xt7b5m627r5n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b5m627r5n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680306  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  6, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  6, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7b5m627r5n section xt7b5m627r5n Tl

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MTOCECY
The South's Outstanding College Daily

Wednesday Evening, March 6, 19f8

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Bill Would Raise
Nonstate Tuition
To $2,000 Level

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Vol. LIX, No.

I

11.1

'Misnomer'
Wins Election
To SG Seat

By GUY MENDES
Prior to the Feb. 7th Student
Government elections, Elizabeth
Oexmann filled out an applicaBy ROBERT F. BRANDT
tion to enter the race, as did 28
tuition fees at Kentucky's four-veother students.
universities
and colleges would be greatly increased under a bill introduced
Three weeks went by before
in the Kentucky Senate Monday. to act on an
Miss Oexmann learned she had
tuition
Senate Bill 394 would increase raise.
been
elected under another
tuition for
students
name! A mistake was made someThe present bill must pass
attending UK from the present the Senate, the House, and be
where along the line, and her
$820 to $1,400 for the 1968 school approved by Gov. Louie B. Nunn
n
name appeared as Elizabeth
year, and to $2,000 for the 1969 before it becomes law.
on the ballot.
school year.
Sen. Harris said he had no
By the time the mistake was
realized, it was too late to cortuition at the four doubts that his bill, or one like
rect it. "The election can only
other universities and Kentucky it, would pass the Senate. He
be contested up until live days
State College would go up from said he expected little resistance
in the House since the House
after it is nin," said election
the present $580 to $900.
chairman Pat Fogerty.
already has passed a bill raising
Sen. Tom Harris
X
....
So Miss Oexmann, a memtuition.
sponsor of the bill, told
Sen. Harris said he expected
ber of the campus peace movethe Senate the measure would
ment found herself with 60 votes
save Kentucky taxpayers more the council would back his bill
and a position as an
than $12 million over the next once it passed the Senate. He
added that it does not matter
Student Government representatwo years.
tive.
The bill followed one passed whether the council backs it,
since council approval is not VISTA recruiters Mikey Carriere, who is from the organization's
"We have her application
by the state House of Represennational headquarters, and Diane Capasella, a former volunteer xeroxed and her name looks like
tatives Feb. 21 asking for in- necessary to the legislation.
He also said he had heard who now attends the University of West Virginia, are in the Ockerman," said Miss Fogerty,
creased tuition for
Student Center trying to sign up students for the program. Today "but I don't think she did it
students. The House bill also no opposition yet from state inon purpose. It (the application)
is their last day for recruiting here. (Story on page 5.)
called for limiting the number stitutions of higher learning.
went through the registrar's of"It is common knowledge that
of
students.
fice and the grades were checkstudents think we
The present Senate bill, how- are fools in
ed out, so there must be an ElizKentucky" for subever, includes no numerical limit sidizing their education, Sen.
abeth Ockerman here," she
students.
on
added. But a quick check showed
Harris said.
Sen. Harris said he sponsored
The increases, he said, are
no Elizabeth Ockerman enrolled
the bill because "we're subsidizat UK.
justified in view of the $64 milstudents with lion Gov. Nunn is
ing
who did not
Miss
requesting
The editor of Look magazine, one of the country's top criminal find out Oexmann, mistake until
Kentucky tax money."
for the state's universities and
about the
lawyers and the president of the University of Alabama were an"I'm not against
colleges, and in light of recent
recently because she did not vote
students," he said, "but I am in national trends that indicate nounced yesterday as three of the six nationally prominent figures in the election and did not see
to speak at Focus '68, a discussion symposium initiated by Student
full sympathy w ith Kentucky tax- other states are increasingout-of-stat- e
the ballots, said she put Oexmann
Government.
payers. I am tired of passing
student fees and tuition.
night with two speakers and two on the application.
more taxes which don't benefit
Focus '68 will be held April sessions Saturday, each featuring
Sen. Harris also said it is unDid the name Ockerman a
the people of Kentucky."
5 and 6 in Memorial Coliseum.
two speakers. A luncheon for the prominent one on the UK camlikely the proposed increases
The increased tuition is sub would result in any sharp reduc- - Speaking on the topic "Focus speakers will separate Saturday's pus (the University registrar is
On Social Inequities" are WilElbert W. and Edward is a formsessions.
stantially more than that recently tion in the number of
ordered by the Council on Public students attending UK and other liam B. Arthur, a University grader member of the UK debate
Mr. Arthur, a UK graduate team) have an effect on the outuate who is currently editor of
Higher Education. The previous state institutions,
of 1937, besides being editor of come?
He estimated these tuition Look, F. Lee Bailey, a young
bill passed in the House was
is also vice president of
"It might have," said Miss
sponsored by Rep. Quentin VVes- - increases would cover approxi- - attorney who has quickly risen Look,
of the state's to the top of his field, and Pres- Cowels Publishing Co. and pres- Fogerty.
Rep. Wesley said mately two-thirley
ident elect of Sigma Delta Chi,
ident Frank Rose of Alabama.
"I don't know," Miss
the house initiated its own action costs in educating
a national professional journalOexmann said, "I don't know
because the council had failed students.
Three other speakers will be ism society.
what type of people voted for
announced at a later date.
Continued on Vtgt 5, CoL 3 me."
Focus chairman Carson PorOne-Thir- d
ter, under whose Student Government administration the program was initiated, said it's purpose is "to draw nationally prominent people to the University for
a weekend devoted to relevant
was afraid I'd be starved,
NORTHAMPTON, Mass. (UPI)-- "I
discussion of pressing national
but it's not so bad."
issues concerning social issues."
So said one of the nearly tion to the fast seemed to come
1,385 students at Smith and
from coeds who thought it was
Porter said the program "is
e
two
women's futile.
designed to perpetuate itself an"It's hard to find anyone ,"
colleges, who fasted for the sec'-nually."
'
ond day Tuesday to protest the
said Smith senior Marcia
I.
-v
Tills year's initial program
war in Vietnam.
Sollek, 21, a biology major from
will consist of a session Friday
Another said the only opposi- Continued on Pare S, Col. 1
j

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VISTA Calling

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'Look' Editor, Two Others
To Speak At Focus '68

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Of Students Fast
At Two Women's Colleges
Wel-lesle-

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big-nam-

pro-war-

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L

i,

Electrifying Show
A Blue Marlin is being wired (above) for Iter limited perform ant
(ri gilt) in a show to be presented in the Memorial Coliseum pool
at 8 p.m. March 7, 8 and 9. Tickets are 75 cents for the per-

formance, titled "Tlurough the Looking Class."

Kernl Photo

by Dick War

and SchUy Cox

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March f, 1968

Mayor Wiley Addresses FOCI,
Names Lexington's 'Big Problems9
By IX)TTIE BEAN
Lexington's problems were the main concern

of Mayor Charles Wylie as he spoke to faculty
members at Focus on Contemporary Issues(FOCI)
in the Student Center Monday.
Mayor Wylie said Lexington's most pressing
problems are in the areas of urban renewal,
annexation and traffic conditions.

urban renewal, the mayor reviewed
for a community center in Lexington. It
plans
would serve to attract tourists to Lexington and
to provide a cultural focus for the community,
he observed. And he added that the center probably
would contain a convention center, a theater
and recreational facilities.
Of annexation, Mayor Wylie remarked that
Lexington has had to annex county areas on a
As for

Scanning College News

lation whereby one person filing a suit could
not stop annexation proceedings.
Mr. Wylie also discussed the "necessity" of
constructing storm sewers in a poverty area near
Georgetown Street. He said unless the federal
government declares the area a "poverty pocket"
and contributes funds to aid in const meting the
sewers, then the residents themselves must pay
for const met ion.
Speaking of traffic problems, the mayor said
plans have been made for "improvement" of
80 different intersections.
He also discussed improving conditionson Broadway and a $2,000,000.00
appropriation to condemn property on Tates Creek
Pike in preparation for the const ruction of a four-lan- e
highway in that area.

Smith enrolls 2,300 girls and
Cincinnati. "There's been very
little adverse comment, and w hat Wellesley 1,700. The Smith fast
there has been has come from began at 6 p.m. Monday and
girls who bring up the futility mns to 6 p.m. Wednesday while
angle, you know, the 'it won't the Wellesley protest began at
do any good' attitude.
midnight Sunday and was to end
"Our reply to that, of course, at midnight Thursday.
is that we're trying to make peoMargot Stein, 21, of Princeton,
N.J., one of the organizers at
ple think."
At Wellesley, Dorothy Kurz, Smith, said, "We didn't think
21, of Summit, N.J., a senior we'd get 500, and now that we
majoring in history, said "I like have over 1,200, we don't know
to eat."
what to think. There tends to be
"I was afraid I'd be starved, a lot of conservative opinion on
but it's not so bad. You see food, the campus."
and you say, 'Oh, there's food
The two demonstrations were
there's the fast there's the war.' not connected.
And that's good, that's what
Miss Stein described the
we're trying to do, make people Smith fast as "completely ad
hoc." Miss Kurz said the Welthink about the war."
Girls at both schools limited lesley organizers, Susan Spear,
themselves to water, tea, coffee 21, of Manhasset,
N.Y., and
and fmit juices.
Stephanie Judson, 21, of PrinceAt Smith, 1,285 demonstrators ton, N.H., told the campus powore green armbands and another litical groups about it but they're
366 sympathizers wore white arm
not involved."

State yniversity Of New York
student at the State University of New York applied the
laws of nature to the problem of rat control in his dormitory.
Handy Brinson used a pet boa constrictor to keep the rats
away. But now, by popular demand, the boa is for sale. The boa
is adv ertised as "clean,
quiet, safe, inconspicuous and affectionate."
Portland State College
Portland State College may see the return of sororities on
campus-- if
they agree to do away with the practice of de facto
discrimination and "blackballing."
Arthur Flemming, president of PSU, hopes to end the practice
by granting recognition only to Greek chapters who agree to sign
a statement of a
policy.
The policy specifies that the selection of pledges and members
should not be subject to outside influence specifically from alumni,
national officers or members of other chapters and that discrimination should not be based upon race, color or religion.
A

purely "voluntary" basis. However, he noted that
the General Assembly is considering new legis-

bands. The 100 Wellesley fasters
wore black armbands.

Miss Stein said five Smith
faculty members also were fasting and 45 were wearing the
white armband in sympathy. A
few students at nearby
Amherst college were also fasting, Miss Sollek said.
Miss Sollek said another purpose of the Smith fast was an
all-ma- le

Vanderbilt University
Four students were suspended at Vanderbilt and 38 others
placed on disciplinary probation after a week of administration
investigation into the use of marijuana by Vanderbilt students.
Chancellor Alexander Heard said the investigation was exclusively
the university's. He defended the wisdom of "making known
these violations by Vanderbilt students and the University's action
on them."
Northwestern University
Graduate students at Northwestern University have formed a
Graduate Student Mobilization Committee to protest the recent
draft deferment changes.
The committee has drawn up a list of demands regarding
Northwestern's policy toward graduate students. Among these
is one specifying that graduate students who leave Northwestern
for jail, Canada, the military or alternate service be
guaranteed
readmission regardless of their reason for leaving.
The committee will make information available on Canadian immigration policy and seek ties with other graduate student resistance organizations.
University Of Virginia
The Student Council at the University of Virginia, with approval
from UV's president, has sent a letter to Gen. Lewis Hershey
expressing disapproval of a draft directive advising local boards
to use induction as a threat against students engaging in "illegal

attempt to "dispel the conception of dissenters as
draft protestors."
"Although we aren't directly
threatened by the draft, we as
women do have an intimate connection with the perpetuation of
life," she said. "It's entirely too
easy to light on a protestor as
simply concerned about himself."
Before the fast began Monday,
demonstrations".
a petition circulated at an antiwar
The letter stated that "the Council wishes to transmit the
rally at Smith calling for a bombfeeling of a student body which absolutely refuses to allow lawful
ing halt, deescalation of the war protest to be blocked by fear or unlawful protest to be illegally
and negotiations with the
punished. While including no judgments on what may be a most
and North Vietnam was valid war effort, the students of this University realize that the
signed by 62 percent of the stucorruption of our nation's legal system is too high a price to pay
dents and 75 percent of the
to punish what the Selective Service System considers illegal
protest."
Viet-con- g

Don't hide under your
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Florida Preview
featuring

...

Gleaming white sand
to wiggle your toes in.

f

Live models displaying

the latest in men's
r.
and women's
swim-wea-

All sales personnel

modeling the all new
knit tops and Bcrms.
Turtlcnccks, too!

WE MAY NOT HAVE ALL THE ACCESSORIES. BUT WE HAVE MOST OF THEM!

This Saturday
March 9,
p.m.
1-

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Trodtmork Rcgitttrttf in ILStlfpfe?

3

,

Women Fast For Vietnam Peace
Continued from Pafe One

-

PffM,V(V.YVY

nivcrsity of Kentucky
407 S. Lime. 255-752- 3

Purdue U.
Ohio State U.
Bowling Green SU.
Miami U., Ohio
University of.Tulane

VV

-4

Ohio U.

Eastern Ky. U.
W. Virginia U.
U. of Cincinnati
Eastern Michigan U.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March 6,

19fi8

Watch Outjaiiaiid Sylvia;Here Come
Pat and Barbara, Local Folk Group
By SHAWN FOREMAN
Now is the time for Tat &
Barbara's latest album "There
is a Time" (Clictwytl CWS
99001). This is a truly great album by Lexington's own Pat
& Barbara (fit Bill).
Side one opens with the title
tune "There is a Time," a slow
ballad. Next exjmes "Don't let
the Sun catch you crying," again

very well done. "Foverty Hill"
features the solo voice of Pat.
His voice blends well with the
guitars.
Fourth is "One of those
songs." This old standard is revived in a grand style that is
Pat & Barbara's alone. George

Gershwin's "Summertime"

fea-

tures Barbara. I have never heard
an arrangement
of "Summer- -

time" quite like this one, and it
alone is worth the price of the

Electronic

"Adieu Emile," penned by Rod
McKuen. ''Adieu Emile" is one
of the best songs on the album.

"Extended Voices" is a collection of new pieces of electronically altered vocal music. Each
selection on the album is a totally
unique experience in electronic
music. The blend of vocal material and electronic sounds is
completely new and quite different from anything I've ever
heard before. Especially good are
"Chorous and Instruments II"
and "Christian Wolff in Cambridge" both by Morton Feld-ma-

album.

The

side closes with

Childhood Memories

"Noah" a biblical ditty written by Pat opens side two. It
is a nice tune. No folk album

of this type is complete without

Billy Ed Wheeler,
and Pat and Barbara hav e chosen
"Comin of the Roads." Their
beautiful rendition of it does
great credit to both the composer and performers.
a song from

BATTLE of the BANDS
The Casuals, Berkshire 7, Southern Society,
also Bill White and his Flameaco Guitar with
others.
8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH 9

"Childsong," written by Pat
(with help, I understand, from
Barbara) is a tune that brings
back memories of carefree living
as a small child. "Fellow Man"

Haggin Hall, Transylvania College
Admission:

$1.50

at the

$1.25 in advance

door

at

follows and is a funny song;
however, P & B have inserted
a little gag routine in the middle

Kennedy Book Store

ofit.
LAST TIMES
THURS.

"Tins ol Riverboat" closes
the album, and what a song
to close with! Complete with
sound effects, Pat and Barbara
belt this one out with all their
might.

20th

IS A "TAUT,
DISTURBING
DRAMA"

Time

2.4,6,

i

J

8 & 10

TRUMAN
CAPOTE'S

FRIDAY
ELECTRIC

n

"There is a Time" should
make it big for Pat and Barbara
(and Bill) and I hope they will
attain great success with it.

INCAR

STARTS

m

IN COLD BLOOD'

HEATER!

70

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Columbia has two budget
L.P.'s in the Classical Field:
"Extended Voices" (Odyssey 32
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album by "The Cryan
Shames" wait no longer. "A
Scratch in the Sky" (Columbia
CS 9586) is here. The sound
of this long awaited L.P. is just
great, and the Cryan Shames
have really outdone themselves
in their second album. Included
in the L.P. is their recent single
"It could be We're in Love"
plus ten other songs.

ernel
STUDENT CENTER
BALLROOM

March 12

8 p.m.

Tickets, $1.00pcrson

RATES

KERNEL

TELEPHONES

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor.
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, 'circulation

ELECTRIC

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Side two contains Pauline
Oliveros' "I of IV" which is a
relatively
primitive although
good piece of music.

1921
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from flies
$.10

iN METROCOLOR
An MGM Rerclejs

at

young men. Richard Maxfield's
"Night Music" opens side one.
It is what I would call an electronically generated group of
cricket sounds. Steve Reich's
"Come Out" is the disenchanting sound of a single voice put
on a tape loop and electronically
split until it becomes a fantastic
collage of sound.

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications. UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March 6, I9f8

Request Indian Reservations

UK VISTA Applicants
By GRETA TIELDS
Recruiters for VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) cannot fill the demand across t lie
nation for volunteers, Mickey
Carriere, VISTA recruit er on campus, said yesterday.
VISTA has alxmt 19,000 requests for volunteers, as compared to about 5,000 volunteers
already in the field, Mr. Carriere said. Requests for volunteers are "way over" applications, he said, although he did
not have immediate statistics.
Applications have increased
30 percent nationally over the
last year, he said. He feels the
increase is due to "a natural
growth," with accompanyin increase in recruitment. VISTA,
which began in Dec., 1964, is
a young program, he said, and

is just now beginning to show
its growth.
Applications at UK this semester have not increased yet
over the number received during
the last recruitment effort made
here Oct.
1966.
In 1966, recruiteis handed out
41 applications. Mr. Carriere did
not know how many were returned.
During the past two days,
20 students have picked
up applications at the recruitment
table in the Student Center lobby,
Mr. Carriere said. About 20 have
also applied for information
about a three-mont- h
summer program, similar to the year-lon- g
program.
This is "very good" response
from a student body the size of
UK, he said. As compared to the
21-2- 6,

Student Learns Oil Found
At His Madisonville Home
Some would tell you it only
in the movies but Logan Walton Calvert, junior education major, might tell you
different.
It isn't everyday a guy wakes
up to find oil struck on his
parents' property (in Madisonville), worth perhaps a couple of
million dollars.
The usual question would be:
How does it feel, Logan? "Very
good," he said, "but we don't
know yet just how much it's
worth. It's too soon to know."
Calvert was first notified of
the discovery about two weeks
ago, but the "oil company
wouldn't let it be known how
much the strike was worth."

happens

About a week later, after picking up a Madisonville Messenger, Calvert quoted the local
paper as estimating the oil pool
to be worth $15 million.
This estimate includes the
whole oil field Calvert said, and
"my parents own 200 acres in
that area." It isn't known yet
just how much of the Calvert's
property is located over the oil
pool.

-5

41 applications VISTA recruiters
handed out in 1966 at UK, alxut
60 applications were given out
at the University of Maryland,
which has alx)ut 30,000 students,
or about twice as many as UK.
In addition to asking what
volunteers do and where they
can serve, students ask frequently about getting draft deferments

The majority of students who
interested in
apply at UK-aworking on Indian reservations,
Mr. Carriere said, adding that
the fact interested him, because
on other campuses the favored
choice is urban areas.
re

On a national level, most want
to work in urban areas, secondly
in rural areas (such as in Appalachian and thirdly, on Indian
reservations, he said. Why UK
students prefer to go to Indian
reservations, he did not know.

for service in VISTA, Mr. Carriere said. "Most boards grant
occupational deferments," he
said, but "it's up to the local

boards."

Focus '68 Speakers Named
Continued from Pare One

Mr. Bailey presently has his
own national television show,
"Cood Company," that is similar to the Edward R. Murrow
program of the 1950' s. He has
also signed with Paramount pictures to do the Sam Sheppard
Story.
Before moving to Alabama,
Dr. Rose was the president of
Transylvania College. Dr. Rose
will serve in the same capacity
at Focus '68 as he did at a similar symposium last year at
He will be the final
speaker and will analyze the
speeches that have been made
previously.
Tickets for Focus '68 are $1
for students and $2 for others.

He served as assistant state
editor of the Louisville Courier-Journ-

al

from 1939 to 1941. During World War II he rose to the
rank of lieutenant colonel as chief
of the press branch of the war
department. He began his career
with Look in 1949 as assistant
managing editor.
Mr. Bailey, 34, has proved
to be one of the most dynamic
in his profession as an attorney.
It was recently said that he "has
revealed himself to be a man
of such ferocious talents that
he may yet decide to empty the
prisons in alphabetical order."

Van-derbi-

lt.

Several students speculated that
anthropology and sociology

courses at UK""have influenced
students' interest in working on
reservations.
A student from Illinois, who
has thought alxmt teaching at a
reservation (not with VISTA),
feels that the Indian heritage of
Kmtuckians interests them in
working on reservations.
VISTA operates similarly to
the Peace Corps, with the exception that .volunteers stay in

the United States and theirtrain-inperiod is six weeks, shorter
than the eight weeks the Peace

g

Corps requires. VISTA does not
require degrees of volunteers.

We Need Help
The Kentucky Kernel is
planning a study of
housing at the University. We would appreciate the
cooperation of students who
rent rooms or apartments
If you are an
student and have any

com-

ments you would like to make
about
housing conditions, please contact Larry
Keeling at the Kernel office
or leave your name, address
and phone number.

In the past two years the
graduate of Boston University's
law school has acted as counsel
for such controversial

cases as

Calvert said the size of the the murder trial of Dr. Sam
pool was estimated according to
Albert DeSalvo alias the
the amount of oil passing through
Boston Strangler, and Frank
an opening in a given amount
of time. This particular pool was
He recently obtained an accalculated at "seven barrels in quittal for the men indicted in
three minutes," he said.
the Plymouth mail robbery. Shep-par-

d,

Cop-polin-

o.

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* We're knee deep in the Big Muddy,
. . . and the
big fool says push on.
Dr. John V. Oswald's statement that men just out of graduate school should be put in a
pool with men of all ages, and
selections should be made from
all age groups, is a practical alternative to solving the "empty
classroom" situation for graduate
schools.

Educators, particularly graduate school deans, have now begun
to show their displeasure with the
recent selective service ruling that
makes inroads into U.S. educational resources, tapping for military
service all graduate students except those with a year or two
head start.
This lottery system is not new.
it, the
would probably draft alleligi-ble- s
plan
into age groups and if the
was
proportion of, say
8 percent in relation to the total
eligible draftees, then only 8 percent of those drafted would be
As some have envisioned

21.

There are many unfortunate as

Student limit.
The recent debate over whether
Kentucky should place a percentage
limit on
students has been tossed around
in the state legislature and campus
government, but the arguments
arising in both bodies only serve
to augment "localism" jargon. In
last Thursday's student blunder-men- t
extravaganza both
and
representatives
could have been likely caricature
material for the Kernel cartoonist,
turning out a typical Kentucky
"united we stand, divided we fall,"
graphic.
In finding solutions for some
of the educational woes in Kentucky, there seem to be more questions that could have been asked
student
concerning the
limit. For example, is placing a
limit on
students unconstitutional? A clause in the constitution guarantees to the citizens
of one state "all the privileges and
immunities of citizens in the several
states." This clause applies to commerce, but it is not clear that it
applies to college education also.
e
Legislators have said that
graduate and undergraduate
out-of-sta- te

in-sta- te

out-of-sta-

te

out-of-stat-

out-of-sta-

e

te

full-tim-

pects of the recent selective service
ruling. One is that graduate school
officials can't predict how large
or how minute the coming class
will be. Will graduate school enrollment really be limited to the
"lame, the hault, the blind, and
the female," or will it be very
near to normal? Under the present
system, no one has the vaguest
notion.
Another unfair aspect of the
present law is that certain students,
because of their choiceof discipline,
remain deferred. Medical, dental,
and divinity students are exempt
from being killed in Vietnam, so
to speak. To change this, it appears
that these particular graduate
schools will either have to urge
next year's incoming class to reject
exemptions, or else
must be done on a personal, volunteer level.
The Yale Divinity School's new
catalogue includes a statement encouraging "students who seek academic deferments to apply for the
standard student classification
non-deferme- nt

..

Yale University Chaplain
William S. Coffin Jr. said recently
that "he has always felt that there
were no grounds for exemptions
of seminarians from service in the
Army," and in explaining its actions, the Yale Divinity School statement said that the "use by theological students of clerical exemptions from military service raises
serious ethical and academic issues.
is a privilege which separates the student from his contemporaries and invites questions about
the integrity of professional education for the Christian ministry. "
Another obvious inequity in the
present draft law is that the poor
arc still
being discriminated
against. Those unable to finance
further education after high school
are almost certain to be drafted.
(II-S)- ."

As far as the training of professors goes, a two, three, or four
year gap will occur. Graduate students and research assistants will
e
disappear for awhile. The
outcome of the present law
long-rang-

is serious and detrimental for higher
education at all levels.

Educators with more radical
views have indicated that admissions policies m