xt7b5m62661z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b5m62661z/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1961 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 53, No. 2, 1961 text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 53, No. 2, 1961 1961 2013 true xt7b5m62661z section xt7b5m62661z A BULLETIN OE 'I`IIE UNIVERSITY OE KENTUCKY 5
SUMMER SESSIC 6 i
_ UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY  
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  fames K. Patterson, President of the Unive  f_  8-1910 Y       »¤  
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 CURRICULA I
The University of Kentucky, a land-grant institution, will offer eight weeks P
of regular summer session work and post-session courses. Courses will be E
offered in seven colleges—Arts and Sciences, Agriculture and Home Economics, (
Engineering, Law, Education, Commerce and Medicine—and in the Graduate (
school.
Over and above its program of liberal education, the University Summer
Session provides numerous opportunities for persons to prepare for specific
occupations. The opportunities are in numerous fields: Journalism, Medical C
Technology, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Nursing, Music,
Library Science, Public Service, Art, Geography, Geology, Microbiology, Psy-
chology, Radio, Television, Films, Social \Vork, Sociology; Agriculture in its
various phases, Pre-Forestry, Pre-Veterinary, Home Economies, Engineering~ l
Agricultural, Architectual, Aeronautical, Chemical, Civil, Communications,
Electrical, Mechanical, Metallurgical and Mining; Law; Elementary and High
School Teaching, Educational Supervision and Administration; General Busi-
ness, Banking and Finance, Personnel Management, Marketing, Accounting, j
Business Management, Industrial Administration, and Secretarial VVorl<. {I
CREDIT HOURS l
Nine semester hours are considered the normal load for undergraduates.
For graduate students, the normal load is six hours; the maximum is nine.
Graduate students who earn six or more graduate credits and who remain in
residence throughout the Summer Session are assigned nine weeks of residence.
University students may be confident of acceptance of credits at full value by
other colleges and universities. Moreover, U.K. credits always meet the tests
for employment, whether by government agencies, by corporations, or by pri-
vate companies, regardless of the field. This is a very important consideration.
In certain categories of employment, students and graduates of land-grant col-
leges have a distinct advantage over other students and graduates.
FEES
For the Summer Session, the full-time fee for all Kentucky students, except
those enrolled in the College of Law, will be $40.50, and for students in the
Law College $43. For out—of-state students, in all colleges except Law, the fee
will be $90.50. These fees are payable at the time of registration.
ADMISSION
Applicants for admission should write to the Office of the University Dean
of Admissions and Registrar for application, stating whether they wish admis-
sion to the freshman class, to advanced standing, or to the Graduate School. ,
Applications and transcripts of credits should be filed 30 days in advance with  
the Registrar’s Office. Students entering with advanced standing and those
entering the Graduate School should present transcripts from each institution g
they have attended. Graduate students who are not candidates for degrees y
may be admitted on the basis of an official statement from the registrar of the _
institution which conferred their bachelor’s degrees. High school graduates are _
invited to start their college careers in the 1961 Summer Session. Special
courses are planned for entering freshmen and special attention will be given
to them to the end that their collegiate careers will be richer, more profitable,
more economical, and more meaningful.
(Continued on inside back cover) B1
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 ccurrurs 3
University Calendar ...............................................................,.............................................. 3  
Probation ................................................................................................................................ 4  
Explanations and Abbreviations ............................................................................................ 6  
Course Numbering ................................................................................................................ 7
Outline of Requirements for Graduation, College of Arts and Sciences .......................... 8 `
COLLEGES AND DEPARTMENTS
College of Arts and Sciences ............ 9 College of Agriculture and
Agriculture ...................................... 9 H0m€ Economics --····---··............. 32
Ancient Languages .......................... 9 Agricultural Economics ·--·-............. 32 ‘
Anthropology .................................. 10 Agricultural E¤gl¤€€1'l¤g ····-·--··..-... 32
* Art ..........,......................................... 10 Agricultural Entomology ................ 32
Botany .............................................. 11 Agronomy ····-·····-·-····---····-···. . .......... 32
Chemistry ........................................ 12 Anirnol Hu$l7u¤dIY ··---··-·-···.--.·...... .. 33
_ Cembiried Degrees _________________ r ________ ig Animal Pathology ............................ 33
Commerce .....................i.................. 13 Diur}’ SCl€rlC€$ ·-·-·········-··-·.·.·-. . ....... 33
l Economics ........................................ 13 P0ulrrY S€l€rlC€$ ······--····---····-··-·-... .. 34
' Erigiisiii Speech, arid Dramatic Arts 14 Horticulture ..........,........................... 34
Geography .....................................i.. 15 llurol Sociology .............................. 34
Geology .....................................1...... 16 School of Homo Economics ............ 34
  .............................................. 16
Hlirrlldlriities ..............................s,.s.... ii Ccifrrij rrr Eucirccriug ·-··---·-·-~-·---·---·-- 36
Hyginnn rind Public Hnnith   17 Cie itieciugiz .i ........ i ........................... 36
Library Science ................................ 18 Cdéinga _ ngineel-mg '‘'‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘··‘ 36
Mnriinninrics and Asrrnnnrny   19 1v1 i ngmeering .i .......................... 36
Microbiology .................................... zo Elmcrl Ergrurruug --··—--···-—···----- 36
Modern Foreign Lnngnngns GCH€f3liEHglU€€i`lHg .i ....................... 37
ood Literatures ............................ 21 M€°l"‘“‘°"l E“g‘“"°““g ·-······-·-····- 38
French ....... . .......................,.......... 21 Météllurgical Engineering ‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘ 38
German ................................ , ....... 21 Mmmg Engmeermg '‘‘‘‘‘'‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘ ‘ ‘‘‘‘‘·‘ 38
Ifolion ·····--·-···-··········-····--·····-······ 22 College of Law .................................... 39
Russian ........................................ 22
spanish ........................................ 22 Collcgo of Education -·-.--.-.................. 40 ‘
Music ................................................ 22 Digsirén of Counseling and
Phi ii   24 ui ance ...................................... 40
i»ii;;)i;Ii ilioiiiooiioo .......................... 25 Bivisicr or Adminisurricr ····-·-—··---- 40
Physics ............................ . ................. 26 lgrslggnzntlinoxndahons 40
Political Science ............ . ,................ 27 . . . . '``'```'````````'`''``''`'```'`'
,_ Division of Cumculum .................... 41
5 gsyéichoriioigyrini .............,........................   Division nr Instruction   42
a rio- - 1 ms .............................. Division or Vnnarinnni Education H 42
Social Work ...................................... 29
` Sociology .......................................... 29 College of Commerce .......................... 44
‘ Topical Majors ................................ 30 Economics ........................................ 44
Zoology ............................................ 30 Commerce ........................................ 44
School of ]ournalism ........................ 31
School Of Diplomacy and College of Medicine ............................ 45
International Commerce .............. 31 Physiology ................................,....... 45
 
BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
VOLUME 53 FEBRUARY, 1961 NUMBER 2 l
Entered as second—class matter at the Post Office at Lexington, Ky., under the Act of
August 24, 1912.

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  1]
CALENDAR FOR 1961 SUMMER SESSION
May 19 Friday—Last date for making application for admission to
[Q the Summer Session
  june 19 Monday—Orientation activities for all new students
  ]une 20 Tuesday—Registration and classification of all new students
]une 21 Wednesday-Class work begins
]une 24 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class for
the Summer Session
]uly 1 Saturday-—Last date one may drop a course without a grade
]uly 4 Tuesday—1ndependence Day Holiday
]uly 5, 6 Wednesday and Thursday—Last days for filing applications
for August degree in College Dean's Office
Aug. 11 Friday——End of 1961 Summer Session
Aug. 14 Monday—All grades due in Registrar’s Ofiice by 3:00 p.m.
Aug. 19 Saturday—Last date to submit application and transcripts to
Registrar’s OHice for admission to the Fall Semester,
1961-62
Sept. 17 Saturday—Opening of Fall Semester, 1961-62
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A; ACADEMIC PROBATION, DROPPING FOR LOW SCHOLARSHIP,
i READMISSION
  Effective For All Students
  Undergraduate Colleges:
{ The following students shall be placed on academic probation:
E l. The student who, during either of his first two semesters, fails to attain a
l grade point average of 2.0;
§ 2. The student who, at the end of his third semester or any subsequent semes-
? ter or term, fails to have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0; I
I 3. The student who is readmitted after being dropped from the University for  
  academic reasons. E
Q A student on academic probation shall be removed from probation at the  
‘ end of a semester or term if he has achieved a grade point average of 2.0 and g
` has a cumulative grade point average of 2.0. {
‘ A student who, during his Hrst semester, demonstrates that he cannot or
. will not do satisfactory work may be dropped upon recommendation of the
, dean of the college in which he has been registered.
. The following students shall be dropped from the University:
l l. The student who, after his first two semesters, has failed to achieve n grade
g point average of 2.0 for at least one of the semesters;
2. The student who, after his Erst three semesters, has failed to achieve a grade
; point average of 2.0 for at least two of the semesters;
  3. The student on academic probation because of a low cumulative grade point
` average who fails to attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 after
g one semester on probation.
Q A student who has been dropped shall normally be readmitted only after `
5 two semesters have passed and after he has presented evidence to indicate that
, he can and will do satisfactory work if readmitted. He shall, however, have the
Q right to appeal for waiving the two semester requirement on the grounds of
  exceptional hardship.
. If a student is readmitted he shall be required to achieve a grade point
  average of 2.0 for the first semester after readmission, and he shall further be
{ required to bring his cumulative grade point average up to 2.0 by the end of
Q the second semester after readmission, or be dropped from the University.
  Professional Colleges:
§ Pharmacy. Any full-time student who fails to make a grade point average
§ of 2.0 during a semester shall be placed upon probation. A student who fails
{ to make a grade point average of 2.0 for two consecutive semesters shall be V
g dropped from the University. A student on probation who makes a grade point 5*
2 average of 2.0 for the probationary semester but who fails to attain a grade  
. point average of 2.0 for the total time in college will be continued on probation  
- for another semester. lf at the end of the second semester of probation he has “
, failed to attain a grade point average of 2.0, he shall be dropped from the
E University.  
i Law. Any student who fails to make a grade point average of 2.0 during '
; a semester will have his academic record evaluated by the Law Faculty and
Y may be dropped from the University or placed on probation as the facts war-
, rant. A student on probation who fails to make a grade point average of 2.0
in the probationary semester will be dropped from the University unless there
l 4

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are extenuating circumstances acceptable to the Law Faculty. A student who  
fails to make the following designated grade point average shall be dropped ;`
from the University unless he has made a grade point average of 2.0 for the g
semester just completed. i
1.5 at the end of the one semester of Law  
1.8 at the end of two semesters of Law .
1.9 at the end of three semesters of Law  
2.0 at the end of four semesters of Law
A student who has been dropped from the College will not be recom- i
l mended by the Dean for readmission to the College of Law until he has re-
. mained out of the College for a semester and a Summer Session and has re-
} ceived favorable consideration by the Law Faculty of a written petition stating
E good reasons why he can do satisfactory academic work. ·
  All Undergraduate and Professional Colleges: Q
The dean of each college shall submit to the Office of the Registrar a com-
plete list of students placed upon academic probation or dropped from the Uni-  
versity within two weeks after the dean has received the grade reports from l
the Registrar at the close of the semester or term.  
A student who is on academic probation may not be employed by any ·
department or college of the University. This shall not prevent any department V
or college from establishing higher standards for student employment. 4;
A student who is on academic probation shall not be allowed:  
1. To serve as an officer or committee member in any campus organization; l
2. To participate in any University extra-curricular activity or in the activity
of any University organization if the participation involves the expenditure
of an appreciable amount of time. V
At any time the dean of a college in which a student is enrolled may dc- I
clare the student ineligible because of failure in current class work; at any ‘
time the Dean of Women or the Dean of Men may declare a student ineligible
whose participation in an activity is judged to be detrimental to the student. y
the organization, or the University. ·
Students shall be removed from probation only on the basis of residence
work at the University of Kentucky. Usually part-time work shall not be con-
sidered unless the student has been placed on probation because of unsatisfac-
tory performance as a part-time student.
Readmission of a student who has been dropped from the University shall
_ be upon recommendation of the dean of the college in which the student is to ‘
{ be registered. However, the student shall have the right to appeal for a review
l of his case by the Scholarship and Attendance Committee of the University.
l A student who has been dropped a second time shall not be readmitted
` to the University.
f Each student shall be presented with a copy of the rules that deal i
` with probation, dropping for low scholarship and readmission. He shall
be responsible for being familiar with these rules and with their rela- A
tionship to his situation.
The probation rules became effective for all students in Septem- y
ber, 1959. it
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  ` EXPLANATIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS
  Colleges are arranged according to order in the catalog and in general, the depart-
  ments of each College are arranged alphabetically.
  Days of recitations are indicated by the initial letters of the days. For exam le,
f M-Th indicates the class is offered Monday through Thursday, M-F indicates the class
  is olfered Monday through Friday, etc.
  The buildings are indicated as follows: _
  A, Administration HB, Health and Hygiene NS, Nursery School I
  AE, Agricultural Engr. HE, Home Economics Obs, Observatory {
  AG, Alumni Gymnasium KH, Kastle Hall Pence, Pence Hall
·$ AH, Anderson Hall KL, King Library PA, Psychology Annex
· AP, Animal Pathology L, Laiferty Hall Ph, Pharmacy Bldg. _
  Agr, Agriculture MA, Music Annex RB, Reynolds Building F
j BH, Barker Hall McVH, McVey Hall SB, Service Bldg. F
;° BL, Bowling Lanes Mcd Sci, Medical Science SH, Scoville Hall (Exp.Sta.)  
  CA, Chemistry Annex Bldg. SP, Stock judging Pavilion  
f D, Dairy MeH, Memorial Hall SS, Social Sciences E
  DC, Dairy Center MeL, Meats Laboratory SU, Student Union  
  EAB, Euclid Avenue Bldg. MC, Memorial Coliseum TEB, Taylor Education  
  EG], joumalism MG, Men’s Gymnasium Bldg.  
  EngrA, Engineering Annex MH, Miller Hall '1`L, Tobacco Laboratory  
E FA, Fine Arts ML, Mining Laboratory WG, Women’s Gymnasium YQ
i FB, F unkhouser Biol. Sci. M, Museum WH, White Hall g
  FH, Frazee Hall  
l
g CHANGES IN THE PRINTED SCHEDULE
  Any variation from the printed schedule must be authorized by the Registrar, who ‘
  requires the approval of the dean and the head of the department concerned. Application  
  for changes in the schedule must be made on blanks furnished by the Registrar. [_
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COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
  001-099 — No credit and/or non-degree courses
100-199 — Open to freshmen; gives undergraduate credit only
200-299 — Prerequisite sophomore classification; gives undergraduate credit only `
{ 300-399 — Prerequisite junior classification; gives undergraduate credit only i
400-499—Prerequisite junior classification; gives undergraduate and graduate
credit for non-majors j
- 500-599—Prerequisite junior classification; gives undergraduate and graduate
j credit _
  600-799 — Open only to graduate students `
  1. Freshmen may be admitted to courses numbered between 200 and 499,
  and sophomores to courses numbered between 300 and 499, upon approval of
  the instructor and the dean of the student’s college. Such approval shall be `
. limited to students who have demonstrated superior ability or preparation.
{ 2. Seniors with superior ability or preparation may be admitted to courses
numbered between 600 and 799 upon approval by the instructor, the dean of
the student’s college and the dean of the graduate school.
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   COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
2
Q OUTLINE OF REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
  LOWER DIVISION
  Genercl Requirements:
  English, first and second semesters, freshman year, 6 credits. V
  General Hygiene, 1 semester. »
  Physical Education, freshman year, 2 credits.
if Aerospace Science or Military Science (men), freshman and sophomore years, 8
  credits.
{ Group Requirements: l
J? l. Foreign Languages (Arabic, French, Gemian, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Latin,
‘ Russian, Spanish). Required: Twelve semester hours in one language, the first
G, nine of which may be waived. Students who entered the University before Feb- ;~
  mary, 1958, may satisfy the requirements in foreign language by passing the {
" basic achievement examination.  
I 2. The Humanities. To satisfy the lower division requirements in the Humanities, _;
  students in the College of Arts and Sciences must earn four credits in literature ¥·
Y and philosophy (Humanities 200, 201 or 202) and two credits in art or music f 1
E (Humanities 203 or 204). These courses should be taken during the sophomore ,, 1
~, year, and two courses from 200, 201 or 203 may not be taken simultaneously.   2
  3. The Social Studies. The student is pemiitted to choose two of the following $
. courses, to satisfy the group requirement in the social studies: History 104, 105, »
  108, 109, Political Science 151, Anthropology 121, 153, Sociology 153, 154, 151,
  Geography 153, 154, Economics 251, 252.  
  l. The Biological Sciences. Students may satisfy the biological group requirements · 5
  by completing a minimum of six semester credits from the following courses: f 5;
f Anatomy & Physiology 102, 210; Anthropology 100; Microbiology 100, 102, 200; ‘ 5;
  Botany 101 or 125, 103; Psychology 100; Zoology 100. A`
I: Note.—Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences ;
  requirements must be in courses that have laboratory. pj
  5. The Physical Sciences. Students will be permitted to take work in either one or ;  
  two departments in order to satisfy the physical science requirement. Six or Z`
pg more credits can be taken from the following courses: Astronom 191, 192; j .,
ii Chemistry 102, 104, 110, 112; Geology 100; 104, 105; 110 with 104; 112, I T
é 113 with 100 or 104, 105; 214; Mathematics 101 or 111, 112, 113; Physics 151, ‘
  152, 211, 213, 231, 232 (with 241, 242). See note under Biological Sciences.
  Note.—A student must have attained a standing of 2.0 in order to be promoted I
f to the next higher classification. l
l . 5'
; UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS l
l Specific requirements are given under each department. Plan Sheets outlinin the T
» u per division work and signed by the student's advisor should be on lile in the cEean's
l 0&ce at the beginning of the junior year.
  Total Number o Credits Required for Graduation: 128 exclusive of Physical Edu- =
`  cation.
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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 9  
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ISIZZIESY Subject Credits Days Hour aggiggzgn Instructor  
AGRICULTURE J
A student in the College of Arts and Sciences may elect toward the A. B. or B. S. degree a ·`
total of 30 credits from other colleges of the University.
For the Department of Physiology see College of Medicine —Page 45 '
ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES i
Jonah W. D. Skiles, Head of the Department, Funkhouser Building 303  
.‘ UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS ,
Reguirements Et}; Field Q Concentration; Forty credits of advanced work in the field
, of Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts, including the Major work. I
i
Reguirements Ea Major; Prerequisites; First year of college Latin or Greek or Hebrew  
g or Arabic. Reguired; A minimum of fifteen credits of advanced work in the Department;
i Tutorial Seminar; comprehensive examination in the senior year. I
  LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS — See Page 8 ,
j Latin Language, Literature, and Civilization I
= 101 Beg Latin 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff ,
102 Elem Lat Reading 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff (
‘ Prereq; AL 101 or one year of high school Latin
§ 209,210 Select from Latin Lit 3ea M-F 2;00 FB 308 Castle
i Prereq; Three years of high school Latin or three semesters of college Latin or '
~ consent of instructor (Open to freshmen with the prereq)
. Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students
509,510 Latin Lit Prereq; Consent of instructor 3ea M—F 2:00 FB 308 Castle ·
I 521 Roman Civilization 2 M—Th 8:10 FB 308 Staff —
V 530 The Tehg of Latin Prereq; Senior standing 3 M—F 9:20 FB 308 Staff
Greek Language, Literature and Civilization
, 150 Beg Greek 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff `
235 Greek Mythology 2 M-Th 11:40 FB 313 Castle `
No prereq; Given in English
252,253 Select from Greek Writers 3ea By Appt FB 303 Castle
, Prereq; AL 253 or consent of instructor
` Arabic Hebraic and Middle Eastern Studies f
1 Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students
V, 576 Studies in Semitic Philology 3 M—F 8:10-11:30 FB 313 Zolondek
{ (June 21-July 14)
  (Field: Background to the Contemporary Middle East)
, (A workshop—type course for teachers and others who want an introduction to what is
happening in the Middle East)
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jg 10 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES — Continued
i
  I$;:;;_ Subject Credits Days Hour aialklgga Instructor
?
  ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES — cont
§
  Classics and Semitics in General
  Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students _
  580 Indp Work in Anc Lang 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff  
  Prereq: Major and a 3.0 in the Department  
Zi Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits
  Courses open only to Graduate Students 5*
Er [
. 633 Intensive Study of an Author 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff E
  Prereq; Necessary command of lang involved I
. 636 Intensive Study of a Period 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff
2, Prereq: Necessary command of lang involved i 1
if 637 Intensive Study of Literary Genre 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff 1
Q Prereq: Necessary command of lang involved 1
L, 790 Res in Tchg of Class Lang 3 By Appt FB 303 Staff 1
` Prereq: AL 530 or the equiv 1
I ANTHROPOLOGY 1
j Frank J. Essene, Head of Department, Social Sciences 125 A 2
f UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS I
E Reguirements in thcgield of Concentration; At least forty credits of advanced work in the
  Major and allied subjects. 3
gt, Reguirements for a Major; Anth 100, 121, 153 (Geog 153 or Soc 153 are equivalents of Z
é Anth 153). Reguired; A minimum of 24 credits of advanced work, including Anth 582
ji repeated once, and at least one course in each subdivision of Anthropology, namely in Z
sz- Archaeology, Ethnology, and Physical Anthropology. Comprehensive exam in senior year.
  LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Page 8 ‘
v ’ E
  Note; Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical science requirements i K
  must be in courses that have laboratory.
te
  100 Intro to Phy Anth 3 M·F 8:10-9:10 SS 128 Snow
  101 Osteometric Techn 1 'I`Th 9:20-11:00 SS 115 Snow (
  Prereq or concur; Anth 100
t
%, Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students
,1
  383 Spec Prob 2 By Appt SS 125 Staff ,
IE 581 Indp Work in Anth 3 By Appt SS 125 Staff
  Prereq: Major and standing of 3.0 in the dept
it `
  Courses open only to Graduate Students  
§§ 768 Residence Credit for Master' s Degree 0 By Appt SS 125 Staff
  790 Res Prob in Anth 3 By Appt SS 125 Staff
il ART
( Richard B. Freeman, Head of Department, Fine Arts 207 S
 j UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
  Reguirements in the Field of Concentration; 40 credits in advanced work in the field of
 Z Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts, including the M·ajor work.
X  
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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES- Continued 11 {
____ _!
I.   Subject Credits Days Hour aE3i1§;2§n Instructor  
ART - cont E
Re uirements f0r_a_Ma`or in Art: Prere uisites: Art 100, 110, 130, 200, 201, 210 and 236 or  
237. Reguired; A minimum of 26 credits of advanced work in Art, including courses 500 and p
509, 12 credits in studio courses, 9 credits in the history and theory of art; and acomprehensive ‘
, examination in the senior year. i
' Reguirements for a Magg Art Education; Prereguisites: Art 100, 110, 130, 210 and 237, j
, Reguired: 15 credits in advanced studio courses, including Art 230, 236, 242, 310, 312 and 336,
9 credits in public school art, including Art 170, 172 and 577, 10 credits in history and theory of z
art, including Art 564 and one more history course, 500 and 509, 4 credits to be chosen within
` one of the studio areas; and 22 credits in Education, including Education 202, 325, 342, 440 or
444, and 450. ¤
» LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Pag; 3 ,
  105 Forms of Art 2 MTThF 10;30—11;30 FA 107 Amyx  
110 Beg Draw & Paint 2 MWF 12:50-4:10 FA 202 Sternbergs j
Q 170 Pub Sch Art, Lecture 3 MW 12:00-1:50 FA 107 Wiggs 1
» 171 Pub Sch Art, Studio MW 2:00-4:10 FA 102 Wiggs Q
i &3 hrs By Appt  
172 Pub Sch Art, Lecture 3 TTh 12:50-1:50 FA 107 Wiggs ,
 , 173 Pub Sch Art, Studio TTh 2:00-4:10 FA 102 Wiggs P
Prereq: Art 170 & 3 hrs By Appt `
210 Intermed Draw & Paint 2 MWF 12:50-4:10 FA 206 Thursz ·
j Prereq; Art 110 & 3 hrs By Appt ,
Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students i
310 Intermed Paint 3 MWF 12:50-5:20 FA 206 Thursz Q
Prereq; Art 210 & 3 hrs By Appt `
311 Intermed Paint Prereq; Art 310 3 MWF 12:50-5:20 FA 206 Thursz
&3 hrs By Appt
395 Indp Work: Paint, Printmaking 3 15 hrs By Appt FA 206 Thursz
Prereq: Major& standing of 3.0 in the Dept ·
. 399 Indp Work; Hist, Criticism 3 5 hrs By Appt FA 209 Amyx
 ` Prereq: Major & standing of 3.0 in the Dept ,
_ 510 Adv Paint Prereq: Art 311 3 MWF 12:50-5:20 FA 206 Thursz `
s 5 575 Art in Elem Sch 2 4 hrs By Appt FA 209 Rannells
  Courses open only to Graduate Students  
  615 Traditional & Exper Media in Paint 15 hrs By Appt FA 207 Staff
  Prereq: 3 crs in adv paint & consent of instructor
E
j ASTRONOMY See MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY
1
‘
‘ J. C. Eaves, Head of Department, McVey Hall 120
; BOTANY
1 Herbert P. Riley, Head of Department, Funkhouser Biological Sciences 220
' UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
Reguiremcnts in the Field of gicentration; Forty credits of advanced work in the field of
  Biological Sciences including the major work.
Reguirements for a Major: Prereguisites: Botany 101 and 103. Reguired: A minimum of
20 credits of advanced work in Botany and the passing of a comprehensive examination
covering chiefly the fields of morphology, taxonomy, and physiology.
LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Page 8
 
 
 '~
fl

  if
I 
‘ 12 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES —Continued
Q Slzljjgr Subject Credits Days Hour aggigiggn Instructor
il
§ BOTANY - cont
1 .
  Note; Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences requirements  
Q must be in courses that have laboratory I
  125-1 Gen Plant Biol 3 M—F 7:00 FB 211 Browne 2
  125-2 Gen Plant Biol 3 M-F 10:30 FB 211 Browne 2
ia 5
  onsivnsrsy   {
  Lyle R. Dawson, Head of Department, Kastle 105A I (
  UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS I
  Classification of juniors or seniors as majors in chemistry is restricted to students having a
  standing of 2.0 or higher in all chemistry courses. 1
  Juniors and seniors may major in chemistry either with a field of concentration in the physical 4
  sciences or in a combination of biological and physical sciences. Students who might want to
  become professional chemists are advised to have their field of concentration in the physical 5
J sciences. Students who expect to enter medical school, obtain an advanced degree in a {
biological science, teach in a high school, or use chemistry only as a part of their liberal E
  education may want their field of concentration to be a combination of physical and biological
V; sciences. 5
‘» 5
= Requirements in a physical sciengfield of concentration gB.S. degree): Forty credits of
  advanced work in the physical sciences including the major work. For specific requirements
1 see the prescribed Curriculum Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science With a Major in
_»`»_ Chemistry in the general catalogue of the University.
  Reguirements in the combined physical-biological science field of concentration (A. B. degree ; A
Q- Forty credits in courses above the freshman level in the combined fields of physical and biologi— q
E cal sciences including the major field. Six hours of education may be included. Students who q
Q; transfer into this field after completing the sophomore year must have a standing of 2.5 or
,_; higheri Prerequisites; Chemistry 110, 112;Math€m1ti0S 113. Required: Chemistry 226 or
  220, 430, 432, 444, or 440, 442, 441, 443, 570, 572; Physics 211, 213 or 231, 232, 241, 242
  and sufficient courses in the biological and physical sciences to make forty credits.
j; LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS — See Page 8
  Note: Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences requirements
  must be in courses that have laboratory. j
xiii .»
  102 Gen Chem for Stud in Agr and 4 M—F 9:20- KH 201 Staff Q
  H Ec, Lec and Rec 10:20
},} Prereq; Profic in Math and Eng
ji§ 103 Lab to accom 102 0 TTh 10:30- KH 101 Staff
if 12:40 ,
  104 Gen Chem for Stud in Agr and H Ec, 4 M-F 11:40- KH 201 Staff
li Lec and Rec Prereq; Chem 102 12:40 ,
  105 Lab to accom 104 0 TTh 12:50-3:00 KH 101 Staff {
l; 106 Gen Chem for Engrs, Lec and Rec 4 M-F 9:20-10:20 KH 201 Staff Q
  Prereq; Profic in Math and Eng _
§§ 107 Lab to accom 106 0 TTh 10:30—12:40 KH 101 Staff l
  108 Gen Chem for Engrs, Lec and Rec 4 M-F 11:40- KH 201 Staff
Z, Prereq; Chem 106 12:40 4
  109 Lab to accom 108 0 TTh 12:50-3:0