xt79w08wd77s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79w08wd77s/data/mets.xml Georgia Georgia Writer's Project 1942 Compiled by Workers of The Writers' Program of the Work Projects Administration, in the State of Georgia; Sponsored by The Board of Education of the City of Atlanta; xxvi, 266 pages, illustrated, 21 cm; UK holds archival copy for ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program libraries; Call number F294.A8 W8 books English New York, Smith and Durrell This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed in accordance with U. S. copyright laws. Georiga Works Progress Administration Publications Atlanta, A City of the Modern South text Atlanta, A City of the Modern South 1942 1942 2015 true xt79w08wd77s section xt79w08wd77s i      
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 ATLANTA
A Cizjy qf the Modern Sou;/z
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   A'l`LAN'l‘A
A City gf t/ze Modern Soutb
Compiled by Workers of the
PVriters’ Program of the U/orla Projects Administration
in the State of Georgia
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P E AMERICAN GUIDE SERIES
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    COPYRIGHT, 1942, BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION  
E   OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA
 Q_ UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, Low ·
 ;i State-wide Sponsor of the Georgia Writers' Project A6
 j. I \.»\i€7
  I FEDERAL WORKS AGENCY Q
  Bmc. GEN. Puxup B. FLEMING, Administrator [
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  _ WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION   a
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W;  HOWARD O. HUNTER, Commissioner 7 `VV`, I
ii  FLORENCE KERR, Assistant Commissioner   Y
ji  HARRY E, HARMAN, ja., State Administrator   E
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Q I FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1942    
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· All rights are reserved, including the rights to reproduce ; ;v_Y3 it
` this book or parts thereof in any form.   to
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*‘!’i  ‘·  . V,  

 P rybce
IN THE minds of many American citizens,
l tradition is the very essence of the South. They expect to find it both
as a grace and a disaster, sometimes flowering as fine living and ex- -
, quisite manners, sometimes wrapped like a vine about an entire com-
munity and strangling all the best energies of progress. This picture _
takes into account only two aspects: on the one hand magnolias, black T
mammies, fried chicken, and beautiful belles; on the other cornbread  
with fat—back and lackadaisical farmers.  
A To both these preconceptions Atlanta is its own best refutation. n
V ` At Hrst sight the tourist may see no tradition at all. All the bustle
and clamor of this ever-changing city seem to take no account of the
i past, to make no terms with anything but modern ways and rapid
V, production. This city of big stores, of smoking factories, of handsome
  modern residences, is truly a city of the modern South. Yet the reader g
  must not be misled by the subtitle of this book. Young as it is, Atlanta f
  has a most dynamic history, swift, exciting, sometimes turbulent. , 
  In assembling the vital facts, the Georgia Writers’ Project con- {
  sulted many written records and interviewed many people. The i 
—f written sources were helpful. The research workers of the project  
ly pored over everything from old newspaper files to Walter G. Cooper’s  
it The Oyficiul History of Fulton County. The interviewing of people l
  T was more difficult—and more fascinating. In a city as young as Atlanta g 
t it was sometimes possible to find older citizens who remembered back l 
  to the exciting days of Reconstruction, and occasionally these men and { 
ih? women would recall comments of their parents that threw light on {
%; the very beginnings of Atlanta. The books and papers gave necessary
  facts; the people interviewed gave an atmosphere fresh from actual l
  experience. They did not always remember exact dates, but by such I
  remarks as “We children weren’t allowed to play on that street,” or  
  “You didn’t have to take a chaperon if there were two couples in the f
  surrey" they imparted a living quality to their reminiscences of Atlanta’s l
  history.  
  V  
   
  V T M- K K

   it _ , 
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3  
y   vi PREFACE  
  Since the publication of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind ’  
V  and the extraordinary publicity given the city by the world premiere  
‘ of the motion picture, an increasing number of people have wanted to  
  know more about Atlanta. Atlanta, A City of the Modern South, com- j
E, piled by the Georgia Writers’ Project and sponsored by the Atlanta  
if Board of Education, should answer many of their questions. The  
lj first part tells of the development of the city in its many phases; the Y
V second part locates and describes some of the principal points of in- lj.
.· terest; a chronology, bibliography, and index will be found in the   {
ig third section. It is for both tourist and Atlanta citizen that this work ij (
i. T has been published. V R
  SAMUEL TUPPER, JR., yi
W  State Supervisor Qijii C
li,  KATHRYN A. HooK, g   C
  Project Technician is; lv
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Contents
» PREFACE ................ v
GENERAL INFORMATION ________,__ xv
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES ____   _____ xix
CHURCHES .............. ` . xxi
CALENDAR OF ANNUAL EVENTS _________ xxv
MAP OF ATLANTA _______ , ,
FULTON COUNTY MAP · . l i i I } znszde back cover
Part I: The General Background
ATLANTA: A CITY OF THE M0DERN SOUTH ..... 3 I
HISTORY ................ 8
I GOVERNMENT .............. 4I
4; TRANSPORTATION ............. 48
  COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY .......... 56 I
Q7 LABOR ................ 64 ·
` PUBLIC WELFARE ............. 72 I
I RELIGION ............... 81
I 1 EDUCATION ............... 87 {
f' N EVVSPAPERS ............... Q4 .
  RADIO ................ 103
  SPORTS AND RECREATION ........... 107
I   ARCHITECTURE .............. 114  
  ART ................. 121 A
  MUSIC ................ 127 Q
  THE THEATER .............. 134 {
  LITERATURE ............... 143 i
  Part II: Points of Interest ·  
  THE STATE CAPITOL ............ 153  
  THE STATE OFFICE BUILDING ......... 155 '  
  vii Q
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3 ; vi 1>R1;FAcE  
 , Since the publication of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind ’  
"  - and the extraordinary publicity given the city by the world premiere ,`
( of the motion picture, an increasing number of people have wanted to  
  know more about Atlanta. Atlanta, A City of the Modern South, com-
Q; piled by the Georgia Writers’ Project and sponsored by the Atlanta
Y. Board of Education, should answer many of their questions. The T
, first part tells of the development of the city in its many phases; the F
i second part locates and describes some of the principal points of in- l
V terest; a chronology, bibliography, and index will be found in the   p
  third section. It is for both tourist and Atlanta citizen that this work   (
  has been published. R
  SAMUEL TUPPER, JR.,  
3  , State Supervisor   C
A  §’ KATHRYN A. Hoox, _  _T C
ii,  Project Technician   N
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Contents
» PREFACE ................ v
GENERAL INFORMATION ___________ XV
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES __________ xix
CHURCHES .............. ` . xxi
CALENDAR OF ANNUAL EVENTS _________ XXV
MAP OF ATLANTA _,_____ , ,
FULTON COUNTY MAP · ' l I · l } mszde back cover
Part I: The General Background I
ATLANTA: A CITY OF THE MCDERN SCUTH ..... 3
HISTORY ................ 8
I GOVERNMENT .............. 41
; TRANSPORTATION ............. 48
  COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY .......... 56 I
  LABOR ................ 64 I
Y PUBLIC WELFARE ............. 72  
  RELIGION ............... 81 I
  EDUCATION ............... 87 g
4  N EVVSPAPERS ............... 94 f
  RADI0 ................ 103
  SPORTS AND RECREATION ........... 107
  ARCHITECTURE .............. 1 1 4 g
  ART ................. 121 k
  MUsIC ................ 127 \
  THE THEATER .............. 134 `
  LITERATURE ............... 143 E
JI;
  Part II: Points of Interest —  
  THE STATE CAPITOL ............ 153  
  THE STATE OFFICE BUILDING ......... 155 '  
  VII ;
 
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     viii CONTENTS  
  THE ATLANTA CITY HALL .......... 155  
  · THE CHURCH OF THE IMMAcULATE CONCEPTION .... 156  
 ;;_ A STONE MILEPOST ............. 157 ff _
 Qi THE FULTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE ....... 158 tf ‘
  AN OLD LAMP P0sT ............ 161 A A {
  THE K1M1aALL H0UsE ............ 161 ’  
  THE JOEL HURT PARK ........... 163 A ‘
  THE MUNICIPAL AUD1T0R1UM ......... 164   A f
  WOODROW W1Ls0N’s LAW OFFICE ...._ . . . . 165 A ‘
  A THE HENRY GRADY MONUMENT ........ 165 Q ‘
QQ  THE CANDLER BUILDING ........... 166   {
*9  THE GRAND THEATER ........... 1671    
Zg  THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY ........... 169   `
  MAR1sT COLLEGE ............. 170    
gn}  BALTIMORE BLOCK ............. 170  
  THE GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY ....... 172 -1; A (
  PIEDMONT PARK ............. 177   1
 ?  THE H1cH MUsEUM OF ART ......... 178   ,
  i RHODES MEMORIAL HALL ........... 180   5
;   { WASHINGTON SEMINARY ........... 181 if A
  THE NAT10NAL STOCKYARDS .......... 182   I
A   THE SITE OF JOHNSTON,S HEADQUARTERS ...... 183  
1 ¥   THE HUEE H0UsE ............ 184.   (
3   g SUTHERLAND .............. 184  
    OAKLAND CEMETERY ............ 185   I
{   GRANT PARK .............. 187   I
S   THE McPHERs0N MONUMENT ......... 192  
·   THE WALKER MDNUMENT .......... 193  
A THE ROBERT BURNS COTTAGE .......... 193   _
_ —. THE FEDERAL PENITENTIARY .......... 193   L47;
{ A LAKEWOOD PARK ............. 194  
_ GAMMON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY ........ 195  
   5 · THE STATE FARMERS, MARKET ......... 196  
{   WREN’s N EST .............. 197  
    THE ATLANTA UN1vERs1TY SYsTEM ........ 198  
g   THE BOOKER T. WASHINGTON MDNUMENT ..... 204   V7.Ev11.LE ............... 212  
ATLANTA MUNICIPAL AIRPORT ......... 212 ·
‘ DECATUR ............... 213
AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE ........... 217
COLUMBIA THE0L001cAL SEMINARY ........ 218 ·
E AVONDALE ESTATES ............ 219
A STONE TVIOUNTAIN ............. 220 1
EM0RY UNIVERSITY ............ 222 Y
" THE STATE GAME FARM ..... ` ...... 229 4
OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY ........... 229 A
FLOWERLAND .............. 23 1 4
I i
UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE AVIATION BASE .... 232 {
THE LAws0N GENERAL HOSPITAL ........ 232 E
{ THE RUINS OF SOAP CREEK PAPER A/IILLS ...... 232 °
1 ROS\N’ELL ............... 233
  Part IV: Appendices
CHRONOLOGY .............. 241 i
Y BIBLIOGRAPHY .............. 247
< INDEX ........... A ..... 251 ,
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HISTORY , Between 36 and 37
A Rhodes Memorial Hall, Georgia Baltimore Block
Department of Archives and Kenneth Rogers
History The Kimball House, Atlanta’s
Lane Brothers Oldest Existing Hotel
“Whitehall Tavern,” from a Lane Brotlzers
Water-Color Drawing by Wil- Church of the Immaculate Con-
_ bur Kurtz ception, Oldest Existing Church
Kenneth Rogers, courtesy of in the City
, Beverly DuBose Lane Brothers
V “Howell’s Mill," from a Water- Vivien Leigh at the World Pre-
· Color Drawing by Wilbur miere of "G0ne With the
Kurtz Wind"
V Kenneth Rogers, courtesy of Kenneth Rogers
y Beverly DuBose Section of the Cyclorama of the
" "The Arrival of the Florida at Battle of Atlanta
the Terminus,” from a Water- Courtesy Atlanta Journal
{ Color Drawing by Wilbur Unfinished Confederate Memorial
  Kurtz on Stone Mountain ” V
  Kenneth Rogers, courtesy of Courtesy Atlanta Journal
  Beverly DuBose The Old Huff Residence, House "
,   "The First Post Office of At- of Three Flags
l   lanta” (Then Marthasville), Lane Brothers
  from a Water-Color Drawing Confederate Ordnance on Site of
  by Wilbur Kurtz Fort Walker, Grant Park
  Kennet/z Rogers, courtesy of Lincoln Higlrton
Y Beverly DuBose
  COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY Between_66 and 67
{A Railroad Yards, Atlanta Terminal Midmorning at the Stock Broker’s
‘_ Station Kenneth Rogers
l Courtesy Georgia Power Threading Automatic Banding
  Company Machine in a Cotton Textile
  Freight Trucks Mill
`G} Lane Brothers Lane Brothers
gi; Department Store Bargain Sale Warping in a Cotton Textile Mill
  Courtesy Rich's Incorporated Lane Brothers
{2 Telephone Operators Mill Village
  Courtesy Southern Bell Tele. Lane Brotl1ers
li, Co. Storing Coca—Cola Syrup in Metal
it Bus Terminal Drums for Shipment
  Kenneth Rogers Coéxrtesy of the Coca-Cola
Y'; o.
  xi
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  X11 ILLUSTRATIONS   I
   , COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY (Continued)   I
 `P  Packing Candy Mule Auction  
i  Courtesy Norris Candy Co. Walter Sparks Fi
  The "Constitution" Printing State Farmers’ Market i
 T" Presses Lane Brothers  
 9; Kenneth Rogers V ‘
  EDUCATION AND WELFARE Between 96 and 97 A
V. Candler School of Theology, Art Student, Atlanta University ··
?  Emory University Courtesy Atlanta University  
E`  Maurice Russell Laboratory at · the Municipal gja
I , Medical Students, Emory Uni- Grady Hospital  
Z  , versity Kenneth Rogers  
VQ;  Kenneth Rogers Recreational Center for Enlisted  
  5 Machine Shops, Georgia School Men  
g j   of Technology Walter Sparks  
$,1  Kenneth Rogers Henrietta Egleston Hospital for  
`Z  Tower of Academic Building, Children  
_ il  Georgia School of Technology Lane Brothers  
It  Courtesy Georgia Power Hillside Cottages It
l   Company Kenneth Rogers   i
‘ ` i Student Printers, Oglethorpe Uni- Marist College Cadets  
i · § versity Press Kenneth Rogers  
i ·   Kenneth Rogers Modeling Airplanes in Tech High  
I`, Q Agnes Scott College School Shops  
*     Courtesy Agnes Scott College Lane Brothers  
T THE ARTS Between 126 and 127  
      Julian Harris, Atlanta Sculptor, "Our Town," Produced by At- ,,al:
{ B` ; at Work lanta University Summer Thea- .3;
l   E Courtesy Julian Harris ter  
z .   “Katie Lou,” by Ben Shute Courtesy Atlanta University   j'
2 i Courtesy Ben Shute Emory University Glee Club  
l   “Magn0lias and Mushr00ms,” by Courtesy Emory University g°··
l ` ‘ Robert S. Rogers Glee Club `V C
2 Courtesy Robert S. Rogers Harmony Class at the Georgia gg
i "The Breakfast," by Robert S. Conservatory of Music  
. Rogers Lane Brothers és ;
- - Courtesy Robert S. Rogers Class at the High Museum ig ,
j Georgia Tech and Agnes Scott School of Art  
Students in Gilbert and Sulli— Kenneth Rogers  
§  _ van’s "H. M. S. Pinai0re" Statue of General John B. Gor-  
{ Courtesy Agnes Scott College don on the State Capitol Lawn  Q
Q Atlanta Theater Guild Produc- Lane Brothers i" 
  " tion of "The Barker" The Wren’s Nest, Home of Joel  
  Courtesy Atlanta Theater Chandler Harris  __
i 5   Guild Lane Brothers   ,
{ { Big Bethel Choir Literary Autographing Tea at  {P.
-   ` Kenneth Rogers A- Department Store  
G ‘ · Lane Brothers    
;fy  tg _ A g o r

 · ILLUSTRATIONS X111
DOWNTOWN Between 156 and 157
‘ State Capitol Business Omces Stay Open Long
, Kenneth Rogers After Dark
Broad Street Is in the Midst of Kenneth Rogers
the Crowded Business District The Post Oilice Annex Shows
Maurice Russell the Newer Architectural Trend
Miles of Railroad Tracks Run Kenneth Rogers
. Beneath the Viaducts of the At Marietta and Forsyth Streets
Business Section Stands a Monument to Henry
Kenneth Rogers W. Grady, Persuasive Advo-
Narrow Streets Form a Zigzag cate of an Industrial "New
Pattern-—Peachtree and Ivy South"
Streets Lane Brothers
Maurice Russell Looking Toward Five Points--
Atlanta During Civil War 1867
Photo by U. S. Signal Corps Whitehall Street at Railroad
, The City Hall Towers High and Tracks-1865
` Modern a Block from Old
Y Capitol Square
Lincoln Highton
, SPORTS AND RECREATION Between 186 and 187
l Grant Park Lake Barbecue, Lakewood Park
Maurice Russell Lane Brothers
·_ Swimming, Grant Park Southeastern Fair, Lakewood
·‘; Lane Brothers Park
;`. Tennis, Piedmont Park Lane Brothers
l Lane Brothers Dancing, Rainbow Roof
Q: Golf, Brookhaven Country Club Kenneth Rogers
  Lane Brothers Bowling in a Downtown Alley
i Playground, Washington Park Kenneth Rogers
  Lane Brothers Archery, Agnes Scott College
f Parade of the Old Guard Courtesy Agnes Scott College
` Lane Brothers l\’Iay Day at Washington Semi-
  Baseball, Ponce de Leon Park nary
g Kenneth Rogers Courtesy Washington Semi-
I Football, Grant Field at Georgia nary
  Tech `
  Kenneth Rogers i
  AROUND ATLANTA Between 216 and 217  
  Dogwood Blossoms—Atlanta’s Covered Bridge at Soap Creek {
  Spring Snowfall Maurice Russell  
  Courtesy Atlanta ]ournal East Lake §
  Stone Mountain Kenneth Rogers {
yi Kenneth Rogers Back-Yard Garden, Decatur 3
E, Mimosa Hall, Roswell Lane Brothers Q
  Courtesy Georgia Power Dairy Farm near Atlanta  
  Company Lane Brothers  
  The Chattahoochee River Cyclorama Building @
  Lane Brothers *
és}-?. A " ”""*““““····· 

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  · xiv ILLUSTRATIONS {j b',
·  wl
Q  ‘ AROUND ATLANTA (Continued)  
{  ~ - Decatur from Courthouse Square Inspection at Fort McPherson jig
l   i Lane Brothers Kenneth Rogers R  F
  Dress Parade Inspection at the Atlanta Airport, Hapeville }*{'_’
  Georgia Military Academy, Lane Brothers rg
  College Park .  
  Courtesy Georgia Military  
  Academy q,
; gt RESIDENTIAL Between 234 and 235  
I The Edward Inman House, on The Home of Mrs. Samuel M. ty
 i Andrews Drive, ls ofthe Geor- Inman Is a Good Example of  
—  gian Style with Egyptian In- the Richardsonian-Romanesque  
 j · iluence Showing in the Two Architecture -   l
  Obelisks on the Lawn Lane Brothers ~1:»; (
 J;  Maurice Russell Still Older Houses Along Capitol lla (
Y ;  ‘ The Hugh Nunnally House, on Avenue Show the Mansard   _
g f  Blackland Road, ls a Fine Ex- Roofs, Turrets, and Scrollwork   J
Ti ~ gl ample oi the Neoclassic Style of the "Gingerbread Era"   l
`  E Maurice Russell Lane Brothers   E
{ The John M. Ogden House, Techwood Is One of Several   1
gi-}  , Pace’s Ferry Road, Shows a Well-Equipped Federal Hous-  
{ Strong Norman Influence ing Projects  
{ Maurice Russell Lane Brothers   I
, l , The Abreu House, Pace’s Ferry The Modern Apartment House of   i
"   Road, Is Notable for Its Box- Functional Architecture and   ]
 §_ ` wood Bordered Walk Leading With Penthouse Garden Is   1
`  l to a Balconied Regency En- Still Rare in Atlanta   ,
_‘ { trance Maurice Russell   Q
{< Lincoln Highton A Large Cross Section of Atlanta ,Q j°_ *
`   All Saints Episcopal and Second- Lives in Two-Family Houses in ` _i
__   Ponce De Leon Baptist (Spire the Old Section near the Cap-   ,
      Above) Are Two of the Many itol =_ [fi {
i {_ ; Churches of the Residential Lane Brothers  s
l   E Sections Many Atlanta People Live in ,l, j, l
3 .   Lane Brothers — Maurice Modern Subdivisions   '
Q   Russell Lane Brothers   `
i _   The Older Peachtree Street Resi- Negro Families Live in Crowded   j
l ll dences, Many Now Boarding Sections Throughout the City lis p
E l Houses, Show an Elaboratc Lane Brothers _·; ;`
{ z Combination of Diverse Archi- Negro Slum Areas Are Being  
` ji tectural Details Replaced by Such Federal   l
~ ·» ` Maurice Russell Housing Projects as the Henry l in
{ Grady Homes ?. _ ;.
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Informaiion Service.- .Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, Chamber of
Commerce Bldg., Pryor St. at Auburn Ave.; Atlanta Motor Club
—, (AAA), Biltmore Hotel, 817 W. Peachtree St.; Dixie Motor Club,
] 309 Peachtree St., NE.; Atlanta Convention and Visitors’ Bureau, ·
  Rhodes-Haverty Bldg., 134. Peachtree St., NW.; Atlanta Historical
Society, Biltmore Hotel, 817 W. Peachtree St. For correct time call
_- WAl¤ut 8550.
i Railroad Stations: Terminal Station, Mitchell and Spring Sts., SW.,
  for Central of Georgia Ry., Atlanta & West Point R.R., Seaboard Air
  Line Ry., and Southern Ry.; Union Station, 2 Forsyth St., NW., for
  Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast R.R., Louisville & Nashville R.R.,
  Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Ry., and Georgia R.R.; Peachtree ,
  Station, 1688 Peachtree St., NW., for Southern Ry. E
  Bus Station: Union Terminal, 81 Cain St., NW., for Southeastern _
  Greyhound of Alabama, Southeastern Management Co., Atlantic Grey-  
1 hound Corp., Teche Greyhound Lines, Southeastern Stages, Inc.,  
*i‘ Georgia Stages, Inc., Service Stages, Inc., Smoky Mountain Stages, I
  Inc., Southeastern Motor Lines, Dahlonega-Atlanta Bus Line, Neel  
  Gap Bus Line, Tennessee Coach Co., Suburban Coach Co., and In- i
  terurban Transit Lines. ,
lf 2
  Sightseeing Basses: Daily sightseeing tours from downtown hotels,  
  the Union Bus Terminal, and the Sightseeing Bus Stand, Peachtree and  
  Broad Sts., NW. Automobiles for hire and guides also available.  
  Airport: Atlanta Municipal Airport, 9.2 m. S. of city at Hapeville  
  on US 41, for Eastern and Delta Air Lines; special bus, fare 75¢,  
fg, _ stops at hotels, Terminal Station, and downtown ticket offices of air  
  lines. l
A I
  xv  
SEQ I

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    GENERAL INFORMATION   ~
 S  Taxis.- 3 5¢ for first 2% miles for one to five passengers; IO¢ for each P   _
  additional % mile; $2.50 an hour.  
  Streetcars and Local Busses: 10¢; two tokens for I5¢; sh0ppers’   1
  busses limited to central business section, 5¢. Q T f
  Traflic Regulations.- Speed limit 25 m.p.h. Right turn permitted   L
  on red light after full stop; left turn on green light only. Signs by   Q
 " traffic lights mark intersection where no left turns are permitted.   Q
  One—way streets marked by arrows. Signs indicate where parking is   Q
  permitted in downtown area; parking on right of street enforced even   1
{  in residential section.   1
P  , Radio Stations: WSB (NBC red network, 750 kc.), Biltmore Hotel,  
  817 W. Peachtree St.; WGST (CBS, 920 kc.), Forsyth Bldg.,   ,
  f Forsyth and Luckie Sts., NW.; WATL (Mutual, 1400 kc.), Henry   1
g 9  Grady Hotel, 210 Peachtree St., NW.; WAGA (NBC blue network,   1 f
  1480 kc.), Western Union Bldg., Marietta and Forsyth Sts., NW.   5
gl;  Theaters and Motion Picture Houses: Erlanger Theater, 583 Peach-  
1   tree St., NE., for occasional Broadway successes on tour; Municipal   j
‘   , Auditorium-Armory, Courtland and Gilmer Sts., NE., for scheduled   §
    l concerts and operas; 48 motion picture houses, including 6 for Negroes.   '
ia   Hi ]
i   Accommodations: About QO hotels, including IO for Negroes; many lg;
.`  i tourist homes. Space permits listing only the larger and better—known   s J
l hotels. City Hotels: Ansley, 98 Forsyth St., NW.; Atlanta Biltmore,   ‘·`, {
_   817 W. Peachtree St., NE.; Atlantan, 111 Luckie St., NW.; Briar- #‘·» ]
{2   ;. cliff, 1050 Ponce de Leon Ave., NE.; Byron, 552 W. Peachtree St., ·,j5j_ I
l     NW.; Clermont, 789 Ponce de Leon Ave., NE.; Cox-Carlton, 683  
( i   Peachtree St., NE.; Georgian Terrace, 659 Peachtree St., NE.; Hamp-  
{ E ton, 35 Houston St., NE.; Henry Grady, 210 Peachtree St., NW.; 1  2
`Z   Imperial, 355 Peachtree St., NE.; jefferson, 87 Pryor St., SW.;  
{  ' Kimball House, 33 Pryor St., SW.; Marion, 67 Pryor St., NE.; ( 
} ; Piedmont, 108 Peachtree St., NW.; Robert Fulton, 114 Luckie St.,  
_ , `, NW.; Tremont, 192 Mitchell St., SW.; Winecoif, 176 Peachtree St.,  
1 ’ NW.  
I '   Enwirons Hotels: Candler, 150 E. Ponce de Leon Ave., Decatur;  
§  1; . Colonial Terrace, 2140 Peachtree Rd., NW.; Hangar, Municipal Air-  
  "y‘ . port, Hapeville.  A`
1 .»» 1 *
  . V Negro Hotels: Mack, 548 Bedford Pl., NE.; Royal, 214 Auburn Ave.,  
‘ ,1  NE.; Savoy, 239 Auburn Ave., NE.  r
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. 1 1  

   3
P GENERAL 1NEoRMAT1oN xvii
Restaurants.- Arcade, 110-12 Forsyth St., NW.; Brass Rail, 138
f Peachtree St., NW.; Colonnade, 2415 Piedmont Rd., NE.; Ellen Rice
Tea Room, 63% Poplar St., NW.; Frances Virginia Tea Room,
Collier Bldg., Peachtree and Ellis Sts., NE.; Herren’s, 84 Luckie St.,
NW.; Holsum Cafeteria, 181 Peachtree St., NE.; Majestic, 1026
Peachtree St., NE.; Peacock Alley, 1564 Peachtree St., NE.; Pig’n
Whistle, 293 Ponde de Leon Ave., NE., and 2143 Peachtree Rd., NW.;
Rector’s, 620 Peachtree St., NE.; S & W Cafeteria, 189 Peachtree St.,
NE.; Ship Ahoy, Q5 Luckie St., NW.; Tavern Tea Room, 625-27 ,
Peachtree St., NE.; Venable’s, 73 Forsyth St., NW. (Space permits
listing only some of the better-known restaurants. All the larger hotels
have coffee shops and dining rooms, and there are modern restaurants
in all sections of the city.)
Dining and Dancing.- Empire Room, Biltmore Hotel, 817 W. Peach- .
~ tree St.; Herren’s Evergreen Farm (open during summer only), US 23; 1
_` Paradise Room, Henry Grady Hotel, 210 Peachtree St., NW., floor Z
i show; Rainbow Roof, Ansley Hotel, 98 Forsyth St., NW., floor show; `
Wisteria Garden, 172% Peachtree St., NW. 8
Q Baseball Games: Ponce de Leon Park, 650 Ponce de Leon Ave., NE.,  
Southern League (Atlanta Crackers); Rose Bowl Field (Georgia Q
  Tech), Fifth St., NE.; Hermance Stadium (Oglethorpe University), '
  Peachtree Rd., NE. `
  Football Games: Grant Field (Georgia Tech), North Ave. and l
  Techwood Dr., NW.; Hermance Stadium (Oglethorpe University), f
  Peachtree Rd., NE.; Ponce de Leon Park, 650 Ponce de Leon Ave., {
  NE., for high school games. l
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· Recreational Facz`lz`¢z`es
_ Amusement Park: Lakewood Park, Lakewood Ave., SE. (open
. May I-Oc!. 5; bowling alley and roller rin/z open year round),
  370.9 acres; lake for boating, race track, midway, roller rink, bowling
  alley, exhibition buildings for Southeastern Fair.
`; County Parks: Adams Park, Cascade Rd., SW., 168 acres; golf
  course, swimming pool, lighted tennis courts, softball diamond, play- i 
  grounds, picnic grills, bridle paths, lake for fishing, community house  
  with branch library. Georgia Botanical Garden, Gordon Rd., SW.,  
  459 acresj North Fulton Park, Powers Ferry Rd., NW., 320 acres; _ 
  golf course, polo field, stables and bridle paths, tennis courts, swim- I
  ming pool, lake for canoeing and fishing, archery range, picnic grills {
  and shelters. l
*i,;._ Municipal Parks: Cochran Park (Oakland City), Holderness St.,  
  SW.; swimming pool, tennis courts, playgrounds. Grant Park, S. Q
  Boulevard and Atlanta Ave., SE., 144 acres; swimming pool, lake  
‘   for boating, tennis courts, baseball and softball diamonds, pony ring,  
ig playgrounds, picnic grounds, greenhouses, zoo, Cyclorama of the Battle [
  of Atlanta. Maddox Park, Bankhead Ave., NW.; swimming pool, I
  tennis courts, playgrounds. Mozley Park, Mozley Dr., SW.; swim-  
  ming pool, tennis courts, basketball courts, baseball and softball dia-  
  monds, playgrounds. Piedmont Park, Piedmont Ave. and 14th St.,  
  NE., 185 acres; golf course, swimming pool, lake stocked with fish,  
_,{ ` tennis courts, baseball and softball diamonds, picnic grounds, pony  
  ring, playgrounds. Washington Park (Negro), Lena and Ollie Sts.,  
  NW.; swimming pool, tennis courts, playgrounds, baseball and soft-  
  ball diamonds, picnic grounds.  
l·   
Q, . Bowling: Blick’s Bowling Center, top floor Belle Isle Garage, 20  
  Houston St., NE. Blick’s Lucky Strike Bowling Alley, 671 Peach-  
  xix  
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  -·» if ·‘ · -   >·;;;;_;_;,,, — . — .   A».—.  
  1 s if 
  XX RECREATIONAL FACILITIES  
  tree St., NE. Speedway Bowling Alley, 693 Marietta St., NW. (  
  i (Only centrally located alleys listed.)  
  Golf: Adams Park Golf Course (county-operated), Cascade Rd.,  
 ‘· SW., 18 holes. Asa G. Candler Park Golf Course (city-operated),  
 '· McLendon Ave. at Mason Ave., NE., 9 holes. Black Rock Club,  
i  Campbellton Rd., SW., 18 holes. Bobby ]ones Golf Course (city-  
i  operated), Memorial Dr., NW., 18 holes. College Park Golf Course, ~  
*? W. Harvard Ave., College Park, 9 holes. Dixie Lakes Golf Course  
 _ (¢<>¤¤ty—<>1>¤rat¤d). 16 m. SW. on US 29, 9 holes. Forrest Hills Golf it
l  Course, Columbia Dr., Decatur, 9 holes. James L. Key Golf Course  
·, {  (eityeperated), Kalb St., SE., g holes. John A. White Golf Course  
 li  (city—operated), Huff Rd. at Cascade Ave., SW., 9 holes. North  
4    , Fulton Park Golf Course (county·operated), Powers Ferry Rd., NW.,   A
Q  l 18 holes. Piedmont Park Golf Course (city-operated), Boulevard at  
lil   Tenth St., NE., 9 holes. New Lincoln Golf Course (Negro), Simpson    
  and Hightower Rds., NW., g holes,   g
  * Riding: Adams Park, Cascade Rd., SW. North Fulton Park, Powers   T
Q Ferry Rd., NW. Pine Hill Stables, W. Wieuca Rd., NW. Pinetop   C
 § L Stables, W. Wieuca Rd., NW. Roxboro Riding Club, Powers Ferry jg f;
 il Rd,, NW, Simmons Riding Academy, Candler Rd., NE.   E
._  Roller Skating: Atlanta Skating Casino, 31 North Ave., NE. Lake-   12
"   wood Roller Rink, Inc., Lakewood Park, Lakewood Ave., SE. Roller-  
,   (home, 634 Penn Ave., NE.  ly;  C
      Swimming.- Pools in all Municipal Parks and County Parks. Black    
[   2 Rock Club, Campbellton Rd., SW. Briarcliff Gardens, 1260 Briar-   C
l i   cliff Rd., NE. Mooney’s Lake, Morosgo Dr., NE. Venetian Athletic    
  `   Club, N€lSOI1’S Ferry Rd., Decatur. YMCA, 145 Luckie St., NW.   G
E ¤ i'. Y WCA, 37 Auburn Ave., NE. YMCA (Negro), 22 Butler St., NE.  Y  B