xt7b8g8fhz7z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b8g8fhz7z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690904  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September  4, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, September  4, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7b8g8fhz7z section xt7b8g8fhz7z IlM
19

Thursday Evening, September 4,

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Ir
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

SDS Plans Vietnam Day

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Of Protest, Discussion

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Dick Pozzuto, steering committee
chairman, stands beside lawyer
Bill Allison (right), as he
addresses the UK SDS chapter.

'

Steering Committee
.
Uiairman Speaks

Ho Chi Mirth, Dead,
Cease-Fir- e
Possible
no comment either from U.S.
military or diplomatic authorities
in Saigon.
In Paris, representatives of the
Viet Cong at the Vietnam peace
talks issued a statement saying
they were more than ever determined "to continue the sacred
resistance to the American aggression . . . to the final victory."

SAIGON
Hanoi
announced Thursday "a grave
and sudden heart attack" killed
Ho Chi Minh, Southeast Asia's
master insurrectionist who drove
French colonials out of Indochina
and fought the United States
to a seeming standstill in Viet(AP)-Ra-

dio

nam.

broadcast

said death

came to the wispy,

North Vietnamese president at.
9:47 a.m. Wednesday.
"Everyone tried their utmost
and gave of their best to save
him at any price," said the announcement, "but because of his
advanced age and serious illness
of the sudden severe heart attack
President Ho has left us forever."
Ho's illness was first disclosed
by Hanoi Wednesday in broadcasts that made it clear the end
was near but did not mention a
lieart attack.
Broadcasts announcing the
death were heard in Washington, Paris, Hong Kong and elsewhere over the world.
No Comment
In San Clemente, Calif., the
Western White House said President Nixon would have no comment on Ho's death. There was

Hanoi's death announcement
seven-daperiod of mournand said "the
ing Sept.
most solemn ceremonial state funeral of our nation" would be
organized, but gave no date for
the funeral.
ffc:ed a

y

4--

Possible
There was

whether the

Cease-Fir- e

no

indication

mourning
mean the Communists
would call for a battlefield ceasefire during that time.
seven-da-

y

might

Scattered fighting and Communist rocket attacks continued
Thursday.
The broadcast named a spe-

committee to take
of the funeral. At the
charge
top were the men from whom a
successor to Ho presumably will
emerge, although a period of
collective leadership was considered likely.
cial

By TOM BOWDEN

;

XX
f

The

Vol. LXI, No. 7

25-ma- n

Kernel Staff Writer
Plans for a day of discussion
and protest of the Vietnam War
which would involve the cancellation of classes on Oct. 15
were outlined last night at a

meeting of the UK chapter of
the Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS).
Dick Pozzuto, SDS steering

committee chairman, described
the planned program as "the
biggest thing" in the near future for the SDS.
Similar programs concerning
the Vietnam war will be conducted at "other universities," a
participant said. The other universities were not named.
Speakers Planned
Another steering committee
member, Frank Shannon, said
that the program would include
"several speakers" who would
discuss various aspects of the
Vietnam war. Shannon said that
the SDS is trying to get an
speaker, but he did
not name any prospects.
The cancellation of classes,
Shannon noted, would be with
the cooperation of the faculty
and administration. "As soon as
we get a schedule of events, we
will start going to heads of departments," he stated.
Another participant said that
contact has been made with "a
small amount of teachers" and
that there is "a great deal of
sympathy there."
"Guerilla Theater" Planned
Also included in the day of
discussion would be a "guerilla
theater" which would consist of
various persons traveling through
the campus "portraying various
acts of violence," including
"some of the terrible &ctr (going
on) in Vietnam."
The day's program would end
with a film; under consideration
are "War Games" and several
related movies.
Billy Horton, another member
out-of-to-

of the steering committee, spoke
at length about the Board of
Trustees, the new student code

and the functions of the

Horton stated that those who
criticize the SDS for attacking
the Trustees are taking a "naive
position." That the Board of
Trustees employs a sort of
racism" in gov"broadly-defineerning UK was stressed by Horton.
He claimed that the Trustees
"lay out the mold that students
have to fit into while they're
here, If you don't conform," he
continued, "you may find yourself shuttled out of the
d

Futrell Holds First
'Open Press Meeting'
By FRANK COOTS

Assistant Managing Editor
Tim Futrell, Student Government president, yesterday held
the first of his weekly SG "Open
Student Press Meetings."
The meetings are intended
as open sessions where students
can air gripes, question Futrell
and learn of SG progress during the week.
Women's Hours
During yesterday's meeting
Fut r e sa i d t he rec o m me nd at ion s
of the Associated Women Student's committee on women's
dormitory hours are now being
studied by the administration.
He optimistically claimed women's hours should be "significantly liberalized by the beginning
of the spring semester."
Futrell praised Sara O'Briant
who headed tlie AWS committee
as well as the process which allows students a "significant role
in nuking decisions which affect
them."
Futrell announced his ap
11

Marine Corps Chief
Fights Racial Tension
(AP)-Act-- ing
WASHINGTON
to cool racial friction, the

to permit Negro Marines more
leeway in expressing racial pride,
remains
everything
provided
within regulations.
Among other things, Chapman said such gestures as the
Black Power clenched fist salute
should be discouraged, but not
binned except during formation
or when "rendering military courtesies to colors, the National
Anthem, or individuals."
"They are . . . expressions
of individual belief and are not,
in
themselves,
prohibited,"
Chapman said in his message
which will be read to all Marines
within 4S hours.

Marine Corps commandant
Wednesday granted black Marines permission to wear limited
"Afro" haircuts and moved to
remedy what he said were some
"valid causes of complaint."
At tin? Mine time. Gen. Leonard F. Chapman Jr. messaged
his commanders all around the
world emphasizing the retiuice-mefor "total impartiality" in
dealing with Marines of all races,
colors and creeds and ordering
measures "to dispel the racial
problems tlut currently exist."
Racial Incidents
The commandant, whose
Comrades In Arms
corps lias been embarrassed by
"However, they are grounds
some recent incidents of racial
for disciplinary action if executed
disorders, stressed that acts of
during official ceremonies or in
violence between Marines "cana manner suggesting direct denot be tolerated, and must stop."
fiance of duly constituted auHis message, and a subsethority."
quent news conference, showed
Continued on Pace 5, CoL 2
that Chapman felt it necessary
nt

Univer-

sity.

Horton stated that the Board
is composed of "rich, distinguished businessmen" who show
interest in training "simple technicians" who can move into business and industry to "replace
vacancies." The university "pays
its debts to society by filling
(these) vacancies," he added.
"Many students don't feel the
restrictions. They come to gel a
good education," and then leave
to take a "middle-range- "
job, he
continued. "This kind of student," Horton said, "who is content with a certain medium level
of success" and who is willing
"to sell (his) soul" can function
well in the university.
Continued on race 7, Col. 4

,.

pointments to the Special Commission on Housing which was
set up to study
in the dorms. The members are
Chairman Joe Dawahare, Steve
Bright, Dee George, Jim Cwinn
and Buck Pennington.
Dawahare said prospects for
"lengthy and complete recom- mendations at this point are
bright."
Futrell also praised the work
of the first SG Summer Cabinet
for their success in completing
a number of projects as well as
carrying out "responsibilities relating to students for the entire
summer."
over-crowdi-

Student Directories On Way
Futrell confidently went onto
say that the Student Directories
should be distributed by Oct.
15 which he commended as the
"earliest return date in recent
history."
The Open Student Press Meetings will be held at 4 p.m. each
Wednesday in the Student

.
-

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Things Are
Looking Up!

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Life in Haggin Hall, a men's dormitory, has never been better
since the University Housing Office converted Donovan Hall into a
women's dormitory over the summer. These students were part
of the crowd of dorm residents who attended a mixer sponsored
by Haggin Hall Wednesday night. Apparently no one seems to
object to the new situation perhaps the Homing Office should take

the hint.

Kernel I'botn By Bob Brewer

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

2

Sqt

4, 19G9

All You Need Is A Sewing Machine
Need a new wardrobe but
can't afford to go on a shopping
spree?
All you need to solve that
problem is a little imagination,
a lot of patience ami a sewing

machine.

Almost any dress you can buy
in a store you can find a pattern
for, along with the added advantage of being able to select
the exact color and fabric you

want.

With one basic shift pattern
a whole wardrobe can be made.
For summer, two yards of a
bright cotton print' fabric becomes
a cool, swinging play dress. In
the winter, bold checked wool
cut from tlie same pattern turns
Into a jumper perfect for classes.

For more dressy occassions, a
lightweight knit, linen or synthetic blend and a few pieces of
simple jewelry nuke a sophisticated outfit that can be dressed
up or down.
Once you get tlte hang of it,
let your imagination run wild.
Take the same basic pattern and
add collars, sleeves, ruffles, buttons, pockets, ribbon trim. Add
a personal touch by monogram-m- i
ng the front.
Bermudas, slacks and bathing
suits are other easy to make
clothes that require little time and
are inexpensive. Most two piece
suits can be made with left over
scraps of material the same style
suit you would pay $20 if you
bought at a store.
The only thing that isn't easier
and more economical to make
than to buy is a blouse. A long
sleeve blouse takes two or three

yards of material and requires
a lot of tedious work, including
cuffs and button holes.
The advantages of sewing your
own clothes include:
EconomyA cotton shirtwaist
dress costs from $15 on up. The
same dress, made with the same
type of material, often with the
same design, costs about $6.
Fit. It is much easier to alter
the pattern for an exact fit than
e
to alter a
dress.
Variety. Sometimes you want
a dress of a certain color or style
and you just can't find it in the
store. With the wide selection
of colors and fabrics now available, its much easier to find just
what you wanted in the fabric
department than on the clothes

to sell quality
handbago

namo brand
and at

DISCOUNT
PRICES

Ik

by tliemsclves

by following the
instructions that come with the
pattern. For those who don't
trust the
method,
the home ec. department offers
a course in beginning sewing,

hand:

WALLER AVE., IMPERIAL PLAZA SHOPPING

u ......
center!

m

fJUJ

w

OPEN TILL 9:00: MON., WED., FRI.

H.E227.

rar-

farah
FaraPreoo

with

ready-mad-

Karen Ellis models a bright yel-- I
low dress she made out of dacron
acrylic blend knit. The easy to
care for, simple line dress cost
about $8 to make.

IT'S OUR BAG!

material and, if you've followed
the pattern instructions, can be
sure it will last through many
machine washings.
Sewing also has its disadvantages, mainly the time involved.
And nothing is more fustrating
than ripping out a crooked seam
or putting in a zipper three times
before it looks right.
Most people can learn to sew

Farah Traditionals . . . best bets
for fashion, for fit, for day-lon- g
comfort. Beautifully tailored in

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fine fabrics that "Never Need
Ironing". Bet on it. You'll look a
winner in these trim ones from
Farah.

rack.

Quality. An eight dollar dress
bought in the store won't last
too long. But when you make
a dress that costs eight dollars,
you know you have high quality

from $10.

Scarves Add Flair
To Your Wardrobe

3

By SHERI PRUDEN
Remember when the only
place a silk ascot ever appeared
was on the portly English gen-

Cinching the waist, a bold
silken print scarf completes the
skirt and shirt look. A classic
paisley scarf woven through a
tleman starring in the late late glittering chain belt updates the
movie?
plainest of dresses.
Scarves have been lifted from
Rich colors, bold patterns and
this obscurity to become the big- versatility add up to the scarf
gest thing on the accessory scene. the boldest and most successful
Ranging from the inexpensive accessory.
h
price of $1.25 to the
r'
sum of $30 plus, scarves can add
verve and color to any woman's
wardrobe.
The "budget scarves" are usually woven of a rayon blend or
a synthetic challis. Acrilon materials rank higher on the price
range, silks even higher, with the
more expensive "tie silk," the
material found in a man's necktie, topping the list.
Scarf designers and manufactures such as Vera, Schiaparelli,
CeofTrey Beene, and Bill Blass
grace scarves with their signatures. Very much a status symbol, the signature scarf is valued
FACULTY
more highly than its unsigned

123 W. Main
Downtown Lexington

sky-hig-

PUNCH IN
for
NEW
STAFF

GRADUATE STUDENTS

cousin.

The maxi scarf, a four to six
foot long stream of color, cuddling the neck and falling far be-

the waist, shapes the newest-loofor scarves. For fall and winter, the maxi scarf knits up in
wool to nestle against a shaggy

Sunday, September 7

coat.

i

:

University
Methodist Chitpcl
Corner Harmon

Rev, Fornash
At

11

a.m.-WO- RSHir

At 6 p.m.

4Jirit

JOIN the library bureaucrats in punch and cookies.
GET TO KNOW the influential who can get you what you want when you need it.
SEE plans for the library's $4 million
expansion.
.

TAKE a tour of the library
Old timers invited too!

Strmon by

SERVICE
of Uf

p.m.

KING LIBRARY LOBBY

low

,'

3-- 5

maze-n- ot

to bo surpassed west of Hampton Court!

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept. 4, l9-- 3

vClNI

MIATYAXD

y jwr optical needs at

Ye LA

of Kentucky,

Imperirlaia

Shopping
'

Waller Avenue
Remember

Inc.

Center

Lexington,

to ask Gene about the SPECIAL CONSIDERATION
to all U.K. STUDENTS

Ky.

given

Telephone 255 - 5506
HOURS:

8:30-5:3-

0

Sat.

Mon.-Fr- i.

8:30-1- 2

p.m.

Proud Mark of a WelMovcd Lady

Community Colleges Provide
Educational Choice To Student
New faculty members of the
University of Kentucky Community College System heard an Ohio
community college president
praise the junior college's role in
higher education at a recent orientation workshop in Lexington.
Dr. Charles N. Pappas, presi-

dent of Cuyahoga Community
College, Cleveland, talked about
"A New and Different College
for a New and Different Society."
"The American Association of
Junior Colleges predicts that by
1980 there will be more than
1,200 community colleges with an
estimated enrollment of three million students," Dr. Pappas said.
"It is not widely known, but bound, as "the newest, fastest
most universities have given up growing, most revolutionary inrefresher courses and there are strument of higher education on
the move today. It has the flexnot nearly enough trained counselors to go around. Unfortunateibility of adapting and adjusting
to current and new needs," he
ly, several large universities have
asserted.
adopted the 'sink or swim philosophy. As a result, large num"Change is taking place everybers of students fail in the first where. It has been said that
and second years."
change is taking place so fast

SAINT AUGUSTINE'S CHAPEL

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It shows it, and sha
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a gift so personal as Anson
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the gift conveys. For her
next birthday, anniversary
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her she's special, with

MORNING PRAYER AND SERMON
at 9:00 a.m.

Earrings.

The Sermon Topic During the Month of September

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In Sterling or Karatclad
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EVENING PRAYER AT 5:30 P.M.

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Sterlingor Karatcladtt $12.50
styles to choose from

C.

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Closest to Campus in Chevy Chase Village
When Ordering:
list initials
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He said most community colleges offer courses similar to the
first two years of the traditional
university. "They are for the
youngsters who want to stay at
home, in order to make the transition to higher learning a bit
easier. Some of the students are
unsure of themselves, or they
may need a refresher course to
help them brush up on the algebra they have forgotten. Or maybe the student needs the help
of a trained counselor to guide
him in selecting an occupation
or profession."
Dr. Pappas described the community college as not tradition

472 Rose Street

Air-condition- ed

M

have increased a hun90 percent of
all scientists who have ever lived
are alive today.

chemists

dredfold, and that

Hazard

C. C.

Shoivs Worth
A recent study notes the economic impact that Hazard Community College, with its 130 mem- -'
ber student body (62 men, 68
women) and its 20 faculty and
staff members, is having on the

Hazard area.
Its full economic impact has
not yet been realized, says the researcher, William R. Miller, resource development specialist in
community services at Quick-

sand.
Miller two weeks ago com,
pleted a study of the college and
student body expenditures which
points out the value of Hazard
Community College, not only as
a cultural asset, but "as a great
economic asset as well."
Miller compiled the facts with
the cooperation of the faculty,,
staff, and a sample of 21 students
who recorded their purchases over
a
period last April.
As a result of the presence
of Hazard Community College,
an additional $17,500 is placed
in circulation in Hazard each

month.
The total of student expenditures is $3,916.64 per month for
such items as meals clothing,
medical care, recreation, educational supplies, transportation,
postage, telephone and personal

items.

In addition,

32

students

re-

$2,486 in cash each
month by participating in the
work-stud- y
program. This does
not include fees paid by the
students to cover tuition.
To this sum is added the
ceive

monthly salaries to faculty and
staff of $13,100, and maintenance
and miscellaneous operations for
one month of $471, bringing the
total to approximately $17,500 being funnel ed into the local economy each month.
When figured annually, the
figure is approximately $200,000,
which does not take into consideration $40,000 received in tuition and fees from the students.

O
The

that knowledge in physical sciences is doubling every eight or
nine years, that while the earth's
population has ahrost tripled in
the last century, tle number of

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The Kentucky Kjernel

We Carry JOHN ROBERTS

and BALFOUR Rings

100CC

STOGIE

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lexington. Kentucky 405O. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school ve except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published bv the Board of Student
Publications. UK Pott Office Box 4tttf.
and
Begun as the Cadet in
published conUnuotuly as the Kernel
since mi.
Advertising published herein la Intended to help the reader buy. Any
falsa or misleading advertising should
b reported to Th Editors.

* Criteria For Competence
Of the many major decisions
President Singletary will have to
make when he gets his feet on the
ground there is one which vitally
concerns UK students. The post of
Vice President for Student Affairs
should be filled soon, and Dr.
Singletary should be made aware
of the views of the students on
this very important appointment.
There are many pressing reasons
why this position should be filled
as soon as possible. First of all,
the Student Affairs office is held
nearly in limbo until it gets a
permanent head. Any decision Dr.
Forth now makes must be a temporary one, subject to change at
the discretion of his successor. This
is not a very forceful method of
operation for an office of the magnitude of Student Affairs.
The Student Affairs office is in
bad need of a complete redefinition. The fluid and overlapping divisions of the office make it almost
incomprehensible to one trying to
benefit from the services it offers.
Before any effective changes can
be made, a permanent vice president must be chosen.
As President Singletary makes
his decision there will be a number of factors for him to consider.
Obviously it is of utmost importance to choose a man who is
acceptable to the student body.
Further, it is essential that the
appointee be well versed in student conduct. Administrative skill
is necessary, but it must take back
seat to practical understanding of
student needs and attitudes. Ideally the new vice president will be
one who is atuned to recent upheavals of other campuses and has
spent some time in analyzing the
causes of these disruptions and
how they can be effectively prevented here. A program for keeping
students in hand will not be sufficient, the next Vice President for
Student Affairs must be able to
communicate with students well
enough to alleviate the causes of

their dissatisfaction, not just the

"Gawd

inet

is presently explosively tover
proportionate in its staunch student
outlook. A less authoritarian Student Affairs head could do wonders
to restore student confidence in

administrators.
These are stiff criteria, but somewhere the man can be found. We
can only hope Dr. Singletary will
exert the effort to make this appointment his first major contribution to the University.

moderates on campus and legal
action to stop disruptive radical
moves.
A romantic attraction for the
tactics of disruptive radicalism by
no means has been dispelled. On
campus after campus, the radicals
can point to the failure of low-ke- y
demonstrations or petitions to
win concessions from administrations, and the fast results they got
by shutting down the university or
seizing a hall or issuing an ulti-

matum.

Most encouraging was the generally realistic appraisal of the radnarrow-sightedne-

ss

...

Wotta9 Lousy World! 99

The Kentucky

The political affiliation of the
appointee should be irrelevant, of
course. It is his student orientation
that matters. The President's cab-

icals'
that prevailed at the recent meeting of campus newspaper editors in Boulder,
Colo. They seemed able to credit
the legitimacy of student positions
while at the same time seeing the
essential destructiveness of the
revolutionary temperament. Hopefully, most students this fall will
tactic.
retain their zest for needed change,
In St. Louis, the conservative-oriente- d but will not let themselves be
sucked along into the blind radiYoung Americans for Freedom were planning resolutions to cal tornado.
The Christian Science
support a strong military stand in
Vietnam anathema to even most
Monitor
ts

-

sub-decisio- n.

Right, Left Or Beyond

At El Paso, Texas, the students
veered toward the radical left. In
St. Louis, they encamped on the
right. But the real battle for domination of the student scene this
fall will not be between the radicals
and conservatives. It will be in the
minds of the basically liberal majority of students, and will take the
form of deciding whether or not to
acquiesce in radical tactics.
Such acquiescence occurred at
the National Students Association
convention in El Paso. The liberal
majority of campus leaders gave in
to black separatist demands both
for control of the meeting and
for $50,000 to finance the breakaway National Association of Black
Students. They seemed mesmerized
by the radical ploy and, even though
it wrecked the NSA's hopes of representing a consensus on campus
civil-righissues, acceded a validity" to the blacks' demanded

o5A-- l

symptons.
It is very important that the
appointee be a man the students
can trust, even if his decision is
contrary to their attitudes. There
should be a rapport between the
administrator and the students he
administers that has not been found
at UK in recent years.
These criteria eliminate all of
the ranking officials in the Student Affairs office, and with good
reason. This leaves the President
Whether
with a grave
to bring in an administrator or to
recruit one from the present University community. We feel the
latter alternative is the more desirable.
The new vice president will
have to make many rapid decisions when he is chosen decisions which can best be made
if he had been aware of the influences leading up to their resolution. For a man to come into
the UK environment overnight and
be expected to appreciate the vast
complexities that have been build-her- e
for years is an unrealistic
expectation. This point is especially
pertinent in view of the number of
high positions being occupied by
men new to this campus. As one
administrator said, "There should
at least be someone around who
knows where the johns are."

Iernei

University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,

1894

1969

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, nofof the University.
;

James VV. Miller,
George H. Jepson, Managing Editor
Robert Duncan, Advertising Manager
Chip Hutcheson, Sports Editor
Carolyn Dunnavan, Women's Page Editor

Editor-in-Chi- ef

Bob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor

Dan Gossett, Arfi Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist

Kernel Forum: the readers write
Dear Drew
To the Editor of the Kernel:
The harsh criticism of Drew Pearson
in "Exit Pearson" from the September
2 issue of the Kernel is a poor, but

typical definition of what "happiness
is" in respect to good journalism.
Happiness for a good column seems
to be concern for truth and objectivity.
The objectivity of the editorial is questionable. In politics and government truths
are scarce and can seldom be dealt with.
Who has been able to answer alltheques-tion- s
concerning the death of John Kennedy, the spending of the industrial military complex, the war in Vietnam, or
the death of Miss Kopechne? How can one
speak of truths when he is surrounded
by doubts and shady facts?
Happiness seems to be pure journalism,
without the nasty yellow kind. But it
seems that Pearson's journalism, like the
that is someKernel's, is a bit
times right and sometimes wrong. As
stated in the Sept. 2,
"Pearson's persistant muckrakings sent
four members of Congress to jail, defeated
countless others and caused the dismissal of scores of government officials."
Who is to say what happiness is?
Pearson probably was the mean, ugly,
dirty, and nasty man the Kernel pictures
him. He was a muckraker. He was surrounded by and was writing about a mean,
ugly, dirty, and nasty society. He wanted,
"to make the government a little cleaner,
a little more efficient . . . in foreign affairs,
to try to work for peace." He believed
journalism was essential to democracy.
He was happy.
Karl Mcrcliant
Freshman
off-whit- e,

Courier-Journa-

l,

editors, then I would conclude that the
Kernel leadership has begun the year by
taking a giant step backward.
I base this assessment on an outstanding piece of morbidity which
seconded as an editorial in our newspaper on September 2, under the title:
"Exit Pearson." The condemnation of
the late Drew Pearson within twenty-fou- r
hours of his death and the attack
on his partner Jack Anderson were slanderous. Ironically, the author of this editorial employed the very techniques to
attack individuals as he fallaciously condemned Pearson
and Anderson for
utilizing. E.g., the lack of concern for truth
and the use of sensationalism.
Quite contrary to this editorial, Pearson has often been acclaimed as one of
the most influencial political critics in the
last three decades by Washington circles.
The Dodd scandal in 1967 is Pearson's
most well known uncovering. Pearson's
column has also been responsible for the
dismissal of innumerable corrupt governmental officials.
In the future it would be comforting
to one to be able to rely on the editors of our newspaper as those who would
not substitute their personal prejudices for
factual reporting.
Paul L. Wertheimer
Junior A & S

And More

Referring to your editorial "Exit Pearson," of September 2:
There are two kinds of journalists in
this world those who look under rocks
and those who tell you how pretty the
rocks are. Drew Pearson strived for membership in this former group, the truth
seekers. The tone and content of your
More Drew
editorial clearly exhibits your application
If action is the most tangible method into that second group of dishwater jourof measuring improvement and, if the nalists.
Kernel editorials are one method of meaChuck Koehler
suring the journalistic morality of our new
Senior, Journalism

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept.

Haggin Hall

4, 1009- -5

UK Prof Visiting Canada

Works On

Dr. Keating came to UK in
Dr. L. Clark Keating, UK
of French, will be a 1962 as chairman of the former
professor
visiting professor in the Depart- Department of Modern Foreign
ment of llomancc Studies at the Languages. He served as chairUniversity of Calgary, Alberta, man of the UK French Departacament during the 1969 summer
Canada, during the 1969-7demic year.
session.

New Image
Students in Haggin Hall want
to improve the hall's image.
So Haggin has a public relations man.
Skip Zender, a corridor advisor at Haggin, is the man dorm
residents hope will change Hag-gin- 's
public image. According
to Zender, any news about the
dorm will be in the "opposite

direction this year."
Zender was referring to publicity concerning a panty raid
last semester at the Complex
which was reportedly staged by
the men of Haggin Hall. During
the incident, Dempster Dump-ster- S
at Haggin were set afire.
Publicity Unfavorable
Ellis Bullock, head resident
at the dorm, says that Haggin
will be "using Skip as the best
person to advise them."
According to Bullock, the only
publicity Haggin received last
semester was unfavorable. He
cited forums which were held
by Haggin residents, but which
were ignored. Forum topics of
"drugs and sex" were given as
examples.

Forums similar in nature have
been planned for this year.
Bullock says the usual comment about Haggin now is,
"yeah, I know about Haggin!"
It's Zender's job to change that
comment
to something more
praiseworthy.

0

Complete Optical Service
to Central Kentucky
Since 1923

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r
Aerial Poetry

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3 Locations

(

143-14-

5

1220
2121

Kernel photographer Dick Ware captures
the effortless grace of a sparrow as it
flys into the early morning sky.

North Upper St.
South Broadway
Nicholasville Rd.

2554716
252-758-

5

278-602-

6

254-936-

6

HEARING AID CENTER
177

North Upper St.

Marine Policy
Continued from Pace One
Chapman asserted:
'VVe must seek in every manner possible to improve understanding among all Marines,
stressing the concept that we are
a band of comrades in arms
. . .with a traditional espirit
that spans an era of nearly 200

years."
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6In '

Look In Sportswear
Available At Four Seasons
The "layered" look in sportswear will be "in" this season
among University of Kentucky
coeds.

And, Four Seasons, 106 Walnut Street just off Main, offers
all the mix and match sportswear which goes to create this
attra