xt7b5m627r67 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b5m627r67/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690408  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  8, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  8, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7b5m627r67 section xt7b5m627r67 rv

1

Haggin's Exploding Battle Zone
Deserted For Complex Panties

!

Dy LARRY DALE KEELING

Assistant Managing Editor
The Student Government election campaign took a strange
twist Monday night when Thorn
Pat Juul and Bruce Carver
showed up at Haggin Hall to
speak to the residents.
The speeches never came off.
One of the corridor advisers
told the two presidential candidates when they arrived that the
Haggin residents were too "up
tight" to listen to campaign talks.
You could tell that something
was about to happen. The dormitory residents were lining the
outside steps to their floors. Then
someone tossed a soft drink can
into the courtyard below and
things began to pop, literally.
A storm of cans, bottles, fire--

THE KEN TUCECY
Tuesday, April 8, 19G9

SG

MNE

University of Kentucky, Lexington

crackers, cherry bombs and blazing rolls of toilet tissue began
to bounce off the courtyard. The
noise was enough to make one
think he had been picked up and
set down in the middle of a Vietnamese battle zone.
Trash cans and Dempster
Dumpsters were overturned. One
of the dumpsters was set on fire.
A Molotov cocktail flashed out
into the middle of the courtyard
and exploded. It was greeted by
a loud cheer.
More cans. More bottles. More
firecrackers. More cherry bombs
in cans.
A ball of fire arced up into the
sky, the product of a Roman
candle.
Guys raced up and down the
r
water
steps waging
fights.
An attempt to turn the energy
into something more constructive, like a "panty raid" on the
Complex, failed.
More explosions. More cheers.
At least a half hour, maybe 45
.minutes passed. No one tried to
stop it. The corridor advisers
inter-floo-

Vol. LX, No. 126

Candidates Continued

Eight of the 41 candidates for
Student Government representaMark P. Bryant thinks "Stutives contacted the Kernel Mondent Government has the potentday to release policy statements
for publication in today's paper. ial of becoming a strong and
decisive factor in the administration of school policy."
See Editorials, Page 4
Bryant is opposed to mandatory housing above the freshman
The Kernel printed brief level and has three things he
sketches of 18 of the candidates,
hopes to accomplish when and
whom they were able to contact, if elected: (1)
improve student
in Monday's issue. The 41 candiservices, (2) liberalize women's
dates are in competition for 16 hours, and (3)
expand the pass-fa- il
Student Government seats in
system to include all
Wednesday's election.

Bryant

elec-tive- s.

Junot

Kentucky's First
Liver Transplant

knew it was hopeless and most
were nowhere to be seen. The
campus police never entered the
courtyard (not many others were
foolish enough to do so cither)
but someone said there were paddy wagons at both the front
and back entrances to the dormitory.
The courtyard looked like it
could be declared a national disaster area. Broken glass. Burning cans. Flaming toilet tissue
rolls. Some students ran across
it. Most weren't so brave. Those
who did deserved combat pay.
Finally, the guy with the constructive idea of a "panty raid"
persuaded the others, and they
poured out of Haggin and
headed for the Complex. On the
way they passed the fire engines
rolling up to Haggin.
The "raiders" went first to
Blanding Tower, then made the
rounds of the other girls' dorms.
The girls of Blanding IV were
probably the most cooperative,
but all the dorms gave their fair
share.
Continued on rage 6, Col. 5

j?
N

1

:
Tf

-

i
1

fC

2

i

j

&

i

-

1

Kapp

George Kenneth Kapp issued
his campaign statement Monday
night: "I intend to work closer
with the administration to pass
student programs.
"For the past two years I
have lived in the dorms and I
would now like to improve the
services they provide. I am for
the liberalization of women's
hours and, except for freshmen,
I am against requiring students
to live in the dorms."

'

y

1

I

I

1

I;

i

1

1

si n
y

McCartney

Frank McCartney believes
Student Government should be
more active. "As a member of
Pres. Wally Bryan's cabinet,"
McCartney said, "I have come
in contact with many of the problems that face the students on
this campus, ranging from new
sidewalks to bus service to pass-fai- l
to student representation on
the boards which give seniority
to faculty and have a say in
University planning, both physi-caand scholastically.
"As a representative, I would
work hard for the advancement of
the student on this campus."
Continued on Pare 6, CoL 3

Johnjunot is running because
he feels "at this particular time,
Student Government is in a good
position to be effective and to
By MARY NELL
exert leadership on this campus."
SUTHERLAND
"The main issue in this elecKernel Staff Writer
tion," Junot said, "is SG's stand
The first liver transplant in
on the
'
because
Kentacky occurred ' yesterday it's the housing policy
only issue which would
when a UK surgical team transget students incensed enough to
planted the liver of a
explode this campus. I'm against
into the body of
baby
Kernel Photos By Dick Ware
and that inAnthony Powell of Ir- compulsory housing
What started as a fiery uprising in the
cludes freshmen."
vine.
IIa88in Hall courtyard turned into the
Junot thinks Student GovernDr. Ward Griffen Jr., the surusual spring panty raid at the Complex
ment should strive to become
geon who headed the team, said a collective
the
Tf Th-mn- i
cooperating
Iff9 wtn btn
bargaining agent beit will not be known if the opera- tween
11. housemothers' modest efforts. despite
students and the Administion was a complete success for
about a year. The main concern tration.
is the possibility of the child's
body rejecting the liver.
The operation was a hetro-topi-c
transplant that is, the
Powell boy's liver was not re--Year-Plan'
moved but an auxiliary liver was
Scott Richmond, chairman of
placed in the body so that both the Student Government elecwill operate at the same time. tions committee, has informed
for destruction of present campus and Jack Hall gave you on housBy LARRY DALE KEELING
Room was made for the new The Kernel of a mistake in the
Assistant Managing Editor
buildings. Destruction of those ing last year, and now there
liver when the surgeons removed SG election ballots. In printing
Thorn Pat Juul defended his buildings in the first list is nearly is four-yehousing," Juul said.
the ballots, the company responstand on the controversial
the boy's spleen.
complete.
Juul told his listeners that the
The old liver will continue sible misspelled Thorn Pat Juul' s
Plan" at two Greek houses
Juul brought to the attention University estimates that in the
to function at its own peak level, first name. Therefore, on Wednesof his audiences the fact that near future there will be 20,000
early Monday evening.
and the new one is expected to day's ballot "Tom" Pat Juul is
Coleman's name appears in the students at the Lexington camCampaigning for Student Government president at Tau Kappa front of the book as one of the pus. He said the
a presidential candidate.
"perform at 100 percent."
plan calls for
The surgeons said they do not The polls will be
andDeltaZeta planners of the
Plan." University housing for about
open Wednes- Epsilon fraternity
know whether they will remove day:
"He is the one who is call- 16,000 of these students and the
sorority, Juul said, "Contrary to
what Mr. (Lawrence) Coleman ing it a fraud and an 'alleged rest would be Lexington residents
the old liver at a later date.
Student Center (8:30 a.m.-The Powell child's liver consays, you're going to wind up plan,' " Juul said.
and commuters.
p.m.)
which was diagnosed
Juul said the plan is five
dition,
living some place other than inCommerce
(8:30
Building
"This University is planning
dividual houses."
when he was four weeks old, a.m. 5 p.m.)
years ahead of schedule and that
a change and this change is not
was the result of the blockage
Coleman, director of campus some of the Creek houses are oriented toward the Greek
0
King Library (8:30
sysof bile ducts within the liver. p.m.)
planning and design, said last already in dinger. Two Greek tem," Juul said. "There are no
About 18 minutes passed beLaw Building (8:30 a.m.-- 5 week that the University has no houses (Alpha Tau Omega and plans for Creek houses.
They're
tween the time the donor died
plans to demolish any of the Phi Delta Theta) are listed in going to tear
p.m.)
your houses down.
the second priority group. Most
Greek houses.
and the transplanting began.
Medical Center (8:30 a.m.-"I have not been known as a
Juul showed the Creeks eight of the sorority houses and two
There have been about 40 p.m.)
or nine copies of the plan which more fraternity houses are listed Greek lover," Juul told them.
medical hisliver transplants in
Complex, Donovan, Blazer
"But I have stood up for stutory, but only. six recipients who Cafeterias (during meal hours) shows the University planning in the third priority group.
for the next 20 years. The plan
"Coleman is giving you the dents' rights, and your wanting
survived the operation are alive Student ID's must be presented.
lists three groups of priorities same line that Rosemary Pond
Continued on Page 3, Col. 1
today.
ll

SG

Don t ShoW

ses

Juul Presents More Evidence
Of University's '20

Election

ar

"20-Ye-

ar

"20-Ye-

6

--

a.m.-9:3-

5

ar

* 2-- TIIE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April 8,

19

Odyssey In The Deep Blue Spring
TIIE McDUNN HOTEL,

By BRUCE ROGERS

SIKESTON, MO.
PROLOGUE
In the lobby
shall go forth
"I
the elders are discussing I
I shall traverse the States aw hile,
fic
theology mapping the
bu I cannot tell whither or
geography of heaven and hell
how long.
With the truckers
In City Lights Bar
Perhaps soon some day or night
while I am singing my voice
They say that in the
w ill suddenly cease . . .
West, cities don't just
Happen, they come up
Must we barely arrive at this
With all the urgent
of us?"
beginning
Violence of expectancy,
Walt Whitman
Like a sexual climax
"As the Time Draws Nigh"
Herein Sikeston the A&P
Loaves of Grass
is closed

lolly-woo- d

the movichouse and strcctlamps
sit lonely in a magazine advertisement
everyone has gone to war
or just gone as back into the past
in the railroad station
old men are often abandoned
creeping over to the hotel
to sit like grandfather
clock

6r

s

listen to classical music &
loud girls
In the lobby
Big Noise fic Grey Cold
Roadways of heaven and hell

FROM THIS SIDE OF THE

seconds, unknown
to
Her various fantasies climbed in
Beside her riding along regally
But wow she was made all of
Gilted tinfoil and, anyway, her
Parents were probably black
motorcycles
Parti-coloure-

April 11, 1969.
APPLICATION FORM FOR SAB COMMITTEES
AWARDS NIGHT

LEADERSHIP

CONCERTS

MISS U.K. PAGEANT

FOCUS

PUBLICATIONS

HANGING OF THE GREENS

PUBLICITY

CONFERENCE

d

ENCOUNTER
and he
was heading
east, out
sundream;

icld

Name

have sd
dont go
tht way
it too
is unreal
empty

Address
Phone
Classification

Grade Point Average

oflife
wdark

Reason for Applying

hills every
where, only
why had
he fled
from

Falling out of windowboxes
Scattering black apples in the
sun
By young men racing across the
mountains
Exploding into the part that is
now

Everlasting, dripping ink from
their eyes
I myself seldom use them
Preferring to drop alarm clocks
s
intothemail
And torn
APPROXIMATELY SEARCHING THE SKY
in the night, there was no sound
but you
and that sound just a taste of
vanilla in the mind
the empty short
phonecall
extended across the violet sheets
of wind and watery light
and no one seems inclined
to go the last distance in seedy
brotherhood
.
nothing, nothing really has been
transmuted into gold
no real changes hanging down
over the road like pregnant
clouds
except that my pockets are filled
with new sunglasses
and that the road seems just a
bit more unreal, more religious
and that time too forms vacuums,
swirls in purple sorrow
(and what could have happened
to make detroit
sit up in the night and wail like
a long black hom)
road-map-

long-distan-

EPILOGUE--

--

the

began
Now far ahead the Road has gone
And I must follow if I can."
Bilbo
"The Old Walking Song"
(J.R.R. Tolkien,
The Lord of the Rings)

SeC

GENE MEATYAKD

for yout 'optical feeds at

;

h

pr

..

The roaa 'goes' ever Von and on?
Down from the door where it

holy west
"poet?" he
askd in
utter silence
and i
merely
scream d back

i

terror-stricke- n

terparts

.

of a

HOMECOMING

LETTERS
be written across the snow
May
By wicked old hypnotists in boxcars
Soot and blood and nitcmares
counOr by their

madness
I would be on the right road
right on time
I would rather not be always
I would rather be sometime, or
perhaps
Prometheus, it seems, is bending
backwards
Across Kansas, stealing ME into
the fires
And I have felt the shock of a
boot thru a mirror
Crashing into the still period of
never

for

The Student Activities Board is now accepting applications for several committees.
Please fill out the application and check the committee you would like to serve on.
All application forms must be returned to Room 202, Student Center by Friday,

high grass

Hut for this romantic Chinese

OUT ON RT. 70
Her wind was a silver jag, calif.
Plates, of course, she had left
Her long hair strung out sunlit
Behind herbut misslipstick venus
Has ignored my thumb however

ATTENTION STUDENTS

"meat," fading
into the

ROAD

ft

of Kentucky, inc.
Imperial Plaza Shopping Center
Waller Avenue

Lexington,

Ky.

Remember to ask Gene about the SPECIAL CONSIDERATION given
to all U.K. STUDENTS
Telephone
HOURS:

(

:S

l

k

,

)

j

8:30-5:3- 0

255-550-

6

Sat.

Mon.-Fr- i.

how to ireccd

8:30-1- 2

dirndl

p.r

write.

Et&w to ssove lavas.
holp!- -)

PRESENTED BY U.K. STUDENT CENTER BOARD

TIK1UKSDAY,. APRIL

7:30 p.m.

17

wlemorial Coliseum

Tickets: $1.50 advance, $2.00 at the door
Available at . .
Student Center, Barney Miller's, and Shacklctons Downtown

The American Red Cross.
Afe don't know where
we'll

be needed

next.

You don't either:
advertising contributed for th public good

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April 8,

19G9-

-3

Juul Says Persuasion Worth Work With Administration
Continued from Page One
your own life style is a right."

'Use Alumni'
He told the Greeks to use
their alumni while they were still
powerful to net the University to
reinstitute the loans for Creek
houses and to net a guarantee
that land would be set aside
for Greek houses.
He said the Greeks, through
personal contact, could control
from 50,000 to 00,000 votes in the
state and could get help from the
three alumni members of the
Board of Trustees.
Juul admitted he was not the
only SG presidential candidate
who could work to help the
Greeks, but he said he and SAH

WBKY Features
SG Candidates
(91.3) will air a
election show tonight
with each of the Student Government presidential candidates
speaking for five minutes interspersed by biographical data on
the candidates and their running
mates.
The campus station will also
carry the election returns Wednesday night, beginning coverage, at
'"
;
approximately 10 p'.rn.
VVBKY-F-

half-hou-

r

were the only ones who had
shown any concern for the Creeks.
He said the other candidates
thought of the Greeks as sheep
and as votes already counted.
"They haven't done anything
for you or offered you anything,"
he added.
He told the two houses that
the University was also going to
cut the Greeks' manpower.
to the plan again, he said
in a few years the University
would he primarily an
and graduate school,
with the only freshmen and sophomores being Lexington residents
or honors students.
Juul urged the Greeks to set
up colonies at the community
colleges to act as a "feeder system" for the campus houses.
Later in the evening, in a
debate with Tim Futrell and
Bruce Carver at Boyd Hall, Juul
spent most of his time defending the production of the Students for Action and
upper-divisio-

t

SG and a fleet of administrative

assistants to assist the executive.
Futrell emphasized his
work in SG during the past year but refused to
accept the blame for the errors
of Wally Bryan's administration.
Futrell Endorsement
Futrell also emphasized the
fact that Bob Brown, in a Kernel column called"M iddleMan,"
had endorsed him despite the
fact that Brown is the president
of Sigma Nu, Steve Blight's fraternity. Bright is the vice presidential candidate running with
Bruce Carver.
Bright later told the Kernel,
"I've worked closely with Bmce
throughout the campaign and, to
my knowledge, Bob Brown has
not talked with Bruce since the
campaign started. I know he
hasn't been at any of the debates
Bruce attended. Therefore, I
don't feel he was adequately prepared to endorse any candidate."
Carver told the residents of
Boyd Hall that he and Bright
had not supported any slate of
candidates berepresentative
cause they would have to work
with the assembly and did not
want to alienate anyone who
might be elected.
He emphasized the point that
student involvement meant working with existing student organizations such as the University
behin-

d-the-scenes

Student Advisory Committee, the
Student Center Board and others.
Carver said he and Bright
had already established relationships with these groups and
can work with them. He said
the SG president and vice president were
members
of USAC, but that Bryan had
never attended a meeting and
Futrell had attended only two.

Tutors Needed
The College Preparatory Program for Disadvantaged Students
is again looking for volunteer
teachers, tutors and counsellors
to participate in the 19G9 summer
session.
The program is aimed at preparing disadvantaged high school
graduates for college.
Last year 48 people took
advantage of the program and 22
went on to enroll at UK.
Although 47 of last years
participants were Blacks, the program is offered to all disadvantaged high school graduates in
the Lexington community regardless of race, creed or color.
The UK chapter of the Black
Student Union is helping to recruit people for the program.
All persons interested in offering their services should attend a
planning session Thursday, April
10 at 4 p.m. in room 109 of the
Student Center.

1

I

NOW SHOWING
i
i

The "Now" Sound of

5

i

A
Q

.

f

Starts WED. 1st Run!

n

Responsi-bility(SAR- ).

;

and
'MATCHLESS'

"We've been labeled radical,"
Juul said. "If advocating better

ng

Just 7 Minutes South on US. 27

'GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD'

the student rights code and

student services is radical, then
we're radical."
Concerning his relations with
the administration, J uul said anyone who stood up for his rights
as a student or called the administration's "bluff was going
to step on someone's toes.
"Persuasion
won't work,"
Juul said. "The last six years
we've had the most persuasive
presidents in Student Government history and nothing has
been done."
He added, however, that he
was against violence. He said
a strong SG and use of state
and federal laws and the University Judicial Board could get
things accomplished.
Futrell told the audience that
he wanted more student involvement in such things as faculty
hiring and firing and curriculum
decisions.
Throughout his talk, Futrell
Defends SAR
emphasized the point that he
He told the audience that,
had not alienated any adminiswhile SAR had only nine memfubers in an assembly of 32, SAR trators and would not in the
ture, but would stand firm for
had introduced over half of the
total bills in the past year. He the students' rights.
He again outlined his "Dyadded that SAR had introduced
namic Executive Plan" which
70 percent of the bills dealover
calls for an intem program for
ing with student services, such as
- representatives of dormitories in
housing, the relevant speaker pol-

;

CARTOON STARTS 7:30
OPEN EVERY NIGHT!

icy,

pass-fai- l.

I

HENRY MAMCIMI
In Concert

INYTIM

o

Co

(Wlfaffects
WltH

Mwfgythe
I

I

I

J

heart,

the head
I and the

I

1

gut...

Judith Crist

jJK

mJ

I

Today,

NBC-T-

!

Eastman
,

IIISiXAl

SCUMO

TUCK

J1

COLOR

ON COLUMBIA

IEC0IDJ

Released by COMMONWEALTH UNITED
INC.
ENTERTAINMENT,
A Division of Commonwealth United Corp.

The Kentucky

I

iff

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel.' University
Station, University ol Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second clasa
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed Uvm times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4UU0.
Begun as the Cadet in 184 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 115.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
27
Yearly, by mail
f.10
Per copy, from files
TELEPHONES
KERNEL
2331
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
2320
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Circulation 2J18
Advertising, Business,

FRIDAY MIGHT, APRIL

25

8:00 p.m.

Memorial Coliseum
Tickets: General Public, $3.50

$3.00; Students, $3.00

ON SALE AT STUDENT CENTER
To Students

April 11 and 12

$2.50

9 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
To General Public

April 14 and on

M

* Why Not
Student Government election
time is a special time of the academic year. Campaign posters begin to pop up everywhere. Speeches, debates and discussions are
scheduled by almost every living
unit and sorority and fraternity.
And the candidates drive themselves into a frenzy saying the
same thing everywhere they go.
In addition to all this, it is
Spring. And academia moves further down on the list of priorities.
Summer jobs become a major concern. Life seems more worth living.
And Student Government seems
irrelevant.
As hard as the point may be to
argue at this special time, Student
Government and its resulting elections are important. On Wednesday
students will be choosing just what
kind of leadership, focus and concern this campus will have next
year. They will be deciding a year
in advance whether Student Government will be the same old lackadaisical organization as in the
past or a body that is willing to
delve into the issues that must be
central to the future of this campus: student rights, student needs,
academic climate, course structure,
faculty, student and administrative
power and many others.
None of this year's crop of candidates for the main offices seem
to hold any real promise for making
Student Government a meaningful
body. But some of them seem less
desirable than others.
It seems impossible to separate,
for the purposes of discussion, the
candidates of Tim Futrell and
partner Jim Gwinn. Each night
they trudge the election trail, echoing each other and the speeches
they gave the night before. Primarily, they seem to be interested
in what they call the "Dynamic
Executive Plan," a meaningless
euphemism. They have promised
to lead a moderate revolution,
which, they claim, will ward off
any violence on campus by giving
students a meaningful voice through
"legitimate' channels. They are
definitely part of that old Greek
machine which has, for so many

years, including this past one, controlled campus politics. Their
standby slogan proclaims that they
are "producers, not just proposers,"
but they have given little evidence
in support of this slogan during the
past year. (Futrell is presidently
vice president and Gwinn is a representative.)
One of their central proposals
is that of expanding the Student
Government executive staff, which
presently contains about 10 member to 40 to 60 members. Futrell's
support is owing mainly to Greek
bloc-vot- e
trading and covert dealwith a faction of the state
ings
Democratic party, and it seems
only likely that the 60 offices will
be used as patronage rewards. Futrell was involved heavily last summer in Katherine Peden's senate
campaign and has many close contacts, which he apparently has
been quite willing to cultivate,

with this faction of the state party. inga somewhat justifiable cynicism
Indeed, Futrell, like most of the toward the whole election process
Greek machine candidates precedfelt by a large number of students
seems only to consider here, they have made it almost
ing him,
the SG presidency as a stepping impossible to know just what they
stone into state politics. Students are all about. Voting for them would
will definitely be placed second be like voting for a candidate who
to his political career.
didn't quite make it to any of the
Jim Gwinn, who represents the debates.
marSteve Bright, Bruce Carver's vice
completion of the power-blo-c
riage of Greek houses and is the presidential running mate, repreimage, sents a very serious and straightepitome of the clean-shave- n
can be expected to provide little forward individual but who has
power and drive to this ticket. the drawback of having a very
Different from the usual Student unenlightened attitude. Anyone
Government candidacies are those who has seen him in action as
of James Williams and Rodney Tapp speaker of the SG Assembly canwho don't want to construct a de- not help but be aware of the detailed platform because they are spotic manner in which he manafraid they would have to spend handles representatives in opposimore time defending this platform tion to him. Although Bright has
than attacking those of the other managed to conduct himself well
candidates. They have insisted that on the debate circuit, students canthey be taken seriously, but it is not expect creative leadership from
really hard to do so. While mirror- - him as their vice president.

Why
We are left with only two candidates.
A split-tickseems to us to offer the wisest choice.
Bruce Carver, while guilty of much of the echoing and platitudinal
endorsement of the other candidates, seems to offer the most hope for
the kind of Student Government we feel this campus needs. His speeches
are not enlightening, and his proposals often seem to have been offered
by someone before him, but he seems devout in his interest in the
causes of student rights and needs. While he has dabbled in the mud,
his hands seem the cleanest. While seeking support from the voting
blocks, he seems to have made few, if any, promises. While picking
a candidate who we feel is often unenlightened for his running mate,
Carver has managed to shed some light. He seems to have come out
et

'
of the whole thing the cleanest.
As seen in the debates and campaign speaking appearances, Carver

Thorn Pat Juul, who is heading
the Students for Action and Responsibility (SAR) ticket, has been
the driving force in the SG Assembly this year. He has demonstrated
a continual willingness to fight
for student rights, regardless of the
barriers placed before him, and has
forced the assembly to deal with
some of the meaningful issues on
campus today. Most notable has
been his support of student rights
in the housing issue. In addition,
he has shown no hesitation in
confronting the administration
where these:issuesare concerned.
.

v.- -

i

.'

It is unfortunate that Juul seems

to have placed so few limitations
tends to squirm under pressure. But we feel he can be counted on when on
what he will do to be elected,
crucial matters are at stake. He also has exhibited a basic awareness however. His
early dealings with
but the
of the real issues facing students today. His quiet,
Republican party, while never
d
for the office to which he aspires.
thoughtful, style seems
to the degree that Futrell has been
Joe Maguire, Thorn Pat J mil's running mate, is perhaps the most linked to the Democratic
ranks, is,
qualified of all the candidates for the SG presidency and vice presinevertheless, irresponsible and podency. As a member of SAR, he has demonstrated the type of leadertentially dangerous, especially in
ship and integrity that we see lacking in most of the other candidates. light of who at
present is in conHe has often involved himself in matters of student rights as well as trol of
state government. Juul also
outside issues of a crucial nature to our society.
has demonstrated this willingness
While presently running on opposing tickets, Carver and Maguire
to deal, mostly overtly," with G reeks
should have no trouble working together as a team. They stand together and
other voting blocs. Because of
on the major issues, and have, in the past, demonstrated compatibility
this lack of scruples, he does not
in their orientations. Both are sincere about finally doing something
merit student trust, despite his
about the state of Student Government and this campus in general
other qualifications.
and seem to agree on the methods. Neither seems so embroiled in himself as to refuse to complement each other.
Indeed, Maguire may well reinforce the areas that are weakest
in the total picture of Carver, and the latter may serve as a stabilizer
t,
for Maguire. A choice of this
rather than really being a split,
seems to be a uniting of the whole which neither the original Carver
ticket nor the Juul ticket offers.
soft-spoke-

n,

well-suite-

split-ticke-

Representatives
Students will be faced with a slate of 41 candidates for SG representative seats when they vote Wednesday. And there is a good chance
that the make-u- p of the assembly will have as much effect on the future
of SG as the selection of a president and vice president. This is true
despite the fact that most candidates for the SG Assembly make no
attempt to tell the majority of students how they feel on the issues
they will be deciding on next semester.
In general, students can only judge the sincerity of a candidate
by the number of posters he or she plasters on the walls of this campus. And bloc-votiamong campus factions, especially Greeks, plays
an important role in the election of these candidates.
We recommend the following students as being the kind of leaders
who will get what needs to be done accomplished:
Bob Duncan, Jim Embry, Barbra Ries, James Korhman, Dan Fischer,
Keith Brubaker and Joseph Wiener Jr.
Whatever you do, don't use your 16 options just to vote for names
or for people you are only acquainted with; this kind of voting is what
puts the assembly in its usual morass.

"
,

.

i

ng

;

w

Carver

LA c
Maguire

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuclay, April 8,

190!)-

-5

Futrell Seeks Student Trustee Vote, Mentions Legislator
By SUE ANNE SALMON

Kernel Staff Writer
Tim Futrell and Jim Gwinn
spent an active night Monday
campaigning for Student Government president and vice president respectively.
Futrell and Gwinn spoke to
students at the Alpha Gamma
Rho and Phi Kappa Tan fraternity houses and later at Donovan
Hall and KirwanlV. Futrell campaigned at one time in Boyd
Hall while Gwinn spoke to students in Blanding IV.
Futrell repeatedly mentioned
his plan to get more students
involved in area committees
which determine hiring and firing of faculty and their tenure.
He also called for "adynamic
viable association to go out and
meet problems when they hap-pe-

"I would petition the president to change the regulations
of the board," he told the students at the Phi Kappa Tan
house.
He added that he has already
talked once about the board regulations with President Kirwan
"briefly and informally."
He proposed a summ er investigation to look into what he called
a "two newspaper policy."
He called for two different
newspaper staffs one for Monday and Wednesday editions and
another for Tuesday and Thursday editions. He proposed a Friday magazine for "photography

-

i

--

am

Action-Responsibili- ty

out-of-sta-

DENNIS
BOOK STORE

All I can do

Higher Education Council
To Study

two-me-

al

four-ma-

zwM

snoi?

out-of-sta- te

out-of-sta- te

the

publicly-supporte-

is ask

out-of-sta- te

Out-of-sta-

te

ELECT

MIKE RIEDINGER

out-of-sta- te

pre-pai-

FOB SALE

I

radical."

...

REPRESENTATIVE

-

CLASSIFIED

Classified sdTcrtlalnff will bo Metp
d
basis only. Ads mar
tod on a
bo placed In persen Monday threat n
er by mall, payment Inclosed,
Friday
to THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Beam
111, Joarn&llsm Bldf.
Bates are $lJt5 tor 20 words, $3.00
for three eonseeatlTO Insertions ot the
same ad of SO words, and 13.78 per
week, 20 words.
The deadline Is 11 ajn. the day
prior to pabllcatlon. No adyertlsement
may elte race, religion or national
origin as a qualification for renting
rooms or for employment.

a

off-camp-

n.

He told the different groups
of students, !'I have already
talked to a member of the Kentucky state legislature who has
promised to present a bill giving
the student member of the Board
of