xt79p843tp06 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79p843tp06/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680725  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 25, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 25, 1968 1968 2015 true xt79p843tp06 section xt79p843tp06 Tie

The South's Outstanding College Daily

Kirwan Named
To Fill Interim
Presidency Post

i

"
i
'

'

-

,
-

;

M,

ill

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Interim President

Dr. A. D. Kirwan speaks to the Board of Trustees following his
appointment as interim UK president. Dr. Kirwan, a professor
of history and formerly dean of the graduate school, told the Board
that he would try "to hold the fort" until a permanent president
is chosen.

For August, September Only

Draft Physicals Suspended
College Press Service

WASHINCTON(CPS)-T-

he

severe financial problems plaguing the federal government as a
result of the Vietnam war are
beginning to take their toll on
the Selective Service System.
Selective
Service Director
Lewis B. Hershey has ordered
all local draft boards to schedule no more preinduction physical examinations for August or
September. The move, in effect,
will limit the draft between now
and late October to persons who
already have passed their physicals, or have received notices
to take them.
Hershey said physical
were being temporarily
halted as an economy measure
made necessary by the $6 billion reduction in Federal spending ordered by Congress for the
fiscal year which began July 1.
Hershey also rescinded the fil
exant-ination-

s

ling of vacancies and promotions
in the Selective Service System
until further notice.
Selective Service officials say
the suspension of physical examinations will have no effect on
their job of supplying manpower
for the military. They also emphasized that the "embargo may
be lifted at any time." As long
as the suspension is in effect,
however, all draftees will be
taken from the pool of "slightly more than 100,000 men" who
already have taken and passed
their physicals, but have not yet
been inducted, officials said.
The draft call for August is
only about 18,300, compared with
a level of 40,000 a month last
spring. Although the Department
of Defense has not listed the call
for September, Mrs. Betty Vetter,
executive director of the Scientific Manpower Commission, expects draft calls will be relative

UK Young Republicans
Named To Nixon Staff

By LINDA ROBERTS
Three UK students have been chosen to serve on Richard
Nixon's personal staff during the Republican National Convention
in Miami.
The three students, Allen Youngman, Patt Maney, and Eric
Karnes will assist Nixon's upper echelon aides. The Nixon staff
carries only 20 such student assistants.
This is Karnes' second trip to a Republican Convention. In
11)61 he served as a volunteer for Barry Coldwater.
Youngman, Maney, and Karnes began to muster support for
Nixon's candidacy immediately after Kentucky's gubernatorial election last November. To help obtain this support Patt Maney served
as chairman of the Young Republicans at the University.
According to Maney they will be concerned with assistiiig Nixon's
supporters and providing services to the delegates. This will include such duties as research, ihauffeuring, ami any other tasks
that may be asked of them.
One of the most important services that these 20 students
will have to perform is to insure that the delegates are aware of
and present on the floor for all important convention business.
Continued on Page 8, CoL 2

Vol. LIX, No. 157

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

UNIVERSITY

Thursday Evening, July 25, 1908

ly light until about January,
when they will skyrocket unless
there is a major cutback in the
size of the armed services before then.
Mrs. Vetter, an expert on the
effect of the draft on the nation's manpower needs, says Her- Continued on Page 2, Col. 1

By BOB ZVVICKER
Dr. Albert D. Kirwan, professor of history and former dean
of the UK Craduate School, was appointed acting president of
the University last Friday by the UK Board of Trustees.
Dr. Kirwan will assume the
the Oswald administration and
acting presidency when Dr. John it's
very important that we do
VV. Oswald goeson terminal leave
not let this gain be frittered
10.
Aug.
away in the next several weeks.
Dr. Kirwan's name was sub"I'll do everything I can to
mitted to the tnistees by Dr.
hold the fort and keep the ship
Ralph Angelucci, a trustee and
on a steady course and pass on
chairman of the screening comto the next president as fine
mittee searching for a permanent
an institution as President Osreplacement for Dr. Oswald. Dr.
wald is leaving us," he added.
said the screening comAngelucci
At a press conference followmittee felt that no person under
ing the board meeting, Dr. Kirconsideration for the presidency
wan said he did not intend to
should be named acting presiinitiate any long-terprograms
dent.
while in office.
Presumably, this took out of
He said one of his first tasks
contention Dr. Glen wood Creech,
would be to name an interim vice
who was supported for the tempresident for student affairs to
porary post by former Gov. A.
replace Mr. Robert Johnson, who
B. Chandler. Dr. Creech was exto receive the resigned July 15. The acting vice
pected by many
president could, in turn, appoint
appointment.
the board meeting an acting athletic director.
During
Dr. Kirwan, who is also a
Gov. Louie B. Nunn said Dr.
member of the screening comCreech told him and other trusmittee seeking a successor to Dr.
tees that he had "never sought
the interim presidency, nor the Oswald, said he expected a new
president to be chosen within a
presidency for that matter, and few months.
that he did not want to be conReflecting on Mr. Chandler's
sidered."
opinion that the new president
Cov. Nunn then asked the
trustees to give Dr. Creech a should be a "Kentucky boy",
Dr. Kirwan said it would be the
standing vote ofthanks"forwhat
he has done, is doing and will "best of both worlds" if the
qualities desired in the president
do in the future for the univercould be found in a native
sity."
but he noted that "a
Dr. Kirwan, who is a 1926
vast majority" of those now ungraduate of UK, said "I regard der consideration are from outthis as a summons to duty that
side the state.
I cannot disregard. Many great
have been initiated by
programs
Continued on Page 2, Col. 4
Ken-tuckia- n,

'The Foot Is In The Door'

Congressional Candidate Knocks
UK's Role In Military Research
By GUY MENDES

Don

Graham, independent
candidate for Congress, Wednesday night voiced concern
d
over the University's
research programs.
In a special interview with
the Kernel, Mr. Graham said
that "while spending on
ponsored
research is relatively small at UK, the foot is
in the door," and that "due to
the increasing involvement of
universities across the country
with the military, we should be
careful at the University of
war-relate-

military-s-

Kentucky.'
Mr. Graham, an assistant professor of religion and philosophy at Berea College who calls
himself a "peace candidate, is
opposing incumlKMit Democrat
John Watts and Republican
Russ Mobley in the November
election for the Sixth District
(Lexington) congressional seat.
"I was surprised when I first
saw the figures (on UK's militaryand 1
-related
research)
wondered how many citizens
in this community are aware of
what is going on at UK," Mr.
Graham said.

He said descriptions of military research projects at UK
sound "harmless, but said "we
must remember that the purpose of the military is to destroy.
"I am questioning whether
4
this should be the goal of a
state university or whether our
S "V-university should be placed in
the position of supporting this
goal," he said.
Mr. Graham said that in order for a university to do military research it must "implicitly subscribe to the goals of the
sponsor.
The annual report of the
t
Universi of Kentucky Research
Foundation
(UKRF) for the
DON GRAHAM
10fi7 fiscal year listed over
$76,000 of UK research spon"It would be interesting to
sored by the Department of
know the figures for this year,"
Defense, over $192,000 sponsaid Mr. Graham. "I suspect
sored by the Atomic Energy
Commission and over $256,000
they have been increasing."
Mr. Graham said he was "not
sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administraattacking research per se" and
that he "certainly was not attion.
United States Bureau of tacking the existence of UniverThe
the Budget classifies money sity research programs or even
financed
research,"
spent by those three branches federally
as "military spending.
Continued wi Vg 5. Col. 3

X

--

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, July

2

25,

9(8

1

Kirwan Named

Continued from

fa

-

j

hv--

.

V?

0

ft

c.

Wally Bryan and Dr. Robert Rudd, the student and faculty
sentatives to the Board of Trustees, were sworn in at last week's
board meeting. Bryan, the student trustee by virtue of his po- sition president of UK's Student Government, docs not have a
vote on board actions.
reprc-Sllldc-

.

Dr. Oswald, who was attending his last board meeting, was
honored by the trustees in a
resolution which read in part:
d
"By following(your)
course, the University has indeed made a successful passage
from its first to its second censo
in
and,
doing,
tury
has achieved the transformation
from a relatively small state uni- well-define-

And

jr,
r acuity

One

A native of Louisville, Dr,
Kirwan was head f(X)tball coach
at UK from 1938 to 19 11, dean
of men from 1917 to 1919, dean
of students from 1919 to 1951,
and professor of history from
1931 to 19G0. He served as dean
of the Graduate School for six
years, stepping down in 19G6
to resume his post in the UK
history department.

i

'

.

raft

lrilStCCS

nt

Dr. Kirwan is a widely reand internationally
spected
recognized historian of the American South. He holds a master's
degree from the University of
Louisville and a Ph.D. from Duke
University.

Physicals Temporarily Stopped
Continued from Page One
shey's order suspending physical
examinations will have both a
good and a bad effect on college
graduates and graduate students
who no longer have deferments.
"Assuming the order stays in
effect and the Selective Service
System has to take its share of
the budget cut, this will delay
the induction of many graduates
and graduate students who have
not taken a physical until at
least November," Mrs. Vetter
said. "It will allow many students to start graduate school

and possibly get in at least one
semester of work before being

taken."

But Mrs. Vetter also said the
suspension on physicals may reduce the number of high school
graduates not planning to go to
college who volunteer for the
armed services. She explained
men tend
that many
to volunteer for the service when
they feel the draft breathing
down their necks after they are
called to take a physical. "They
don't have a student deferment
and they know they're going to
non-colle-

HKEMTUCICYl

now showing!

Hie
Green Berets
...JOHN

have to go, so they volunteer
the branch of service they
prefer. But this order cancels
physicals for these young men
as well as for college graduates,"
she said.
"Every time you lose a volunteer, you add another draftee,"
Mrs. Vetter said. The more the
draft call is increased, then the
greater the burden becomes on
college graduates who already
have received their physicals.
ded
In another
last week, the fourth
velopment
assembly of the World Council
of Churches, meeting in Sweden, approved church support for
young men who resist the draft.
A report adopted by an overwhelming majority of the 720
delegates at the meeting said individuals should have the right
to refrain from participation in
"particular wars," such as the
Vietnam war, on grounds of
for

non-votin-

Named Bmce Westley chairman of the UK Department of
Journalism.
Appointed Collins W. Burnett chairman of the Department
of Higher and Adult Education.
Reappointed Hubert C. Mohr
chairman of the Department of
Horticulture.
Appointed

John J. Laverty

administrator of the University
Hospital.

Four Asbury Collegians
Set Up Community Center

By JEANNIE LEEDOM
lot of prayer and a lot of faith helped four young people
establish the Christ Center, a Lexington community center oriented
toward helping young people.
zations and churches donated
"It has to be a miracle!
food and their services."
Mes. Becky Petrie,
Speaking was
The four student, Dixie and
as she pointed out, "We didn't
Jim Parker and Becky and Paul
have a building, so we prayed
about it. Later a man called Petrie from Asbury College in
Wilmore, Ky., have now incorand leased us our present building for one dollar for one year. porated into "Laymen in Action
"We had the building but for Christ."
The Christ Center, located
nothing to fix it up with, so we
about it. Soon a paint on the corner of Maxwell and
prayed
Mill Streets, does three main
store owner donated 175 gallons
of paint; a local motel donated types of ministering to the people:
worth of furniture,
$250,000
The students conduct street
drapes, carpeting, lamps and picthree or four nights
tures; and various civic organi- - meetings
a week. They go into the slum
areas and share their testimonies
with the people.
LAST 6 DAYS
EVERY EVENING AT 8:00
On afternoons, students work
with younger children with whom
they share the teachings of Christ.
and SUN. at 2:00 p.m.
On Wednesdays from 8 p.m.
until midnight and on Fridays,
Saturdays and Sundays from 9
p.m. to.l a.m., the Center sponsors a coffee house called "The
I Catacombs" where they have
DAVID
UONFL
FRANCO
"open-mike- "
discussions and feaI ture a band called "The Conten-

draft-relate-

DAVID

Wayne Janssen

vcrsity to one that contributes
with increasing effect to regional,
national and international needs
. . . The light by which you
guided us was bright and unwavering. We shall proceed in
its afterglow for a yet considerable time."
Two new board members were
sworn in by Gov. Nunn at the
meeting. The new trustees are
Dr. Robert W. Rudd, chairman
of the UK agricultural economics
department, and student government president Wallace Bryan.
g
memBryan will be a
ber of the board.
In other action the trustees:

A

STRAND

WMiW'TO
SAT.

MATS.

"Super-coo-

l!

Exciting!

NPluperfectr-(c-

'Fascinating! Irresistible!"--,
"Always special! He Is best!"-- ,,

r

r,,

)

r

1
S

RICMARO

VANfSSA

1H11S-ME-1RQ-HE1WS-I-

ders."

Baifd
"Super-chi-

Sleek, stunning, ready to pounce!

c!

'Dazzling!"

Huntress supreme!"

marvel!"

'She is marvelous!"

"Delicious,

mini-skirt- ed

--

S
JACK

on
D

L

ht ni.
arted

CM(L0!
t

MOSS

LOGAN

Bon

HART

hw

KM

ONCE

AMD

ind I .m

Fforo

IhF

TECHNICOLOR

"A stunningly detailed bank robbery. The movie's high
point by far!"
Two irresistible objects sparked by a chess game as titillating
as the Tom Jones eating sequence!" , ..'We've got a beauty UW
"A soon-to-famous kissing scene!"-- ,
"When Dunaway meets McQueen. ..the
to fly!

FUIUHE

PANAVISION

Mu'C
KINO

FROM

by f

NtDtMO

L0tt

H WHIIE

WARNER

ARTS

vl

FIRST RUN!
STARTS 9:10;

Adm. $1.50

THE CYCLES... THE SURF...
AND THE SWINGERS
THAT MAKE IT ALL GO!

sparks begin

McQueen and Dunaway is the

KNIR

ms

r..,

chess game between

If

W( 8S IV)

nitty) jytSLj

A

JAY

sexiest

thing I've ever seen in a movie. A shining triumph! Marvelous!
Superb! A motion picture that is sheer class. ..one of the best!"-,a- c,
llu-

Miristh Corpoution

-

Pu soiils

StevoMcQuoen
FayeDunawiy,,,

A Norman Jowison Film

u

.o,u,,K
'

H

fc'J'lll

CO! OK ly
j

i

1

M1UU

Uluvr

II,

...

l

w

o
R

- ''""

fHKluit'tl

W.

SuKKld to4 Mlui AudirntfTt.fT.j

.Mill

D...M.-.-

l

NiMIIMII

.

......7.

lWIOll

j
PANAVISIOr COLOR

LAII.CON0ITIONI9

Center is
and people of all faiths or with
no faith are invited to attend
the street meetings or the cof-

h

United ApllStS

EXCLUSIVE!
BIS EUCLID

One of the most recent goals
of the center is to le a liome
for
homeless
young people.
"There's really no place in Lexington where older teenagers and
young adults can live, so our
goal is to take these people in
and let them live with us until they are
stated Mrs. Petrie.
The Center is now housing
M people-fo- ur
directors, 21 stall
members and live other young

peopk.
"The ("enter is really proving to us that Cod is not dead,"
saiii Mis. Petrie. "The Christ

r

111
1'iiumurke .Jack Weston
..
,
rl.in
T1

..

"We are not trying to be a
church, we are an avenue where
the churches can work," said
Mrs. Petrie. "We believe Christ
can change the hearts and motivations of these people in the
slum areas."

FIRST
2W 2174

RUN!

BY DE LUXE

Plus
'THE HOUSE OF 1,000 DOLLS" color
VINCENT

PRICE

MARTHA HYER

fee

house."
READ

THE KERNEL

CLASSIFIED COLUMN DAILY

* Till:

KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Tluirsl.i, July

'IX

IWM- -.1

Centennial Theatre To Produce 'King Lear9

By D. C. MOORE
The Centennial Theatre will
present for their final production of the 19G8 summer session,
William Shakespeare's
"King

Lear".

This play, which is well
known and really needs no detailed description, will probably
be the best that the Centennial
will do for the '68 summer sea
son.

Miniatures From Modern
Masters Now On Display
Modern Masters in Miniature and Craphics from Cubism to
Op,
an art exhibition from the Kay Hillman Collection, New York
City,
will open at the University of Kentucky Art
Callery Wednesday
July 24th. Selected by Mrs. Hillman, the exhibition is divided into
two sections: 22 modern masters in miniatures
(paintings, drawings
and collages) and 23 graphics.
This collection, (one of which is pictured below) formed over
many years, and
continually, reflects Kay Hillman's
interest in those germinating stages of a master's work. By concentrating on the miniature, she has isolated specific statements.
Loosely construed, the Collection nonetheless offers an index-partito be sure-o- f
various stylistic committments made since the turn
of the century.
The exhibition will be on view from July 24th through August
14th at the following hours: Monday through
Friday
Saturday

The Centennial Theatre which
has had a fantastic season so far
this year with their first three
productions, will rise to new
heights after their production of

"King Lear."
To be directed by Charles
Dickens, King Lear, will star

famed Shakespearean actor Arnold Moss, who came to Lexington especially for this play. With
the addition of this new blood,
"King Lear" will be an outstanding production and come close
to establishing The Centennial
Theatre as one of the better
summer productions.
Over the past few years The
Centennial Theatre has slowly
been building a reputation that
they can be proud of. "King
Lear" should be the best pror
duction of the
span.
four-yea-

The '68 summer season has
shown the technical talent and
the acting ability of the Centennial members involved. All

9--

and Sunday

of these will be brought to bear
on "King Lear"
"King Lear" as done by the
Centennial Theatre ought to be
unusual, provocative and beautiful.
The play, which lends much
to the modern theatre while taking nothing away, can be staged
in many different styles without
destroying the total effects involved.
Even if the play does contain some Elizebethan conventions, the play is not restricted
to any one mode or set as many
modern plays are.
The Centennial Theatre will
be out to suprise with their uniqueness.
By bringing in Arnold Moss
an'd adding the combined talents
of the regular Centennial members, The Centennial Theatre will
close the finest season that they
have had so far plus add greatly
to the reputation of the University of Kentucky's Arts.

far
J

'A

ui

rj?

.

Arnold Moss, noted Shakespearean actor has come to Lexington to play the lead role in
Centennial Theatre's final production of the summer, "King

Lear."

5.

Unusual Music Selections

of Death

UK Chorus Sings

The University of Kentucky
Summer Chorus will present its
summer concert Wednesday, July
31 at the Agricultural Science Au-

ditorium.

The program will include two
selections, a "Mass in
by Franz Schubert and "A Parable of Death" by Lukas Foss.
is a beauThe Mass in
tiful piece of music with unusual
chord arrangements and a sensitive lyrical style not found in
spme religious works. The tone
is happier and not as mundane
as other masses.

will find that "A Parable of
Death" is one piece that
bines not only music but much
dramatic technique in a narrator
that read with a deep and corn-b- y
prehensive understanding.

brings an unusual vision and
skill to the age old subject of

corn-Deat-

Both pieces of music should

stand out as remembered works
those who hear them and many

t"

i

Times

at

HPManure On
Colorado U.
BOULDER, Colo. (CPS)-Crit- ics
say it stinks; art students
who created it and their professors call it a valid art form.
"It" is an art display created
by two University- of Colorado
graduate students whose primary
component is horse manure. The

-

HELD OVER!

r0

PARAMOUNT

"A Parable of Death" is an
earthy complex work based on
the music by Lukas Foss and
"Stories of the Dear Lord" by
the German poet Rainer Maria
Rilke. It is a moving piece by
a contemporary composer who

.

f"

Miss Moment explained that
the display and its medium were
a response to "the limitations"
under which the students had to
create a show. "We wanted something fresh and cheap," she said.
After complaints about the
display convinced members of the
Student Activities Office (which
approves displays and art shows)
that it should be dismantled three
days before its scheduled run was ,
up July 16, the Fine Arts faculty voted to endorse the display and 'support the student

designers. One professor
stu-

called the display "the best
dent show we've had in a long
time." Another told The Colorado Daily that, after all, "art is
residue . . . the leavings of a,
creative activity."

OTMnts

?f

VMerMattta
are

Couple

"VTechncoor

cHtcMiaJ- -

Starring Arnold
Thurs.-Tues- .,

August

JgATpjC

Admission:

'FINE ARTS BUILDING
Unirersiry of Kentucky

CINEMA

Pile

$2.50; Students: $2.00

Reservations

PAL0MAR PICTURES INTERNATIONAL

258-900-

0

Eft

XQ

Moss
1- -6

& $1.50

HELD OVER! 2nd WEEK!

Ext. 2929

PH.

NOW! FIRST RUN!

252-44-

its y : i u
Adm. $1.50

93

IN LEXINGTON
presents

WBimm

galplates filling a plastic-drape- d
lery in the CU Memorial Center, has caused quite a furor on
the University campus

lttfrs.

4k

SA'aVk,

PICTURES

and

dung, arranged on rows of paper

The show's designers say use
of the dung was not a put-o"It's both funny and serious,"
Zeniuk said. Most of the 100
plates of manure bore such
identifying tags as "me," "you,"
"eat it," and single numbers of

BARGAIN MAT.
60c til 2 D.m.
-v
MO N thru
.-

"0

Shor--

IMMBI

3f

i

:

?

laughing
and loving

sir

m

in...

IMP
S8
Dflio

lwoiki.j:uie

VILUAM HOLDEII

. BEAU BRIDGES

LAURI PETERS
At 1:20, 3:20,

CARROLL

5:25, 7:25, 9:30

NAN MARTIN

O'CONNOR-..,-

CUFF ROBERTSON

VlliCE EDWARDS

mm mmm mmwrmtmamiixomiwm
iu
RCHARD JAECKEL

ABBEY LINCOLN.

DEVIL'S BRIGADE"

JACK

WATSON

puiool

cm

rum

ruTM.aiei

twins

.

Plus: DICK VAN DYKE ot

"FITZWILLY"
IN COLOR

Im

color

itiiui

* Wrinkled Shorts, Etc.
grey suit, matchingtie and shower
shoes, or as they're sometimes
called, thongs." Presumably, no
effort was made to find out that
this gentleman a Presbyterian
chaplin from Yale University possessed a bad foot infection at the
time.
Even when keeping editorializing to his editorial page, Wachs
forgoes making sense in order to
let his prejudices clearly surface.
A Leader editorial stated, "No
doubt a good many young people
in Fayette have and will support
McCarthy in the county and state
conventions without having the
slightest idea about his political
beliefs." We'd like to know how
Fred arrived at this deduction. Was
it sent from above, or did he use
one of his highly accurate polls
to gain this knowledge?
It is a shame that the Herald,
which publishes on its own five
A feature story on the McCardays a week, cannot completely
thy visit in the same issue stated break with Wachs, for it is clearly
that "many in the crowd sported the better
paper when it comes
beards not to mention other signs
to responsible journalism. Monof the 'peacenik' movement, such
Herald even congratulated
as sandals, wrinkled Bermuda day'slocal
the
McCarthy forces for a
shorts and
Pushing
fight" a triaside the fact that this was a clear "gallant, impressive
bute well deserved. Jack Reeves,
example of biased reporting, we Phil Patton and their forces did a
can't help but wonder how the fine
job in gaining all but 14 of
Herald Leader came to the conFayette County's 83 delegates.
clusion that sandals, wrinkled BerIf we were to believe what Fred
muda shorts and
are Wachs would lead us
to, we could
signs of the "peacenik" movement.
assume that Lexington is curonly
We also wonder how many conrently infested with "bearded, sanservative Lexingtonians have since"
daled, wrinkled Bermuda shorted,
burned their sandals, wrinkled Berd
peaceniks." We should
muda shorts and
be so lucky. We are more prone
Then there was the paragraph
to believe that Fred Wachs has
sense of responsiwhich read, "One of McCarthy's
little if any
staff conducting the rally was rebility to the field of journalism
or to the community.
splendent in an expensive-lookin- g

Continuing in liis scries of great
disservices to the Lexington community, Fred Wachs, general manager of the Herald Leader, managed to present a completely biased
coverage of Sen. Eugene McCarthy's visit to Lexington last week.
On the morning following McCarthy's visit, the Herald Leader
ran a large, front page picture
of several youthful McCarthyites.
A couple were
one
d
and
wore
girl
glasses
one boy had of all thingsa mustache. Underneath the picture the
cutline read, "It's persons who
dress like this who make up part
of the movement of Sen. Eugene
it was a
McCarthy." News-wisBut to the elderly Wachs, Lexington's combination
of Lewis Hershey and J. Edgar
Hoover, it was a beautiful chance
to editorialize.
bare-foote- d,

wire-rimme-

e,

non-pictur-

e.

mini-dresses-

es

mini-skirte-

mini-skirt-

it

f

$

y

'

i

t

I

i--

Jj

."

mini-dress-

jr

jyp

Tw

?

s.

j-

'.

!

!
1

-"

?

t

It

3

"

f

r
"

f

I i v'

.

I

s

A

$

t
!I

v

i

11

;

I

!

i
-

'

i

7

Save Lives, Not Faces
Lives are expendable, prestige is not that is the impression one
gets from the position taken by our government at the Paris peace

talks.
Nearly four months have elapsed since President Johnson called
for negotiations and progress has yet to be made. The negotiators
sip tea; meanwhile back in rice patties lives continue to be extinguished.
The stalemated talks could continue as such for a good while and
may eventually be broken off, giving our government the perfect rationalization for escalating the war.
It seems the United States will not take steps to end the conflict unless it can do so and emerge smelling sweetly. Apparently,
our officials don't realize the name of our country presently carries
with it around the world a stench comprable to that of rotting carrion.
Polls show that 80 percent of the Europeans believe the U.S. should
not be in Vietnam and that withdrawal is the only face saver. It is
a fact that the French actually gained prestige when they withdrew
from what was then Indochina. Somehow we seem to think that because we have lost more lives than the French, we stand to lose
more by withdrawing. It is only reasonable to say that we stand to
lose much more by staying in Vietnam.
The United States must take the first definite step towards peace,
that the Communists won't. We must begin
decreasing our war efforts, for such a move would greatly enhance
the changes of success at the talks. We must also begin plans for a
coalition government in the South and bring the National Liberation
Front into the peace discussions.
for it can be assured

Vice President Humphrey fears that the public and the politicians
will interfer with the talks and has implored everyone to "leave the
negotiating to the negotiators."
Humphrey is dead wrong is he wants the people to keep their
noses out of the negotiations. Now, more than ever, the American
public has a chance to bring about an end to the war. If this nation
truly desire peace, let the people urge our officials to admit our mistake and speed-uof our war effort.
the

7owo

p

l

M
ill

V

1
1

Mr

i

1

t

ft
lM

n

If we act quickly and save lives instead of faces, we may

some-

day regain the world prestige which we have squandered.

The Kentucky

Iernel

The South' Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED 1891
Editorial

present

THURSDAY. JULY
the ojHnions of the Editors, not of the University.

25, 1968

Guy M. Mendes, III, Editor
Tom LVrr, Business Manager

ScIJey Cox, Ffu)tograpu:r

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Thursday, July 2",

I'MiH- -ft

McCarthy Speaks Prior To County Meetings

lly DFKIIIE TASS1E
"Gene llic Machine Killer,
It's Up to You." The
short-haire-

straight-lookin-

pearance Friday was the final
thrust in the ellort to draw out
voters.
The senator arrived at the
Fayette County Courthouse at
ahout 12:30 p.m. and appeared
at once striding among the
crowd to shake hands and he
kissed hy old ladies.
His speech urged the reconciliation of old and young people, divergent economic groups,
and the Democratic party and
Democrats of this country.
While he spoke police scanned the crowd from the tops
of nearhy huildings.

d,

McCar-

g

thy supporter carrying the sign
typified loth the appearance
Sec related pictures on Tagc
Six.

and sentiment of the majority of

his supporters.
The aim of the McCarthy
campaign, which lcgan in Lexington several months ago, was
the election of county delegates
last Saturday. McCarthy's ap

"We said we would put this
a political
through
country
test," he told the crowd." I
feel this is the time to take the
hard issues to the voters for
judgment. . . . The prohlem is
whether judgment can he translated into political action.
"Here in this state we have
a test of the political system.
"After this election, regardless of its results, the process
of democracy will lc strengthened, if we need lawsuits to
clarify a few things."
The processes of democracy
were hard at work during the

University Soapbox

Edward Kennedy For VP

John Marshall Meisburg, Jr.
Those who supported Hohert
Francis Kennedy for President
will never he able to go hack to
"life as usual." All across the
nation, men and women were
prompted to leave their homes,
business, and normal lives to
join in the Kennedy drive. Most
of them could hardly wait to
see another Kennedy in the
White House. It meant a return
to the excitement and greatness
of the vigorous Kennedy era.
Hut it was not to le. Another
gunman got in the way of the
Kennedy dream.
Hut the Kennedy people cannot simply return quietly to private life. Exhausted and disgusted they must le. Hut defeat, pessimism and despair are
just not part of the Kennedy image. In fact it is diametrically
opposed. Some former Kennedy people say they face a
dilemma, a dilemma of political
alienation. They see objections
to Humphrey and McCarthy.
The former is unacceptable on
the issue of Vietnam, and the
latter is objectionable on the issue of civil rights.
One of the big issues of the
current Presidential campaign
is the struggle letween the
"new politics" and the
"old politics." The new politics
of Kennedy
and McCarthy
seems to offer the American
people that they will have more
of a voice in their government.
The "new politics" seems to be
more responsive to the growing
political awareness in America,
especially among the young
people and the college students.
The "new politics" seems opposed to party "bossism."
On the other hand, the "old
politics" seems to be the politics of intrenched party bosses,
who feel remote from the people. The "old politics" seems to
le unresponsive to the growing political alienation that is
driving people from lxth the
Democratic
and Republican

By

Woods arson
is a crime.
Report any
sign of it.
Jro-iKfc--

,

S'K

XJ

Sj-- Kv

HELP PREVENT

IT FOREST FIRES
in the south

parties. Indeed the latest Gallup Poll showed that "independents" are now the second largest "political party" in America, scoring higher in the poll
than those who called themselves "Republicans." This growing block of alienated voters
must not be ignored, or go unrepresented.
The former backers of Robert
Kennedy thus face a dilemma.
And the only logical solution is
a consolidation of the "old" and
"new" politics. The only logical
solution is "Humphrey and
Kennedy in 1968." The Democrats should make this move for
two go