xt79w08wd43s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79w08wd43s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680205  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  5, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  5, 1968 1968 2015 true xt79w08wd43s section xt79w08wd43s A Computer Is Nice, But There Arc Other Ways

How Students Cheat Phones For Fun, Profit

By LINDSY VAN C ELDER
NEW YORK (UP!)-Coll- ege
students were trying to
cheat the telephone company long before
g
but the game today
gave way to
is more sophisticated than anything grandpa ever imagined.
The typical long-d- i stance swindle in the
age went something like this:
A girl at Northwestern University and her beau at
Princeton would go to public telephone booths at a
prearranged time. The boy would deposit coins for
the first three minutes. The
operator,
at the end of an hour of sweet nothings, would ask
him to deposit the money to pay for the rest of the call.
goldfish-swallowin-

er

long-distan-

Boy and girl would then run like the dickens.
But students today are using far more elaborate
devices, and according to a spokesman for the American
Telegraph St Telephone Co. (AT&T), they're doing it
more for fun than for profit.
AT&T calls it stealing. So does the federal government, which punishes toll fraud with a penalty of up
to five years in prison and a $1,000 fine.
One popular method is the "credit card gyp." A
girl who worked at the United Nations in New York
used to call her boyfriend stationed in a Chicago phone
booth, giving the operator the number of a phony
telephone credit card.
When the real owner of the credit card received the

bill and refused to pay, it was too late for the phone
company to collect.

Another trick, according to AT&T spokesmen, is to
freeze ice in the form of a coin. Unlike metal "slugs,"
the evidence melts after the caller enjoys his free
conversation.

cross-count-

"Touch tone fraud" is still another gimmick. Callers
use their own musical instruments to simulate the sound
of a coin falling through a pay box or in the case of
the new touch-ton- e
telephones figure out the proper
combination of buttons to push. Only operators with
Continued on Page

2, CoL 3

THE KENTUCKY

IINEL

The South's Outstanding College Daily
Monday, Feb. 5, 1968

University of Kentucky, Lexington

Kentucky Colltftate Prexi Service
NAZARETH, Ky. It started
about 8 p.m. with the Rev. Mal-co-

-

m

Boyd urging the audience to
"draw some blood, get down to .
the nitty gritty" and end 12 hours '
later with a song in an experimental liturgy that went "Thisis
the time to speakThis is the time
to open up."
In between there were spirited
discussions on Black Power, hippies, civil rights, durgs, Vietnam,,
the draft, religion and student
power. It was an
"Think in," and there was some
bloodletting, and much openness
in the quest for fulfillment of the
purpose: higher awareness of the
surrounding world and better understanding of another person's
viewpoint.
It got off to a slow start, and
most of the original 700 left before midnight. But for those 100
or so. who endured, the early silence of the
Nazareth
College marathon turned into a
freeflowing discussion out lasting fatigue.
Most of the crowd consisted
of college students, but there were
all-nig-

91

.SMi

Schwartz, Bo)rd 'Draw
Blood' At Nazareth, Ky.

THINK-I- N

all-nig- ht

Vol. LIX No.

also teachers, social workers,
clergymen and nuns. Nazareth
College is a small Catholic school
just outside Bardstown.
The Rev. Mr. Boyd, Episcopal
chaplain-at-larg- e
to the nation's
collegians, challenged contemporary attitudes on sex, education and religion, but drew little
reaction.
"Colleges and universities are
not intellectual," he said. "You
get a training instead of an edu-

cation."

The controversial poet-priealso said he fears threats to the
"American Experiment" such as
racism "those that rot from
within" more than he does
Communism. "My foreign policy
isn't anticommunist, but
st

Students, he said, "are the
only hope we have today." Marijuana should be legalized "so we
could forget about it." Then "we
could worry about napalm, what

matters."

He also commented on civil
rights ("It's a conceivability we
might have legalized apartheid
in this country"); stereotypes

ir

-

HI

("Let's deal with others and forget images"); and "Bonnie and
Clyde" ("an allegory on American violence from the Boston
Tea Party to Newark, from Indian massacres to Vietnam").
He answered a listener's question, a cautious request for some
specific advice, with "Don't have
the audacity to come to an authority figure and say, "Big
Daddy, I can't think." Don't
look for the answers necessarily
suffer with the questions!"
After the Rev. Mr. Boyd's

Through
Broken

talk, small discussion sessions on
specific issues began, and the
ice quickly melted. Hawks and
doves went at it over Vietnam;
d
fellows tryed to
on rase 3, Col. 1

Glass

well-dresse-

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Hi

tit!)'';!'

To see the University from a different
perspective was the goal of Greg Bloomberg, Kernel photographer, as he directed
his lenses through the broken glass of
an old house across the street from the
University Chemistry-Physic- s
Buildingon
Rose.

It All Started

With 'Obits'

ment, Abell was sent to illustrate
collecting only caption informaSam tion, while an editor of the an article concerning the making
of synthetic crystals. To do so,
Abell, now a senior English
magazine works on the manuhe visited General Electric and
major and editor of last year's script independently.
Western Electric laboratories
Abell spent five weeks photoKcntuckian, "when I was sitting
and photographed research in
in the Lexington Herald-Leade- r
graphing the digging, which beoffice doing obituaries and the gan each day at 4 a.m. and endand microcir-cuitrcrystalography
weather and looking through ed at 1 p.m. in an average of
When his internship was to
the January 1963 issue of Naheat. During that
end in August, he received what
time the team made a significant
tional Geographic. I was terhe termed a "lucky break."
ribly bored, and I happened to discovery a tool which revised
"The assistant director of
see an illustrated article entitled the date of the earliest known
'Across the Alps in a Wicker man in America to almost 13,000
photography asked me when I
had to go back to school and
Basket.'
years ago.
After finishing his first assign
"I decided that was better
Continued on Page 3, CoL 4
than doing 'obits' so I wrote
them a letter.'
Actually, there was more
than this to getting a job as a
photographer for National Geographic Magazine. As 1966-6- 7
Kentuckian editor and a Kernel
photographer for three years,
Abell had gained a great deal of
By DARRELL RICE
Those ROTC cadets you see on campus wearing green fatigues,
experience.
By submitting a portfolio of black Army boots with pants legs tucked inside, camoflaged ascots
his own photographs and arrangand black berets are the Kentucky Rangers.
But there is more to being a ling techniques, physical fitness,
ing an interview with the maga-zinthe UK Student applied
d
comRanger than wearing a distincbattle drill,
for a summer internship with tive uniform. Although there is bat, leadership, discipline and
National
There no direct relationship between military courtesy.
Geographic.
the ROTC Rangers here and the
were approximately
200 apKentucky Long Rifles was the
Army's Rangers or the Green original name of the group when
plicants for the three internBeret Special Forces, all three it was initiated here in 1962,
ships offered.
Abcll's first assignment, which groups emphasize roughly the but the title was changed in
to the Rangers. The RangIn'gin in June 1967, was to same training procedures.
The stated purpose of the ers' training is now oriented tophotograph the work of an
urcheological team of college Rangers is to produce "a group ward problems likely to be enstudents near the Mexican lord-e- r 'of cadets that train like the(Army)
countered in Vietnam.
like the Airin Arizona. The team was Rangers, double-tim- e
The Rangers meet every other
to borne, march and look like the Sunday afternoon. They do calexcavating a site
have l)een inhabited by some Presidential Honor Cuard, and
isthenics and run a mile at each
have more esprit de corps than meeting. Four or five times a
of the earliest men in America.
the Marines."
semester the group goes out for
Georgraphic
photographers
The program stresses patrol
cover a story such as this alone,
Continued on I'aje 2, CoL 1
lly KERRY ALLEN

"It all started," said

y.

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110-degr-

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UK Rangers Simulate

V

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Vietnam War Situation

e,

hand-to-han-

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15

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Photo by Kentucky CollcgUU Preu Service

Ed Schwartz, president of the National Student Association,
cusses tike "hows" of student power at an ail night "Think-inat Nazareth College Friday.

dis"

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Teh. 5,

.

'Doivn To The Wily

Gritlf

From Obituaries To
At Nazareth, Ky. National Geographic

Think-I- n
Continued from Page One

religion with agnostics. Catholics, Jews and protcstants. At
the beginning the conversation
had a conservative coloring, but
sparks eventually flew.
By 1 a.m. it was Ed Schwartz's turn to talk. He is Mr.
Student Power on American college campuses, the president of
the National Student Association. Despite the hour, interest
was high, for Schwartz demanded
that the students not be satisfied
with mere "rcsjxmsibility."

ple."

We want to bring confrontation onto the university, onto the
campus, not simply to relegate

NEW YORK (UPI)-T- he
United Negro College Fund reported Saturday it had received-recordonations the past year,
with particularly high contributions coming from cities which
suffered the worst of last summer's ghetto riots.
Dr. Stephen J. Wright, president of the fund, said Milwaukee's contributions were up 64.4
percent; Detroit up 14 percent
and northern New Jersey, including Newark, up 13.4 percent.
He said the fund received
$4.6 million in 1967, up $600,000
from the previous year.
"It appears that a great many
individuals quickly
community response to racial
strife," Dr. Wright said, "and
their efforts to increased support of education as a
basic answer to the exclusion of
large numbers of American Negroes from our nation's economy."

DuBois Due Equal Time

W

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fI

The DuBois Clubs decision
was by a 1 vote, and the dissenter, commissioner Robert E.
Lee, said "the fairness doctrine
ends at the international border
and I would not take the responsibility of turning the microphone over to those who would
advocate the overthrow of the
government by other than the
democratic process."
6--

it

.

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ii

iim

round-the-worl-

The approved alternate route
have led through the
Strait of Vilkitsgogo, which the
Soviets claimed to be entirely
would

within their costal waters. One
of the purposes of the voyage
was to establish the rights of
other nations to use this passage
(or innocent travel and oceano-graphi- c
research.
But on Aug. 28 the expedi

rTZ!m

111"

iim

Continued from Tajfe One
then if I would like to go to
Norway and from there around
the world."
He received permission from
parents, draft board and UK to
enter school late and on Aug. 8
departed for Norway.
There, after a tour of the
country, he was to board the
Coast Guard icebreaker Edisto
d
to photograph a
voyage by the polar ice route.
The route to be followed would
take the two vessels in the
voyage across the top of Europe,
Siberia, Alaska, Canada and
back to Boston. The trip, "regarded as the last voyage of
world significance as yet unaccomplished," had been planned
by the United States for three
years.
Although some Soviet surveillance was expected, the two
Russian jets which made low
passes over the ships on the
first day out of port came as a
surprise. For the next week a
Soviet bomber was present almost constantly.
"After that week, we encountered the first significant
ice, midway over Siberia." The
ice soon reached impenetrable
conditions of up to 30 feet thick
and forced the expedition to
turn south in an attempt to take
an alternate route.

tion received orders to return
home because of Soviet protest.
The almost 200 rolls of film already shot of the voyage were
useless.
When the ship finally returned to the states, it was too late
to enter UK for the fall semester,
so Abell was assigned to photograph for an article on the Erie
Canal. The job involved shootstretch of the
ing the 400-mil- e
original canal in New York as
well as the rebuilt commercial
canal and the cities and communities that grew up as its
result.
Abcll's final assignment was
the winter coverage of an
article on the Adirondack's,
which included photographing
the U.S. winter Olympic trvouts.
The former Kentuckian editor
expects the first publication of
his work to be in June of this
year (the article on crystals),
but other stories may not be
printed until up to a year after
that.
Because of his work for National Geographic, Abell succeeded in entering 13 of his
prints in the national Pictures
of the Year competition along
with photographers from magazines such as Life, Look and
Holiday.
Now his time is filled by
being a fulltime student at UK,
and with preparing his own
photographic exhibition at the
Student Center next fall.
He also will be photographing the Blue Grass area for a
proposed Geographic article on
horses. Other than this, he says
of future work for the magazine, "I would like to go back
some day perhaps after

ii

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present all sides of controversial issues.

The decision on the DuBois
clubs which have been identified both by the FBI and the Department of Justice as being
Communist fronts was one of
four decisions the FCC handed
down in a single day in connec

WW
1

tion with its fairness doctrine.
Under the fairness doctrine
broadcasters are obligated to

(AP)-T- he
WASHINGTON
Federal Communications Commission ruled Friday that a radio station that editorially attached the W. E. B. DuBois
clubs as being "controlled by
American Communists" must
give the group radio time to
answer.

.MMwHrf

ri

real stuff, the real controversy"
surfaces at teach-in- s
and not
in the classroom is what has inspired the student power movement, Schwartz added.
Other aims of NSA are getting
students to ask questions about
curriculum content and to encourage cooperative learning.
How can people who learn
that they have no willingness to
feel or to assert themselves expect to deal with anybody on a
meaningful level, he asked.
"How can you develop something called love if you don't
even know who you are?"
Questions about oneself are
serious, he noted, and "get right
to the heart of some things like
civil rights and Vietnam. It gets
to who you are and what you're
going to be in life. Forget the
problems outside of you and look
at you."

Schwartz tempered his charge
with some caution, and noted
that students are not seeking
power merely for power's sake.
Instead the goal is
education, deeper sensitivity toward others, and a better
middle-clas- s
life, he said.
Education, Schwartz said,
should be "the task of expanding
relations that make sense to peo-

Negro College
Donations Up

ll:vr

it to a few hours an evening in
a teach-in.- "
The fact that "the

"We say . . . try to exercise
Schwartz
student POW-ER,- "
said, spitting out the last word.
Reing responsible means acquie-singt- o
a certain culture that does
not allow challenge, offending,
raising questions or exploration,
he said. It means "accepting,
and hoping to hell that (the establishment) will listen to you at
some point."

phathize with a Negro who
worked in the slums; priests, sisters and Mormons talked over

1068- -3

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MANY REDUCTIONS!

of Kentucky
407 S. Lime. 255-752- 3

Purdue U.
Ohio State

U.

Bowling Green SU.
Miami U., Ohio
University of Tulanc

Ohio U.
Eastern Ky. U.
W. Virginia U.
U. of Cincinnati

Eastern Michigan U.

J

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Feb. 5, 1008

2

'More Esprit de Corps Than The Marines9

UK Rangers Simulate Vietnam War Problems

Continued from 1'aRp One
construct traps likely to be enfield exercises, faculty adviser countered there. Pimji sticks are
an example. There are sharpened
Capt. Paid Vader said.
On other days classroom lec- stakes stuck in the ground and oftures are conducted on survival, ten concealed in covered foxholes.
communications, weaponry and They are smeared with human
related topics.
excretion on their shuqicned ends
There are now 33 cadets in to infect their victims with disthe Ranger program here. Two ease.
of the Rangers are from Air Force
Another trap the Rangers have
ROTC, but the group is officia- built from Army manual speciflly sponsored by the Army.
ications is a bamboo whip with
The Rangers require members spikes attached that is triggered
to be a sophomore or above, have by the victim as he is following
a 2.2 grade average (and a 3.0 a jungle trail.
in the ROTC Department), score
The Rangers learn to be on
300 points on the Army physical
the lookout for these traps, as
proficiency test and be currently
well as others, like underwater
enrolled in ROTC.
charges set in streams likely to
Capt. Vader said the cadets be forded.
plan their own training program,
Also in relation to Vietnam
and they try to make the train:
warfare, the Rangers learn suringas realistic as possible.
vival techniques for jungle terAs applied to Vietnam, cadets
rain. This includes knowing the
difference between poisonous and
Med Center To Aid
edible plants found there.

School For Retarded
The Associated

Press

Plans have been announced to
construct a $570,000 school for
retarded children in Fayette
County.

The school's program will be
started by the Bluegrass Asso-

ciation for Retarded Children and
gradually turned over to the Fayette County school system.
The University of Kentucky
Medical Center will participate
in the operation of the facility.

who went
Vader,
Capt.
through nine weeks' training as
an Army Ranger, said that although the cadets carry on a wide
range of activities, the program is
mainly built around patrolling
techniques.
Ed Fegenbush, senior in horticulture who is the Rangers
cadet commanding officer, said
there are two major kinds of
patrols combat patrols and reconnaissance patrols.
Combat patrols search and

TODAY and
TOMORROW
i;
Chem., fclec, Mech., Met. E.
(BS, MS. Citizenship.
Civil E.
Ohio Dept. of Highways
(BS, MSt. Citizenship.
Humble Oil, Esso, and Enjay Chemical Citizenship. Schedule I: Accounting. Acct., Statistics, Math, Computer
Science (BS, MSt. Schedule II: Engineering. Ag., Chem., Civil, Elec,
Mech.. Mining E. (BS, MSt. Schedule
III: Dealer Sales. Economics, Gen.
Bus., Finance, lnd. Mgt., Liberal Arts,
Mkt. (BS. MS).

Lawrence X. Tarpey of the College
of Business and Economics will lecture on "The
Life: Some
Economic Constrainets," at 7:30 p.m.
in Room 222, Commerce Bldg.
Dr. Joseph Kessler will speak to
the Russian Club at 7 p.m. in the
Student Center.
"Funny Films," will be shown at
noon in Student Center Theater. Admission is 10 cents.

WBKY-F-

Tomorrow
Theta Sigma Phi will meet at 5:30
p.m. in the Journalism Bldg. for initiation and dinner.
Deadline for applications to be turned in for Student Government election is noon Tuesday, 102 Student

Center.
Alpha Lambda Delta will meet at
7 p.m.
in 20ti Student Center.
The Romeros will play at 8:15 p.m.
in Memorial Coliseum for the Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture
Series. Admission free with ID.
Circle-will meet at 6:30 p.m.
in 116 Student Center.

Coming Up
Students interested in attending the
Cedar Kidge retreat February
l'J, and 11 Should contact Doug
Sanders by Monday.
Junior women may apply for Links
scholarship until Tuesday. Applications available in basement of Frazee

5:00
5:15
5:30
6:00
7:00
7:30

"Working with the Adolescent"
Annon

Play of Daniel, A
Musical Drama"

12th

"The
Century

Sign off
TUESDAY
12 00 Sign on
Music 200
1:00 Hodgepodge
12:00 News

2:00

9.

Afternoon Concert Bob Cooke:
Kabalevsky, "The Comedians"

Students eligible

for a fellowship
Board are asked to call

Students interested in intramural
bowling or volleyball should sign up
in 107 Student Center by Feb. 7.
Students interested in submitting
manuscripts to the Southern Literary Festival should do so bv Feb.

Continued from Page One
perfect pitch are immune to this
one.
In some cities, free calls can
be had by the student with the
gumption to tell the operator he
is a policeman then give her a
phony badge number. Others authoritatively ask the operator to
charge the call to "my business
phone" and bill some hapless
company.
More ingenious are the engineering majors who unleash
their computers onto the longdistance lines. A St. Louis youth
fed all the listed numbers of a
local telephone exchange into his
computer and found out what
unlisted numbers were left over.
He then dialed them all until
he discovered which ones belonged to corporations paying a
flat monthly rate for unlimited
calls and hooked
himself in.
Some students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
similarly found a line between
a
computer at the
school and Bell Laboratories in
New Jersey. They figured how to
get on the line, convinced the
Bell operator they were company
engineers and proceeded to call
friends.
all their far-oSome students including a
Harvard group that figured out
how to connect themselves with
Strategic Air Command bases all
over the world have come up
with contraptions and methods
that even the phone company
hadn't thought of.
AT&T denies that the practice is widespread. Out of 4.64S
arrests in 1966 for telephone violations, a spokesman said, only
23
cases involved electronic
cheating which may only mean
the computerized thieves arc
harder to catch.
Why the kids have chosen
the phone company as their targetrather than the Post Office,
a gas or electric company or a

Jim Sisson, Rangers'
tive officer
(second-in-command-

WALLER

AVlNUt

.t

execu-

career."

).

private firm -- is

a mystery to

AT&T.

"We don't know why the
cheaters chose us," a spokesman
admitted, "But they've gone
about as far as they can go."
He said AT&T engineers try to
keep a step ahead of the students
and that ordinary coin - box
smashing has been rendered obsolete by newer, stronger telephones.
"We think this is a serious
thing," he added. "It's stealing
and there's no getting around

it."

id
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L-

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-

KENTUCKY
I'iu't Zsf VAf.YCuoTjj

He said this feeling is typical of most of the Rangers here.
Fegenbush said the Rangers
have "helped me quite a lot in
ROTC summer training camp in
handling problems. We're trying
to pass what we've learned on
to the other cadets, too."

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1ernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky,
Kentucky 4)50t. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Off.ce Box 4'iati.
Begun as the Cadet in lm and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1IMS.
Advertising publithed herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

ti i '

METROC0L0R

ff

Jmperial JJoiISe
1

"I'm an Army brat and plan
to be a professional soldier,"
the senior geography major says,
"and I feel anything I learn will
be to my benefit in my Army

encountered."

STANLEY DEMOS. Manager

15.

command."

How Collegians Swindle
The Telephone Companies

For a delightful, relaxing, carefree weekend, a
pleosant evening, or when parents and guests
come to Lexington, visit the Imperial House,
Lexington's most elegant motel where gourmet
foods, wines, and fine service prevail. Entertainment and dancing nightly for your pleasure. Our
rooms are spocious, elegontly oppointed and
supremely comfortable.

Hall.

Contact Mr. Ball, McVey 224.
Applications may be picked up for
Delta Delta Delta scholarship competition from Mr. Smith, basement of
Frazee Hall.
Below are the job interviews scheduled for Tuesday. Contact the Placement Office, second floor of the Old
Agriculture Bldg. for further infor-

91.3 mc

MONDAY
UN Review
Sports: Burt Mahone
It Happened Today
Evening Concert "Missa Papne
Marcelli" by Pnlestrina
About Science
Search for Mental Health

7:55 News
8:00 Viewpoint
9:00 Masterworks

Camp

from Mortar

M

said the program "makes us more
physically and mentally apt for

wooded areas. The practice helps
prepare the men for wartime conditions.
"The biggest asset," Fegenbush says, "isleaming how much
you don't know in the problems

data-processi-

degrees

Today

destroy patrols and ambush missionsare designed for small-grou- p
offensive action, he said,
while reconnaissance patrols are
dispatched to gather information
without being detected by the
enemy.
The patrols are planned and
practiced by the Rangers in

Friday, Feb. 9, 8:30 p.m.

Smokey Robinson
Saturday, Feb.

10, 8:00

...

Red Mile Clubhouse

and the Miracles

p.m.

...

Memorial Coliseum

AVAILABLE AT THE STUDENT CENTER

* THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Moml.iy, Tcl. 5.

1908- -5

'I Wish To God I'd Never Heard Of It'

Candidates An dSap Run In New Hampshire
By HUGH A. MULLIGAN
CONCORD, N. H. (AP)-"Y-

know it's presidential primary time in New Hampshire,"
twanged
George Des
Coteaux, with a snap of his red
galluses and just a hint of a
glint in his eye, "when the sap
start ed to run."
Citizen Des Coteaux, on this
particular frosty morning, was
filling a bucket from a water
tap protruding from the lovely,
white claplxiard town hall in
Weare-p- op.
1,420 -- where on
Tuesday March 12, he and his
fellow townsmen, each according to his party persuasion, would
be taking part in the nation's
first preferential primary.
"Ain't got time to talk politics now," he aX)logized. "Pipes
froze over at home." Then, with
a perversity that is legendary
among votersof thcCranite State,
he held forth at some length on
President Johnson, the war in
Vietnam, the rise of Ronald Reagan, Social Security payments
and local snow removal.
Down at the crossroads the
"Romney-bus,- "

a

delapidated

school bus bearing the advance
hue-er- s
and criers of Michigan
Cov. Ceorge Romney's guest of
the Republican nomination, had
stalled in the drift.
"She always stalls when the
mercury dips below 40," sighed
Bill Johnson, Mr. Romney's New
Hampshire campaign manager
who inherited the bus, along
with a public address system
and 13 straw hats, in an unsuccessful bid for the U.S. Senate
two years before.
All over New Hampshire, the
scenery was set, the characters
were on stage for the first big
dramatic production of the 1968
presidential year.
Gov. John W. King, a Demo- -

y1t&jr"::-;,-

was in the gold cupoled
state house in Concord, lining

crat,

ou

up write-i- n
support for President Johnson.
At the Copper Lantern coffee
shop in Hillslxiro, handsome,
David Stertweedy, button-dow- n
ling, Richard Nixon's campaign
manager was arguing strategy
with the short order cook, the
local school superintendent and
two telephone linesmen who stoj)-pe- d
by to repair a relay circuit.
At the Byzantine Coffee House
in the Greek section of East Manchester, attorney Nicholas Copa-dileader of the Nelson Rockefeller forces, was trying to conand a
vince two brothers-in-lacouple of cousins that the governor was so firm about not running he had called him to New
York and told him to "call off
all activities, overt or covert."
In his Dartmouth College office at Hanover, handsome, tweDavid Hoeh,
edy, button-dow- n
Sen. Eugene McCarthy's man,
was try ing to recruit pretty girls,
a fixture in every primary campaign, to hand out buttons in
behalf of the Minnesota Democrat, while elsewhere on the frozen Ivy League campus a battery of computers, hired by the
Romney folk, was analyzing every
Republican voter in the state.
Eugene Daniell Jr. a crusty
country lawyer was sitting in
front of a roaring fire in what
had once been his grandfather's
hen house in Franklin, telling
Bobby Kennedy in a forthright
letter that it was impossible to
call off the Kennedy write-i- n
movement, that "the cause was
bigger than the Kennedy name."
In a cluttered Manchester advertising office, John McDonald,
a purveyor of campaign buttons,
bumber stickers, straw hats and
s,

v;-

other election paraphernalia was
taking time from his regular buscaminess to advance the write-ipaign of Ronald Reagan, extolling for visiting reporters the
candor and charisma of the
who so far has shown
no interest in the New Hampn

n,

shire race.
New Hampshire once had a
law limiting campaign expenditures to $100,000 per candidate
in this first in the na'tion popularity contest. Then the good
burghers of his ministate-po- p.
606,921 last federal census or
about three-tenth- s
of 1 percent
of the national population realized they had a pretty good thing
going.
This time around the television networks will spend upwards
of $1.5 million, and the candidates with their retinue of press
and pollsters probably twice that
much, trudging the snowy highof a state that
ways and
will send only eight delegates to
the Republican National Convention in Miami Aug. 5 and only
26 to the Democratic convention
in Chicago three weeks later.
by-wa-

This disproportionate influenthe nominating process-le- ss
of 1 percent
than
in the case of the Republican
convention's 1,333 delegates
has led critics to complain that
the pundits and pollsters have
grossly exaggerated the importance of the New Hampshire primary. The feeling grows that the
whole thing may be more of a
put up than show down.
"Not so," insists Gov. King.
"New Hampshire is the valid
ce on

-

r. A
UPI Telephoto

George Romney announced his candidecy for the Republican presidential nomination Nov. IS. His declaration has led the Michigan
governor into a decidedly uphill battle in the New Hampshire
primary.
grass roots test. The state ranks they do sex," which leads one
second per capita in the nation to believe that Grace Metalious,
industrially. Its mills and fac- the late laureate of New Hamptories have made it a melting shire social mores, may have
had the citizens of Peyton Place
pot for many nationalities; Slavs,
Scandanavians, Italians, involved in the wrong hangup.
"The New Hampshire priTurks, Irish, Greeks, Germans,
Lithuanians,
mary? I wish to God that I'd.
Because of the town meeting never heard of it," lamented U.S.
tradition, government is very Sen. Norris Cotton, the Mr. Reclose to the people in New Hamppublican of New Hampshire who
shire. They're not controlled by got bumed last time around supthe media, what they read in porting Barry Goldwater. "But
the newspapers or see on TV. the people of New Hampshire
love it. They don't care if it
The people of New Hampshire, admits Nixon man Ster- destroys every politician in the
ling, "think more of politics than United States.
French-Canadian-

s.

-

UPI Telephoto

New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, an unknown factor