xt7b5m625m4t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b5m625m4t/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1971 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. Quarterly, Publication suspended 1922 and resumed with v. 1, no. 1 (May 1929); v. 5, no. 9 (May 1933) not published; issues for v. 37, no. 2-v. 40, no. 1 (spring 1966-spring 1969) incorrectly numbered as v. 38, no. 2-v. 43, no. 1; v. 40 (1969) complete in 3 no. journals  English [Lexington, Ky. : University of Kentucky Alumni Association, Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus University of Kentucky. Kentucky alumni 2002- Kentucky alumnus monthly Kentucky alumnus, vol. 03, no. 42, 1971 text Kentucky alumnus, vol. 03, no. 42, 1971 1971 2012 true xt7b5m625m4t section xt7b5m625m4t F " 0 ' " ~ ' T.- ,_. g,  g` ,_.__  3; _ *`  0.0._•» . 0
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  ' j If you’ve never heard UK football coach ]ohn Ray  
  5 speak, try to attend a function at which he’s the main
. attraction. What you’ll hear about the future of UK foot- X AS
ball and what you’ll feel for this man and his beliefs will {   1
· make you wish for football equipment and a chance to .
.   get on the field. i
In this Alumnus you’ll find a brief article written by V .
the coach, giving his basic outlook on the 1971 season. IO
He gives away no secrets. He doesn’t come right out and
say UK is going to be a winner this year. He does say
that the Wildcats are going to be better. Q M
In two years at the University, the football team has Q,
.. *_     “   ‘   —.  fj I   y " won but four games. Yet, Ray says, he remains “eternally  
.’*— -, i.' _ _, ·  QQ? ‘j . optimistic.”  
  . _,     if  \`    g Despite having the same number of wins each season,   Ia
_   4,* I   wi if ""'”"·D    .  · _ Bay feels the squad improved last year simply because  
  I,  ’~-, V ff   · V     . 5 the score differential in losing causes was less the second  
  T " ¤ J     - year than the first.  
i ~ ` ._ ___     In 1971 he hopefully points to sophomores, products of  
      i I · ` the first full recruiting year by his staff. These young ¤· E
I ~ ` men, together with a nucleus from last year, Bay thinks,   E
  I ° ~ ‘ `. will give him what is needed to take a giant leap down  
i     _, ` the road to recovery of past glories in UK football.  
, '··&·~ _ M} All we can say is, if football games were won by   P
_ • _  ‘ · A *1; F enthusiasm and hard work alone, ]ohn l’iay’s teams would  
. :,,,,1 gr   . is I be undefeated. We stand behind you Coach.  
  V NVE BELIEVEH! 1*
;  V J p I ` I Q U Q ii Q   A
i` ti ‘ » . . 2 ‘
.. ~ , A   » I feel inclined to exercise an editor’s prerogative and  
Q   acknowledge the retirement of a UK professor who served
l   the University over 39 years. Dr. ]ohn H. Bondurant i
,, served in the Department of Agriculture Economics from k I
February, 1932, until his retirement ]uly 1, 1971. During i
Eur] D. \VuIIaee ’21, Lexington, is the spirit behind the that tenure he was honored for various achievements,
redeuelopmenl of Shrikerlouvn. Read of the Siialcers be- but none can compare with the honor he has given this
ginning on page 17. cditor—the privilege of calling him “Dad.”
D.M.B.  
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  Etc 677 Z/[ ji G IZ/772/ZZl5 ~
Y   I
  X ASSOCIATION OFFICERS Volume 42l Ni1rrilrn:·i‘$T3i August 1971 I V
ll { ]. Paul Nickell ’32
0 President  
Lexington, Kentucky Ilmvducina
3] ]olm R. Crockett ’49 Rgbgfl gy ryyyy 2 g
ci Vice-President
Louisville, Kentucky
iy y F M _ ,38 O])timistic—.’•.(S1·*aIT*=§l
Q. Mlsl IOC l L mms Couelz john Hay 3
is ;. Treasurer
ly il Lexington, Kentucky  
  Jay Bmmfiéld ,48 L0ok—‘We’ve Cot A Hamill
    SgC,.€w,.y, Band 1)irector Harru C·l·atlr·e
ld fl Director of Alumni Affairs  
  L“"*g’°"¤ Kentucky Cultured in the Corn Patch
Ol   lack Vlliltl [0
ig gi EDITORIAL STAFF
VH   Edu". It Takes A Long Time to Learn
  David M. Bonclurant Dr- Frank G. Dickey ]4
by il Plzotograpliers  
ll YL K. h \r . . l
ll ll Glmet   Colm They Make You Kindly \Veleome
yl Iolm R. Mitchell ‘ ] 7
  \ViHiam VVEHS Sliakertouqn at Pleasant Hill
%  
  Advisors
nd   Edward L. Swift, ]r. About The Alumni 2 
red Ellsworth Taylor lVOI'K.S‘llO]), Reunions, Profiles, C lass Notes
mt   Thomas E. Clark
  l, Pllllllng Do You Recall . . .
Us l University of K€HtUClV¥V· iii! »`»:’\V   ‘=¢·»fV»%¤";  Q 
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THE 1971 \\'II,DC.~\T COACIIING STAFF-Seate1l(l to r), Carroll Humfress, , . LGB
john Ray, Frank Ilum, Dave Adolph. SlA(lIl(ll)1g (l to r), George Sefeilc, Hal   O
Ilurntcr. ]o1’ Ilaeringi, Dick Tate, Dan Seluznouiclz and Alex GilJlJ.s·. Hunter, V _ 1 A V M01
Tate, S(’k£IllOUl(`ll mul Gilrlrs are nerr faces uf Ker11‘11cl
.         pla
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      =V. _11-     Wit
1101 DON \\’lLSON—R0y Don mms     ;1       I
1. .       1 , 2,    V.*2 ~*‘i ¢¤:g¤11-; ru
the W zlrlcuts well as head tramer. He   1 1, "`P VV   1   ·    J`?  .`
V I , V V V V Y · rV.. *         lim
1Vs· Jégllllllllg l11.s· second season 111 Lex-   4 1   ;V V_1;~VV_      
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  We have more speed, which I am sure was evident to \Vant a guessing game? Pick the starting quarterback.
  all those who watched the Blue-¥Vhite game. We also Possibilities are senior Bernie Scruggs (left, above) and
A have more young men competing for the chance to play sophomore Mike Fanuzzi (right, above). But d0n’t forget
at many positions. about another sophomore, Ron. Sciarro. A certainty on
‘ Because of this new found speed, the realignment of defense will be middle linebacker Ioe Federspiel, a
 ,g_, the coaching staff, which includes several new faces, and senior (below).
S our new offense, which is similar to the Texas VVish-
  bone-T, we feel our chances of winning have been greatly
  improved.
 y i Some of the outstanding players you might be in- _ _,_   b _   » .
  terested in hearing about for the coming season are A AA V   ( AA   A    
  sophomores-to-be: Ken O’Leary, a fine split receiver,     (   _ A __      
I Hflrvoy Sword, a fine offensive tackle, Mike Fanuzzi and   ii   W i  ,; '__g _  ,     iff  
Bon Sciarro, both outstanding quarterbacks; and Frank     "     ,       AQYQA _
I LeMaster and Doug Kotar, both good running backs.      , ,           
On the defensive side are Pete Kunk, end; Tony “   `‘~   A   .· A       ,,,3
, Moffett, tackle, along with Elmore Stephens, Carl Melvin,   A   A  1  t 1   AA A V °    
Darryl Bishop and ]efl \Voodcock. The defense shows {        *   __     V
outstanding ability and great desire.         ITIA  , ,’ AA ;     . i`A`   -    
Our kicking game, the field goals and extra points will _      T " llll A  
( be handled by Tom Kirk who may remind some of you   A ,  
of Lou Michaels. He is a left-footed kicker and built   ~;,·f·"   _  ,.i,’  t ,
along the lines of Lou.    j i fl , - _   vi   — ‘A   A
Our schedule is basically the same as it has been these 3;* ¤   I         ,
past two years. Some of the experts list it as one of the  f i  ` `   ,       Y .
I toughest schedules in the nation. However, when you   6       A at A
play a demanding schedule it means much more when       ··'’  
you win. w   A
, We are looking forward to the 1971 football season ._§ _ _.  
  with 21 great deal of enthusiasm and expectation. \Ve ti   _' 1
  have a deep feeling of responsibility toward our loyal      , ""   A
  fans and dedicated Alumni who have stood with us these          ~       l
  past two years. \Ve are sure that those of you who are   A`; if A     ’ r
  Watching, or listening to our games during 1971 will see \ `·``     A At    
a definite improvement in the Kentucky football fortunes.     A
5

 harry clar/. . pf   ’ ·-`` °*.  [      .,  
.. " . _ ‘·. _ __,,,...J"'  
  .»}..   V·_.. .  W   .  
It was the {]_ft€[’I]QO]] ef September 21, 1968_ The tension had become s0 intense and the pressure on the liSh<¢<
atmosphere in the band room at UK was tense, filled band that afternoon so great. Statty
with the anticipation that had been building for several Now the time had come to put it all together and "do Ahd
weeks for the 120 members of the “new" version of the our thing.” \Vh0 could predict the outcome? \Vho hthht
"Wildcat” Marching Band. This was a Saturday after- could foresee acceptance or rejection? htthtl
noon, and the band was awaiting its Hnal instructions The acceptance of the “new” band is history. That thht'
prior to its performance at the Missouri game—its first fateful day in September 1968 was the beginning of a V€1`$h
appearance of the year and the first opportunity to new era in the band’s history. The front page of the th th
demonstrate its total renovation by the University. More Sunday Herald-Leader carried a four column picture of htthd
than anyone knew, the future of the UK Band depended the band as it played the National Anthem at pre—game with
UU   PCI`fO1`ll]2Il]CC. Tl1€ l:1'€Sll ilttilZll(lC   tl]G Ul]iV€1°- CCYCIHOHTGS. Tl1G St1ll}CPLIp€1` COl1t1'1l)tltC(.lC(l1tO1'l2`llly \Vltll· tOhh'
sity, the increased interest and support by the UK in the week about the “new" UK Band. ]oe Creason, in that
.~\thletic Association, and a new awareness of the band his Couricr—]ournal column was verbally resplendent, as
by those persons interested in UK football made the usual, in his generous praise of the new look, and in-
spotlight fall brightly on the band that afternoon. Suc- numcrable letters and comments were received. Tt
CUSS \\'()lll(l p2l.V(‘ tllC \V2`|.y` fOI` COlltlllllC(l SUPPOIT tllld 21 It   ()l)ViOU$ l]O\V tlltlt tl]C SC1'l€S of 1llO1`(llllLl.tCly COIN- StOH(
l)l`lgllt flltllI`l‘Q flllllll'€ . . . \VL‘ll, \VllO COlll(l Sily. iA\Vt1l'C pl(‘X l)l'(‘ClSi()I1   \V€l`C (l€SlgllC(i. to ClItCll tllC CYC of ygari
of what was at stake, the band had been working since the fans, that the music was arranged to attract attention Ot tt
the last week in August with a total dedication to make rather than create a subtle mood or tell a story, and lash]
this hand one that would long bc i·einenibt~red. A new that the addition of flags and majorettes were to add wht
l)2Ul(l (lll`(`CtOl`, l|lll(llO\Vll, lllltl'lC(l, \Vltll (ll{fCl'Cl]t l(l(ii`tS, Ij() ijl](‘ Q()l()1' Utlltl pLlQ;(‘t1lli[l`y of tl`l€ ll2l.lftlll1C. TllC first SufH(
a new concept in marching and playing, a large group of show, and even the first season, developed as a fast paced, hhtlt
tl`(‘$llllll‘ll, 11 ililfereut kind of music, strange rehearsal hard hitting spectacle from beginning to end, LIS if to S11)2 etal)
hours, and above all, GIRLS in the UK Marching Band, in our loudest voice, “Look, wc’ye got a bandl” \Vho CHN html
\V(‘l`(‘ jllSt SOIUC of tll(‘ lvilCtOI`S lllillI(‘llClllg tll()SC \\'Ol](l(‘1`lllQ, jlltlglj tlltlt Hl‘St SllO\V ll] SCl)tCIlll)(‘1` Ol` CVQH tllC lL`l$t $llO\V thc
musicians that month. Add to this meager beginning at Tt·iint·sst·t»? Certainly the actual proliciency of the YUM
the strange attitude by the new director who insisted band, compared objectively to other bands that year it Pi
that everytliing be kept under wraps until the bands lett soniething to be desired and perhaps lacked some of Schh
l'll`St p€I'fOl`llll\llC(`. illld lt l)C(‘Oll1CS 110 \\’()IlLl€l' \Vlly tllC tll(‘ pl'C(jlSi()l], SlZ(‘ tllltl gl't1l](l(2llI` of lllillly of tllC C$tHl)' md
6

 those bandsrnerr. Added to sorties into Ohio, Indiana,
West Virginia, Tennessee and Georgia for musicians, the
recruiting program at UK has paid off both in numbers A
and in the quality of the students.  
Not only was it necessary to “seli” the band program  
I to prospects, it was also vital that we promote the pro-  
  E v gram here at home, to the administration, the Athletic
Association, the students, alumni and the football fans in K
general. It was a time for promoting the band as an
important part of the University, a valuable addition to *
the lives of its members and a contrasting activity to the
l G Q i normal academic nature of a major university. It was a
time for convirreing arguments for a reasonable budget, ,
, a budget that would permit the UK Band to provide its
members with the same advantages and opportunities as
I A other bands of the South and Mid-\Vest area. It was
l obvious that the University had to show its willingness
, to pay the enormous expense that is inevitab_ly attached
  I ’ to a reasonably large and attractive marching band. It
  was a time when the University community had to be
A B a n d shown the need for total university cooperation in
a facilitating the recruiting effort, and in providing the
endless logistical support necessary for a lively and
progressive program.
i lished bands. But to those involved, students, clireotorg, For three years 1l0\V the Marching Band has grown. ‘
staff, administrators, it was the greatest band around. FYOW the 1967 HgU1`€S of C0nSiCle1'21lJly less than the
) And regardless of deficiencies in performance skills and “M&1'€lil¤g l0O,” it lH1S g1`0W11 to and Stk1biliZeCl at the
) numbers, no one could fault the tremendous spirit of the P1'€$€¤l 200 plus $iZ€- N0t really lkifge . · - jl1St average
band of ’68. Their attitudes and the great desire to put a t01` the S0Utl1e€lSte1`¤ C0nte1`e11Ce . - . but we’ve kept
{ unit on the Held which could proudly represent the Uni- P¤€€, \V€’V€ m€i€l€ 0111` lnfifk will Welle still g1'0\Vil1g in
1 versity of Kentucky made this band completely unique quality. What can we foresee for 1971`P
B in the annals of the Univer-sity_ UK will have better The 1971 “\Vildcat” Band should reach new levels of
{ bands than ’68, but it will never find a group of bandsmen Pi`0HCl€°U€Y» with all €V€“ g!`€¤t€i` emphasis OU P1`€Cl$i0“»
e with more enthusiasm or esprit de corps. They laid the $t}’l€ and playing. Tl]€ St1`€¤$tl] of the individual Pliiyef
i- foundation, cut the starting niche for the future growth has improved Consistently over the past three years, and
U that is now so obvious in l97l_ there is no reason to suppose that the collective effort in
VS _ 1971 will be less than outstanding.
i- First Season A Stepping Swim Beginning August :22 the band arrives on campus for
The success of the first season was only a stepping its "Early \Veek” activities. For almost a week the band
l_ stone. A band cannot live on enthusiasm alone year after undergoes irrterrsivc rehearsal, day and night, preparing
if year, and there has to be a constant and careful nurturing for the season ahead. Living in the University dormi- y
ii of the maturing program. In the first place, to build a tories, each rnernber of the band suffers the heat of
d lasting and progressive band program, there has to be a August, tired lips, sore feet, sunburn, the dust of the
d continuous flow of good musicians and good marchers in rehearsal field, and in general the fatique of rnuelr exer- Z
St sufficient number to provide a comfortable margin for a cise and too little rest; all to produce the best football
;l_ major university band. There had to be established an band possible at UK. Fortunately, the hard work and
y_ elaborate recruiting program to seek out, attract and continuous rehearsal schedule during this week is inter- A
in finally “sign” high school musicians. So, while executing laced with a few social events, including the “Early I
w the normal band activities on campus during a given \Veek” Banquet, which is always a fitting climax to the
re YUH1', there has developed in the past three years at UK intensity of the week’s events. Shortly after the end of i
ar a parallel program of recruiting in Kentucky’s high this week, the students begin their elasswork and the
Of schools, starting with the high school band directors bank begins the normal daily rehearsal schedule. A
i). and their students and reaching even into the homes of The Band’s first public activity will be as a participant
7
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