xt79zw18mj7j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt79zw18mj7j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590304  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  4, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  4, 1959 1959 2013 true xt79zw18mj7j section xt79zw18mj7j GuignoVs 'Cyrano deBergerac Begins Tonight
9

By IIAPPT CAW'OOD
Opening curtain for Guignol Theater's largest production "Cyrano de Bergerac" rises at 8:30 tonight
with favorable predictions. The play runs through
Saturday.
Including faculty members and seven townspeople
in its cast of 42, the play is divided into five acts. Each
act requires a different set.
One of the four Kernel reviewers says the size of
the cast is impressive. Also commended were methods
of subdued lighting, arranged by Jim Read, and the
realistic set decorations. Wallace M. Briggs, director,
estimated its cost at $1,000.
Portraying; Cyrano will be William F. Nave, with
Melanie Frssler as Roxanne. "It's great to be playing
a leading role beside a man so talented," Miss Fessler said.
A strive for realism is evident in their efforts. A
Lexington veterinarian, Dr. Robert Hcnsley, has been

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instructing the fencing scene. Miss Fessler said they
have been rehearsing every night, except Sundays, since

Jan.

20.

"There will be a great deal of ad Jibbing," David
Dick, actor in the play, said when speaking of the
large cast. He estimated each had a speaking role
though some were primarily for street scenes.
"When a play moves you even with the sets not
completed and Cyrano without his boots that's a
performance," wrote a reviewer. "Even in rehearsal the
characters lost all present Identity. Through their speech
and mannerisms they carry you to the 17th century
France. They are actors."
The costumes, representing fashions of 1640, were
difficult to piece together, Dick stated. Costumes were
made by Mrs. Lolo Robinson, associate director, and
Betty St. Clair.
Leading actor William Nave, UK graduate, presently

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

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head of personnel at Frankfort, resides in Versailles. Co-st- ar
Fessler is a sophomore transfer from Northern
Center on a dramatics scholarship awarded as a finalise
in the last Kentucky Derby Queen Contest. A member
of Kappa Delta, she said "Cyrano" would be her debut.
She also added, "I guess it was the scholarship thaC
first interested me in drama."
The "Cyrano" play, written by Edmond Rostand, !
the Guignol Theater's second production this school
year. The first performance was "Calne Mutiny Court-MartiaTheir next scheduled play is "The Diary of
Anne Frank," in early May.
Ouignol Theater will feature "Cyrano de Bergerac" at
the Southeastern Theater Conference, March 20, in
Berea. The conference includes universities and community theaters from 10 states.
"Cyrano" runs approximately two and one-ha- lf
hours.
General admission is $1.25 and 70 cents for students.

Vol. L

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 1959

C

No. 74

Group To Study

.Kernel. .Kentmckiam
By BOB ANDERSON
Discussion at a Student Congress
meeting Monday
night showed
that some representatives are in
favor of an SC study of the Kernel

"Backstage With Cyrano"

Members of the production crew of the Guignol Theater's "Cyrano
de Bergerac" are shown preparing props for the play which opens
tonight. Pictured from left to right are Mary Warner Ford (on the
ladder), Frank Brabson, Faye Turner and Pat Vann.

Russia Repeats Stand
OnEastGermanRoute
WARSAW, March 3 (AP)

The
Soviet Union repeated today its ind
tentions of making
East
Germany the
guardian of the
West's access route to Berlin. It
also reiterated that if the West
used tanks and planes to keep
hold of Wet Berlin it would mean
world war.
In a note sent to the Polish ambassador in Moscow, the Kremlin
also denounced the projected conference of Big Four foreign ministers, and said only a meeting
of governments could lower
tension.
It offered to discuss a general
peace treaty for all Germany at
such a summit conference. '
The note wasdelivered just after
Minister Harold
British Prime
Macmillan kit Moscow for home,
and it teemed a deliberate slap
at him.
In a ncte to the Western Powers
yesterday agreeing to the idea of
a foreign ministers' conference,
the Kremlin said it would prefer
a summit cenference.

The note to Poland asked how
foreign ministers could accomplish
anything if the chiefs of government were not ready to reach
agreement.
The note proposed this agenda
for an East-WeSummit Conference:
1. A peace treaty with all Germany.
2. The status of Berlin.
3. European security and disaar-mameh- t.

red-rule-

st

s

and Kentuckian.
The C Executive Committee
will meet with the Board of Student Publications and the editorial
staffs of the Kernel and Kentuckian. They will discuss policy and
finances and make recommendations.
The Executive Committee consists of Pete
Perlman,
Fred
Brown,
Strache,
Joanne
Bob
Wainscott and Dick Roberts.
Gregg Rhodemeyer, SC representative from Education, expressed
dissatisfaction with the consideration given student organizations
by the Kernel. She said the Kernel does not give organizations
sufficient publicity.
.

f--

for
students.
Wainscott reported $3 per student is given to the Student Union
Board, 50 cents to SC and $1.54 to
the Kernel. Other amounts not
specified are granted by the Board
of Trustees.
These funds are granted to the
Kentuckian, Stylus and the men's
and women's dormitory governing
groups. It was reported that the
Kentuckian has a surplus of $40,-00- 0.
$181

te

Perry Ashley, assistant director
of student publications, said the
$40,000 reported at the SC meeting is the total the Kentuckian
has before the publication cost
0.
payments of approximately

ng

the Kentuckian and enables the
staff to save money by making
cash purchases, Ashley added.
One SC member asserted that
since the Kernel is a student
and is supported by student fees, it should be responsible
to the students. It was suggested
that perhaps the Kernel should be
responsible to SC.
Continued On Page 8
puo-licati- on

f

$25,-0Q-

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person who has gone through Week seminar generally agreed
college dees not find his religious Monday.
Dr. Prentlse Pemberton, profesvalues diminished, members of a
panel in a UK Religion in Life sor of social ethics at Colgate-RochestDivinity School, Rochester, N. Y., said modern suburbia,
where a large number of college-educatJSCAA Tickets
people live, is testimony
Director Bernle to this.
Athletic
Shively announced Monday taht
The Rev. Ellsworth M. Smith,
tickets for the NCAA Regional executive secretary of the Western
Tournament in Evanston, 111., Unitarian Conference, said rewill go on sale at 9 a. m. Thursligion should be '"an intellectual
day at the Coliseum.
exercise and not just an emotional
Holders f .UK ID cards will experience." He said "there is a
be allowed one ticket for each conflict if religion Is fixed md
night at $4 per ticket. Persons beliefs cannot be changed."followOther speakers had the
must buy tickets for both sesing observations:
sions. The tournament is March
Lt. Col. Mert Lampson, staff
chaplain, Armored Replacement
A

er

ed

.lr

-

FU

For Donovan Danage

ee

ML Panel Thinks Values
Are Unharmed By College

13-1- 4.

hard-worki-

out-of-sta-

Boys May Be Charged

Mutual withdrawal of armies
and creation of a nuclear
zone and a zone of withdrawl of
Warsaw Pact
both NATO and
forces in Central Europe.
The damage to Donovan Hall
5. Reduction of the armed forces caused by seepage of water through
four floors from a stopped-u- p
Continued On Page 3
drain may be paid by fourth-floo- r
residents.
Donovan Hall Director Don ArmVeterans9 Checks
strong said Monday night it was
Today is the last day veterans
may sign for their March checks, a "possibility" that boys in that
section of the dormitory would
the Veterans' Office said
have to pay for the damage if the
offenders failed to reveal them
4.

The discussion followed a report
He said the surplus of the Kenby Bob Wainscott, students' fee tuckian is an
accumulation of
committee chairman. It gave a small profits gathered over a perbreakdown of the $81 student tui- iod of 20 years or more. It is
tion for Kentucky residents and "good
capital" for

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selves.

The shower drain was ' found
stopped up by paper Tuesday
morning, Feb. 25. A section of the
ceiling in the cafeteria fell after
being weakened by the water.
Water was three inches deep in
the cafeteria and two first floor
rooms. No estimate was made of
the damage.
Armstrong said interviews with
boys in the fourth floor section
began Monday night. He said it
was too early to decide what ac- tion would be taken against the
offenders.

nimiii'i

Part-Tim- e

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Director

President Dickey's office announced ' today that Mary Lou Melton
prohas been named part-tim- e
gram director in the absence of
B. B. Gorrell. Miss Gorrell has
been granted a leave of absence by
the University,

Nine UK Coeds Enter

Training Center, Fort Knox, said
to learn why some educated people
believe and others do not, it is
necessary to find out their childhood experiences.
Chap. Elmer I. Carriker, Wright-PattersAFB, Dayton, Ohio, said
that scientists have learned there
is no "lid" on their world, and
"have become humble."
Emery Emmert, student chairman of RIL Week, said "when we
think of God we think of our God,
who is the God of alL"
Speaking at an RIL convocation
Monday night. University President Frank G. Dickey said the
challenge to education is the developing of traits which will bring
forth "Peace on earth good will
toward men."
on

Derby Queen Contest
Nine UK coeds have been entered in the Kentucky Derby
Queen contest.
They will meet with girls from
ether colleges in the eastern region for a preliminary contest on
March 14.
Campus organizations sponsoring entrants are SAE, Alice Broad-ben- t;
Sigma Nu, Priscilla Lynn;
KD. Melanle Fessler; Theta, Yiv-ia- n
Toner; Kappa, Marlene Fitter and Edwina Humphreys; and
Tri Deit, Patty Harper and Susan
Bradley. Anne Prewitt Shaver will
represent the Lexington Rotary
Club in the content.

The girl who is chosen queen
will receive prizes totaling $15,000,
including a MGM screen test, a
$500

scholarship,

appearance

on

national TV, a mink stole and a
box at the Kentucky Derby.
John Proffit, regional chairman
of the center, said Saturday was
the deadline for making application. The regional committee U
composed of vice chairman Mai-co- m
Mason, president Of the Lexington Optimist Club. Virginia
Priest, Diane Vittetow, Mary
Joyce Proffit, Jim Host. Frank
Brabson,. Jim Oraves, and Jim
Todd.

* 2

- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

t, 10V)

UK Graduate Home Ec Tea
To Be Given
To Direct
tea" for Junior and senior students in home
economics will be given by the
UK Home Economics programs
staff from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. today
in the lounge of Erikson Hall.
The receiving line will be composed of Dr. Abby L. Marlatt.
director of the School of Home
Economics; Dr. Ethel Parker, head
of the home economics education department; Miss Viola Hansen, chairman of home economics
extension programs, and Dr. O. P.
Summers, extension service personnel and training officer.
A

Foreign Trip
T.

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A UK Journalism graduate has
born appointed academic director
of 'Foreign Assignment 1939," an
educational tour of Europe.

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The director, llryre W. Itucker,
a Rachelor's
Decree in
journalism from t'K in l!M9. lie
currently is on the faculty of the
I'niversity of Missouri, where he
is completing his doctorate.
received

Persons making the tour will
have an opportunity to discuss
European political, economic and
g
social problems with
leaders of government, communications, labor and management
y
during the
tour.

"get-acquaint-

ed

Military Ball Tickets
Tickets for Saturday's
tary Hall will be sold for
coupV from

11

a.m. to

Mili$1 per
2 p.m.

today through Friday in the SI It
ticket booth.
Tickets will he $1.50 at

Now Showing!
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TEARS FOR SIMON

David Farrar

Julia Arnall

YOUR PAST IS SHOWING

Terry Thomas

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Peggy Mount

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Prof. Rucker's appointment as
arademic director was announced
in New York this week by Dr.
Jean J. Newman, president of the
sponsoring travel and study groups.

i

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Filet Mighoni
Lamb Chops

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ENDS TONITE!
Lana Turner and Barry Sullivan

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Food:

Lobster Tails
Fried Oysters
Rainbow Trout
Sea food dinner
Jumbo Shrimp

FRAT PARTIES

Veal Cutlet

MOVIE GUIDE
Carl Hegley is receiving a flu vac
cination from Mrs. Robert Blake- man at the UK Infirmary. The ASHLAND "Your Past is Show- shots will be given through Satur- .
8:32
jng " 212
-day of this week. The cost is 50
Tears for Simon," 3:39. 6:49,
cents for students and 75" cents
g.gg
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..
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Kentucky Author Is Described By Spivey
As Being A Lover Of Man, Not Mankind
"Too much concerned with man
in general and not enough with
him as an individual is a fault of
Elizabeth Maddox Roberts." Dean
Herman E. Spivey told the Humanities Club Monday evening.
In his talk,
"The Mind and
Creative Habits of Elizabeth .Maddox Roberts, as Exemplified in
her Second Novel," Dean Shively
discussed the works of the native
Kentucky author and said why
then have not been more accepted
by the public.
Miss
Roberts is a native of

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search for reality beyond fict, men as an individual,, and tl.ero
is too little external action, al- and withdrawal and return.
The author's works are abun- - though the internal action Is pr- dant in the use of symbolism, bably intense enough,
music, dreams, folklore and lyric
He said it was not accepted bv
Pros,
the general public, because the 2( f
Spivey said music is often a m- - and 30s were violent. The pcoj it
Jor motif in her novels, and she wanted
harsh, dramatic,
,"tc
often listened to Beethoven's Ninth staccato reading matter.
Symphony while writing.
Miss Roberts had not mastenc
In evaluating Miss Roberts' sec- - the accepted technical requii?- ond novel, Dean Spivey said she ments at the time of her secor.c.
was too much concerned with men novel and most readers could i
In general and not enough withcomprehend her aims.
a

Springfield,

and attended high
Covington. She was
graduated from the University of

school in

Cadets Jisit Research Center

Chicago.

Force ROTC cadets are briefed by Lt. Col. T. R. Nichols, IK
a5iimnus, during a recent visit to the Arnold Engineering Development Center, Tullahoma, Tenn. The students inspected some of
the test facilities of the center, an arm of the Air Research and
A--

t

1925-194- 1,

Development Command.

Russia

Runways Lengthened

SUVA. Fiji (AP) Nadi International Airport In Fiji is being enlarged to take Jet aircraft that will
ot (lr Great Powers stationed in
fly the Pacific run next year.
friCi.n countries.

Continued From Tage

1

The main runway is being exV( Hp :ns.
tended from 7.000 feet to 11,000
' . tan on te;-t- of these ea- - feet. The secondary runway is
being strengthened, and new taxi-waas well as a new control
Soviet Union said it was
ir dispensable that countries which tower and radio station are being
wire victims of German agres-- .. built.
uch as Poland and Chechoslovakia, should take part in the
rirpo-esummit conference.
ban of atomic and hydrogen

1

10 of her
In the years
major works were published,
.and three of these are now in
the Library of Congress.
Her first novel, "The Time of
Man," was published in 1925 after
three years of work, Dr. Spivey
said.
Miss Roberts worked on
her
second novel, "My Heart and My
Flesh," for 17 months before it
was published in 1927. The social
change of the Patrician land owner with an accent on individual
character is described in the boon.
Miss Roberts, who sued broad
'symbolism in combination with a
general theme of rural life, featured two parallel themes in her
second novel, he said. They sv.e
12

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ys

le

MAN...

SEE THIS

FOR

QUALITY

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HOSPITALIZATION
INCOME PROTECTION
INSURANCE

?

LIFE

ARCHIE ROBERTS

General Agent

ARCHIE ROBERTS AGENCY
INDIANAPOLIS LIFE INSURANCE CO.
PHONE:

4-96-

21

d

Grant Given
To UK Press

They

Ihf

Ford Foundation has re
J for the third time a grant!
University of Kentucky
ti iY
Pie.--t
lor publication of scholarly
uojk in the humanities and social
m iences.

PT

They said nobody
could do it...

in

i

The Kentucky Research Foundation will administer the grant,
which totals $4,100. It is the third
payment fo an anticipated five-jra- T
allotment of funds for that
purpose.
University Press Director Bruce
Dt nbo said stipulations of the contact required that the money be
during 1959 for publication
t
iT wi rks which otherwise could
nci be financed.

J

O'fv'

sr-cn-

fsf

Beat Generation
To Be Discussed
rrecl E. Waddtll. junior topical
ni;tjfi'. will present a paper
"A Look at the Beat Gene- ii'tif i at a meeting oi tne t'ni-- .
Icstipy Club on Friday.
paper will present an ex- in-arrination cf this subject of rr.iuh
Htcn controversy, which has been
the topic cf several articles in
7 iT'e and Life magazines.
The meeting will be held at
4 r. m. in Rocm 128 cf the SUB.
en-till-

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.

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Are

You

Violating The
"Pinning Code?

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......

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to

.

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complete with a
photo of 70 top fra-

"forbidden four" published
here for the first time. Learn
why some school authorities
consider pinning a "wholesome" customin March
McCall's, now on sale.
& Mn

n- -

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AJm

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Don't miss the inside-campstory of the traditional etiquettes of pinning, in March
full-col-

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l5ki

AN
taste to it lm
'Cv

'

If a pinned girl dates other
men, should she wear the pin?
If a couple breaks up, should
the pirl return the pin? How
should a pinning be celebrated?

McCall's

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wore

Modern... change to modern I'M

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:

* New Trend In Royalty?
A new member was added to the

roster of UK royalty Saturday night as
the campus Gold Diggers crowned
their sultan. He's a little outnumbered in the midst of a veritable throng
and atof queens,
tendants, but he is in an enviable poladies-in-waitin-

g

sition.

The tapping of the Oriental

poten-

tate, along with last term's Greek god,
might introduce a disturbing element
r
"Every
into the University's
Coed a Queen" program. Although
the Gold Diggers held the contest last
year, the dream of a silver-foil- ,
genuine crown on every girl's
head is undeterred. This year has seen
even more and better queens.
20-yea-

glass-studde-

d,

But the danger remains. Just suprage spread.
pose that the king-deitOne black day, we would wake up
and think: "Zounds! There isn't a
single queen on this campus!"
y

After all, what could be more terrible than going to a dance and not
being able to watch a coronation? No
more breathless suspense while the

V,--

master of ceremonies drones out the
names of the 23 lovely attendants. No
more watching with
eyes
as the queen herself makes her drama
tic entrance in a sweeping ballgown
(borrowed from the queen of the last
weekend's dance wiio in turn got it
from the previous rcgina), laden with
flowers and bestowing smiles of ecstasy
on her crowds of courtiers. The

'

tear-dimme- d

thought

is

shattering.

four-legge-

pork-bearin-

W
v
i

An occasional king is fine. So are
gods, sultans, cars, wazirs, plenipotentiaries, and sundry omnipotent rulers.
Variety is, alter all, the spice of life.
Even selecting a pig the
oinking type to the
ranks of royalty, as Centre College did
recently, has its good points.
But the thing must not be allowed
to get out of hand. What would UK
be without its queens Military,
Perishing Rifles, Homecoming, Little Kentucky, Sigma Chi and
Pushcart Derbies, Lances, Keys, Mardi
Gras, RIL and Zen?
Ever see a beehive occupied only
by drones?

v

4

V,
r

lit

g,

Ken-tuckia-

n,

An Ode To Odor

It will soon be spring, and we are
weeping.

Not because we dislike buds and
girls in cotton dresses and daffodils
and girls in shorts and beach parties
and girls in bathing suits and nesting
birds and girls in bermudas and verdant foliage and girls in sweaters and
garter snakes and girls.
Nay, 'tis none of those that causes
our copious tears. We weep because
each spring, since time immemorial,
Kernel editors have been allowed to
meet the pungent aroma of M&O's

prolifically spread fertilizer with
equally pungent editorial comments,
cartoons and other devices, and we
have been denied this cherished prerogative.

dents and working after dark to evade
our spies, spread its manure on campus in December. This elusiveness,
plus the fact that there have been no
warm breees to waft along the telltale scent, completely outfoxed us. We
have been duped. Cheated. Our
rights usurped. We weep.
Even now the fertilizer is working
its magic on the campus embryonic
grass, but students will be deprived
of the incomparable sensation derived
from gulping a lungful of fresh air at

Donovan Hall and walking to the
SUB without exhaling. Because they
fertilized the campus so early and in
such knavish secrecy, M&rO probably
won't cause a single twitching nostril
this spring.
So we weep. How can we raise a

M&O, no doubt disguised

The

as stu

"stink about their fertilzer if it doesn't?

Boy

AU-Americ- an

Gather 'round cats and I'll tell you a
story

About how to become an

All-Americ-

Boy.

Buy yourself some sneakers and a

basketball
But only if you're over six feet tall.
Practice dribbling, passing behind
the back, and all that jazz.
I bought myself some sneakers 'bout
a year ago.

Broke them in in a day or so.
And all round town it was well understood
That I was getting to be pretty good.
Hook shots, set shots,
dunks.
J practiced all day and I practiced
all night,
My coach's hair was turning white.
Ie didn't dig that give and go-- he
two-hande- d

said,
"You can .stay, but you gotta play
slow."
Freezing, stalling, that's for the birds
So I took my basketball, sneakers and
all
'And headed for (Lexington) late in

it takes.
Along came a guy with a big cigar.
He said,
"Come here, kid. I'm gonna make
you a star.
I'm going to take you to the NCAA-gi- ve
you a scholarship sign here,

kid."
Well I signed my name and became
a star,
The team traveled near and far.
I was scoring points, trying not to
hack

And fighting reporters off my back.
Played in the Coliseum broke all
records Number One. 4
I'd shoot a ball with a great big grin
And the thing just kept on going in.
But then one day the NCAA
Said (Knock, knock) "Not today
We're going to investigate you, boy
we're going to cut your allowance-gim- me
take this
that basketball
subpoena
Yeah.

University of Cincinnati
Sews Record

to stall
And the starting line is really tall.
Fast break, give and go, pouring it
on

I

was jumpin

Four-Legge- d

it necessary to seek the aid of the press
in publicising the week. The Kernel
has been vety helpful.

Pets

To The Editor:

In answer to a letter in Tuesday's
Intcriaith Council also apjMeciates
Kernel from Jerry Buckman about the
and inteiel of the
dogs in Shawneetown, 1 would .faculty and students. The attendance
the
like to point out first of all that it of the faculty at Mondaywight's conspecifically states in the lease of all vocation was indicative of the interd
Shawneetown residents that no
est the faculty has shown in Religion
animals may be kept on the in' Life Week. We thank the Brass
premises.
Choir and the Choristeu for their
wonderful contribution.
I agTee that not all the dogs roaming in Shawneetown belong there, but
Without this
help, RIL Week
the dogs that do reside in Shawneewould not be possible.
town particularly the females draw
Richard Robkrts
the dogs from surrounding residences.
Picsident
boy was knocked
My
Interfaith Council
down the other day by a large collie
puppy that looked like a
Chivalry Lives On
call. If my wife had not chased the
dog off he might have done more than .To The Editor:
just tear my son's coat.
Recently the Kernel published an
article concerning the death of chivalA majority of the parents in Building D stated that they were in favor ry on campus. Admittedly there are
very few manifestations of manneis
of complying with their lease.
above and beyond the call of duty,
I am not a dog hater, but a crowded
but we in Patterson Hall were given
apartment area is not the place for an opportunity to observe one very
dogs.
good example.
four-legge-

d

half-grow-

n

John R. Mitchell

Coverage Appreciated
To The Editor:
Interfaith Council appreciates very
much the coverage that the Kernel
has given Religion in Life Week, especially Tuesday's edition. In trying
to promote a program of this nature
on a campus this large, we have found

Henry Pepper, our nominee for
Gold Diggers Ball, showed us his appreciation by sending us a lovely note
and flowers. We truly appreciate this
kind gesture and would like to commend Henry for his tboughtfulness.
Thanks for reaffirming our faith in
UK men, Henry!

Joyce Jensfn
I'attmon Hall

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Eatctcd ar the Fort Office at Leiington, Kentucky u aecortd class natter
Published four time a wr-- during the regular hool yrur
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAH

and apoppin' and was

getting the breaks
All the scouts said that I had what

Kernels

Herndaa

The Readers' Forum

tmd- -r tK

eiit boUday

k

try.

By Bob

He Can't Stand For Me To Have The Last Word, 99

three-year-ol-

the fall.

Them cats down there they don't

Krratl MfsUgc

Act of March 3, 1871.

and eiams.

Jim Hampton, Editor-in-ChiLarry Van Iloosr, Chief Sportt Editor
News Editor
Bill Nkkrk, Chief
Society Editor
Billie Hose Paxton,
Perry Ashlfy, Business Manager
Nohman McMumjn, Advertising Manager
Baer, Staff Thotographer
Cordon
Han. Chapman, Cartoonist
ef

on a movie

MEMPHIS
theater marquee:
Adam and Eve
Going Steady
(We wonder if it's in
(AP)-Si- gn

EDITOR)

Cinema-scope.-TIl-

E

WEDNESDAY'S

NEWS STAFF
Joanie Wejsslnckh, Editor
Lahhy Van Hoose, Spoils Editor.
Box Blaxeman, Associate Editor

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

,

1939- -5

r"

PAGING
7

the

ARTS

i
V

0::
V.-

Niven Outstanding

':w;V J

In'SeparateTables'

'

r.y

let hi, Hill and Lancaster) is an example of what hapiens v. hen a playwright (Terence Rattigan)
takes two plays, carefully threads them together and provide
a probable Academy Award vehulc lor David Niven.
Rita Hayworth leaves much io
The picture deals with a group
of residents at a rather dull Eng- - be desired, but she is married to
lish hotel where everybody eats the boss, James Hill, so what, can
at separate tables representing, you do about the situation--

f

"Separate Tables"

'"
i

m
MIYOSIII UMEKI

moo

u

i

Rodgers-Hammerste-

in

the Seesaw."
The year saw established queens
scene parade to
new triumphs, but a fresh crop of
trend won the
talent and
greatest attention.
Backstage. Kettl Frings, a matronly Hollywood script writer,
swept up all the honors including
the Pulitzer Prize for her play,
' Look Homeward, Angel," based on
I
the Thomas Wolfe novel.
New laurels were won by Helen
Hayes, with an American Theatre
Wing Tony as the top star for
'Time Remembered," plus a bevy
of critical bouquets for "A Touch
of the Poet."
Among the other great ladies
were Katharine Cornell, back after
fix years, in "The Firstborn;" Judith Anderson in "Comes a Day;"
Fontanne, giving in
and Lynn
'The Visit" one of her most
mordantly memorable .portrayals.
Gwen Verdon and Thelma Ritter
phared honors as the top distaff
musical stars of the season for
their performances in "New Girl
in Town."
Also on
the
ftage, Jacquelyn McKeever was
cited for her debut in "Oh, Capan-exoti- c

song-and-dan-

The other story deals with
aging fashion model (Rita
who comes slinking Into
the hotel with the intent of win- ning back her former husband
(Burt Lancaster).
It seems that she is getUng
lonely in her old age. But a block
to her plans appears when it fs
discovered hubby has fallen in
love with the landlady (Wendy
Hiller).
The acting is a great example of
some good old pros in action.
David Niven gives an excellent
portrayal of a frightened little man
trying to buck the cold, cruel world,
and Hiller and Kerr give per- formance well worth the Academy
Award nominations that they re- cently received.
Hay-wort-

-

'The Great Decision'
Story
Tells
A-Bo- mb

"The Great Decision: The Secret
History of the Atomic Bomb." by
Michael Amrine (Putnam. $3.95).
At the end of the first cabinet
meeting, Truman, the new president, learned for the first time
from Secretary of Wax Stimson
that an atomic bomb was being
constructed.
It was a secret on which he
had nearly stumbled when in the
Senate his own Truman Committee wondered about phenomenal
expenditures at a couple of the
secretive Army's Western installations.
As . Roosevelt
had told him
contrary inChurchill on the
formed his friends and even his
Parliamentary opposition Attlee
he himself did not pass the word
on to Byrnes, and the United Nations was organized at San' Francisco by United States delegates
who had no inkling of this in

like-fasci- nated

Van Dor en's
an Wife Turn9

busiest cos