. Governing organizations should be the leaders of
students, not reacting only when
the cry of the majority student
Purdue's AWS proposes to hire
student niht hostesses to let voice is so loud as to be almost
women students back into the dor- deafening.
mitory w henever they return. This
Some UK w omen, w hether they
does not mean they must find
or not, hav e called
students willing to stay up all are the majority
for greater freedom from their Uniniiit. They plan to use several
versity landlady, whose policies
"shifts" of workers.
are set by AWS. By granting the
As more and more colleges and freedom to these women, AWS
universities are moving tow ard free- in no way interferes with the freeing their women students, the UK dom of those who prefer stricter
chapter of AWS looks more aixl regulations. This group may conmore obsolete in insisting they be tinue to observ e 10:30
p.m. closings
regulated strictly. The excuses of- but on a
rather than
fered against late hours, like the
basis. They should
one concerning personnel, seem have no right, however, to deny
to be mere flimsy fascades for an the rights of those women wanting
unwillingness on the part of the later hours.
AWS representatives themselves to
free themselves from paternalism
We can only hope that the
and assume responsibility for their newly elected AWS will be more
own actions.
liberal than its predecessors in
Perhaps it is true, as AWS recognizing the need for increased
claims, that the majority of the nonacademic freedom for women
UK women do not want a "no students and understanding the
hours" situation, but AWS has no true role of AWS as a protector
responsibility to see that these of women's interests rather than
women get the coddling they de- a policing agency in women's resisire.
dence halls.

,,nvc

1

loo

self-impose- d

staff-impose-

d

If

Berkeley Tackles Bigness

Letters To The Editor:

The mere size of a university can
be its undoing. A bureaucratic,
standardized, impersonal, assembly line operation can take the
heart out of education and leave
the students unchallenged, uninspired, unfulfilled.
To tlie Editor of the Kernel:
the outer w orld that tend to corrupt
Major American universities are
During a cursory examination of our parochial student body. We aware of the dangers, and increasneed never fear that anyone will
your daily tabloid I chanced to see
ingly there are signs that they are
on Candidate O'Brien's dare profane the "Holy Body's"
your report
determined to do something about
debates w hile we have such sterling it.
speech before that illustrous group
known as the Kappa Kappa
apostles of virtue among us.
Now a special faculty committee
Gammas.
of the University of California at
It is the apogee of ridulousness
It was indeed refreshing to hear
to expect less from our glorious Berkeley, responding to last year's
that our lilywhite paragons of virtue
leaders. We of all faiths must join student unrest, has come up with
recommendations.
are to be protected from the secular
together and give thanks for those far reaching
These would strengthen student-facult- y
influence of political discussion
w ho show us the true way. May w e
never stray from it.
rapport and allow greater
upon the floor of the Student Congress. We dare not risk the retaropportunity for students to move
DAVID C. SHORT in educational
directions compatidation, both social and communal,
Law Junior ble with their
own individual needs
that might result from exposure to
and interests.
the sometimes grim realities of the
w omenUnder programs envisioned by
world. We must protect our
Not Tlie Man
the faculty committee, Berkeley's
folk from these realities. Why what
would Kentucky do with women
Please inform your readers that 27,000 students could receive dethat accepted equal responsibilities
grees for experimental study proI am not the local sports editor
It mentioned
grams not included in the tradialong with their equal rights?
in your editorial,
tional departments. And instead
would disturb the status quo and "Second's Best," of March 25.
of the Ph.D. they could receive
Mr. O'Brien and Mr. Westerfield
RUSSELL RICE a Doctor of Arts degree, designed
are to be commended for their valfor persons drawn more to college
Sports Editor, Lexington Leader
the forces of
iant struggle against
teaching than to a life of scholarly
research. While the Doctor of Arts
degree would be more demanding
than the master's, no dissertation
would be required.
The South's Outstanding College Daily
In addition, students could help
University of Kentucky
rate faculty teaching but not, as
ESTABLISHED 1894
TUESDAY. MARCH 29. 1P56
some would like, share in policyWalteh Chant,
making by sitting on faculty and
Tehence Hunt, Managing Editor
Linda Mills, Executive Editor
administrative committees. They
John Zeii, Neus Editor
Associate News Editor
Associate News Editor
could receive liberal credit for work
Kenneth Gheen,
Judy Chisham,
IIenhy Rosenthal, Sports Editor
and research done outside the uniMahcaret Bailey, Arts Editor
Caholyn Williams, Feature Editor
versity and for community, service
Business Staff
projects.
Mahvin Huncatb, 'Circulation Manager
William JCnapp, Advertising Manager
Some of these suggestions,' as

Womenfolk And Politics:

Reader Jabs At SC Race

well as others included in

the

Bei-kele-

y

report, are already common
policy in one or another American
college or university. The striking
thing about the Berkeley recommendations is simply that they
bring together so many relatively
new programs all moving in the
direction of greater flexibility.
Education must become flexible
enough to meet individual needs
(without becoming so amorphous
that it ceases to be education).
While some of the Berkeley proposals are bound to come under
heavy attack in faculty debates,
and may need modification, movement in the direction of the report
seems to us inescapable, not only
in Berkeley, but at other large
universities across the land.
The Christian Science Monitor

The Kentucky Kernel
Editor-in-Chi-

-

.i

-

--

1

* m

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March 29, lfi--

University Soanli

By BARRY FORTER
have remained silent in the
hopes that someone might comment upon Mr. O'Brien's announcement of his candidacy.
Hut since no one has seen lit
to do so, 1 rise somewhat reluctantly to the dubious honor.
I

Mr. O'Brien, who has of late
displayed his forensic talents on

the floor of Student Congress,
has issued a platform that is a
masterpiece of x)litical acumen.
He plans to double an employment service that can accommo- Ar. Torier, a junior in Arts and
Sciences, was a participant in the

merger negotiations between Student Congress and the Student
Center Board.

date presently

300 students but
has yet to see a fraction of those
hired out of a possible 12,000
employers. This is indeed a
grandiose gesture. Another plank
is to administer the book ex- -

1

"

VI

,''

juiMfT,

i

:f

JOHN O'BRIEN

change. Considering last semes-j- t
s
response t tlis pro)osa
seems like wistful
thinking.
He mentions an increase
in the
representative function of the
Congress. I will applaud cspc-liathis a