xt79w08wd385 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79w08wd385/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19651112  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 12, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 12, 1965 1965 2015 true xt79w08wd385 section xt79w08wd385 Inside Today's Kernel

Vol. LVII, No. 43

--LL

jlL

J

University of Kentucky
KY
1965
NOV.
LEXINGTON,

FRIDAY,

12,

Eight Pages

Student Congress rotes to reestablish
the Committee of 240: Poge Two.
Photographer R. C. May "tries to
moke people think": Page Three.
Editor discusses "antiquated"
laws
against alcoholic bererog.es at Uni- rersity functions: Poge Four.
UK senior reriews Russian trip: Page
Fire.

'Cats meet Houston in Astrodome
Saturday: Poge Six.
Vnbrersity Choristers to join Lexington Singers ond Cincinnati Symphony
lor concert: Poge Seven.
AWS retoes extension of women's
hours: Poge Eight
Young Republicans support
US.-Vi-

Policy: Poge Eight.

arvardPs ychologist

Lectures Ob 'Utopia
By BONNIE

GERDINC

Kernel Staff Writer
Utopia, that type of idealistic
society in which people live in
ideal perfection, especially in
laws, government, and social conditions, is now so near that we
should be thinking seriously
about it.

This was the theme of Dr.
F. Skinner's lecture Thursday afternoon in the Student
Center Theater. Dr. Skinner, a
professor of psychology at Harvard University, is one of the
behavioral
nation's
leading
scientists.
His lecture was the beginning
Centennial
here of a three-da- y
Biological Sciences Conference.
n
Dr. Skinner has become
for his research and
studies on the operant conditioning theory, which is a method of
p
learning
gradual
through a system of rewards, and
for his research and accomplishments in the teaching machine.
He based much of his lecture
on the ideas he expressed in his
book "Walden Two." He tried to
show how, through operant conditioning, a positive reinforcement, a change in the individuals
behavioral
pattern, can be
achieved which eventually becomes the foundation of a Utopian
society.
"There is also an extraordinary interest in distopia or a
satiristic Utopia," he added. "The
best books of the 20th century,
about a sort of Utopian society,
for instance,
"Brave
New
World," are basically satiristic in
B.

well-know-

Barkley
Prog ram

Planned

University President, Dr. John

W. Oswald, officially invited the
UK community today to attend
a special Centennial convocation
honoring the late Alben W.
Barkley at 3 p.m. on Nov. 23

in Memorial Coliseum.

Issuing the invitation, Dr.
Oswald announced that University classes will be dismissed
between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. for
the convocation and unveiling.
M.
Dirkson
Sen. Everett
(R. 111.) will give the convocation address preceding the unveiling of a replica of the Barkley
statue model. Gov. Edward T.
Breathitt will present the replica
to Dr. Oswald, who will receive
it on behalf of the University.
The orginial statue is now at
the State Captiol in Frankfort.
In inviting the University
community, Dr. Oswald said,
that the Centennial year had been
saved for the formal dedication
of the replica with confidence
that this event will make a sigcontribution to the
nificant
celebration.

step-by-ste-

nature."
books of the 20th century, about

ophers

to

study

Utopia,

by

attempting to make his Republic
a society of perfection."

"We are not far from a bit of

Plato's Republic ourselves. The
blueprints for the Republic were

found and used in designing the
city of Washington D. C. This
shows what might have hapened
in Plato's Republic," said Dr.
Skinner.
He continued by discussing
the Christian concept of Utopia
heaven. He said that it is hard
to design a celestial Utopia for
it is hard to design a Utopia for
the 70 to 80 years that a person
lives on earth.
I le discussed the studies made
by Thomas More, Francis Bacon,
Rousseau, Adam Smith, and Karl
Marx.
In the early centuries when
men were faced with the fact of
building a society, round-th- e
world travelers would return and
tell about the good life of the rest
Continued on Page 2

'tiff'.

Y

t

j,
Dr. B. F. Skinner, professor of psychology at Harvard University
and one of the nation's leading bchaviorial scientists, began his
four day stay at the University Thursday with a lecture on 'Utopia.
Dr. Skinner is here for the Centennial Bilogical Conference.

University Hosts 250 At Meeting
Of American Mathematics Society

The University Department
of Mathematics, as part of the
a sort of Utopian society, for Centennial
observances, will host
instance, "Brave New World," a sectional meeting of the Amerare basically satiristic in nature." ican Mathematics
Society here
Dr. Skinner traced the history
today and Saturday.
of Utopian societies and the ideas
Dr. W. C. Royster, chairman
w hich have developed concerning
of the University's Department
these societies.
of Mathematics, said the dele"The history of Utopian
gates will number about 250,
thinking," he said, "can be found among them research mathematiin the way people hoped to obtain cians from the Midwestern and
this idealistic type of society. Southeastern states.
Plato was one of the first philos
The sessions will be held in

the Student Center with the exception of a topological algebra
session scheduled for Saturday in
McVeyllall.
The mathematicians will read

papers on current
research in mathematics and six
papers on research in
topology.
At 2 p.m. Friday the entire
delegation will hear an address
by Prof. Tatsuo Homma of
Florida State University in the
50

te

Student Center Theater. Prof. P.
Tulane University
will address the assembly in the
theater at 9 a.m. Saturday.
S. Mostet of

Dr. Royster said this section
has one of the largest memberships of the society and one of
the best attendance records.
Registration began at the Student Center information desk at
11

a.m. today and will continue

through 10 a.m. Saturday.

Protests9 Backlash 'Browns9 Pentagon
The Collegiate Press Service

The protests against American policy

in Vietnam have resulted in a backlash

that threatens to drown the Pentagon
in a sea of cookies, fruit cake, and other
gifts for the servicemen in Vietnam.
Spokesmen for the Pentagon said they
are welcoming support but are weary of
the problem it creates. Literally tons of
cookies, hundreds of cases of beer,
thousands of books, and other items have
been offered, and the Defense Department
has little intention of moving all that
to Vietnam.
One form of support for American
policy on college campuses is what has
Stu- come to be called the "bleed-in.- "
The University cfuipter of Young Americans for Freedom will sponsor a bleed-i- n
here Dec. 7. The organization hopes "to
have 500 people" donate blood for (7.S.
soldiers in Vietnam.
for American troops in
Vietnam as a sign of support.
The blood, however, isn't needed in
Vietnam and the American Red Cross,
which is handling many of the donations,
vsaid it is not being sent to Vietnam.
A spokesman for the Red Cross said
it "certainly appreciates the spirit behind the college movement" but "in

dents give blood

view of the fact there is no blood short- wrong with giving blood to the North
age there, you can understand that no Vietnamese. "I'd rather concentrate on
one is pressing for any unneeded blood the South Vietnamese," he said, "but
drives."
I'm in favor of giving blood to everyRed Cross President James Collins said one."
that more than 100,000 students on 75
The International Red Cross, which
campuses are expected to participate in handles the
gifts to the North Vietnamese,
blood drives. He said the Red Cross took
said in Geneva last week that it was
on the assignment at the encouragement
embarrassed that the organization was
of the Department of Defense, but he
apparently being used by protest groups.
wants people to understand that very
International Red Cross officials say
little of the blood donated on campuses
the war in Vietnam confronts the Organwill be sent to Vietnam.
The clash of student opinion is seen ization with a situation they believe is
in the competing blood drives at Stanford unprecedented in its more than 100 years
University. One campus group collected of activity. For the first time, an official
pledges of blood donations for the North said, the Red Cross is being used as
Vietnamese, and an Army ROTC group an intermediary to forward relief supplies
started a blood drive of its own as a provided by people of one country for
people in a country with which their
symbol of support for U.S. policy.
Other groups have expressed a desire government is at war.
to send blood and medical supplies to
However, the Red Cross said its job
the North Vietnamese "victims" of Amer- is to move the supplies, not to catalog
ican policy. These groups have been the donors or their motives.
branded as traitors by many U.S.
Campus groups are now becoming inChristmas train that
officials, and one even quoted a law- volved in a 100-cmaking it a crime to "give aid and will cross the country gathering gifts for
comfort to the enemy."
troops in Vietnam. The train is officially
However, New York's Sen. Robert being sponsored by the U.S. Jaycees, the
Kennedy told a Los Angeles press conYoung Democrats ami the Young Repubference last week he thought the blood licans. It is the first time the Young
donations were in "the oldest traditions Democrats and the Young Republicans
of this country" and he could see nothing
have combined on any project.

The typical response to the protests
however, has been rallies, speeches, and
meetings.
At Rutgers, 3,359 students last week
signed a petition in favor of U.S. policy.
An additional 700 names were gathered

at Douglass College, the university's
branch for women. The petition was presented to the New Jersey congressional
delegation.
The student newspaper and the campus
radio station at Syracuse University joined
in rallying campus support for U.S.
policy in Vietnam. In joint editorial announcements last week, the paper and
the station said they "strongly support
the government and its present policy
in Vietnam."
At the University of Utah, 475 students
have signed a letter to the commanding
general of U.S. forces in Vietnam supporting U.S. policy there.
Adding to the verbal reaction against
the protests. Dr. Grayson Kiik, president
of Columbia University, said last week
that a student who rates political activity
above an education should "surrender
his place in the university to someone
who regards the university as more than
a place to mount an
soap
box."

* -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Nov.

2

12, 19G0.

Reestablishes
Committee Of 240

Skinner Says 'Utopia Is Near'
Continued from Fte 1
It is an isolated yet contempory
of about
1,000
of the world in places where no community
These ac- people," said Dr. Skinner.
governments existed.
counts made great impressions
"They worked only a few
upon the Utopian thinkers.
hours a day, someone watched
"The Utopian society I show their children, social contact was
in "Waltcn Two" is a blueprint
minimized while personal contact
for a Rood life. It is based on 19th was maximized and all needs and
century country life in England. necessities were furnished for a
go(xl life, by the community,"
he added.

PIZZA

It is behavioral

technology

that makes the system work he

OK GRILL

SC

of the
conditioning
operant
reward system.
Through constant rewarding
of favorable acts a child will tend
to continue these actions and
soon a positive reinforcement w ill
occur and a certain action to a
given situation will have been
learned. Thus, by this type of
conditioning a child grows up
retaining the behavioral pattern
which can be related to the
Utopian society.

The Committee of 240 was
by Student
officially
Thursday night w ith the
Congress
stipulation that it be begun by
the end the first week of spring
semester, 1966.
Duties delegated to the committee included sending UK
students back to their home
counties to tell them of services
and programs offercxl by the
University.
One member for each two
home county high schools will be
chosen with the understanding
that he have at least a 2.3 grade
point average.
Congress also brought up a
proposal to consider establishment of a student book exchange
center. A bill on the subject will
be discussed and voted on at the
next SC meeting.
Another proposal dealing with
academic assistance was referred
to committee for consideration
until Congress' next meeting.
Vice President of Student
Affairs, Robert Johnson, spoke
casually to the assembly, first

said. In order to establish the
"The only problem in a
Utopian society a human being .Utopian society," said Dr. Skinas a baby must be subjected to ner, "is motivation. A world
where everything is available is
not interesting or challenging. A
person is usually not satisfied
even when he has everything. He
will not work and that cutsdown
THE MOTION PICTURE OF TH E YEAR!
on production."
ii
-- HELUJMPICTURETDr. Skinner added, "You
A
rtrrti rs
I
1.'
',. I
LULU W
cannot design a community
STUNNINGLY
where everyone has everything.
MAY BE THE SCREEN'S
You make people productive and
J
NEW CUMSWIE!
you make people happy."
"SEAN CONNERY'S
REVELATION
He said that his ideas were so
WORK IS
TMf PFRFORMANCES
violently attacked because they
ARE UNIFORMLY
were getting too close to reality.
in
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ARTISTS

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Will Dunn Drug

WELB

Corner of

division requirements would be
the same for all students.

Bulletin Board
The Newman Club will present
Rev. Richard Harbison of the
First Presbyterian Church at the
Newman Center, 320 Rose Lane,
at 8 p.m. Sunday.
ses-

sion Saturday at 2 p.m. in Room
214 of the Memorial Collesium.

278-115- 1.

Lime and Maxwell

S.

The College Store
FOUNTAIN
COSMETICS

FIRST AREA SHOWING

He said under the new plan
students could change colleges
without losing credits already
all lower
because
achieved

The Home Economics Honorary
is selling Steamed Puddings for
50 cents each Nov. 15, 16, and
17
in the Home Economics
Building. Call order to Becky
Cook,

jtf

LUnftilU UJlUUUIUUil

effective."

SUKY will hold a special

C TM( RCTlM
HcnMNno

nun

that SC president
Winston Miller had asked him
over "to fill in for a light meeting."
In a more serious tone, Mr.
Johnson reminded the assembly
of the administration's interest
in the student governing b(xly.
"The administration is more and
more turning to you for joint
endeavors," he said.
of the
In a discussion
academic plan, recently released,
the vice president said the proposed unification of all freshmen
and sophomore students in the
one college of Arts and Sciences
would, "protect you from making
false starts. . .the organization
will be different but more
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The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, Unlveraity of Kentucky, Le
ington. Kentucky, 40506. Second-cUtpoaUtK
paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
1'ubUkhed four Umea weekly duruif
the acboul year except during holiday,
and exam period., and weekly during
the cummer seme.ter.
Publuhed fur the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publication., Prof. Paul
Uberst, chairman and Unda ttassaway,
secretary.
Uvgun as the Cadet in 18M, became Uie Kecord in ItM), and the Idea
in 11W8. Publuhed continuously as the
Kernel since 1W13.

LLOYO

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RELEASE

SOUTHLAND

The Kentucky Kernel

SattbrBtlCAAANATiJAMUDOfiMI

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ftciiA&ro

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* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Nov.

Student Plays
Conic To UK

12, 196S- -3

Tries To Mnkc People Think'

May Photos Shown

A
newly formal student
By MARGARET BAILEY
theater group at UK will present
Kernel Arts Editor
its first production Nov. 18. 19.
"I like to make photographs that make people think," says
and 20 at 8:30 in the Lab The- Robert C.
May, chief photographer for UK's Public Information
ater. The group will present two
Service. May recently opened an exhibit of his work at Doctors
one-ac- t
plays by French play- Park Callery, 1517 S. Limestone
wright Ioncsco, "The Hald
he says. "By looking at a photoFrom the viewer's standjxiint,
Soprano," and "Jack, or The
graph from a distance, you might
May has certainly accomplished
Submission."
get an abstract form. As you
his aim in this striking exhibit.
The purpose of the new drama His
move in closer you can sec what
fascination and appreciation
group is to bringcomplete student for the drama in nature is espethe picture really is."
drama to the UK campus. They
This abstract quality of photocially noteworthy.
hope to stage one play a semester
Whether it be a wave upon graphs is quite evident in May's
with students doing all the the
shore, foliage deep in a wood, exhibit. When viewed from a
acting, directing, and producing. or a lone sandpiper on a beach, distance his photographs may
The group w ill be financed by
has captured the tone of the seem to be abstract patterns in
the Lab Theater fund and all May
black and white, but when seen
small drama and communicated
proceeds will be returned to this it to the viewer through his own at close range, the viewer maybe
fund. Faculty advisor is UK
stylistic devices and flawless startled to discover he is looking
drama instructor Charles Dick- technical
at grains of corn, a sand dune,
reproduction.
ens.
Perhaps the most striking or leaves reflected in a puddle.
The plays the group has
Many of the photographs in
feature of the exhibit is
chosen for its initial performance stylisticuse of
May's
very black and very the exhibit were taken last sumbelong to the "theater of the white tones in his
mer while May was attending a
absurd". Ionesco himself has with most of the photographs workshop under Minor White in
gray tones
termed them "anti-playsAn ommitted.
Oregon. May used four cameras
of existentialism, they
"This is known as the zone for the exhibit, the Mamyiaflex,
attempt to say that contemporary method of photography," May the Leica, the Hasselblad, and
society has negated all values and explained.. "I expose for the the Rolleiflex. He prefers the
existence is meaningless.
larger cameras to the 35 mm
shadows and develop for the high"The Bald Soprano" will be lights. This way I can control the because of the larger negative
directed by Donald Schwartz.
size.
contrast and tone values."
The actors are Robert Cooke,
The exhibit will remain at
Tli is technique also helps
Susan Cardwell, Keith Coodacre,
Park Gallery
until
carry through May's philosophy Doctors
Elizabeth
Hoagland,
Shirley of choosing and viewing subject Nov. 27 and may be viewed
Donne, and David Hurt.
matter. "I photograph things as Monday through Friday from 9
Director for "Jack, or The
they are and as they are not," a.m. to 5 p.m.
Submission" is Danny Howell.
Student
actors are Howard
FIRST RUN!
Enoch, Lucia Wrape, Shawn
Starts 7:30
Admission 90c
Monohan, Hiller Hobbs, Albert
Pyle, Patricia
Kelley, Clen
Taylor, Marianna Dimotakis.and
Joan Rue.

friDWln

mm"

Kernel Photo by John Zeh

Robert C. May is shown

with one of his photographs.

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* "As Nearly As We Can Translate, It Says: 6We Are

Aii Antiquated Law
state law no alcoholic
beverages may be brought on the
University campus.
Additionally, the president of
the University is charged with delivering an annual warning to the
students on the effects of excessive alcoholic consumption.
Most
campus residents would have to admit these
laws are rather poorly enforced.
Alcoholic beverages flow freely at
many University events, from
Saturday night's game to the
dance at the Student Center folsober-minde- d

lowing.
Any doubter need only to cross
the campus early some Monday
to watch M&O workers dump loads
of bottles and broken bits of glass
into trashcans inside the stadium
or scrub the smell of stale hops
from the floors and walls of the
Grand Ballroom.
As there is no effective enforcement of the rule, it is somewhat
obsolete and should best be dropped
from the statutes.
Although we would not advocate
consumption of alcoholic beverages, we feel that a college student
is mature enough to decide for
himself whether or not he will drink.

9

they can handle a cocktail at their
club.

By

Maxwell Place stands on University property, but also it is a
private residence. Technically, if
Dr. Oswald serves alcoholic beverages to personal guests, he is
violating a law.
The idea that the University
can order grapejuice for Dr.
Oswald's private guests is a bit
absurd.
Consumption of alcoholic beverages often is tied in with moralistic
beliefs, but only with some of the
students and state residents.
Objections to permitting alcohol
on campus based on such moralistic feelings have the effect of
linking the University and certain
religious beliefs, not a popular
joining in modern society.
If Dr. Oswald were to give an
annual lecture on temperance he
would, in effect, be preaching
religiously-linke- d
moralism to the
students.
But

more important

Agreed In Principle On Preventing Uie spread
Of Nuclear Weapons; However

is

99

6

s:-.'

the

artificiality of the law, which really
little affects the amount of drinking
going on. It has not been effective
because the students have rebelled
against the right of the state to
members are regulate their personal habits, an
Certainly faculty

mature enough to decide whether

objection well taken.

Letters To The Editor:

Confusion In Poverty
The most confused element in
the war against poverty remains
the extent to which the people of
the slums should have a controlling voice in developing community
action programs to end their own
poverty.
Sargent Shriver, chief of the
Office of Economic Opportunity in
Washington, keeps emphasizing
that his agency intends to stand
by the Federal law's requirement
for ''maximum feasible participation" of the impoverished in all
such programs. The White House,
under pressure from social work and
community groups in many areas,
has been at pains to spike reports
that the Budget Bureau favors a
retreat from the Shriver policy.
But the mayors of some big
cities make no secret of their reservations about giving slum dwellers
a bigger voice than the elected
representatives of all the people
in City Hall, in decidinghow public
funds should be spent to fight
poverty. Not the smallest factor in
their reserve is the fear that the
establishment of militant action
groups in slum neighborhoods will
upset the political balance in their
cities and thus jeopardize entrenched party organizations.
Obviously, no programs for combating povert are going to have

much appeal unless the poor acquire some greater sense of
in overcoming their
and social afflictions.
personal
Equally, no program can be independent of all the other forces in
the community if an integrated,
over-a- ll
solution of school, job and
other civic problems is to be the
result.
Since so little real guidance
has come from Washington on how
balance can be achieved in setting
up community programs and since
most of the programs are moving
with dismaying slowness, it is welcome news that a privately financed
organization has been set up to
train 1,000 community workers as
guides in the antipoverty war.
Walter P. Reuther of the United
Automobile Workers is chairman of
this new Citizens Crusade Against
Poverty, and his union has made
an initial contribution of $1 million
to help finance it. This is an imaginative use of union funds to help
the less privileged in American
society. The roster of religious,
civil rights, social work, labor and
other leaders enrolled in the new
bodies is
group's policy-makin-g
broad enough to insure some helpful contributions in this muddled
field.
The New York Times

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY

OF KENTUCKY

1894

FRIDAY, NOV.

Walteh Chant,

Linda Miixs, Executive Editor

Sally Stvll, Netcs Editor
Cay Cish, Women

Kenneth Cheek,

12, 1965

Editor-ln-Chi-

Kenneth

Amoiiute Editor

To The Editor:
As a recipient of two degrees
from the University of Kentucky
I feel I have the right to register
a complaint concerning the home-

coming activities.
President Oswald does not have
the right to interfere with traditional homecoming activities. His
idea of having a student alumni
dance together, instead of separate,
was a selfish concept. The traditional dance at the Phoenix should
not have been eliminated to satisfy
one man's desire.
President Oswald made the
statement at half-tim- e
during the
that the size of the crowd
ballgame,
in the stadium testified to the spirit
of the school's graduates. The
crowd was large because Kentucky
has a good football team and not
because of spirit. Anyone who
thinks spirit was involved has
atrophy of the mind.
hope that next year the homecoming activities will be left to
the alumni and not be usurped by
an outsider.
HUNT SMOCK
Instructor of English
Murray State College
I

To The Editor:

The South's Outstanding College Daily

ESTABLISHED

haw Student Complains
Of Writer's UK Image

Hopkins, Manatfng Editor

Judy Ciusham, Assotiate Nwi Editor
JIenhy Rosenthal, Sport Editor
Pane Editor
Mahgahet Nailey, Art Editor

On behalf of the Student Bar
Association of the College of Law
I want to register our sentiment
of complete and utter disdain for
at least one student ut Marietta
College.
Whether the "junior law student

at the University of Kentucky"
really existed or not is beside the
The point is that it is
point.
totally irresponsible to take an isolated experience and by implication
to indict the students of the University of Kentucky (in particular
the College of Law) and the state
of Kentucky.

However, Miss Porotti's biggest
defect seems to be her ignorance.
If the law student mentioned was
merely a contrived literary device
to provide the format for the expression of her views, why did
she pick Kentucky? Does she not
know that Kentucky has not been
mentioned at all in the House
Activities Committee
investigation of the Ku Klux Klan?
Even New York can mot make that
claim. Does she not know that
both of our Senators supported the
Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965?
Does she not know that our
Covernors have been consistent
supporters of civil rights legislation? Does she not know that
the City of Louisville passed a
public accommodations ordinance
even before the national act?
Yes, Miss

Porotti's greatest flaw

is her ignorance of Kentucky and

its state University the kind of
ignorance that tends to raise the
ire of progressive, responsible
southerners whom she would meet
should she ever come to our state.

t

MITCH McCONNLLL
Secretary, Student Bar Ass'rt
College of Iaw

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Nov.

12, 1965- -5

Student Reviews Values After Russian Trip
Travel Provides Greater Appreciation
P
For Basic Premises
Of Democracy-

A
summer's trip through
Soviet Russia led University student Willis Bright to question
some of the fundamental values of
American democracy.
Hut at the same time it has
led him to develop greater appreciation for basic premises of
democracy and a clearer view of
America's international task in
the future.
Bright, an arts and science
senior from Lexington, said, "We
arc going to have to go a step
further than verbalizing our concern for other peoples of the
world and actually do something.
We need more active participation in building international

and understanding."
"Actually," Bright added, "I
came back with more questions
than answers."

Bright spent approximately six
weeks touring Russia and the Iron
Curtain countries with a student
group sponsored by the National
Student Council of YMCA's. He
is vice president of the group's
Southern region.
A scholarship
from the national Y, combined with contributions from local civic groups
and personal piggy-ban- k
raids,
combined to finance the trip.
from
Thirteen
students
the nation were
throughout
selected for the trip.
Included on the tour were
stops in East and West Berlin,
Belgrade, Warsaw, Paris, and
several areas within the USSR,
including Moscow, a sports camp
near Kiev, Volvograd (formerly
the
Armenia,
Stalingrad),
Ukraine, the Georgian Republics,
Rostov and Leningrad.
Early in the trip the group
spent an unexpected night in
East Berlin.
"Someone had become confused on the schedule, and we
arrived at the station two hours
too late to catch our train to
Warsaw," Bright said.
During the layover, they were
treated royally with the station's
elegant club room set aside for
their use. Beer and cognac was
provided for refreshment.
The group caught one of the
famous East Berlin sendoffs of
Russian experts.
"With all the flowers, hugs
and talk you would have thought
wives were saying goodby to their
husbands," Bright said.
One of the early highlights of
the trip was a visit to a salt
mine in Warsaw. Bright said in

"Inside Report"

-

tricate cathedrals of salt were puritanical
society," he comcarved hundreds of feet below the mented.
earth's surface.
They are outraged by the
The group spent alxnit five 1930-is- h
picture of the American
weeks in Russia altogether with
society which they hold.
the largest chunk of time spent
"The Russian student's favat a sports camp for Russian orite American novclists-and
the
technical students near Kiev.
ones most widely
to
"In the USSR each university him -- arc Steinbeck, available and
London,
student attends the camp for a
Bright said.
two week session during the Dreiser," Soviet students are ex"The
summer," Bright explained.
tremely anxious to learn more
Here the A