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‘ g TO THE PRESS AND RADIO:
I Here is your copy of the Kentucky Vlildcats football facts booklet
ll for 1952 which we sincerely hope will aid you in covering U. of li.
Q this season. lf you desire additional information or art, please feel
free to contact the Sports Publicity Office.
S Applications for working press and radio tickets should be directed
to the Sports Publicity Oflice as [ar in advance as possible. Tickets
will be mailed or you will be notified to pick up at the Information
\\"indow in Memorial Coliseum, directly across the street from the
I stadium.
i
I lf you intend to file from the press box, please so advise when re—
{ questing passes in order that you may be assigned a seat adjacent to your
] \i\'estern Union operator. It is advisable also to make advance re-
K servations with the Lexington office of \iVestern Union.
l Radio stations desiring to broadcast from Stoll Field must Hrst se-
, cure a permit from the University Radio Director outlining sponsors.
i fees paid, and any network arrangement. Booth assignment and
A tickets will be issued by the Sports Publicity Office upon approval of
` application by the Radio Director. Spotters are available if requested
i in advance. Stations should order lines installed by contacting the
  Lexington Telephone Company.
Sideline or upper deck press box passes will be issued to accredited
` photographers.
` Your press»radio—photo pass admits your car to the reserved parking
space along the circular campus drive west of the stadium enclosure.
; The pass also entitles you to enter any stadium gate on your way to
“ the press box. ¥Vhen leaving the box late after the game, you will
find gate number one open. This gate, under Section A at the left
y end of the stands on the opposite side of the field from the press box,
is an exit to Avenue of Champions in front of Memorial Coliseum.
Admission to the press box is limited to male personnel.
KEN KUHN
W Sports Publicity Editor
`

 {
Q
  Q
;; ‘  ¥    1
i
 

 i
l
I CONTENTS
l I Page
U. of K. Recruiting Policy ...............................,.,.,..,........................................... 4
1952 Wildcats' Schedule, 1951 Results ............................................................ 5
Facts About University ot Kentucky .................................................................. 6
The Shape of Things to Come ........................ . ..........................................,...... 7-8
Bryant’s Record at Kentucky ........... , ........................,.........,,.............................. 8
The Bryant Story .................................................,.....,..,............,........................ 9-10
The Coaching Staff ........,.,.,........,......,............................................................. 11-12
1951 "B" Team Results ....................................................................................., 12
Kentucky Captains and Coaches Through the Years ...,........................,......... 13-14
Origin of "Wildcats" Nickname .,............................. . ...................................... 14
I The Wildcat Offense .....................,....................,.....................,......................... 15
  Lettermen Lost .. ...........,..........................., . ............,......................,,................... 16
` Lettermen Returning .,............,.,....,....,....,.......,...............................................,.. 17
l Kentucky's Modern Record At a Glance .............................................,............ 17
l Summary By Positions ......................,.,..........................................,.................... 18
I Kentucky All-Americans, All-SEC Players .....................................,....,............... 19
I Kentucky's Bowl Record .................................,......................,...,.,..,.,.................. 20
I Ali-Time Bowl Teams, Kentucky's Colors .............................,............................ 20
National Records Set By Kentucky, Parilli ..........................,,........,................, 21
SEC Records Set By Kentucky ........................................................................ 22-23
Stoll FieId—McLean Stadium ..,....................... . .................,................................. 24
I Kentucky Football Statistics, 1951 ,.,...............,....,...,. . .,............,................... 25-27
1952 Varsity Roster .............,,.,.......,.,.....,..............,.......,.,.............................. 28-30
1952 Schedule Details .........................,.,.....................,.,.,..........,......,.............. 31-42
Composite Opponent Schedule, 1952 .......,..........,............................................. 43
Thumbnail Sketches ..........................,............................................................. 44-53
Press-Radio·—TV Outlets ................,....................... , ..... , ...................,....,.......... 54
University of Kentucky History ....,.,....,.,. , ............................................,............. 55
U. of K. All-Time Football Record .....,....................................,....................... 56-61
Prepared by Ken Kuhn
Sports Publicity Editor
Composition and Printing by University of Kentucky Press
SPORTS PUBLICITY OFFICE TELEPHONES
Dept. of Public Relations Dept. of Athletics
y 205 Administration Bldg., Memorial Coliseum
2189 • 2l 80 224l
Lexington, Kentucky

 ‘ U. OF K. RECRUITING POLICY 4
p ¥Vithin an hour after the Kentucky football squad returned to the cam-  
pus from its New Year’s Day 1952 triumph over Texas Christian in the
Cotton Bowl at Dallas, Coach Paul Bryant startled the grid world with a
challenging new recruiting policy.
The \rVildcat mentor decreed a unique plan to “cease all recruiting
of football players outside the state of Kentucky.” i
‘ Bryant, who in six seasons at the Bluegrass school has produced four E
, bowl teams and enjoyed triumphs in three of the post-season classics, invited J
? other colleges and universities to adopt the plan as a step towards elimina—  
tion of “all the evils attendant on recruiting.” It is believed that the Bryant }
< plan was the first such major corrective step, short of outright de-emphasis i
j or abandonment, to be adopted by any major football power in the country.  
\¢Vhile Kentucky will not conduct or condone recruiting outside the i
state’s borders and immediate emphasis will be placed on encouraging the  
best Kentuckians to attend their state university, out·of-state students will  
V be accepted under highly-selective limitations. Bryant directed a limit of i
Q “no more than five football scholarships in any one year to non—Kentuckians.” I
In all instances, he pointed out, “out—of-state students must seek us out ’
? and apply for scholarships. \Ve will make absolutely no effort to recruit i
them." The coach explained that the allowance of five non—Kentucky schol- ·
arships was designed in most part to accommodate sons and brothers of '
alumni and to keep the out—of-state ratio on the football team in line with
the ratio of non—Kentuckians in the total student population.
r Despite the fact that only 108 Kentucky high schools fielded grid
squads last year, Bryant declared "We have confidence in the ability of Ken- '
. tucky boys to stand toe-to-toe with those of neighboring states and hold
i their own in football.”
\¢Vhile the full effect of this unique "stay in your own back yard" plan
probably will not be evident until at least another year, the current roster
(as of end of spring practice) shows an equal division of Kentuckians to
I out-of-state players. The contingent of 37 native Kentuckians is the largest ‘
in the school’s football history.

 1952 W|LDCATS' SCHEDULE
Date Opponent Site Starting Time
Sept. 20 Villanova College ..,......... Lexington 8:00 p.m. (CST)
, Sept. 27 *Mississippi U. .................... Lexington 2:00 p.m. (CST)
( Oct. 4- Texas A. & M. .................. College Station,
Texas 8:()0 p.m. (CST)
( Oct. 11 *Louisiana State .................. Lexington 2:00 p.1n. (CST)
· Oct. 18 **Mississippi State .............. State College,
  Miss. 2:00 p.m. (CST)
Oct. 25 Cincinnati U. .................... Cincinnati, O. 1:15 p.m. (CST)
Oct. 31 Miami U. (Fla.) .................. Miami, Fla. 7:15 p.m. (CST)
(FRI.)
Nov. 8 *Tu1ane ................................ Lexington 2:00 p.ni. (CST)
( (HOMECOMING GAME)
( Nov. 15 Clemson .............................. Lexington 2:00 p.1n. (CST)
( Nov. 22 *Tennessee ...,...................... Knoxville, Tenn. 1:00 p.m. (CST)
( Nov. 29 No Game
( Dec. 6 *F1orida U. .......................... Gainesville, Fla. 1:00 p.m. (CST)
1
, 1951 RESULTS
1 (VVON 8 — LOST 4)
1 Crowd
1 Site UK Opp. Estimate
1 Tennessee Tech .................................. (H) 72 13 26,000
· · Texas ....................................................   0 7 47,000
Mississippi* ..................................,.......   17 21 20,000
Georgia Tech* .................................... (H) 7 13 35,000
Mississippi State°* ........................,..... (H) 27 0 31,000
Villanova ..............................................   35 13 35,000
. Florida* ................................................   14 6 31.000
Miami (Fla.) .................... . ...................   32 0 28.000
Tu1ane* ................................................ (A) 37 0 37,000
George 1Vashington .......................... (H) 47 13 20.000
Tennessee* .......................................... (H) 0 28 36,000
COTTON BOX/VL
. Texas Christian .................................. 20 7 75,347
TOTALS ....,........................... 314 121 421,347
Home Attendance ............ 211,000
COTTON BOYVL CHAMPIONS
° Designates Southeastem Conference Contests. (
5 .

 1
Facts About
University of Kentucky
General Information
LOCATION—Lexington. Ky., a community of about 100,000 in the
heart of Kentucky's famed Bluegrass region. The city is the thor-
oughbred horse breeding center of America and the largest loose-
leaf tobacco market in the world. It is located about 80 miles  
east of Louisville and 85 miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio. ,
FOUNDED - 1865 .
A ENROLLMENT - Approximately 6,000 J
PRESIDENT-Dr. Herman L. Donovan g
  VICE-PRESIDENT—Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain  
FACULTY CHAIRMAN OF ATHLETICS- Dean A. D. Kirwan  
’ DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS - R. W. Wild (
i ATHLETIC CONFERENCE - Southeastern _
Y NICKNAME OF TEAMS — \*Vildcats (
- STADIUM- McLean Stadium on Stoll Field (capacity 36.000)
i MASCOT-"Col0nel" (a live Kentucky wildcat) V
  BAND-“Marching l00" (all male) Z
E · FIGHT SONG -“On, On U. of K." (
" COLORS - Blue and \\'hite  
~ I
Athletic Staff
· ATHLETIC DIRECTOR-Bernie A. Shiveley (Illinois ’27)
, HEAD FOOTBALL COACH — Paul `W. Bryant (Alabama ’36)
~ ASSISTANT FOOTBALL COACHES—Ermal Allen (Kentucky '42);
I Paul Dietzel (Miami U. ’4'7); Clarence Underwood (Marshall ’3B);
jim Owens (Oklahoma ’50); Phil Cutchin (Kentucky *43); and
jerry Claiborne (Kentucky ’50).
TRAINER- Charles (Smoky) Harper (Mercer '23)
EQUIPMENT MANAGER — S. C. (Buster) Brown
STUDENT MANAGER - Thorton Wright
TICKET SALES MANAGER- Harvey Hodges (Kentucky ’3l)
SPORTS PUBLICITY EDITOR- Ken Kuhn (Michigan State ’42)
6

 ( The Shape of Things to Come
After Parilli, what?
That question appropriately poses a representation of the problems
faced by Kentucky Coach Paul Bryant in his efforts to field a good
football teamin 1952.
  The absence of the All-American quarterback, offensive sparkplug
‘ in the Wi1dcats’ drive to national grid prominence during the past
three years, points up the essential keynote of the 1952 season—general
lack of experienced personnel.
After three successive trips to major bowls, the prospect for 1952
j is one of the country’s youngest major college teams, experience—wise.
i Not a single player will be on hand this season who was either an
l offensive or defensive starter in the Sugar Bowl game of two seasons ago.
  Only six reserves return who even made the trip and none of these saw
§ over three to four minutes of action. Of the 22 two—platoon starters
  in the Cotton Bowl contest last New Year’s Day, only ten return-
, representing a loss at every position except end. From the entire tra-
` velling squad of 49 making the bowl trip, only 22 lettermen are cur—
- rently available and generally show only one year of seasoning.
i Taking up the \Vi1dcat cause in 1952 will be one of the youngest
and most inexperienced teams assembled by the U.K. coach, who
i emphasizes he is building for 1953. A breakdown of the current roster
Q shows seven freshmen, 29 sophomores, 15 juniors, and only six seniors.
  Bryant is neither opti1nistic nor pessimistic about his chances to field
  a team in '52 as successful as those of two other major re—bui1ding years
  (1946 and 1948) in his career at Kentucky. As he puts it, "Our team
next season will not be as strong as those of the bowl era (1949-50-51)
due to a lack of sufficient experience on the part of a majority of our
best men and a lack of adequate depth at many key positions. \Ve are
looking at the coming year with the idea of training our personnel to
function as a unit by 1953. If they learn their lessons fast and develop ·
well during this ‘re-building' process, we should win some ball games
next fall, However, we’ll be a long ways from rating as a contender
for the conference championship. That's not a pre—season prediction.
It’s just the plain truth as we see it now."
Encouraging to the \Vildcat headmaster is the belief that he and his
staff “know more about the personnel than we've ever known after a
spring practice before." As he analyzes the team, the greatest lack of
depth will be at ends and linebacker; and the biggest weakness will be
the lack of an experienced quarterback and passer. On the credit side,
he lists the strong points as a good running attack, general team speed,
depth at guard and aggressiveness in the middle of the line,
7

 i
y i
.»\s was the case in other re-building years, Bryant will be utilizing  
‘ a slightly modified style of attack in an effort to make the best use of I
available personnel. The chances are that variations of "Split T" pat- `
terns will be introduced to supplement the basic "T" formation system
· used for the past five seasons. Behind this modihcation is the reason _
that the pass—Hinging Parilli is gone, no outstanding passer-ball handler
is available, and several good running backs appear in the fold. The
T two-platoon system will be used as much as possible, Bryant indicated.
There will be a lot of strange faces in the lineup and probably some
surprises as regulars of last season are shifted to other positions. ,
M The important quarterback post may end up as a two platoon job I
‘ from all indications gained in spring practice. A duo of converted
I halfbacks, neither of whom have quarterbacking experience, appear
ready to stage a down—to-the-wire Fight for the position. Harold (Bunky) Q
Gruner, third-leading ground gainer on the team last year, will probably A
get the nod over threat Larry jones on the basis of his greater smooth-  
‘ ness in operating out of the slot and slightly superior passing ability. ,1
  The impressive titles of Sugar Bowl champions and Cotton Bowl *
1 champions, gained in the past two consecutive seasons, will mean little ~
this year except encouragement to opponents and the agenda of tilts
,, for ’52 ranks as one of the toughest faced. V  
· a
s l
i 1
. BRYANT S RECORD AT KENTUCKY ·
~ SEC Bowl l
`V Year \V0n Lost Tied Standing Games Q
1946 7 3 0 Eighth  
1947 8 3 0 Seventh Great Lakes (won) {
.f 1948 5 3 2 Ninth
1949 9 3 0 Second Orange (lost)
1950 11 1 A 0 First Sugar (won)
1951 8 4 0 Fifth Cotton (won)
48 17 2 .
8 .

 l
l
I The Bryant Story
One of the nation's most outstanding football mentors by tests of
both success and leadership in the collegiate Held, Coach Paul (Bear)
. · -     V   - - · Bryant has lifted
~   ' gc    Kentucky out of the
; 5; *  _   . fo o t b all doldrums
‘ i "  `“"A`·‘   a n cl firmly estab-
i .   ,_ lished them in na-
    . `··`‘:     . tional prominence.
        i‘i   K The 38-rear-<>Id
I   _     ,`'‘` Q   _"_: i   ’ . former Alabama end.
  I sv       · who risked a promis-
      · i  _ _ ing future when he
i    V  S   moved to Kentucky
       _ in 1946. is recog-
`     iq  , nized and respected
.   {ek   Z  °;` ‘ in the football world
i     i   U V' * for his successful rec-
2       E ord with the \*Vild—
    '““ 5 1   `'Y QF  .,.__,l   1 a   V__;»   ...    ...    CMS — wi¤¤¢1‘S of 48
t   e  . V ve - ._it . ‘ .  lzf     cac — · . » · · ·
    t ’`iet;       EIS`? Si} ` 11212 YEZEZF
    . t t =1=     Ei.   r   ’ . 5, g
    M.-»~. . rc,   ..,:   _ . _ . _
  s t at » i—-,V jg V»c·   . championships and a
‘   _     . conference title.
   g l p ly         yyr. s   B r y a n t also i S
z i· "*    '···   1* · ` — —   known as a pioneer.
  unafraid to take a chance on something that seems right, and his pio-
A neering attitude is reflected in a recently-adopted unique plan to restrict
recruiting of players for his teams to the state of Kentucky. He firmly
believed wide—spread recruiting to be one of the game's evils and dar-
ingly took the active lead in doing what he thought right to correct the
situation.
That the amazing Mr. Bryant has been right before pleases his fol-
lowers and worries his opponents. In 1946, when he gave up the reins
at Maryland after a successful first season and came to Kentucky, Bear
asked for a live—year contract. He explained that it would take that
amount of time to get the Wildcats established in winning ways. The
Hnal chapter of Bryant’s "Five-Year Plan" was written after the 1950
season. As predicted, Kentucky hit a winning stride by capturing their
first SEC championship and vaulted almost overnight into national
prominence by defeating Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.
· 9

 A brilliant sequel to the "Five—Year Plan" story was written last
~ _ season when Bryant's underestimated footballers snapped out of an
early-season slump to capture a coveted bid to Dallas’ Cotton Bowl. In
completing their round of the major post·season grid classics (Orange
. Bowl, 1950; Sugar Bowl, 1951; and Cotton Bowl, 1952), the Bryantmen
scored a stunning upset of Texas Christian, the Southwest Conference
champions. =
( The upswing in Kentucky’s grid fortunes also has resulted in per-
sonal security for Bryant. ·He is currently working under a 12-year
pact awarded by grateful school authorities following the 1950 cam-
• paign. `
A native of Fordyce, Ark., Bryant starred in football and basketball ‘
while attending high school there. Later, at the University of Alabama,
` he played right end on the Crimson Tide elevens of 1933-35, going to
the Rose Bowl in his junior season.
His coaching career began as a ’Bama assistant for four years fol-
lowing graduation in 1936. From the Capstone, he moved to Vander»
. bilt to become line coach. After working with the Commodores two
seasons, Bryant entered the Navy. Discharged in 1945 as a lieutenant
 i commander, he soon signed with Maryland as head coach. VVith one
 ‘ successful season of head coaching behind him and a growing reputa—  
y tion, Bryant was sought out in 1946 by University of Kentucky and
accepted the Southeastern Conference school’s invitation to lead its
  teams out of the grid wilderness. j
 _ In his initial season, Bryant re-built shattered foundations to give  
 V the \Vildcats seven victories against three defeats for their most success-
` ful season record ince 1912. Getting used to the feeling, the 1947 club
 j copped eight and again dropped only a trio of tilts. Recognition be-
li gan to come as Kentucky accepted a bid to perform in the inaugural
.· Great Lakes Bowl at Cleveland in December, 1947, and defeated Villa- `
, nova. The game marked the VVi1dcats' Hrst bowl appearance. (
  Hit hard by graduation, U. of K. still managed to stay on the win-  
` ning side in 1948 with a mark of five wins, three setbacks and two ties_ 1
In 1949, playing what was considered the most ambitious schedule ever  
1 attempted by the school, Bryant’s charges surprised the football world `
by winning nine important games and dropping only three. Included  
J was a close (13-21) loss to Santa Clara in the Orange Bowl. The team
, also finished second in the conference race.
The 1950 campaign was one of the most brilliant in the Bryant
career. No longer underestimated by opponents, the ’50 Wildcats
nevertheless surged to the conference championship on a 10-1 record
. and capped their success by knocking off national champion Oklahoma
in the Sugar Bowl for their first major bowl victory. The SEC title `
was the culmination of 84 conference games over a 17-year period. 6
In the 62nd year of the institution’s football history, Kentucky be-
came a "name" power and had achieved goals reached by no other
UK grid squad.
10 .

 I
The Coaching Stuff
ERMAL ALLEN (Kentucky ’42) . . . One of Kentucky’s most famous
athlete graduates. Allen at 32 has had a full career as a collegiate star,
pro—football player and successful college grid coach. He starred at
quarterback for the \Vildcat forces from 1939 to 1941 and entered
military service following graduation. Returning as a graduate student
after his discharge, Allen became the center of one of the Southeastern
Conferences most controversial cases when he attempted to play a
fourth year of football in 1946 and was declared ineligible after two
games. Allen joined the U.K. coaching staff for the remainder of the ‘
’46 season, spent the ’47 campaign as a T-quarterback with the profes-
sional Cleveland Browns, then re-joined the `Wildcat staff in 1948. He
became head freshmen mentor in 1950 and was promoted at season’s
end to fill the backfield coach vacancy.
CLARENCE UNDER\VOOD (Marshall `38) . . . Friends call Under-
wood by the somewhat un-respectful nickname of "Buckshot." but he
( has earned high respect from players and fellow coaches, alike, since
he joined the Kentucky staff in 1948. Besides the usual duties on the
I football field, he has the sometimes difficult task of keeping gridders
L eligible by prodding them to tackle the daily classroom grind with the
` same forcefulness demanded of them on the greensward. He had a suc-
` cessful career as a high school coach at Beckley, KN'. Va., from 1938-43
and served three years in the Navy as a lieutenant during \Vorld \Var ll.
PAUL DIETZEL (Miami, Ohio, U. ’47) .... A n indefatigable football
, laborer, Dietzel has a background of fine play as a Little All-America
I 'center at Miami U. and as a college coach. After his graduation from
  Miami in 1947, he joined Sid Gillman's staff and served with the school
i until Gillman took him to \*Vest Point in 1948. At the Academy, he was
1 Plebe football and basketball coach. \Vhen Gillman moved on to Uni-
` versity of Cincinnati in 1949, he took Dietzel with him as an assistant.
( Kentucky called for Dietzel`s services after the 1950 season and he
joined the staff for 1951 spring practice. He was a B-29 pilot with the
Army Air Force during `World M/'ar II.
l JIM O\VENS (Oklahoma ’50) .... A ll-America end and co-captain of
the Oklahoma Sugar Bowl team of 1949, Owens joined the Kentucky
coaching staff shortly after the Wlildcats humbled the Sooners in the
’51 New Orleans classic. During his playing days under Coach Bud
H \Vilkinson at O.U. from 1947-49. Owens performed in four bowl games
(Gator, 1946; Sugar, 1949-50; Senior, 1950) and the All-Star Game at
Chicago. ln 1950, he played pro ball with the Baltimore Colts and
served as end coach on the johns Hopkins staff. During \Vorld \Var II,
he was in the Naval Air Corps as an enlisted air crewman.
i 11

 PHIL CUTCHIN (Kentucky ’43) . . . One of three current full-time
1 assistant coaches on the staff who have player experience under Bear
Bryant’s tutelage, Cutchin was appointed Aug, 1 of this year. He grad-
uated from U. of K. in 1943 and spent nearly four years in the service
»_ before returning to pick up his final year of eligibility as a halfback on
the Bryant-coached 1946 team. In 1947, he became assistant football
coach at Ohio Wesleyan and remained until recalled to service in
`I December, 1950. As an Army lieutenant, Cutchin served with the First
. Cavalry Division in Korea for a year during this duty tour.
I JERRY CLAIBORNE (Kentucky ’50) . . . An outstanding safetyman
and end during four years’ varsity experience under Coach Bryant,
Claiborne is the newest addition to the staff, appointed in mid-August.
1 · As a collegian, he was regarded as one of the nation’s top pass intercep-
tion artists and his play helped pace U.K. to its first major bowl game,
the Orange Bowl of 1950. He was selected as the tea1n’s most valuable
player and, following graduation, became head football coach at
1 Augusta (Va.) Military Academy.
  PART—TIME ASSISTANTS
  Also assisting with coaching duties in 1952 will be ex-players Doug »
 · Moseley, _]im Mackenzie, Emery Clark, Ed Hamilton. Cliff Lawson, and I
i ]ohn Netoskie. All six are veterans of the Orange-Sugar-Cotton Bowl V
, era who completed their varsity eligibility on New Year’s Day, 1952.  
;_  S
 ii COACHING STAFF CHANGES SINCE 1951  
 il Five men who were assistant Kentucky coaches in 1951 have resigned l
ii since the season ended for varying reasons. Carney Laslie has become 1
  an assistant to Earl Blaik at the U.S, Military Academy; Charles Mc- A
S ` Clendon will serve in an assistant’s capacity at Vanderbilt; Bill McCub-  
bin intends to devote his full time to the position of Director of Intra- l
murals for U. of K.;   D. Langley will be head coach at Madison High
school in Richmond, Ky.; Vic Bradford is giving his complete time to
 ` private business in ¥Vinchester, Ky.; and Pat james will direct Danville
, (Ky.) High school grid activities.
1951 "B" TEAM RESULTS
Team Ky. Opp.
Fort Knox .............................................................. 0 6 ‘
Georgia Tech "B" .............._.,.,.___....,,..,,,,_._____,__,__ 13 46
Tennessee “B" ..........................,._....._...__...,__________ 7 42
Vanderbilt "B" ...._.________________________________________________ 20 32
12

 Kentucky Coptqms ond Coaches
Through the Years
Year—Captain Coach—Scliool W L T
1881 No Record No Record 1 2 0
1882-1890 No Intercollegiate Competition
1891 J. I. Bryan No Record 1 1 0
1892 Ed Hobdy , Prof. A. M. Miller, Princeton
and Jackie Thompson, Purdue 2 3 1
1893 Ulysses Garrad Jackie Thompson, Purdue 5 2 1
1894 George Carey WV. P. Finney, Purdue 5 1 0
1895 Smith Alford Charles Mason, Cornell 4 5 0
1896 \¢Valter Duncan Dudley Short, Cornell 3 6 0
1897 Roscoe Severs Lymon B. Eaton, Cincinnati 4 4 0
1898 Roscoe Severs VV. R. Bass, Cincinnati 7 0 0
1899 A. S. Reece VV. R. Bass, Cincinnati 5 2 2
1900 Wellington Scott VV. H. Kiler, Illinois 4 7 0
1901 VVynn Martin VV. H. Kiler, Illinois 1 7 1
1902 John H. L. Vogt E. N. McLeod, Michigan 3 5 1
e 1903 David Maddox C. A. Wright, Columbia 6 1 O
1904 J. VVhite Guyn F. E. Schacht, Minnesota 9 1 0
1905 W. P. Kemper F. E. Schacht, Minnesota 6 3 1
E 1906 Frank Paulimi _ J. White Guyn, Kentucky 4 3 0
; 1907 George Adair J. White Guyn, Kentucky 8 1 1
J 1908 George Hendrickson J. \Vhite Guyn, Kentucky 4 3 O
‘ 1909 Richard Barbee E. R. Sweetland, Cornell 9 1 0
l 1910 Richard Webb E. R. Sweetland, Cornell 7 2 0
l 1911 Tom Earle P. P. Douglas, Michigan 7 3 0
1912 W. C. Harrison E. R. Sweetland, Comell 7 2 O
1913 Herschel Scott J. J. Tigert, Vanderbilt 6 2 0
5 1914 James Park Alpha Brumage, Kansas 6 1 1
Q 1915 Charles Schrader J. J. Tigert, Vanderbilt 6 1 1
Q 1916 M. J. Crutcher J. J. Tigert, Vanderbilt 4 1 2
1917 J. A. Brittain S. A. Boles, Vanderbilt 3 5 1
1918 John G. Heber Andy Gill, Indiana 2 1 0
1919 J. A. Dishman Andy Gill, Indiana 3 4 1
1920 E. V. Murphree VV. J. Juneau, VVisconsin 3 4 1
1921 James Server VV. J. Juneau, \Visconsin 4 3 1
1922 B. L. Pribble VV. J. Juneau, \Visconsin 6 3 0
1923 Dell Ramsey J. J. VVinn, Princeton 4 3 2
1924 Curtis Sanders Fred J. Murphy, Yale 4 5 0
1925 A. D. Kirwan Fred J. Murphy, Yale 6 3 0
1926 Frank Smith Fred J. Murphy, Yale 2 6 1
1927 Charles Wert Harry Gamage, Illinois 3 6 1
1928 Claire Dees Harry Gamage, Illinois 4 3 1
1929 \Vill Ed Covington Harry Gamage, Illinois 6 1 1
1930 L. G. Forquer Harry Gamage, Illinois 5 3 0
1931 Ralph \Vright
John Sims Kelly,
Altemate Captain Harry Gamage, Illinois 5 2 2
1932 O. L. Davidson Harry Gamage, Illinois 4 5 0
1933 Howard Kreuter Harry Gamage, Illinois 5 5 0
13

 j Year_Captain Coach—School \V L T
1934 ]oe Rupert C. A. ¥Vynne, Notre Dame 5 5 0
1935 ]ames Long C. A. WVynne, Notre Dame 5 4 0
1936 Gene Myers C. A. \¢Vynne, Notre Dame 6 4 0
‘ 1937 ]oe Hagan C. A. Wynne, Notre Dame 4 6 0
1938 ]ohn S. Hinkbein A. D. Kirwan, Kentucky 2 7 0
1939 ]oe Shepard A. D. Kirwan, Kentucky 6 2 1
1940 ]ohn Ei ner A. D. Kirwan, Kentucky 5 3 2
* 1941 None A, D. Kirwan, Kentucky 5 4 0
1942 Charles WValker A. D. Kirwan, Kentucky 3 6 1
1943 No Team—¥Var Year
i 1944 ]im Little A. D. Kirwan, Kentucky 3 6 0
1945 None Bemie Shively, Illinois 2 8 0
j 1946 Phil Cutchin
(Honorary Captain) Paul Bryant, Alabama 7 3 0
1947 Bill Moseley
(Honorary Captain) Paul Bryant, Alabama 8 3 0
1948 George Blanda
(Honorary Captain) Paul Bryant, Alabama 5 3 2 V
1949 Harry Ulinski j
· Richard Holway }
Alternate Captain Paul Bryant, Alabama 9 3 0  
‘ 1950 Bob Gain and
\Vilbur Iamerson 1
‘ (Co-Captains) Paul Bryant, Alabama 11 1 0
1951 Vito Parilli and g
= Doug Moseley i
i` (Co-Captains) Paul Bryant, Alabama 8 4 0 .
ij ALL-TIME RECORD—53l GAMES .................................. 296 206 29 ~
F ORIGIN OF "WILDCATS" NICKNAME T
Kentucky’s athletic teams are known to sports fans as the \\’ildcats.