xt79w08w9x1r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79w08w9x1r/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1997024 minutes English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, 1997-02-mar4. text Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, 1997-02-mar4. 1997 2011 true xt79w08w9x1r section xt79w08w9x1r 







                                            AGENDA

                                 Meeting of the Board of Trustees
                                      University of Kentucky
                                             1:00 P.M.
                                           March 4, 1997
Invocation

Roll Call

Approval of Minutes

President's Report and Action Items

PR 1    President's Report to the Trustees
             Report on Monte Verde Archaeological Site in Chile

PR 2    Personnel Actions

PR 3    Central Administration
        A. Revision of Administrative Regulations

PR 4    Community College System (No items to report)

PR 5    Lexington Campus (No items to report)

PR 6    Medical Center (No items to report)

        Finance Committee

 1.    Acceptance of Interim Financial Report for the University of Kentucky for
            the Seven Months Ended January 31, 1997
 2.     Report of Leases
 3.     Approval of Leases
 4.     Capital Construction Report
 5.    Patent and Copyright Prosecution
 6.     Hilary J. Boone Gift and Pledge
 7.    Violet Showers Couch Gift
 8.    Katherine Longyear Gift
 9.    John Jacob Niles Charitable Trust Gift
 10.    George B. Tuggle Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust
11.    Sale of the South Farm, Tract A




 







      Minutes of the Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of
Kentucky, Tuesday, March 4,1997.

      The Board of Trustees of the University of Kentucky met at 1:00 p.m.
(Lexington time) on Tuesday, March 4th in the Board Room on the 18th floor
of Patterson Office Tower.

      A.   Meeting Opened

      Governor Edward T. Breathitt, Chairperson, called the meeting to order
at 1:02 p.m., and the invocation was pronounced by Dr. Elissa Plattner.

      B.   Roll Call

      The following members of the Board of Trustees answered the call of
the roll: Mr. Alan Aja, Mr. Ted Bates, Governor Edward T. Breathitt,
(Chairperson), Mr. Robert N. Clay, Mr. Merwin Grayson, Mr. John "Jack"
Guthrie, Mr. James F. Hardymon, Professor Loys L. Mather, Dr. Robert P.
Meriwether, Mr. Billy Joe Miles, Professor Jim Miller, Dr. Elissa Plattner,
Professor Deborah Powell, Mr. C. Frank Shoop, Mrs. Lois C. Weinberg, Mr.
Martin Welenken, and Mr. Billy B. Wilcoxson. Absent from the meeting
were Mrs. Kay Shropshire Bell, Mr. Paul W. Chellgren, and Mr. Steven S.
Reed. The University administration was represented by President Charles T.
Wethington, Jr.; Chancellors Ben W. Carr, James W. Holsinger, and Elisabeth
Zinser; Vice Presidents Joseph T. Burch, Fitzgerald Bramwell, Edward A.
Carter, George DeBin, and Eugene Williams; John J. Piecoro, Assistant to the
President for Administrative Affairs; Dr. Juanita Fleming, Special Assistant
for Academic Affairs; and Mr. Richard E. Plymale, General Counsel.

      Members of the various news media were also in attendance. A
quorum being present, the Chairperson declared the meeting officially open
for the conduct of business at 1:05 p.m.

      C.   Approval of Minutes

      Governor Breathitt said that the Minutes of the Board meeting on
January 21, 1997 had been distributed and asked for any additions or
corrections. Professor Miller moved that the Minutes be approved as
distributed. Professor Mather seconded the motion, and it carried.

      D.   President's Report to the Board of Trustees (PR 1)

      President Wethington called attention to the following items in PR 1:

      1. University of Kentucky alumnus Ervin J. Nutter donated $1
         million through an estate trust that will establish up to four
         professorships in mechanical engineering.




 





                                   -2-



      2. The College of Medicine faculty members were awarded $27.2
         million in National Institutes of Health funding during fiscal year
         1996, an increase of 16 percent over the $25.4 million awarded in
         fiscal year 1995. The increase raised the College of Medicine's
         ranking among the 126 NIH-funded medical schools in the nation
         from 63rd to 58th.

      3. The Kentucky Council on Higher Education has approved the
         state's first joint degree program, a Ph.D. in social work. It will be
         offered by the University of Kentucky and the University of
         Louisville.

      4. The College of Social Work is providing UK's first course offered
         exclusively on the Internet. The course, Graduate Social Work
         Research, will be taught by Professor David Royse from his
         computer in the Patterson Office Tower to students at Northern
         Kentucky University.

      5. Officials from Midway College and Maysville Community College
         have agreed to an educational partnership that will allow area
         students to receive a four-year degree. This partnership will deliver
         baccalaureate degree offerings in Cynthiana.

      6. The University of Kentucky Martin Luther King, Jr. Cultural Center
         located in the Student Center is celebrating its 10th anniversary this
         year. The Director, Frank Walker, says that the Center has the
         largest African/American library collection in the state.

      President Wethington asked the members to peruse the other items in
the report at their leisure.

      As a part of his report, President Wethington said that he was pleased
to have Professor Tom Dillehay, Department of Anthropology, make a report
on Monte Verde Archaeological Site in Chile. He asked Chancellor Zinser to
introduce Professor Dillehay.

      Chancellor Zinser reviewed Professor Dillehay's impressive
credentials, noting some of his post-doctoral honors and awards, eight
Fulbright Fellowships and his numerous scholarly publications. She
expressed pleasure in introducing Professor Dillehay.

      Professor Dillehay thanked President Wethington and the Board
members for the opportunity to make the report. He also thanked his
colleagues for coming to share the moment with him. He displayed some
artifacts and talked about the importance of the research, prehistory in
Kentucky, and the rich archeological heritage of the state.




 





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      He noted three reasons why this kind of research is important:

      1. to try to rewrite the first chapter of human history on this side of
         the world,
      2. to give other disciplines a lot of data they do not have, and
      3. to fill in the history of Chile.

      He said there were more than 80 scientists from all over the world with
most of them concentrated at UK and at the Chilean University involved in
the Monte Verde project. He introduced his colleagues attending the Board
meeting: Dr. Vernon Case, Dr. Anastasios Karathanasis, Graduate Student
David Pollack, Professor Richard Jefferies, Graduate Student Gwynn
Henderson, and Michael Murphy.

      Professor Dillehay noted some of his findings at Monte Verde; arrow
heads, extremely well preserved organic remains, extremely well preserved
bone remains, cortege, slip knots, and human foot prints. He displayed a rib
fragment from the mastodon and said they found hundreds of artifacts. He
said that the site is extremely well preserved, and it gives an opportunity to
look deep into the past. As a result of these findings, the chapter of human
history on this side of the world has been completely rewritten.

      Professor Dillehay thanked the University of Kentucky for this project.
He informed the Board that in 1980, when he first came to UK, much of this
work was rejected for grants by the National Science Foundation, the
Fulbright Commission, and the National Geographic Society. He reported
that the University of Kentucky Research Foundation gave him a small grant
of $6,000 that allowed him to go back to Chile and get the data. The key year
was 1981, and it was after 1981 that he received a series of National Science
Foundation grants and spin off grants from his students and others. He noted
that the University of Kentucky played a very important role in all of this
research. The project has involved 30 to 40 students not only from Kentucky
but another 60 students from different Latin American countries as well.

      He said that the whole issue of the peopling of the Americas involves
not only Chile but all of the Americas. The Commonwealth has a very rich
tradition in doing archaeological research, going back to 1918. The names of
Funkhouser, Colonel Webb and a number of other people who established
the University of Kentucky are some of the pioneers in archaeology in the
United States, and the tradition is still maintained.

      He called attention to a publication by David Pollack entitled Slack
Farm that had been given to the Board and said this site was reported on
several years ago in the National Geographic Magazine. It is a publication
that deals with the archaeology of this area and is an important site. He
mentioned another book entitled Kentucky before Boone which won a prize




 





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in history, and the author is Gwynn Henderson. These are professional
archaeologists who are also finishing up their Ph.D.'s at the University of
Kentucky.

      He said that when he travels across the state of Kentucky and talks with
people in the local communities he is always proud of the fact that people
point out to him that they take great pride not only in their industries but
also in the Civil War sites, the cemeteries and the archaeological sites. He
said that he was trying to produce a computerized record of all the historical
and prehistoric sites in the state so they can be preserved in the future with
the grant. This is a public service that is provided for the Commonwealth.
He said that he was involved in Kentucky mainly as a result of working with
a good group of students and colleagues.

      Professor Dillehay thanked Dean Edwards for providing him support.
He expressed appreciation for his help with the project as well as some other
endeavors, particularly in setting up more efforts by the University to engage
in Kentucky archaeology.

      President Wethington asked Professor Dillehay to expand on the recent
publicity about the project.

      Professor Dillehay said that the second volume on Monte Verde site is
going to be published by the Smithsonian Institution Press and some of the
staunchest critics in the field. He said that he invited them to read the book
and come to the site. A donor provided the funds, and they visited the site.
They looked at the materials in the laboratory there and spent two days at the
University of Kentucky. The finality brought to the project is what everyone
is now seeing in the press. People are now accepting it, accepting the fact it
has broken the old paradigm and that the first chapter of human history
needs to be rewritten. He said that this is something they have known for
about 20 years, and science takes a long time to unfold if you do it correctly,
particularly if it is interdisciplinary science.

      Professor Dillehay entertained questions from the members of the
Board.

      Governor Breathitt said that Professor Dillehay had certainly brought
distinction to himself and his colleagues, and thanked him for his
presentation.

      Professor Dillehay expressed his appreciation for the opportunity to
address the Board and thanked President Wethington. He then received a
round of applause.

      President Wethington expressed his appreciation to Professor Dillehay
and to his colleagues who were in attendance. He said the Board and the




 





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Administration appreciates the good work that Professor Dillehay does for the
University of Kentucky. They have brought good positive attention to the
University and to themselves, and they are valued.

      Professor Mather pointed out that Professor Dillehay came to the
University of Kentucky from graduate school and stayed. He is now an
internationally known archaeologist and the greatest in his field. He said that
the University has been a good place to get people's careers started, but it has
been difficult in some fields to retain them at the University. Retaining good
faculty is critically important for the institution. He said that he strongly
suspected that the University is well behind its benchmarks for the kind of
institution it aspires to be. But, the University has the greatness that it has in
this area because Tom Dillehay chose to stay at the University of Kentucky.
He commended the Administration for their efforts in retaining good faculty.

      President Wethington thanked Professor Mather for his comments and
said they were well stated.

      E.    Personnel Actions (PR 2)

      President Wethington recommended that approval be given to the
appointments, actions and/or other staff changes which require Board action;
and that the report relative to appointments and/or changes already
approved by the administration be accepted. Mr. Aja moved approval. The
motion, seconded by Mr. Welenken, carried. (See PR 2 at the end of the
Minutes.)

      F.    Revision of Administrative Regulations (PR 3A)

      President Wethington said PR 3A is a recommendation for two
revisions in the Administrative Regulations (AR's) regarding the
University's retirement plan. He asked George DeBin to comment on the two
revisions.

      Mr. DeBin stated PR 3A recommends that the Board approve two
changes in the Administrative Regulations: Retirement Regulation Plan
AR 11-1.6-1 and the Phased Retirement Policy and Program AR II-1.6-2. He
explained that early retirement is authorized when the combination of the
employee's age and years of continuous service equal or exceed 75. The
revision proposed to the University of Kentucky Retirement Plan is to
require individuals electing early retirement to have a minimum of 15 years
of continuous service at the time of retirement.

      He said that a further revision entitles an individual electing early
participation in the Phased Retirement Policy and Program to activate any or
all of retirement benefits that have been acquired under the University of
Kentucky Retirement Plan. The revision in the Phased Retirement Policy




 





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and Program is to make it possible for those electing Phased Retirement to
access retirement plan funds without separating from the University after the
effective date initiating participation in the Phased Retirement Program.

      President Wethington elaborated on Mr. DeBin's explanation stating
that the 15 years of continuous service in the first policy change applies to
those electing early retirement. He said that the Board could approve an
exception in the case of financial exigency or in the case of a university
employee loaned temporarily to an outside entity such as state government.

      He said that the second policy change would make it possible for faculty
members, who have elected to take a phased retirement program over a
three-year period or less. He reminded the Board that they passed such a plan
in the last year that would allow a faculty member to do this. This change
would allow that faculty member to start drawing his or her retirement at the
time that the election is made. In other words, a faculty member could still be
working in the phased retirement program and be drawing his or her
retirement benefits during that time. The faculty members who have
expressed interest in the plan are ones that are likely to exercise the phased
retirement program.

      On motion made by Mr. Shoop and seconded by Mr. Grayson, PR 3A
was approved. (See PR 3A at the end of the Minutes.)

      Governor Breathitt thanked President Wethington for including
Professor Tom Dillehay and his colleagues in the President's Report.
Without the Tom Dillehays, his outstanding colleagues and others of that
distinction on campus, it is empty.

      G.   Acceptance of Interim Financial Report for the University of
Kentucky for the Seven Months Ended January 31. 1997 (FCR 1)

      Mr. Hardymon, Chairperson of the Finance Committee, reported that
the Finance Committee met and considered 11 items for action. FCR 1 is the
monthly interim financial report for the first seven months of the year
ending January 31, 1997. He noted that this is a time when the realized
income runs ahead of the expenditures because of the state appropriation
timing and because of the student fees. He noted that realized income for the
estimated budget for the year is 69%, and expenditures/commitments are
about 59% of the approved budget for the year. The University has a strong
balance sheet and a strong financial condition. He moved approval of FCR 1.
Mrs. Weinberg seconded the motion, and it passed. (See FCR 1 at the end of
the Minutes.)




 





-7-



     H.   Report of Leases (FCR 2)

     Mr. Hardymon reviewed the lease agreements in FCR 2, noting the
value is less than $30,000 per year for each agreement. He said that the
Finance Committee accepted the report and moved approval of FCR 2. His
motion, seconded by Mr. Welenken, passed. (See FCR 2 at the end of the
Minutes.)

     I.   Approval of Leases (FCR 3)

     Mr. Hardymon reviewed the leases in excess of $30,000 per year and
stated that the leases are recommended for approval by the Finance
Committee. He moved approval of FCR 3. Mr. Bates seconded the motion,
and it carried. (See FCR 3 at the end of the Minutes.)

     J.   Capital Construction Report (FCR 4)

       Mr. Hardymon said FCR 4 is a quarterly report for the three months
ending December 31, 1996. The Finance Committee reviewed and accepted
the report after discussing the change orders in the report. He moved that the
report be accepted. His motion, seconded by Professor Powell, passed. (See
FCR 4 at the end of the Minutes.)

     K.   Patent and Copyright Prosecution (FCR 5)

     On motion made by Mr. Hardymon, seconded by Mr. Guthrie and
carried, the Board approved FCR 5 which involves a new method for
reporting patent and copyright prosecution. (See FCR 5 at the end of the
Minutes.)

     L.   Hilary J. Boone Gift and Pledge (FCR 6)

     Mr. Hardymon stated that FCR 6 recommends that the Board accept a
gift from Hilary J. Boone of $200,000 and a pledge of $200,000 for an outdoor
tennis stadium. Mr. Boone's $200,000 pledge will be fulfilled with equal
payments in 1997 and 1998. Mr. Hardymon reminded everyone that Mr.
Boone was a member of the university varsity tennis team and is one of the
University's most generous donors. He moved approval of FCR 6. His
motion, seconded by Mr. Grayson, carried. (See FCR 6 at the end of the
Minutes.)




 





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      M.    Violet Showers Couch Gift (FCR 7)

      Mr. Hardymon reported that Mrs. Couch is the surviving spouse of
Virgil Couch, a 1930 graduate of the University of Kentucky. Mr. Couch
gained recognition during his 40 years of federal government service for his
expertise in personnel administration, training and executive management.
In his memory and that of his sister, Lucille E. Couch, a 1932 UK graduate,
Mrs. Couch has endowed scholarships in the School of Music and the Martin
School of Public Policy and Administration. The music scholarship will
benefit students who want to teach vocal music, and the Martin School
scholarship will benefit students who have been public policy or
administration professionals in government. He moved that the Board
accept a gift of $100,397 from Violet Showers Couch of Arlington, Virginia, to
benefit the College of Fine Arts School of Music and the Martin School of
Public Policy and Administration. His motion was seconded by Professor
Mather and carried. (See FCR 7 at the end of the Minutes.)

      Governor Breathitt gave praise to Virgil Couch for his attendance at
the UK Alumni meetings in Washington for 20 years. He said that Mr.
Couch always made a speech about this great institution that he loved. The
University of Kentucky has outstanding centers, and this is another example
of somebody showcasing the College of Fine Arts and the Martin School of
Public Policy and Administration.

      N.    Katherine Longyear Gift (FCR 8)

      Mr. Hardymon said that Professor Rey M. Longyear taught music at the
University of Kentucky for 30 years prior to his death in 1995. He explained
that under the terms of Mrs. Longyear's gift to the University, she will live in
the residence until her death, at which time the property, presently appraised
at $101,000, will be sold and the proceeds used to fund the Rey M. Longyear
Memorial Fund in Musicology. The fund will provide fellowships,
scholarships, prizes and other awards to support graduate students in
musicology. He moved that the Board accept the gift of a remainder interest
in the residence from Katherine Longyear of Lexington, Kentucky, and, upon
her death, the Board further authorizes the sale of the residence to fund an
endowment in the College of Fine Arts School of Music in memory of her
deceased husband, Rey M. Longyear. Mr. Grayson seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously. (See FCR 8 at the end of the Minutes.)

      0.    John Jacob Niles Charitable Trust Gift (FCR 9)

      Mr. Hardymon stated that FCR 9 recommends that the Board accept a
gift of $250,000 from the John Jacob Niles Charitable Trust of Lexington,
Kentucky to establish the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music in the
new Fine Arts Library. Before her death in June 1996, Rena Niles worked
with the library staff to plan a special reading room and library program to




 





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honor the life's work of her late husband, John Jacob Niles. John Jacob Niles
was a Kentucky musical treasure. The Finance Committee accepted this gift
and recommends the Board's approval of FCR 9. Mr. Hardymon moved
approval of FCR 9. Professor Powell seconded the motion, and it
unanimously carried. (See FCR 9 at the end of the Minutes.)

      P.    George B. Tuggle Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust (FCR 10)

      Mr. Hardymon stated that FCR 10 is a recommendation that the Board
of Trustees accept the George B. Tuggle Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust,
an irrevocable trust valued at $403,313, established by George B. Tuggle of
Somerset, Kentucky. He noted that Mr. Tuggle graduated from the
University in 1949 with a degree in journalism and retired to Somerset after a
career in banking in Cincinnati, Ohio. The annuity trust, of which the
University is trustee, designates a portion of the corpus for a professorship in
English in memory of his parents, William J. and Nina B. Tuggle, and a
portion to establish the George B. Tuggle Scholarship Fund at the University
of Kentucky to benefit students from Boyle, Wayne and Pulaski counties. He
moved approval of FCR 10. His motion, seconded by Mrs. Weinberg, carried.
(See FCR 10 at the end of the Minutes.)

      Q.    Sale of the South Farm. Tract A (FCR 11)

      Mr. Hardymon reported that at the September 17, 1996, meeting of the
Board, the administration was authorized to conduct a sale of Tract A of the
South Farm. Formal appraisals of Tract A were obtained from two qualified
firms. The bid by JDN Development Co., Inc. exceeds the highest of the two
appraisals and, accordingly, has been found to be acceptable to the
administration. JDN Development Co., Inc. has been so advised. Board
approval of the bid is required before the sale can be completed.

      He said that the recommendation is that the Board authorize the
administration to accept the high bid of $18,365,400 submitted by JDN
Development Co., Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia, for Tract A (containing 42.96 acres)
of the University's South Farm; further, that the administration be
authorized to finalize the sale within 30 days after the Board's approval of the
bid.

      Mr. Hardymon said that the proceeds from the sale of Tract A will be
used by the University for the construction of a Plant Sciences Building for
the College of Agriculture in accordance with the "Twenty-First Century
Plan," thus assuring that these funds will be used to advance research in
support of the College of Agriculture. It seems to be a very well-done project
by the Administration. The Finance Committee reviewed it and accepted it.
On motion made by Mr. Hardymon, seconded by Mr. Bates and carried, FCR
11 was approved. (See FCR 11 at the end of the Minutes.)




 





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      R.    Investment Committee Report

      Mr. Wilcoxson, Chairperson of the Investment Committee, reported
the Investment Committee met for two hours prior to the Finance
Committee to discuss the Investment Committee's performance results for
the endowment for 1996. He reported that the market value of the
endowment in July of 1996 was $161 million, and at the end of December
1996, the market value of the endowment was $177 million. He noted the
upside was approximately $16 million during that six months period, about
$13 million market appreciation and the other $3 million gifts.

      He said that in July of 1992 when the Investment Committee first
addressed the long-range asset allocation plan, the market value was
approximately $96 million. Since 1992 it has gone from $96 million to $177
million through December of 1996. He reported that from December 1996
through January 1997, the endowment went from $177 million to $182.5
million, up another $5.5 million.

      Governor Breathitt thanked Mr. Wilcoxson for the excellent report. He
also expressed appreciation to the members of the Investment Committee
and the staff of the University that work with the outside consultants.

      Mr. Wilcoxson thanked Mr. Henry Clay Owen and his staff for their
outstanding work on a day-to-day basis. He said that they were the greatest
people to work with, following which they received a round of applause.

      S.    Dr. Deborah Powell Bid Farewell

      Governor Breathitt stated that this was Dr. Deborah Powell's last Board
meeting. He congratulated Dr. Powell on her distinct honor of being named
Dean of the Medical School at the University of Kansas. He thanked her for
her long-time commitment to the University and the Chandler Medical
Center and her outstanding service to the Board. He wished her God speed.

      President Wethington said he would like to echo Governor Breathitt's
sentiments. He thanked Dr. Powell for her service on the Board and her
service to the University. As a faculty representative on the Board, she
certainly has represented the views of the faculty on the campus and has done
so in a manner that makes it extremely easy for a President to work with a
faculty representative. Dr. Powell's administrative experience, her leadership
and her dedication have been long recognized. He thanked her for
everything she has done and wished her well at Kansas.

      Dr. Powell said that she had been at the University of Kentucky for 21
years, and it is very hard to leave. She said, "I owe a lot to this University and
clearly I will never forget it." She said that she had learned a lot at the
University and from her participation on the Board which she would take




 





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with her. She thanked Governor Breathitt and President Wethington for
their good words. Dr. Powell was given a round of applause.

      T.   Meeting Adjourned



      There
Chairperson



being no further business to come before the Board, the
adjourned the meeting at 1:59 p.m.



                                          Respectfully submitted,


                                          Lois C. Weinberg
                                          Secretary
                                          Board of Trustees

(PR 2, 3A, and FCR 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 which follow are official
parts of the Minutes of the meeting.)




 









                                                                    PRi1


Office of the President
March 4, 1997


            PRESIDENT'S REPORT TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

1.    Ervin J. Nutter Gives $1 Million For Engineering Professorships

       University of Kentucky alumnus Ervin J. Nutter has donated $1 million through
an estate trust that will establish up to four professorships in mechanical engineering.
The gift, which will be donated after the deaths of Mr. Nutter and his wife, Zoe Dell
Nutter, will bring to more than $3.5 million the contributions from the Nutter family at
Beavercreek, Ohio. Mr. Nutter earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from
UK in 1943.

2.     College of Medicine Increases Ranking Among NIH-Funded Medical Schools

       During Fiscal Year 1996, College of Medicine faculty members were awarded
$27.2 million in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, an increase of 16 percent
over the $25.4 million awarded in Fiscal Year 1995. The increase raised the College of
Medicine's ranking among the 126 NIH-funded medical schools in the nation from 63rd to
5 8th.

3.    Joint UK-U of L Social Work Doctorate Approved by Council

      The Kentucky Council on Higher Education has approved the state's first joint
degree program, a Ph.D. in social work. It will be offered by the University of Kentucky
and the University of Louisville. The program will begin next fall with 10 students from
each university. Each institution was planning to offer the degree, and decided to combine
their efforts.




 





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4.    Jenny Hansen Sets Yet Another Record

       Jenny Hansen, who won three straight NCAA All-Around titles in gymnastics
while a student at UK, has also won her third straight national Gymnastics Honda
Award, given to an outstanding female athlete who "embodies the ideals of team
contribution, scholastic endeavor, school and community involvement and those personal
characteristics that are reflected in the philosophy of intercollegiate athletics." It is the
first time that an athlete has won the prestigious award three times in any single sport.
She was honored, along with athletes from 10 other sports, at the presentation of the
Honda-Broderick Cup during the recent NCAA Convention.

5.    Architect Chosen for New Classroom Building at Prestonsburg CC

       Ross-Tarrant Architects Inc. of Lexington has been announced as architect for a
new classroom/health education building at Prestonsburg Community College. The new
building is a joint project with Morehead State University and has been called a model of
cooperation for Kentucky higher education by state officials. Last winter, the Kentucky
General Assembly appropriated $5.5 million for design and construction on the new
building which will be attached to the PCC Martin Student Center.

6.     Social Work Course on the Internet

       The College of Social Work is providing UK's first course offered exclusively on
the Internet. The course, Graduate Social Work Research, will be taught by Professor
David Royse from his computer in the Patterson Office Tower to students at Northern
Kentucky University. Royse travels to Northern Kentucky to meet with the students
three times during the semester for the class introduction, mid-term and final exam.

7.    Four to Be Inducted Into Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame

      Four persons will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame April
14 as part of the annual UK Journalism Alumni Association dinner and the Joe Creason
Lecture. The 1997 inductees are Judith Clabes, former editor of the Kentucky Post and
now president and chief executive officer of the Scripps Howard Foundation; Hugh
Morris, retired chief of the Courier-Journal Frankfort bureau; Ken Rowland, former
WLKY-TV news director and WHAS-TV news anchor in Louisville and now a business
commentator on WDRB-TV, Louisville, and Fred Wiche, popular farm and garden
director at WHAS radio and television in Louisville. Al Neuharth, founder of USAToday,
will give the Creason Lecture.




 





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8.    Midway College and Maysville CC Team Up for Four-Year Degree Program

       Officials from Midway College and Maysville Community College have agreed to
an educational partnership that will allow area students to receive a four-year degree. The
degree in organizational management will be from Midway College. The courses will be
taught at Maysville CC's Licking Valley Center in Cynthiana. The partnership, which
has