xt7b8g8fg70r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b8g8fg70r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420303  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7b8g8fg70r section xt7b8g8fg70r The

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TO INTERVIEW

TO PLAY IN

TOP STUDENTS
Kernel's Editor
To Appear First
'

N.C.A.A. TOURNEY
Coach Rupp Says
Nothing Definite
Planned As Yet

On Weekly Show

"

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Outstanding students of the sevKentucky has been named by the
eral departments in the arts and Associated Press as one of the almost
science college will be interviewed certain teams to land in the eastern
on the Wildcat review as a new division of the national collegiate
feature of the University radio basketball tournament. The Wildcats
regular Saturday noon practically assured themselves of an
studio's
broadcast.
invitation by winning the SouthDesigned to encourage scholarship eastern conference tournament in
in the college, the new radio feature Louisville last week.
is sponsored by a faculty committee

Illinois, winner of the Big Ten
Richard Adams, English instructor,
will interview the students each title, also was named &s a probable
eastern entry in the tournament to
week.
Bob Amnions, editor of The Ker- be held in New Orleans March 20 to
21. The western division tournament
nel, has been chosen for an interwill be held at the same ' time in
view on Saturday's program, it was
Kansas Citv. Winners of the two diannounced yesterday by Adams.
FROM THE REAR!
One student from each of the 27 visions will meet in Kansas City on
Jul, inn jilayci foiili Krntu hy's srYnf)))' fonrard l'iil!er While 11s lie races under the has-- a departments in the college will be March 28 to determine the new N.
l:rl fur
of llie Southeastern confer- - on the program, as far as possible, C. A. A. champion. Wisconsin gained
triji shot 111 Satiinlnv afternoon's game in the semi-finalit was announced yesterday. Stu- the crown last year.
tourney at Louisville.
rnte
Colorado is the only team which
dents with a standing of 2. or bethas been mentioned as the most
ter will be given preference.
Heads of the departments will I) obnble starter in the western
name several students from which tournament. Winner of the Rocky
one will be chosen for each broadMountain's Big Seven Conference,
cast. The interview will concern Colorado was the only major team to
finish the current season undefeated.
the student's major interest.
feature is
The new
Each division will be composed of
propart of the regular
eight teams, and the remaining outgram originating in the University fits will be
determined by tournastudios and transcribed to station ments in the various conferences,
WHAS. Louisville.
and the winners of the leagues in
Chosen for the first broadcast. which they play.
Amnions, a junior student from
Lexington, is majoring in English.
Title Is Sixth
stride until the championship game basketball game in the South, 8.500 As a freshman, he tied for the Phi
Sonia Rerkowitz
For Kentucky
Saturday night.
fans, turned out for the final game. Beta Kappa scholarship award.
He is a member of Omicron Delta Elected
MEL BREWER HITS 11
Everyone had expected a Kentucky-TennessIn
Kappa, men's honorary leadership
Mil Brewer played his best game
fracas but Alabama honorary; a pledge of Scabbard
and Of Women's Group
By BOB ADAIR
at the pivot spot against Mississippi, turned the Tide on the Vols
Blade, advanced military society;
Kentucky's Wildcats gained their tacking up 11 points to lead the Cats
Sonia Bcrkowitz, Lexington, was
The championship battle saw an
Government Asfifth Southeastern conference bas- - to a 2 victory. Kenny England, inspired bunch of Alabama Red Ele- and the Student
elected president of the Women's
sociation.
ketball championship by the tourna-- I one of the outstanding guards of
Administrative council at a meeting
phants, who had upset the mighty
ment route by emerging victorious the tourney, hung up nine markers charges of Johnny Mauer in the
yesterday afternoon.
Stall Elected
over Florida, Mississippi. Auburn, to take second place in the scoring
first semi-fintilt, come from beOther officers named were Mary
Bernard Stall III has been elected
and Alabama in the Jefferson county column against the Rebels.
hind to take 4 lead over Kentucky president of the Pryor Pre-Mso- - Garner, Winchester law student, vice
Armory at Louisville last week-enKentucky supporters got a big m a
battle in which the ciety. He will replace Si Holmes, who president; Betty Pugh, Lexington
The Wilncats also claimed the scare Saturday afternoon when Au- lead changed eight times and in has left school to go info the armed journalism junior, secretary; and
crown another burn's Plainsmen,
conquerors
the Southeastern
of
'
Sara Triplett, Henderson, treasurer.
(Continued on Page Four)
forces.
;
year when the tourney was not held, Vanderbilt and Tulane, ran up a 0
making a grand total of six chamlead before Ermal Allen tipped one
pionships for the Big Blue
in after five minutes had elapsed.
The Wildcats held off a second-ha- lf Coich Jordan's boys, including the
rally by the underdog Florida two leading scorers in the cShfer-enc- e,
6
Manci and Hawkins, were hit"G;itors to take a
decision in
the final game of the first round. ting from all angles and took a 12
Carl Staker and Marvin Akers, aided point lead with only three minulles
by the great floor work of Ermal remaining in the first half. The
Allen, combined 19 points to give fhe Cats cut the margin to seven points
Cats a lead which the 'Gators could as the period ended but there were
kit
only eight minutes left in the game
not overcome.
when the Blue cagers overcame the
OIT I ORM
Coach Adolph Runp's cagers were Tigers' advantage and went on to
Jim King paced the Cats
way off form in at least part of win
every game until the final battle with 11 tallies and Ermal Allen fol- lowed with nine. Manci took scoring
with the Crimson Tide cf Alabama.
honors for the game with 13 points
Although the Cats r2n up the largest
margin of vic tory in the tournament, before he fouled out late in the bat- tie.
a 27 point advantape over MississipThe largest crowd ever to see a
pi's Rebels they didn't hit their
s

Wildcats Take SEC Title
By Beating Florida, Auburn,
Mississippi And Alabama

te

Southeastern

President

ee

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On AP
First Team

Allen Selected
All-Conferen-

ce

Ermal

Allen, Kentucky's

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FIRST MUSICAL
OPEN LECTURE
SET FOR TODAY
Lambert Talks On

team.
Allen was the only regular forward fo make the first five, since
Dick Mehen, Vol center, was picked
for the other forward position. It
is the general opinion that Allen
was a unanimous choice for the
forward position.
An unusual ineiaent occurred when
the final poll was recorded. Three of
the first five all conference players
selected are centers. Wheeler Leeth
of Alabama was named for the pivot
spot, and Shag Hawkins, Auburn
star center, was picked for a guard
position along with Louis Adair of
Alabama.
The complete first and second
teams are as follows:
First Team
Ermal Allen. F. (Kentucky)
Dick Mehen, F, (Tennessee),
Wheeler Leeth, C. (Alabama)
Shng Hawkins. G. (Auburn)
Louis Adair, G, Alabama)
Second Team
Bobby Moore, F, (Georgia)
Bernie Mehen, F, (Tennessee)
Jim King, C, (Kentucky)
Marvin Akers, G, (Kentucky)
Mike Balitsaris, G, (Tennessee)

Beethoven's Music
At Third Hour

Mrs. Jacobs will discuss
"Fundamentals of Flower Show
Judging" on the morning program.
Mrs. Stilz will preside at the noon
luncheon which will be followed by
another talk on "Judging Specimen
Bloom" to be given by Mrs. Jacobs.
The latter part of the afternoon will
be devoted to an examination.
Professor Gardner will open the
Friday morning session with a discussion of "Gardens For Victory,"
and Miss Jones i" fellow at 10:30
o'clock with her talk on "Fun With
Flowers."
Mrs. Frederick A Wallis of Paris,
chairman of the flower judging
school, will preside at the Friday
luncheon. Friday afternoon will be
devoted to the showing of Dr. Pence's
pictures and an examination.

f
By WILYAH GRAVES
and pleasing blend of
voices was shown in the girls' glee
H,,h concert eiven Sundav at Me- mnriiil hall under the direction Of
Mildred Lewis. Interpretation and
dynamics were expressed artistic- ally
This year there were more voices
in the glee club than in previous
years. The result was the production
of a better tone quality.
After the audience and glee club
had sung our national anthem the
glee club sang the grand and mag- nificent "Omnipotence" by Schubert,
followed bv the light gay tune,"My
Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair" by
Haydn
A balanced

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Engineer College
Sends New Plan
For Education
educational plan
A stream-line- d
for new students in the engineering
college is explained in letters mailed
from the college this week to high
school graduates throughout the

Beginning at the first quarter on
11, the course will include algebra, English composition, general
chemistry,
engineering
inorganic
drawing, military science, and physical education. This schedule will
total 20 hours of classworlc each
week.
While no definite assurance can
be given, it is expected that students
who are doing good work will be deferred from military service until
they complete their courses of study,
Stephen Black Featherston Jr,
Prof. W. E. Freeman, assistant dean, Milford Donnn Estill, and Edward
announced.
Reinhardt Jr., all former University
students, have enlisted for officer
training in naval aviation, it was
announced by Lieutenant Comman-

June

FOR
Featherston, Estill
Reinhardt Enlist

der John W. Geppert. senior member of the Naval Aviation Cadet
Selection board, of St. Louis.
Featherston. son of S. B. Featherston. Sr., 137 South Hanover Avenue,
is a graduate of the class of '40.
Estill, son of J. D. Estill, 308 North
Hanover, was a senior arts and
sciences student.
Reinhardt, son of Edward Reinhardt. Louisville, is a junior in the
commerce college. He received a
letter In football.

Lafferty To Conduct
Open Lecture On
Parlimentary Law

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In the second group, "Snowflaxes" panist, Adele Gensemer, was sung in
Cimara was a tone picture the last group. A novelty m this
pamtea very oeauuiuiiy oy u,e g.cr group was i
umBr
club with Mary Virginia Fulcher which Js a Roumanian folk song. Bercpusf ,rom
Enjoyed very much by the audience Ave Maria . as soprano soloist.
.tiuuorui
Byron
The third group included Berceuse was the last number which was a
medley of songs representing the
ana
Ave Maria,
from "Jocelyn.
tv
"Tamborin", cello solos played most four branches of the armed service: Rrnnk in the Fnrest
the navy, army, marines, and air Drum song ..
skillfully by Byron Bach,

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Durante
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Thnsnelriii

Srituiwrt
iiervrMjw

Rirrfiftlc

ciaude warford

Anna Roos. Ann Curter Felts and Chorus
Let My Song Fill Your

was corps.
The entire program was composed
Heart
Ernest Charles
of "Brook In the Forest", by Bir- - of:
I
Winter and Spring
csak; "Dream Song", by Warford
r
o'er the Tarn's Unruffled
with soprano solo sung by Anita Th' Omnipotence
Mirror
My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair
Charles T. Oriffes
Haydn
Roos and Anne Felts; and a gay My
Incidental Solo, Anne Cowglll
Bruhm.s
I.ove Is Green
...
modern waltz, "Let My Song Fill
The Vilhige Gossip. Roumanian Folk Song
II
The Year s at the Spring .. Mrs. H A. Beach
Vour Heart" by Charles.
Cimorra To Dur Boys a Medley
Snowflakes
arr., Oensemer
"Winter and Spring1 which was
Murv Vlrrfnia Fulcher and Chorum
c
i ,h
arranged by the glee Club's accom- - Dnnza. Danza Fanclulla
Marines' Hymn. Air Corp. Sonfi'
enthusiastically

t

Herman

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THREE

y

Accepted

will ho
W'ildral h.islt llcill
held at 10 a. m. tiiinirw in
hall il iva- - .iiiiidiiiiiciI
vesierdav afternoon lv President

Ken-luck-

state.

'Dunce, Little Maid

the fourth group of songs consisting

sj0(i;il I'nivtTsilx rnnvfH.i-liohonoring the
ituiioiis

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iniririiii.

Classes Dismissed
For Celebration
In Memorial Hall

1

in mini I1 lower Judging Show
lo lie Held Here litis Week
Kentucky.

3'

rnsna-pinash-

'

Thursday morning in the University
Student Union building with registration. Greetings will be extended
by Mrs. H. Alvin Stilz cf Lexington,
president of the Garden Club of

I'M P.tR

The Kinunis C lub is giving a dinFirst musical open lecture in the
ner for the members of Ihe
history of the University will be held
Kentwky basketball team
this morning when Prof. Carl A. today at the Phoenix Ilctel 1 : 15.
Lampert speaks on "Beethoven, the
Man and the Musician" the third
All regularly m licdult-i lasshour In the band room of the Music
Center. Records will be played to es for the third hour will lx'
illustrate the various phases of the dismissed for the meeting, the
composer's life.
I'niversitv administration said.
Porfessor Lampert, in an inter
Although no definite plans for
view yesterday, explained that the the convixation
hae been anlecture wilr be conducted rather in- nounced, ii
ivas hinted csier-daformally. "We're going to give every
that speeches will le made
one a good time, and if anyone is
money by President Donovan. Fcrnie
dissatisfied he can have his
back," he remarked.
Shivcly, athletic director: and
After each record has been played basketball coach Adolph Rupp.
there will be a discussion of that
Sunday, when the train carryparticular composition in relation
to Beethoven's life. Professor Lam- ing the Wildcat basketball team
pert said that the "Pastoral Sym- arrived at I'nion station, about
phony" will be played first to illustrate the lighter side of the com- 100 students and a part of the
Two Suky
poser. The little cuckoo calls and band met them.
trills will be pointed out and com- cheerleaders led cheering and
mented upon. More formal composinging.
sitions will also be studied.
Kentucky has won three of
knowledge of music is
Technical
not necessary for an enjoyment of the last four Southeastern conthe lecture according to Professor ference loin namenis.
Lampert.
ictorv convocaA similar
Friday, 7th hour, Prof. Rodman
Sullivan, department of economics, tion was helil alter ihe
will lecture on "Totalitarian Trade
team won the SoutheastMethods" in room 101. White Hall.
ern conference tournament two
years ago at Knowille. Staged
in Alumni gymnasium, ihe conUK MEN
vocation was attended by over
of the student Ik1v
SIGN
NAVY and the b.md.

40-3- 1.

The annual flower judging ?chool.'
sponsored by the University extension department and the Gr.rdtn
Club of Kentucky will be held Thurs-d.':- v
and Friday on the campus.
Frances Jones ot Cincinnati, author of the newspaper column. Fun
With Flowers." will be the featured
speaker on the school program.
Other speakers will be Mrs. Maud
R Jiicobs, South Carrollton, horticultural judge; Prof. John S. Gardner. University horticultural f.old
agent, and Dr. Sailie Pence mathematics professor
Participation in the school is open
to students and the public with the
payment of a registration fee. Miss
Chloe Gifford. secretary of club and
community service in the extension
department, is in charge of arrangements.
Miss Jones will illustrate her lecture with arrangements of fresh
flowers, and will use the titl? o!
her column as her subject.
The program will open at 6 o'clock

Eri.ial Allm
Team

TOMORROW
AT THIRD HOUR

fleets

ft.-.-

.v.

f

Wildcats ToBeHonoied
At Special Convocation
For Southeastern Win

Girs' Glee Club Presents Concert Sunday

42-3-

All-SE-

N

and fighting forward, was the only
Wildcat selected on the All South- eastern conference AP first team by
a poll of coaches, sportswriters. and
officials. Jim King and Marvin
Akers were selected on the second

WILDCAT REVIEW 'CATS SLATED

?

k

Makes

I'M 'J

UK Wildrats will lie given
10 in Memorial hall, when President Donovan
tomorrow ai
lias railed a sjm' ial Virion (jii(h aiion.
Willi anollii r Southeastern scilp siring ai iln ir Ih Iis, the
'Cat loaches and players will all he there, and every student
ai lie I'nivcrsilv has been called to pay 'tribute to their
achievement.
Those who were ai ihe Louisville ouiing, as well as those
who got their share second "hand via the air waves, will have
a last ilinmc to recognize ihe latest addition to I'k's string
of lopnoich net teams.
Tomorrow morning is one lime when it will he definitely
bad tasir to show up in the Grill during convocation hour.
-- Eilitnr.
lir

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Ball-Haw-

OF KENTUCKY

For The Lntosl Addition

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Kernel

KENTUCKY

ON PAGE FOUR

Borowskl-Gensem-

Schubert-S)tc!:e-

,

J

Mrs. W. T. Lafferty. prominent
club woman and authority on parlimentary procedure, will conduct
a parlimentary law class Thursday
at 4 o'clock in room 204 of the Student Union building. This course,
under the auspices of Mortar Board,
has been presented for the past few
years.
Mrs. Lafferty considers the particular problems of parlimentary
procedure in campus groups and
clarifies th emore difficult points of
Robert's Rules of Order. She encourages questions and demonstrates
the correct forms for conducting a
meeting and carrying on discussion
in a group.
Parlimentary procedure forms one
section of the examination for eligibility for Student Government offices. This conference will be a great
aid to future candidates who expect
to take the examination this spring.
Mrs. Lafferty will also give valuable
pointers in carrying on a debate or
ending unnecessary discussion in a
meeting.
This conference is open to all
University students

three-fourth-

s

NEW OFFICERS
TO TEACH ROTC
Miles And Croft
To Be Replaced
Major Floyd L. Carlisle and Major
will arrive at the
University immeoiately to fill vacancies in the miitary department
created by the leaving of Major Lysle
W. Croft and Major Leroy Miles.
Major Carlisle, from Headquarters
Fifth Corps Area. Fort Hayes, Columbus. Ohio, will replace Major
Croft who has been ordered to troop
duty as a psychologist with Headquarters Armored Force. Fort Knox.
M.ijor Dahl, f'om Camp Croft.
South Carolina, will replace Major
Miles, who is now an instructor in
tactics at the Officers Training
School at Fort Benning. Georgia.
Major Croft, senior sophomore instructor. gradunt?cl from the University in 1926.
On completion of his master's degree ha was appointed assistant
Dean of Men for one year. He entered personnel work in 1936 and in
1938 he received his doctor's degree
and was appointed Assistant Dean of
the College of Ai ts and Sciences and
director of the University Personnel
office.
Major Miles, who was senior
freshman instructor graduated from
the university in 1928 with a B. S. in
Commerce. He received his Master of
Science degree in business administration from Harvard. Major Miles
was associated with the First National Bank and Trust company until he was called to active service

Arthur G. Dahl

Chemical Society
The March meeting of the Student Affiliates chapter of the American Chemical, Society will be held
at 7:30 p. m today in room 201. Kas-tl- e
hall. Arthur Collins, president,
announced yesterday. All industrial
chemists and chemists are invited t

attend.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
NEWSPAPER OP THE UNIVERSITY

OFFICIAL

rtmijRKD
KXCKTT

inn wmiT Dtnmo m onoot team
HOUDATS OR VXAMUtATIOM FKRIODB

Kouturtr Intrcolleeit

Prna

Bob Ammons

.

Editor

Harold Winn

Kentucky, m

ftoterrd
t th Post Office. t Lcxlnfton.
rcoiid rJus matter under the Act of licrcb
MMfBSH

I7.

Jim VV'ooldridce
Bob IIillenmeyer

AmocmMIob

II

LOS

AOblltt

- SUN

FWCIC-

BDBSCniPTION RATBi
tt.OQ On
Semester

One

Tour

All ffffflrtf mrtictet gnt colvwnt ere to be contMere4 the
ovtn.ont vt the writer themstlvet, end do not eeceMeriiy
reflect the opinio of The hemel.

pat snider

Letters

Gossip

ON TOP OF THE HEAP

BOB ADAIR
Sports Editor
Society Editor
MARGARET CANTRILL
DAN SHINDLEBOWER. DANA R. OLIVER....Cartoons
JAY WILSON
Advertising Manager
LEWIS SAWIN
Assistant Managing Editor

National Advertising Service, Inc.
' fmttutm frtrnentttif N. T.
New Yok.
420 Madison Ave.
- OOITCMI

Features

Managing Editor
News Editor
Business Manager

Lexington Board of Conuraere

CNH

MARCH 3, 1912

OP KENTUCKY

betty puoh

by Bob Ammons
I'Unoirs coitNim
Oh Los I And By The Wind Grieved.,.
1111;

ful. Ail the things she had read
about in Mademoiselle, really were
true, and they were really happen- lug to her. It was just like the
magazines.
man girls in gin to fadt
If you watch than at the dances
And the boys were always call- or talk to them in the Vuum. vim ing her up and sitting at her table
rant help but oolite the ever-in- jn the Grill. She always got such
creasing phony laugh, the too often a big rush at the dances.
npeahd phrase, the forerd smile. You
w
ran see thtm straining to art like
The jris al tne for0rUy told
thc used to ail a lien they were fresh ner Jt was ner cute i"ine tliat got
and impressed, hut it n,Vs false. This them Bnd gunny decided that Yes.
are just not the same.
that milt, h s, Snp knew from
All in all. it's about the saddest Mademoiselle that boys liked girls
story we know, teen noise urea use
onrl she reli7-r- i that
.h .rA
it happens ear uUer year.
tngt W8S wny tney Uked ner
And so,' Sunny decided that she
Now, when she came to the Uni- - was
the cute tvoe. and began pay- versity in the fall. Sunny Martin Jng gpecia, attention to the
was her real name, given her tures in Mademoiselle which show-b- y
.,
her grandmother, and all the , h
tvn -- ,rU shnnlrl dress
girls thought it was so cute) was
to
she
gai, to look just
Just abotl: the typical freshmali iJke the cute type girls and she
began to act like she thought cute
Back home she had been about ,tirt Khn..ld act Around the
as Dooular as a cirl could be in sorority she learned how to be coy
the small town high school had and make cute remarks to flatter
played the lead in the senior play, tne
she began to act like
and was considered nice looking.
sne didn't get the point of a boy's
The first few days, she was prac- - joke, even though she did. and they
tically lost. Everything was so big always laughed and said she was
and so wonderful. She went to the so cute and had to explain to her.
YMCA parties and met some other She knew lots of other cute tricks,
freshman boys and girls, and once too.
Jerry Slater, a boy from back home
of COurse. she didn't have time to
who was a junior now. took her to g0 to tne library with Henry any
a rush dance at his fraternity.
Everything was just so exciting nim except in the English class. She
Sunny had to write long letters woudll-- t even think of asking him
to her mother to tell her about
the sorority for open house, be- them.
cause he was so 'quiet and none of
And especially there was a boy tne
nad ever neard of him.
who had English with her. His And ne reany was sort of countri- name was Henry and he was sort ficdi
the boys back home,
of shy. like some of the boys back
And go for gunny it was a long
home. She always felt so at home m,,H f
with Henry, and she liked to study bridge in the Grill. Just thousands
with him in the library and drink of boys thousands of jokes, over
Pepsi-Colat Jones nox-ua- n
and over again.
About tins nine o sear, if you look
n
you
the lights flit her
uut in if trrshman class.
One by our ou can see the fresh
.

pic-tth- at

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as

afterward.
But for really being thrilled she
Along about Felj'uary, as you
rmtiH rather o in thr fraternitv
..n,, with Jerrv He took her there mlgnt expect, tne cnange came over
newness began
more and more now. and although Sunny Martin The
.i,- n,lrif.r.,ann thP funnv to wear off. The dances at the framaking all lernlt- nouses were tne same
remarks the bovs were
over- At lne Unlon U was the
the time she laughed and alwavs and
oVer and over
had such a wonderful time. She got same lnin6
smoking
cigarettes a n d
W
U know more and more fraternity
ughlng
and talking smart
boys, and thev alwavs gave her such
and
talk
SAm&
l'le, fame
a big rush at the Union dances.
ver end over. The girls at
And the girls at the sorority were thi6s
talkill8 abou' tne
so nice too. Thev got her dates with the
and the same thlls and
other fraternity men and told her P0
e brid8e eames the same thing
how the people in the GriH all said
everyone over 81111 overshe was so cute, and how
And all the time she had to keep
laughed when she couldn't catch on
to the jokes. They taught her a being cute, because that was why
lot of other things too . . . how to she was popular.
play bridge and to fix her hair
She felt the change in herself,
right, how to put makeup on so it She kept up smiling, but she didn't
would look good in the bright lights mean it. She kept up laughing, but
at the dances and how to wear cute it sounded false. She kept up being
cute, but it made her sick. She
ribbons in her hair.
For Sunny it was all so wonder- - knew she wasn't the same Sunny
-

Martin who had come to school
in the fall. She was a fake, a phon- ey. artificial, a front. But she had
to be cute, because that was why
she was popular.
Soon the telephone calls began to
come less and less, the stags took
with someone else,
their
tlle boys in the Grill sat at some- one else's table. She thought she
0,'gnl t0 study this semester and
make a standing to get initiated.
But she found she couldn't. And
5,0 she went back to the Grill and
ridge and had to be cute
Pla5'ed
some more.
It got to be sickening.

l)s

as the semester wore on
things got worse, and she wanted to
get away. But when she got home
for the summer it was just as bad.
she couldn't enjoy the countryfied
things around there, and the boys,
my Ood.
.
Tne mSht her fatner told ner

J

This Book Was Just

-

becaase sne naan i maae a siana- Sunny Martin cried for a Ion;
K . n,
as
HHIU1. kJliV UlUll i.
didn't want to stay, but she didn't
want to go back either.
Y
For a year Sunny stayed around
home. For a long time she wouldn't
talk to any of the local people un- less she posithlly had to; she
at her parents. She got
a few letters from the girls in the
sorority, but pretty soon they got
to be too busy to write her.
Slowly though, she came out of
I hear. She began to be inter- ested in the church and in read- ing. and took a class of young
children in Suiviay School. The
wemen at the church asked her to
talk before the Book Club'
nlake
And so she's back home again
now. The last I heard of Sunny
was married to the son of the
man who owns the feed store there
m town, sne taiics to tne neign- bors over tne ience on summer
nights and goes to prayer meetings
on Wednesdays. The folks around
town say she is the most active
member of Bundles for Britain and
is expected to be elected pres!!- dent of tne Baplist Women's Aux- lUary some day.
They say Mrs. Greenfield-th- at's
often men- her name nawaoem
tion that she used to go to the
University. They say she doesn't
tak much &boM u
(
kmm- the woman who lives
, x,
((, lier aml su, ,,.;3 ,,,
L1

I

1.
V
7"

1

111 .

11

O1

rT
I

-

1

ON

l ilt

COLLEGE FRONT

book disappeared
reference
rom the library of a physics prof
at Marshall college and the prof,
much concerned at the loss of a
valuable volume, attempted to
cate it.
The search proved fruitless and
graauauy ine incident supped rrom
mind that is until he discovered
the lost manual one day while look-i- t,
ing on the shelf. As he picked it
up to examine it more closely, a
piece of paper fell from between the
pages onto the floor,
On it was this unusual message
from a trouoled conscience:
Prof. Hron:
I took this book from your book-sh- e
case without checking it out some
time ago. I am returning it after
nnding it too valuable to be stolen
rrcm tne department
BOOKWORM
A

I

fcei I
-

Hi ri

By Jimmy

-

d
term paper from his fra- ternity's files. He got an A minus,
and a note from his prof which.
roughly, ran like this: This was an
A paper when I wrote it, and by
golly, it's still worth an A minus!"

HOW TO CATCH IP
ON BACK WORK
Up at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, a young man worked out
a beautiful plan.
He went to a friend and said.
"You do the work In Course A and
111 do the work in Course B and
well trade." That being okeh with
the party of the second part, he
went on to another friend and said.
"You do the work in course B and
ill oo tne wort in course A ana
wen exchange.
Then he went to sleep while those
two other guys you've heard about
t
did his work. He managed the trad- STILL A GOOD
ing beautiful!', but the two other
got
gilys
TERM PAPER
together afterwards.
Northw estern's Purple Parrot told We'll stop here because so far it
of a student who turned in a 20- - makes a beautiful story.
.

Complaiul Against
Carnegie Kooin
Still Unanswered

-

(,.

stnis

-

"M-viau-

-

inymuwu

,.

.

..,

oe-ll-

-

Greco-Roma-

-

....

,

-

-

-

.

i

d

And then there's the stot about the eight
students who left lor Louisville I hutsday and
never saw a game. EaiK
still ainon1' the uiissiu.

Monday

thev were

T

Pictutescpie speech out i ibuled bv I oni Anderson, sports editor ol The Ki"i ille Jimrntil:
"Dig. bad. St. Bel naidnish like Jolmnv Mauer."
We understand that Mauer. Icnnessee's bav
ketball coach, resents AudciMu's description.

T

j.

Alter the Auburn Keiiluc k m iiii Iiii.iI i
one southein sxrts writer houcd his incligna
lion al the olhcials and Adolph Rupp's tactics
bv signing his dateline: " Rupp ille." K..
--

T

I he Kernel s
Hob Adair and R. C. Smith,
sports editor of the Oumge and While. Tennessee's student paper, have been, as you piob- -

(lor-uieil-

Louisville).

Dorsy Krcords Only Bright
o
n..n
i

Was

Tu

Kon-n- l

;

t.onvoralifn;

MI'SICAI. Ml 11 ERINGS
Best disc to reach the ears of
this listener in the past few months
has been Tommy Dorsey's new re- cording of Cole Porter s old favorite
Wh.t .s Th,s Th.nS Called Love.
This in our opinion is one of the fin- est written and TD's waxing rates 1st
among recordings of the number,
Some solid Dorsey trombone, superb
phrasing by braso. a trumpet ride by
iggy iuman, ana a nnai cnorus Dy
This one has been recorded for some
time but was released only last week
for retail sale.
RpVprse side is another old one
Love Lends A Little Gift of Roses,
vccalist Ken Curtis, borrowed
from Shep Fields for this side, sing- ing some pretty lyrics. Again TD's
t.
trombone is a
This man
is undoubtedly the most consistently
good musicia 011 wax ,j....
Artie Shaw's latest releases are
definitely not up to his usual star- dards. Titles were Absent Minded
iniiur.aii auu umeooay .o- body Loves. Hindustan is a compli- caiea arrangement oi an oia jump
tune, while the other two are pops.
neither very good. Artie plays a fair
high-ligh-

P.y lin.i. PtMCk
clarinet on Somebody but all sides To the Editor of The
If it hadn't be'n for a reporting
are lacking the usual spark,
last few records put out un- - class assigrment. I would have been
The
Hoi- - r.lnnn VTillnr'c noma
t,,i,w,
nrrth. in thl flri!! Iiw "l
"w
ably go down in music history as be- - Tuesday. Thank Gcd for the jour- -

m

piaved. The titles we are referring
to in particular are Keep 'Em Flying
and Let's Have Another Cup ' Cof- fee. Flying features some wild but
pointless blowing of the brass with
cne rnytnm secuon leading tne
goes nowhere in particular. Coffee.
a poor attempt at strengthening
Pan American relations, is sung by
Marion Hutton and the Modernaires
in North American style then saxist
Ernie Caceres goes south of the bor- aer wlln
vcal 'he should stay

there

.

Reverse is a fair jump tune Chip
Off the Old BIock. teaturh. " some
,
....
w.
,j .i

...

Hal Mclntyre.
has
in less than two months gathered
a fine grouo of young musicians and
nas muiuea a nne Dana, r eaturea
instrumentalists are former Good- man saxman Dave Matthews and
Woody Herman's
old trumpeter,
Steody Nelson.

-m
aul u
deeFest fympathy. for the Detroit
minister had a message which wa
truly impressive. Maybe you dicir.'l
go because vour roonre wa
m. .u
,
nr vnur fnl'.-- j
r.t i..
wr

iir

ws Just plain too
cold and Jt:e did have his car I
dcubt the rationalisation. "Tfcer.wouldn't have been room for every-wit- h
bodv anvwav
Why don't people admit it when
they do not want to do something?
To get the point. Dr. Henry H. Crane
.
.
snould have rated a capacity crowd
Memorial Hall wa
h!iif.fiiipi
,n- - t
Franklv. I wouldn't hav.
the convocation unless I had to- I
get the willies when I t