xt7b2r3nwc6c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b2r3nwc6c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19151007  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  7, 1915 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  7, 1915 1915 2012 true xt7b2r3nwc6c section xt7b2r3nwc6c THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Pormerly THE IDEA

State University of Kentucky
VOL. VUL
KENTUCKY

WITH

STATE

LEXINGTON,
GOES

SEVERAL VARSITY

INTO
MEN

GAME

EARLHAM

INJURED

LIST

Server, Thompson Crutcher, Dempsey, Rodes,
ana aenraaer may wot nay m
Saturday's Game.

GOOD

Corn

ON

CHANGES IN THE LINE - UP ARE
State "will oppose the eleven from
Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana,
on Stoll Field Saturday afternoon for
the second game of the season. The
Blue and White varsity will go Into
the game seriously handicapped, as
Server, Thompson, Crutcher, Dempsey, Rodes, Corn and Schrader are on
the "nurses' list." Most of these men
will bo able to play though with char-li- e
horse's, hurt joints, and other ail
ments, their best work will not be
forthcoming.
George Park, one of the scrubs, and
a brother of Jim and Curt Park, .had
the misfortune to break his nose one4
day last week.
As Earlham is put down on the
schedule as one of the practice games,
many of the scrubs and Freshmen will
men
be used. Tigert had thirty-thre- e
out in togs last Saturday and thirty-onof them were used in the game.
Earlham, it will be remembered, was
defeated by the Blue and White team
81 to 3 last year.
This team, however, is always reckoned as good as
Butler, so the rooters may expect to
see a good if not a better article of
ball Saturday than was put up in our
opening game. The ' weather, it is
hoped, will be more suitable for the
sport.
It is not unlikely that several
changes will ibe noticed in the line
Saturday.
Coach Tigert would not
say how he expected to play the men.
Kinne may be seen in action on end
in place of Simpson and Schrader also
may be used in this position. Britton
will probably go to fullback with the
big Simpson at guard or tackle. This
seems to be the logical position for
the Lexington youth. The side line enthusiasts would welcome Capt. Schrader back on end, as he played a stellar
game at this place last season. No
one doubts Britton's ability to play
fullback.
Dr. Tigert will go to Mississippi to
be present at the Transylvania-Mississipp- i
A. & M. game. Southern writers are not considering Transylvania
big games.
as one of Mississippi's
Coach Stewart hopes to "slip up" on
the big Aggies as he did on the Ohio
University eleven in September.
Assistant Coach Tuttle will have
charge of the team Saturday.

i

ANNOUNCED

LI

U. TEAM

Lack of Team Work Is
Noted In the Work of
the Wildcats
33-- 0

WAS

THE SCORE

State christened her new Blue and
White football gridiron last Saturday
by defeating the Butler College boys
33-It was each team's first start
this season and consequently poor
football was played.
The superior attacks and the open
field running of the
ly Rodes and Hayden, is responsible
for the 33 points.
Rodes played his expected star
game, Grabfelder showed up well, Captain Schrader had an
except
when called on to punt, and Hayden
proved a "find" for the coaches. Several times he skirted the ends for considerable gains and as one has said
did a Ruth St. Denis through the
whole Butler team.
In the line Dempsey and Britton
proved to be the surprises. Both of
hese men seemed to be in every play.
Crutcher, Server, Clayton, Thompson
and Simpson also played good
game, howtvtr, a lack of team
work In the line was apparent.
Server kicked off to Butler. State
held them for downs and on the next
play Rodes went across from the
ard
line. This happened within
the first three minutes of play.
Schrader missed goal. Three minutes
later "Grabby" grabbed an attempted
forward pass of Butler on their
line and ran through a broken
field
for the second touchdown.
"Dutch" booted the oval squarely between the posts on this occasion. Server kicked off again. A few minutes
later Rodes carried over the third
touchdown.
The Butler boys were evidently suffering from a bad attack of stage
fright, or else they were still gazing
at State's now "fixed up" field and not
playing football.
Butler began a series of rushes at
tho beginning of tho next quarter and
MINING SOCIETY MEETS.
mado first down four times in sucAt a meeting of the Kentucky Min- cession. Tho situation was critical
ing Society in the Mining nulldlng last when Butler fumbled on State's
lino and Hedges recovered. CapTuesday night, tho named officers
were elected for the ensuing term: tain Gqode, Quarterback Bonliam and
president, Piedmont Hill; vice presi- Halfback Loy, who played the best
dent, Fred Jones; secretary and treas- game for tho visitors throughout,
backs,-particul- ar:

e

off-da-

indi-idu-

thirty-y-

d

urer, James F. Irvine.

(Continued on Page 3)

PROGRAM GIVEN

'INTERCLASS

No. 3
MEET

TRACK

BY UNION SOCIETY TO BE HELD OCTOBER

BUTLER PROVES EASY
EOR

KENTUCKY, OCT. 7 1915,

16

A

Enthusiasm Is Manifest and State Has Best Prospects Good Program Announced
Npw MptnW(1 avo
In Years For Winfor the Meeting Next
F.m-nining Team
Saturday
The Union Literary Society met in
its hall, on the third floor of the Gym
nasium Building, last Saturday night
and a good program was given. It
was one of the most interesting meetings in the history of the society.
Several new men were initiated and
the' names of others presented for
membership.
In the absence of Messrs. J. H.
Coleman and C. R. Bourland, G. R.
Smith and H. Felix were placed on
the program.
In the business session the important change was made that the society should meet at 7 p. m., the pro
gram to last until 8:30 and the business meeting from 8:30 until 9 o'clock.
This arrangement gives all an opportunity to go to town after the society
closeB.

President J. T. Gooch insists that
all .members be prompt .and Invites
all who are interested in literary society work to pay them a visit. Watch
the buleetln board in the hall of the
Main Building for the weekly program.
The following program will be given
by the members of the society next
Saturday evening at 7 p. m.:
Devotional exercises H. Felix.
Seven minute speeches by the following new members initiated at the
last session J. B. Hutson, J. V. Sellers, E. C. Kelley, V. Mills, C. P. Wy-at- t,
W. Garrison.
"Reasoning, Inductive and Deductive" W. D. Iler.
"Edgar Allen Poe" H. Scott.
Critic E. J. Elmer.
Business meeting.
All members are urged to be present
and those who are Interested in literary work are invited to pay us a
visit.

. TO

HAVE

NORMAL

CLASS

Instruction

To Be Given
Men Who Expect

To Teach
H. G. Stack, physical director, will

start a normal class the early part
of next week for men who are Interested In or who may some day expect
to secure a position ns gymnasium

The work will consist of
light physiology and anatomy. Light
gymnastic drills ami simple dances
will bo taught, also kinesiology, or
the study of tho mechanism of tho
joints. The class will meot two hours
a week, tho time to bo arranged to suit
"'oso who wish to enter.

GOOD

MEN

ARE OUT

The Patterson Literary Society met

In Its hall on the third floor of the
H. G. Gym last Saturday; evening. The

Tho new physical director,
Stack, announced Tuesday that the
lnter-clas- s
track meet which was to
have been held at the trotting track
last Saturday afternoon, will be held
Saturday, October 16, on Stoll Field.
Mr. Stack seems to have awakened
interest in this branch of athletics,
which for many years past has only
been considered in a
manner.
Teams have been one or
teams and often some of the
best track material in the University
failed to appear in a track suit. This
Is not to be the case this year and
Mr. Stack intends to turn out a track
team worthy to oppose any team in
this part of the country.
He himself Is no "mean" track man,
and is a high hurdler of national fame.
In Bill Kendrick, a California
the coach will have a man
whom he expects to trim any man in
he South this year. Only last Saturday he went out and cleared the bar
at 5 feet 11 Inches, thus breaking all
previous
Kentucky
He
records.
made a mark of 6 feet 1 inch at the
University of Lower California last
year. Kendrick is matriculated In the
Law College. He also is a promising
igh hurdler.
Oka Brooks, of Pittsburg, is another new man who has
chosen the Blue Grass State University to win fame on the cinder path.
He holds a mark of 4 minutes and 31
seconds for the mile, which will, if he
can repeat, establish another record
here. Still others who are good track
men are here. Some have never been
out yet and a lot will wait until spring
to don the scanty togs and the
shoes.
Captain Hickerson, who was the
only man who managed to wrestle a
first away from the Volunteers at the
trotting track last May Is In the University and will be seen heaving the
weights many feet when the spring
meets are at hand. Other track men
in school who have taken interest in
are Wilder, Clark,
the fall work-out- s
Mayhew, Sallee, Hogrefe, Faulkner,
Simmons and others.
The officials and time of the meet
October 16 are to be announced later.
Tho events will be:
dash;
dash; mile run; 70 yards high
'uirdler and the discus throw.
It is not too late for you to come
it to get In condition for the meet,
nnd possibly add a few points to your
class score.
d

two-me- n

high-jumpe- r,

long-spike- d

100-yar- d

d

William Sallee, Elmer Lambert, Earl
Mayhew, John Ilogrofo, Ben Roth,
Robert Duncan, Jeff Clark and others
have already signified their Intention
of joining this normal class.

meeting was a success, as all those
their topics
creditably, and the hall was filled.
Never In the history of the society
did there ever before fail to be a
sufficient number of chairs to seat ttw
audience.
This is very gratifying to President
O. M. Edwards, who is putting forth
every effort possible to place the society on a satisfactory working basis.
The following program will be rends red October 9:
Essay, "Some Phases of the European War" C. W. Harney.
Declamation F. O. Mayes.
Declamation Mr. Crawford.
Debate, "Resolved That in Kentucky Women Should Be Granted
Equal Suffrage With Men." Affrma-tivW. C. Shinnick, G. C. Wilson
W. U.
and J. J. Hume. Negative
Condit and B. Flshback.
Senior critic's report.
"
Junior critic's report.
Business meeting.
All members are urged to come, be
prompt and help make the society a
go. An especial invitation is given
to the new men ofl the University.
Watch on the bulletin board in the
hall of the Main Building.
on tho program handled

e

EXAMS ARE HELD

Winner to Be Given Scholarship at Oxford,

The Rodes Scholarship examination
was held Tuesday and
Wednesday, October 5 and 6, in the
faculty room of the Gymnasium Building for the purpose of selecting one
student from the state to whom will
be given a scholarship of 300 pounds
per annum to the University of Oxford, England. This examination is
open to all students of the Kentucky
colleges who will be nineteen years of
age and will have completed at least
their sophomore year at college before the dato of entry.
Those who took the examination
were: G. C. Wilson, Pa! it Lick, Stato
University; Robort S. llyars, Lexington, Transylvania College, and J. D.
McCready, Kentucky Wesleyan College. On December 20 this committee will again meet, when they will
select Kentucky's representative from
tho names sent them. In October,
Hi!, tho winner will take up his residence at Oxford.
(Continued on Page 3)
in Kentucky

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Svmnhmiir.
FIRftT.T.LAftft

F.vrin.iv Mutual and T In i vernal Promm of Mortar Picture!

OrrlWr.
IN

Suits Mode to Order

Meet Me at

rvtav iiaMuriiriJT
Dry denning

i

week-en-

FIRST-CLAS- S

LEONARD
BARBER SHOP

La-Sal-

(Adv.

At Leonard Hotel
NONE BETTER
COGSWELL BROS., Proprietors

ADA MEADE.

Metropolitan Restaurant
The Place for Good Things to Ea'

The change in prices at the Ada
Meade seems to have met with instant
favor, as it brings with it more expensive and spectacular vaudeville
shows.
For instance, Dena Cooper & Company who are featured the last half
of this week have never before appeared in a city as small as Lexington.
Don't fall to see their wonderful
work in "Hari Kari." It will make
you gasp.
(Adv.
MISS MARY SPENCER UNHARMED
IN ARDMORE,
OK LA., DISASTER.

Welcome to Our City

PATTERSON

r

When you contemplate

securing Life or Accident & Health Insurance
ask the K. S. U. student
representing a conservative, Boston, Mass., Company to submit a proposition.

You need the Insurance. He will ajh
preciate your Business.

Address

406 City Bank

CHICAGO QUICK
SHOE REPAIRING

Most
NEWS OF THE FRATS.

Mr. S. E. Michot, of Louisville, spent
MIbb
Thursday with his daughter,
Mary Louise.
Miss Ina Darnall, who returned to
college after an attack of fever, is
suffering from a relapse.
Mr. James Denton, of Somerset,
visited his daughter, Miss Esther,
Thursday.
Miss Margaret Woll was called
home Sunday, due to the Illness of
her grandfather.
Mrs. E. C. Underwood, of Louisville, visited her daughter, Miss Eliza
Spurrier, Sunday.
Mr. George Turner, of Louisville,
spent Sunday with his daughter, Miss
Mary Turner.
Miss Mary Aeron visited Misses
Eliza Plggott and Mildred Graham
Sunday.
Miss Laura Esther Ecker spent the
week-enwith her parents in Louisville.
Miss Mattle McMurtry, of Nicholas-villf- ,
at
is spending the week-end
Patterson Hall with Miss Miriam
d

Ho-rin-

d

Wie-man- n,

At

d

Why
rrice.

have sore feet by walkinir on tacked
soles when I sew them on for the Bume

Beat Work and "Materia)

Guaranteed
This ad and $1.00 entitles
hearer to a $1.25 Job

P. Leivenson
113

South Uroudwuy

Misses

sisters,

HALL

Miss Emma Jean Crutcher and Mr.
George Stone, of Frankfort, visited
Misses Mary and Emma Utterback
Sunday.
Miss Elizabeth Moore, of Louisville,
with Misses
will spend the week-enKatherine Synder and Anita Crabbe.
Miss Elizabeth Gibbs, of Sayre College, spent Sunday with Miss Elizabeth Duncan.
Miss Frances Geisel visited Miss
Marie Speidel in Louisville Sunday.
Miss Daisy Hockensmlth, of Frank
fort, is coming to Lexington for the
Fall Trots, and will visit Miss Emma
Holton.
Mrs. H. S. Barker returned from
Louisville Sunday night after a visit
of several days.
Misses Mary Keith Hawkins and
JUNIOR CLASS ELECTS Mary Ashbrook are registered at Patterson Hall for the school year.
Miss Aileen Garnett, of Cynthiana,
At a meeting of the Junior class held
in the chapel last Thursday afternoon, visited Miss Mary Hamilton during
Frank Crum, of Inez, was elected pres- the week-end- .
Miss Ina Sherrabeck, traveling secident of the class; Miss Blanch
of Lexington, vice president; retary of the Y. W. C. A., arrived
Miss Edna Martin, of Midway, secre- Tuesday to be the guest of the State
tary; Newland Waters, of Middle-tow- Association.
Miss Margaret Brown, a student at
treasurer, and William Shinnick,
3f Bhelbyville, class orator. About one State, will leave this week to enter
hundred members of the class were the Library Training Course at Copresent at the meeting, and the vote lumbia University.
Miss Martha Fox Hieatt, who gradfor several of the offices was very
uated from the Arts and Science Declose.
partment last year, has a position as
teacher of English in the high school
at Vidrlne, La.
Miss Mary G. Fisher spent the weekTHE COLONIAL
end with relatives In Danville.
Miss Myrtle Smith spent the week-rnwith her relatives in LaGrange.
Mon
Tues. and Wed,
Miss Elizabeth Farra spent several
days last week with her mother in
OCTOBER 11, 12 and 13
Jlcholasville, previous to the latter's
The Great Sociological Drama
lpparture for Florida for the winter.
Miss Ina Sherrebeck, Y. W. C. A.
secretary for this district, came to
Lexington Tuesday, and is at the Hall
for a few days.
In 7 Dig Acts
Several Patterson Hall girls attendM. I. game Saturday.
ed the T. U.-AdiiUMHiinit Children 10c
lanery of tCatletts-burg- ,
Miss Merlo
AdultN litfc
is expected Friday to spend the

Miss Mary Spencer, a graduate of
After you have settled down
K. S. U., who was teaching in
to business in your College
duties, the next thing on the
Okie., when the town was alprogramme is to have your
most destroyed by the explosion of a
picture taken to send mother
and the "girl you left behind
gasoline tank car, has written a letyou." The place is
ter describing the event to her father,
Humphrey's Studio
J. M. Spencer, president of Sayre ColReduced Rales lo Students
lege.
W. Main St.
Phone 1635-Miss Spencer, who is a teacher
modern languages in the Ardmore
High School, was conducting a class
Hair Cut
15c at the time of the explosion and was
Shave
10c hurled against a table by its force.
(EXCEPT SATURDAYS)
Recovering from the shock, she aided
GEO.
MARTIN'S BARBER
the students in escaping from the
SHOP.
Basement, 139 East Main, building, all of the windows of which
Opposite Phoenix Hotel.
had been shattered. She received no
Injury, with the exception of a flesh
wound on her hip.
x

with her

NEWS.

Ard-mor-

341

d

rJawn and Dew, and Miss Edness

Eagle Barber Shop

E

SBaE

OPEN 10:90 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M.

u iTAMPER. Jr.. Owner and MmiHr.

SEPTEMBER MORN.

College Hoys' Tailor
"September Morn," the senson's
Suits Dry Clenned nnd Pressed - $1.00 greatest musical comedy hit framed
Suits Pressed 3,1c All work Guaranteed
stage pictures InPhone 1G50-152 S. Limestone in scries of pretty
stead of dear, old Nnture ns the only
environment, comes to the Ben All
Benkart & Fotsch,
Proprietors Friday and Saturday and Saturday
matinee. A Jolly riot of fun, dancing,
singing coterie of Tango Girls In the
iu aoutn wmestone Street
Opposite the Phoenix Hotel Block
lively chorus numbers Is "September
Lexington, Ky.
Morn." Carl George Is principal comWORK GUARANTEED
edy peddler with a company of fifty
assisting. The attraction but recently
closed a sensational run at the
Opera House, Chicago.

107 WEST MAIN STREET
BEST SODA FOUNTAIN IN THE
CITY. FINE HOME-MADCANDIES

Whtrt the Go's

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

P. B. ROBARDS, Tailor

CALAGIS & CO.

Cm

"Damaged
Goods"

The nine fraternities in the University are in their own houses this
year for the first time In the history
of the school.
The Kappa Alphas have taken up
quarters at 218 South Broadway. The
chapter from Transylvania Is with the
State chapter.
The Sigma Chi's have gotten a
house at 120 East Maxwell. They
moved there from Hagerman Court.
The PI Kappa Alphas moved from
Aylesford Place to 245 East High
Street.
Another change is that of the Sigma
Nu's, who recently moved into a
house which has just been completed
at 319 East Maxwell Street. They
were on the corner of Pine and Mill
Streets last year.
The Phi Delta Thetas also deemed
it wise to make a change and moved
from South Upper Street to the A. N.
Gordon residence, at the corner of
Lexington Avenue and Maxwell. All
but one of their men who did not
graduate returned to the University
this year.
The Kappa Sigmas will remain in
their last year quarters, at Pine and
Mill Streets, as iwill the Alpha Tau
Omegas, who have been located at
the corner of Arlington Avenue and
Maxwell Street.
The Delta Chis have moved from
Madison Place to 411 East Maxwell.
They report that the outlook for the
year is promising.
The Sigma Alpha Epsllon boys will
remain in their spacious quarters at
326 Grosvenor Avenue.
Gamma Alpha Kappa, the frattrnity
for chemists, reports that there are
six active members who returned this
year and one pledge. Through an error, no mention of this fraternity was
made in the Varsity Handbook.
Sigma Nut Entertain.
The local chapter of Sigma Nu entertained at their home on East Maxwell Street Satiirday evening. After
the dinner there was a theater party
at the Ada Meade.
Kappa Alpha Houaewarming.
(The
Transylvania'
and
"State"
chapters of Kappa Alpha had a
at their new home on South
Broadway. There were about fifty
guests present and the hosts were assisted in receiving by Mr. and Mrs.
W. E. Freeman, Mrs. J. E. Cassldy and
Mrs. Hornbrook.
house-warmin- g

We do Kodak Finishing and all
photography,
kinds of
flashlights, etc. Films and film packs
developed free of charge. The usual
prices for printing and enlarging.
McClure Photographing & Supply Co.,
125 East Main Street.

SUBSCRIPTION

DANCE

Eenefit of Open Air School

Extraordinary
Showing of

Autumn Wear
For Young Men

to
find here
that is new in
things to wear; and not only

YOU'LL

that, but the best of everything. You have this advantage here, you choose from
nothing but good quality
with satisfaction assured.

SUITS,

OVERCOATS,
HATS, HABERDASHERY,
SHOES qualities men of
good judgement spek.

Graves, Cox
& Company
(Icorpprauq.) ,
''College Fellow's Shop"

ADA MEADE
SUPERIOR VAUDEVILLE
2 NEW SHOWS WEEKLY
5 - - SHOWS DAILY -

.......

MATINEE
NIGHT .
$1.00 WORTH

10c
10c

SAME MANAGEMENT

Franz Josef Spengler
The Photographer

Fri. Night, Oct. IS, I9I5

in Your Town

Has pleased the exacting

student and the best

GOODWIN'S
SAXAPHONE TRIO

....

FOR

3

peo-

ple generally for fifteen
years. Can he show you?

Phoenix Ballroom
ADMISSION

11.00

311

W. Main St.

Phone

1092-- y

f

i

* THE KENTUCKY

i.
BUTLER PROVES EASY
(Continued from Page 1)
woro responsible for the ferocIouB at- tack during the early stages of this
quarter. The entire. Freshman team
yas substituted during the last few
minutes of the third quarter.
The
Kitten.; wrested the ball from the But-lo- r
teai i and were assuming a most
aggressive policy when time was
called.
The Varsity team was returned to
the game at the beginning of the last
quarter which was a repetition of the
first, three touchdown being scored.
Tho Butler line restated many Bluo
attacks and State resorted to open
plays mostly end man and runs from
punt formations to accomplish their
advance. Good and Bonham did most
of the gaining for the Hoosiers. With
better interference they might havo
scored on the Wildcats.
The summary of the game follows:
L. E
Crutcher
Good
Server
Ball
L.T
C
Dempsey
Mullane
Clayton
R. G
Davis
Thompson
Hill
R.T
Simpson
Amerlung
R.E
G. B
Bonham!
Rodea
Wagoner
Grabfelder
L.H
Agnewj
Schrader
F. B
Haydon
R.H
Loyj
Score by Periods.
'....20 0 0 13 33
State
000
0j
.. 0
Butler
Referee Ham of Kenyon. Umpire!
I

Caswell, of Georgetown. Headlines-maKing, of Transylvania. Time of
minutes each.
periods 12
State
scoring, touchdowns Rodes 3, Grabfelder, Haydon; goals from touchdown Schrader 3.
Substitutions
State, Hedges for
Rodes, Rogers for Clayton, Kinney for
Simpson, Gumbert for Hayden,
for Rogers, Zerfoss for Crutcher,
Peak for Zerfoss, KInne for Hedges,
Mcllvain for Grabfelder, Poindexter
for Schrader, Shaw for Gumbert,
demons for Dempsey, Hume for
Howard for Brittaln, Simmons
for Thompson, Ricketta for Server,
Jrutcher for Peak, Rodes for Kinney,
Irabfolder for Mcllvain, Schrader for
'olmlexter, Hayden for Shaw, Demp
sey for Clemons, Clayton for Hume,
Irlttaln for Howard, Thompson for
Simmons, Server for Rickets. Butler
Brown for Good, Good for Wagoner,
Cook for Ferree, Oilman for Cook.

n

Crls-ma-

n

Crls-ma-

AND PROFESSOR
MATTHEWS ARE OUT FOR

MRS. SMITH

IOARD POSITIONS.

SCHOOL

KERNEL

RHODES SCHOLARSHIP EXAM
(Continued from Page 1)
Tho subjects in which the appll
cants were examined were Latin,
Greek, algebra or geometry and arithmetic. The judges' were President
Emeritus James K. Patterson, of State
University; M. B. Adams, president
of Georgetown College; Thomas B.
McCartney, of Transylvania; Rev. J.
T. Clark, president of Kentucky
and President Ganfleld, of Center College.
In a recent rearrangement made by
tho Rhodes Trust in the United States,
determined by the interest taken in
the competition, Kentucky was placed
in List A.
Wes-leya-

"Yes, sir; thank you, sir."
"We have the chapter on the military this morning. Mr. Brown, what
is an army?"
"An army is composed of ont lieutenant and two hundred and eighty- i'ne atoms, otherwise known as ca
dets."
"Are these atoms alive?"
"That has not occurred to me, but
n sure that they exist"
"Very good, I thank you for your
exact use of English. Mr. Jones, why
;ro these cosmic particles suffered to

NEW FALL "LUBIES"
Hat

d

LUBY & ALEXANDER

THE TOGGERY SHOP

CO.

no

W. C.

SHUCK,

MANAGER

UUJVirAlN

j-

THESE LEXINGTON FIRMS
VERTISE IN THE
KERNEL.
NUF CED

looks and Supplies.
The University Book Store.
Lunch Counters and Restaurants.
Kresge's 6 and
Store.
W. F. Oldham.
Metropolitan Restaurant.
Martin & Stockwell.
University Lunch Stand.
Amusements.
Orpheum.
Ben AIL
Colonial.
Ada Meade.

OFTROLLERS

The first regular business meeting

jf the Strollers, the dramatic organization of the University, was held
Monday afternoon in the newly equipped room in the basement of the Main
Building, at which W. C. Shinnick, of
Shelbyvllle, a Junior in the Department of Journalism was elected to
the position of Stage Manager and
will direct all of the Strollers' performances this year. James McConnell, of Arlington, a Senior Ag student
was elected Business Manager. Enoch
Grehan, head of the Department of
Journalism, who writes for the Lexington Herald, and Is one of the best
dramatic critcs in the South, was
chosen by the Strollers as their faculty adviser for the coming year.
it was voted to continue the practice of holding an amateur night which
was begun last year, and this will be
.he latter part of this month probably, in connect with the annual Hallowe'en entertainment.
At this time
all newcomers at the University are
given an opportunity to display their
talent in dramatics and the Strollers
are able to get in touch with the new
lateriaL

Men's Clothing.
&

Graves-Co- x

Co.

Kaufman Clothing Co.
Graddy-Rya-

Luby & Alexander.
Cluett, Peabody Co.
Women's Clothing.
Purcell's.
Roberts, Ladles' Hatters.
Barber Shops.
Eagle Barber Shop.
Leonard Barber Shop.
George T. Martin.
Soda Fountain and Confectionery.
McGurk Brothers.
Calagis & Co.
Phoenix Fruit Stand.
Photographic Work.
Franz Josef Spengler.
Humphrey's Studio.
R. L. McClure.
Jewelers.

Fred J. Heintz.
Caskey Jewelry Co.
Sporting Goods.
Callaway & Co.
Shoe 8tore.
Special Shoe Co.
8hoe Repairing.
Chicago Quick Shoe Repairing.
Drugstore.
W. E. Stagg.
Lexington Drug Co.
Insurance.
Joe M. Robinson.
Hotel.
Phoenix Hotel.
Tailors.
P. B. Robards.
Railroads.
Queen & Crescent
Printing.
Welsh & Murray.
Fayette Drug Co.
Florist.
John A. Keller Co.
Dentist.
J. T. Slaton.

WE SAY ITS GREAT
TO BE AN AGGIE
Agriculture and Home
Economics
8tudents Get Passes to
Trots.

Last Monday marked the opening
of the fall meeting of the Lexington
Trots, which will last ten days. All
agriculture and home economics students are expected to have one free
day, most probably Saturday.
This
is an annual occasion and is looked
forward to with great pleasure by all
.Tiembers of this college.

AD-

School

STAGE

OUR CATECHISM CLASS Jas. McConnell Chosen Business Manager and Mr.
"Good morning, gentlemen, are you
Grehan Advisor
prepared to recite this morning?"

The State University Alumni Club
has indorsed Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, a
prominent graduate of the University,
as a candidate for the Board of Education in Lexington in the regular
election in November. Professor C.
W. Matthews, a member of the faculty, is also a candidate to succeed
himself as a member of the board.
clutter the earth?"
"That they may drill persplringly
COMING IN EVERY DAY
r.d add to the fame of the lieutenant
and to the glorification of the principles laid down by Kaiser Wilhelm."
"The members of an army are cloth-sMade
The Best $2.00
in uniforms, the book says. What
s a uniform?"
and inspect Our Big Line of. Fall and Winter Tailoring
"A cloth fabrication which makes a
adet's stomach look like a chest
Some uniforms have brass buttons
nnd gold lace, and these add much to
145 EAST MAIN
OPP. UNION STATION
the scenery and the pride of the wearer. However, atoms never attain this
distinction."
"Students who worked their way
through the University were formerly
GRADDY-RYA- N
excused from the army. Why was
INCORPORATED
this nefarious practice discontinued
FURNISHINGS,
CLOTHnVG.
this year, Mr Jones?"
SHOES.
"Because it 1b a long way from the
HATS AND TAILORING
Sfcte campus to the Mexican border,
140 W. MAIN STREET
PHONE 903
in my opinion."
"1 em surprised, Mr. Jonee, that
Y.ti give an opinion. Your text states
that no atom is allowed to have an
WHERE AM I GOING?
opinion. Will some one give Mr.
TO
Jones the answer in the book?"
"The reason they are not excused
Y
JUJXULr
Is because students who work their
way through college have too much
fun."
"Thank you; I have one more question. Mr. Jones, what is the reward
for being a member of the army?"
"If one stays in the army long
OFFERS TO THE COLLEGE YOUNG MEN
enough he will eventually have the
exquisite pleasure of being shot or
destroyed in some other approved
mfu nviJ-- i o nonr
i
niri
manner."
"The hour is now up. Almost all
of you have done well. Please remember, however, that no one but an
officer may have an opinion. Study
diligently and you will truly see the
beauties of warfare much more clearly. We are now trying to have drill
You pay no more for these good
required of atoms five tlmeB a week,
clothes than you would just
so that by acquaintance you may grow
ordinary clothes.
to love to carry your gun. Good day."

AlJNUIUiN

Miss Dean accepted this place, as
her parents live at Annlston, her father, who for many years was In charge
f the Weather Bureau here, having
jecn transferred to Georgia.
Miss Dean was a member of Alpha
XI Delta Sorority and very active in
college circles.
Miss Cornelia Page, previously In
Mr. Curtis' office, will fill tho vacancy
by M1m Dean's resignation.

Music.

Lexington College of Music.

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT

WILLIAM E. STAGG, Your Druggist
PHONES

2871-91-

MAIN & MILL

3

HarU Schaffner & Marx

MISS

Won't You Come in and Look?

DEAN

I

I

!IWIll,pillWi,isjSWslsVi

RESPECTFULLY

SOLICITS

THE

PATRONAGE

OF

State University Men and Women

RESIGNS HER

POSITION AS LIBRARIAN.
Miss Addle Dean, graduate of the
Arts and Science College in 1912 and
since then Experiment Station librarian, has resigned to accept a position
as teacher of French and Latin in
the High School Annliton, Gs.

I
'I

THE PHOENIX HOTEL

C. D.

FOOT BALL

Calloway
SUPPLIES

&

146 WEST MAIN STREET

Co.

KODAKS

* THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL

Shout out aloud for Mary Uapp
I lor
bonu
can't chow Eight-Hou- r
Scrap. Miami Student.

The Kentucky Kernel

(Formerly The Idea).
Published every Thursday throughout tho College year by tho student body
of the Stale University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the stuLot's have "fifteen" for Bessie Reese
dents, alumni and faculty of the Institution.
Sho draws the line on Roquefort
TUM 'KWfTUOKY KJCRN1L Is the oHiciel newspaper of the University.
cheese.
It hi tawed with the view of furnishing to Its. subscribers all .the college news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of Items of Interest concerning tho universities, et ether States and Canada.
Motor Maniac (riding up to blackFIVE CENTS PER COPY
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
smith shop a la horse) "Hey, boy,
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postoffico as second-clas- s
d
put a
shoo on tho left rear
EDITORIAL STAFF.
foot, quick!"
FRANKLIN CORN
J.
Assistant Editor
Dart N. Peak
Managing Editor
J. R. Marsh
Managing Editor
Assiatant
Miss Anita Crabbe
All Aboard for Kentucky.
"Squirrel Food.
William Shlnnlek
' All Freshmen must
honor and
Miftfl Rebecca Bmith
respect upper classmen; must wear
Athletic Editor
McClarty Harbison
the official red and black cap In the
Locals and Law Miss K. Mitchell. .. .Home Economics
J. T. Gooch
jtilldlngs, on tho campus and 'terriMechanical Herbert Graham
Julius Wolf
Fraternities
tory hounded by Calhoun Street and
Mining
S. J. Caudlll
Miss Anna L. Whitwortli. . . .Sororities
Ludlow Avenue and Clifton Avenue
Agriculture
James McConnell
Education Miss Marie Becker. .. .Patterson Hall and Carson Field; must ubo the cellar
Miss Elsie Heller
REPORTERS.
entering McMIcken Hall;
M. C. Finney steps when
W. T. Cottlngham
H. J. Evaus
Estill Woods
must attend all convocations, class
Miss Mildred Taylor.
BUSINESS STAFF.
must sit In
meetings and
Business Manager
W. J. Harris
Jig rooting section, without a girl, In
Carson Field; must park their autoA Kick and a Suggestion.
mobiles In the rear of M