xt7b8g8fhz94 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7b8g8fhz94/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650216  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 16, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 16, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7b8g8fhz94 section xt7b8g8fhz94 Inside Today's Kernel
Staff writer traces the history of the
Socialist Party in America: Page Five.
Readers discuss campus beauty and
proposals for library efficiency: Poge
Four.

Vol.

LVI, No. 77

University of Kentucky
FEU.
LEXINGTON,
KY.,

TUESDAY,

16, 1965

Eight Pages

Vandy game is a "must" for the
Wildcats: Page Six.
Chet Huntley discussed current politics and foreign affairs at his Saturday night lecture at UK: Page Two.

Women's page editor previews spring
fashions: Poge Three.
Histories of UK and the College of
the Bible were related at a science and
religion seminar dinner: Poge Seven.
UK gets a grant to aid student
employment: Page Eight.

e

part-tim-

A national survey
reports on college
cheating: Page Five.

Community College
Expansion Discussed
WILLIAMS
Kernel Staff Writer
The possibility of expanding the present community college
system and establishing such an institution in Louisville in joint
cooperation with the University of Louisville is in the discussion
stage, according to Dr. Ellis F. Hartford, dean of the community colleges system.
President Oswald and Dr.
said, "presumably the community college would be a downPhilip G. Davidson, president
of the University of Louisville, town school that would serve
the youth in the metropolitan
have met to discuss the idea. In
addition, a joint committee has area who are unable, for one
reason or another, to attend
been organized to investigate
the proposal.
college."
Emphasis would be on the
Serving on the committee are
Drs. Woodrow Strickler, W. G.
transfer program. The college
McGlothlin from UL, Drs. A. would concern itself primarily
D. Albright, Ellis F. Hartford,
with technical,
and Mr. Robert E. Kerley from
and professional orientation.
the University.
It would serve
stuThe idea was suggested to dents. Presently, approximately
President Oswald shortly after 200 students from the Louisville
he came to UK by Louisville area are attending the Indiana
civic leaders who were conUniversity extension in
cerned with the fact that many
Ind.
The downtown school would
of the youth were unable to attend college because of financial
help alleviate the problems of
difficulties and lack of accomtransportation and parking.
modation at UL.
Basically, the Louisville-Uestablishment (no name has
Dr. Hartford said that several Louisvillians believe the been suggested) would be comtuition rates are a prime factor parable to the present seven
which hampers many prospeccommunity colleges currently
under the direction of the Unitive students from attending
colleges.
versity.
The goals would be almost
Also, selective requirements
identical to those of the moveand the excellency of the private schools in the state are ment toward the community
college system. In such instituprominent factors in the situation.
tions, the needs of the commun"If established," Dr. Hartford ity are emphasized.
By CAROLYN

I

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700-80- 0

Debate Vietnam

Dr. Amry Vandenbosch of the Department of
Political Science and Lt. Col. Bruce Coleman, who
has recently returned from service in South

"

Jeffer-sontow- n,

Vietnam, debate the current situation of Vietnam
at the Kentucky Political Union tiebate yester- day. See story on Page Seven.

Student Tickets Available
For Founders Convocation

Student tickets for the Founders' Day Convocation with President Lyndon B. Johnson are still
available at the Memorial Coliseum, the Centennial Office announced today.
Dr. J. VV. Patterson, Centennial coordinator, said today an
additional 1,612 student tickets
will be available at the Memorial
Coliseum ticket window from 9
a.m. until 2 p.m. tomorrow. As of
5 p.m. Monday, 4,191 students
had claimed tickets for the convocation at which President Lyndon
B. Johnson will deliver the main
address.
Students wishing tostill claim
tickets must present their ID
cards, Dr. Patterson added.
The coordinator said the main
reason for extending the deadline
is to enable students who may
have been unaware of the Monday
deadline to still obtain tickets for
the event. Admission to the convocation is by ticket only.
Dr. Patterson said tickets for
graduate students in residence
having no ID cards may still gain
admission to the event by show

ing evidence they are the equivalent to full time students. Students in this category are urged
to obtain such certification from
their respective department chairmen or advisers.
Another extended deadline is
for members of the University
faculty. Faculty members who
have yet to obtain their tickets
may do so until noon Wednesday
providing such tickets are still
available in their respective deans
offices.

Faculty members representing
other colleges, universities, learned or professional societies cannot
make ticket reservations through
their deans offices, but as delegates, will receive their tickets
at Sunday and Monday registrations.
612 tickets will be available at
the Coliseum ticket window Wednesday. "These tickets will be
available from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.
on a 'first come, first served'
basis," Dr. Patterson said.
No tickets are yet available for
the general public. "We do anticipate that some tickets for the

Norman Thomas
Will Speak Tonight

Norman Thomas, American
socialist leader, will deliver the
first in a series of four Student
Centennial Committee political
forum lectures in Memorial Hall
today.
The lecture, scheduled for 8
p.m., is the fifth event announced
by the SCC.
In a political career that has
spanned nearly CO years, Thomas
lias been the Socialist Party's
presidential candidate six different, times, and has also campaigned for the offices of New
York City mayor and governor of
New York State.
Thomas also was one of the
first persons in the nation to call

attention to the plight of the
sharecroppers of the South. He
helped organize the Southern
Tenant Farmer's Union.
He has campaigned for world
disarmament, with international
control and inspection, applying
to criticism of the Soviet Union
the same standards of value that
he applies to his own country.
Thomas will arrive from New
York at Bluegrass Field at 5:34
p.m. today, and will be met by
Mary Marvin Porter, chairman of
SCC political forum subcommittee.
A coffee hour, open to the
public, will be held in the President's Room of the Student Center following Thomas' lecture.

public will be available and an

announcement concerning these
tickets will be forthcoming," Dr.
Patterson said.
Nearly 13,000 persons are
pected for the convocation.

ex-

K

ar

Registration Committee Asks
Emphasis On Preregistration
By JUDY CRISHAM

Kernel Staff Writer
The Faculty-StudeRegistration Committee decided Friday
that students not taking advantage of Spring preregistration
would either register last or would
go through late registration in the
nt

faU.

Under the new registration
system, which has been proposed
by the committee and which has
been temied "an intermediate
step toward total computer registration," all sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the six undercolleges,
graduate
including
Nursing, would be preadvised
and preregistered this spring.
Then, the proposed system
would schedule all students possible in the class and section requested, select alternate sections
when these are available at the
same time, print schedules for
those students whose schedules
were complete and send these
schedules to the students through
the mail this summer. They would
also print partial schedules for the
other students and send them
with the notification that the
schedule is not complete, print
a list of courses and or sections
requested but not available, and
print a list of positions not used
for each class remaining open.
"We hopefully anticipate putting 4,000 students completely
scheduled in classes," said
Cliarles Elton, dean of the Registrar. "This is better than 40 permit."
He explained that those stu

dents whose schedules were not
completed would go through the
Coliseum in the fall and just add
the number of classes he lacked.

"This system will give us

in-

formation regarding student
for classes," lie said.
"We should be able to organize a master schedule to fulfill
the needs of the students," said
Dee Pittman, of the Registrar's
de-nu-

office.

The plan calls for only two
days of registration in the fall. It
was proposed that the Coliseum
would remain open for registration from 7 a.m. 8 p.m.
The student committee reported that they favored the grade
point system of registering.
Suggestions were made as to
Iww to provide for the community college transfers. One committee member suggested that they
comedown to register during the
summer, while another suggested
that Lexington personnel be sent
to the community colleges this
spring to orient them.
Richard Longyear, chairman
of the student advisement subcommittee, reported that after
taling with the various deans, it
was the "general sentiment that
advising conditions are adequate
for the proposed preregistration."
His subcommittee proposed
that the student In nude cognizant of the impirtance to be preadvised, the maximum number
of advisees for each adviser be 35,
the deans see that advisers are
available at particular times and

that office hours be posted. The
student is responsible for seeing
his adviser.
Fulfillment of advising duties
will be taken into consideration
in faculty evaluations, and departments' heads be the responsible basic unit for seeing that
advising is done.
Fred Strache, assistant to the
dean of men, reported that summer orientat ion for entering freshmen would begin July 6 and run
for 16 days.
"We can register comfortably
200 a day," he said.
These entering freshmen, he
said, would be advised by students.
"In effect, it will operate the
same as last summer," Mr. Strath e said, "except that it will be
five days longer."
The subcommittee
recommended tlut a study of the advising system be made by a squally appointed committee, but
said that the deans suggested that
the University oicrate under the
present preadvising system until
September, 1966.
He added that the entering
student w ill be sent various reading material, including a list of
l)oks which "will helphim begin
to think," and that a cultural
program is being planned lor
orientation.
The agist rat ion committee
suggested that entering freshmen
piy the second installment on
room and Itoard during the
ration period.
pie-legi-

st

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Tuesday. Feb. 16. 1965

Chet Huntley Speaks
On Politics, Vietnam
By FRANCES WRIGHT
Assistant News Editor

Chet I iuntley, noted television
news commentator, told a Lexington audience Saturday night the
Republican Part) has not "come
to grips with the role of the federal
government in today's society."
Mr. Huntley spoke at the Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture Series.
The Republican Party must
accept a big, strong federal government as a fact of life, he said,
if it is to compete in 20th century
politics. They should evaluate
the government and try to make it
work, he said.
"It is not in the cards that we
are going to fall into Marxist socialism," he said. "We are convinced that it won't work. It is
old fashioned, old hat."
Neither is the federal government going to be eliminated "day
after tomorrow," he said. Few
people would want it that way if
there were a choice, he added.
Drawing together the Eastern

industrialist and the Western
agrarian of the Republican Party
is an issue that Republicans have
not resolved, Mr. Huntley said.
Sen. Barry Coldwater, COP
candidate for the presidency
last election, was a symbol of
the rural independent agrarian so!
ciety that suggested a return to
the country's youth, he said. This!
is an opposite view from the Eastern industrialist, he said, and the
Republican Party must decide
which way it will go.
Speaking on foreign affairs,
Mr. Huntley said that communism is showing its clay feet. He
said that he sees communism as
a passive religion, and in 19 years
the nearest thing to a success it
has is Cuba. The Communists
will change, he said, and even if
they won't "roll over and play
dead," they are showing signs of
talking sense.
Mr. Huntley said he feels that
the American people want to solve
the racial issue so that the country' can go on to other issues.

Human Rights Group
Plans Education Talks

Hi' ii

in-th-

HUNTLEY AT UK

"Americans will be the
on earth to effectively
solve this problem," he said.
Mr. Huntley seemed dubious
of success for the President's
Appalachian Bill for the elimination of poverty, saying its provisions were too broad.
He said, "It is too early totell
if it will work , but the odds are
not good for it."
"Maybe." he added, "if it
makes the public aware of the
problem, it will be in some measure successful."
first-countr-

The Campus Committee on
Human Rights will provide educational programs on .race relations to all organizations interested.
Cyrus M. Johnson, professor
of sociology and chairman of
the publicity and information
subcommittee ofthe campus committee, said that the information
is available to all organizations
that request it.
He said that the campus committee would provide programs
which include films, guest speakers, and "njmorclinics"jn which
organizations' members act out
roles.
Mr. Johnson said that the
committee would provide a series
of programs with different speakers or a specific program on only
one topic.
The purpose of the commit- -

Kernel Staff Writer
Fraternity treeings are apparently being brought to a stop
at the University. The
Council may signal
their official end during its regular meeting tonight.
Many of the fraternity presidents today expressed opinions
favoring the move to ban treeings. Others said they would not
oppose the action.
Several reasons appear to be
behind the movement to abolish
this fraternity tradition.
The recent death of a Georgetown student during a fraternity
prank brought comment from
several of UK's fraternity leaders.
Dan Key, Sigma Nu vice president, said that in light of what
happened at Georgetown the treeings were futile. He thought tradition should be respected and
when it is not, it has no further
place.
Inter-fraterni-

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"Most of the boys feel that
treeings are childish anyway,"
commented Rick Hennessey, president of Phi Sigma Kappa. .
Another factor against the
prank is the Panhellenic Council, which last semester indicated
its disapproval of such action.
Those fraternities, such as Al

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The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, Unlvemlty of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 4J5O0. Second-cla- n
poaUke paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
Publikhed (our times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published lor the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Stephen Palmer,
secretary.
Ilegun as the Cadet In 1894, became the Itecord In 1100, and the Idea
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Students and faculty in groups of 10 or more, are entitled to $1.00 off
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Mail orders to Brown Theatre, 315 West Broadway, Louisville, Ken.
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Fib.

Hi,

HMtf-

-:

Winter Pauses For Entrance Of Spring Fashions
..

Spring Styles Are Multiple n
By PAIGE SULLIVAN
Kernel Society Writer

It's just about that time again

Spring-wh- en

women, young
and old, turn their thoughts to
fashion. The word this year is not
change. It's variety!
In other words, there isn't a
defined look in the new spring
clothes as there has been before.
Every woman can choose her
wardrobe to suit her personality
and likes, and still be in fashion.
Basically there are two personality types! the "yin" and the
"yang." Yin types are very feminine. They prefer bows, ruffles,
and soft details with bright to
pastel colors. The woman with a
yang personality prefers garments
that are more tailored, with welted seams and interesting buttons

1

-

v

-

.

14

- Season Tins
On Trends:

for detail. (However, most of us
are a combination of the two
types, and therefore have both
7 Xr"' a.' Vv
feminine and tailored clothes.)
And fashion designers have
kept both types in mind this
spring.
Take suits, for instance. A yin
type will like one made up in delicate pink, yellow, or sea green.
It will probably have a softly
printed silk blouse with a bow at
V.
the neck, which may or may not
match the lining of the jacket.
The skirt is often slightly gathered and eased; the jacket
or lowered at the neckline.
The yang personality type will
prefer suits with longer jackets,
some of which are belted. The
skirt may be wrapped or pleated.
Sleeves are set-ior dolman.
There are many doublebreasted
suits, as well as coats, on the
market.
(A word to the fashion wise:
experts say the doublebreasted
Breezy Is Word For Spring
look has a tendency to make one When the warm spring breezes blow, the fashion conscious woman
will be well prepared. The everpresent Chanel suit, left, insures sleek
look shorter and rounder.)
Dress selection is wide in sty le lines and lasting femininity to please the most ardent "yins" and
also, with a fashion to suit each "yangs". If the spring winds bring out your love of sports, the
individual. It goes without say- jaunty plaid culotte dress, right, offers the height of fashion
and comfort.
ing that the shift is still "in."
Some of the dresses arc belted;
some are eased with slightly
worn for a suit or, sans jacket, as black, rose and navy, turquoise
skirts. For the taller miss, an afternoon dress.
and peanut.
Sound daring?
there is the tunic dress with slits
They're not. In the right propor(simply a dress with a shorter
Speaking of traveling, there is tions, styles and fabrics, they're
tunic worn over it), which is not a new fabric called Chavaccte
stunning.
only very flattering but also very which makes into one of the most
With such a choice, no one
comfortable.
packable dresses you can buy.
should have trouble finding just
Then there is the
Knits, too, are nice for traveling,
dress, made up in a bold printed as- well as garments made of the the right costume for her occasion.
And all these pretty things and
fibranne rayon which can be worn
rayon blends which pass easily
to the beach by day, or in the for linen and don't have linen's
more, are arriving at the shops
and department stores, so keep
evening with a pair of dressy tendency to wrinkle.
an eye out for additions to your
sandles for an intimate dinner
color is plural. This
spring wardrobe.
party.
Spring
Dress and coat ensembles are 'isn't going to be a red spring or a
smart, and there are so many white one, or a pastel one it's
places where they can be worn. all of these and more! There are
The coat may be madeofanubby soft flowery prints and bold, exotwoolen worn over a gay printed ic, abstract ones; polka-dotsilk dress, which can be used stripes, and plaids. Color schemes
alone or with a sweater later in are unusual and varied red on
the season. Sleeveless coats made
in cotton pique over matching or
FORMAL
contrasting dresses are stylish for
IMPERIAL PLAZA
a trip to the city or a luncheon in
the summer.
RENTALS
Good for traveling is the dress
and jacket costume, which can be
No matter what

n

cut-awa-

y

4

,yXs: M A:. V

n

With the big gusts of spring- time wind, on which the newest
spring clothes arrived, have also
come those noisy, conspicuous
friends affectionately
hailed
"more fads!" And they come in
every size, shape and. . .country.
A
lot of unusual fashion
"trinkets" are coming from
Europe this year, and it's a good
idea to keep an ear tuned to tlie
continent.
With the Fonssagrives-Tie- l
look,
"kooky,
there is no telling what you are
liable to see walking along campus one of these days.
Mia Fonssagrivcs and Vicki
Ticl are the two American girls
who are taking France and this
country by storm with their
wacky styles and color combinations. You can thank them for
purple and orange stripped dresses with cinnamon and red lace
trim!
devil-may-car-

Miss Fonssagrives began the
latest fashion "in" four years
ago while she was studying in
New York City she wore the
first patterned hose. How's that
for starting a fashion revolution?
Along with unusual designs
and colors, foreign jewelry manufacturers have hatched a new inspiration . To your collection of
ceramic pins, earrings, and whatever else you happen to own, you
may now add ceramic rings. Made
in Austria, these rings are comparatively inexpensive, and their
quaint designs are pleasing, attractiveand a bit of the 61 e
daring!

A-li-

-

4

77V

mm

Speaking of bold designs, this
cotton blouse shows the spring
trend toward flashy colors and
exotic prints. An Italian influence can be seen in the decorative hipline scallops and the accents of white at the sleeves and
collar.

Recipes

Drain canned apricots and
serve them with a soft custard
sauce for a lovely dessert.

s,

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Federal Aid For Some
Abraham Ribicoff has
reintroduced his proposal to provide
tax credits for college expenses. He
would allow a taxpayer to deduct
from his tax bill 75 percent of the
first $200 expenses for tuition, fees
and books; 25 percent of the next
$300 and 10 percent of the next
$1,000. It is an attractive proposal
designed to appeal, as the senator
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family, which understandably is
delighted to receive a tax break in
such a worthy cause. Apparently,
it also appeals to the average American senator: the senators joining
Ribicoff in sponsoring the bill range
from liberals like Case andMcGov-er- n
to conservatives like Thurmond
and Tower. But the administration
is against it, and rightly against it.
The cost of the proposal, which
Sen. Ribicoff did not mention in his
speech, will be about $1.3 billion
a year. The question then is, if we
are going to provide an additional
$1.3 billion annually in aid to higher education, is this bill the wisest
way to do it? It does virtually nothing for the good student who now
cannot afford to go to college at all,
or for the student who is not for
Sen.

Ciiirt You Head Signs?"

tunate enough to have a family income high enough to have any use
for a tax credit. It is, in short,
thoroughly unclear how far this
proposal would broaden opportunities for able youngsters to go on to
college, as opposed to merely giving
a break to those already fortunate
enough to be going to college without it.
Sen. Ribicoff introduced this bill
a year ago with 13 cosponsors, and
it was only narrowly defeated despite the opposition of the administration and a majority of the

Senate Finance Committee. This
year he has 31 cosponsors. It is to be
hoped that, at the least, the Senate
will hold off action on this proposal
until after the administration's own
education program has been acted
on. Otherwise we are all too likely
to see a broad-base- d
program of aid
to all American students go down
on the grounds that having so generously helped those who can afford
to go to college we cannot afford to
help those who cannot. That would
not be a very impressive way to
start off toward the Great Society.
.

-- Tie Washington Post

The Readers' Forum
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Standing magnificently from the
Limestone Street view is the Commerce Building which adds to the
attractiveness and progressive goal
of the University.
I am personally impressed by
the various modern classroom facilities provided in this building. One
of these facilities is the press button
blackboard. No longer does an instructor have to wait for students
to copy what he has written before
erasing this board to inscribe new
material. He can adjust the board
to suit his height. If one layer of the
board is occupied, he simply presses a button, that layer is ascended
or descended, and another board
appears for use. This idea is
a step towards automation.
Commerce students who were
former admirers of girls passing before White Hall, now have a dream
and a glory. This glory certainly is
the building of which I speak. Seemingly, they do not show appreciation
for our pride. Here's why.
The Commerce Building has one
of the most comfortable student
lounges that I have seen anywhere.
I am disgusted at how it is kept by
the students. After their snacks, the
time-savin- g,

students leave peelings, papers, and
cups on the table and go about their
business. Students coming there
after do not sometimes find clean
spaces to sit and relax. Furthermore,
faculty members who wish to take
visiting friends around this building
often find this room an embarrassing spot.
Keeping this room in this manner gives me the impression that
either we do not appreciate that
fine facility or we have not come to
a full realization ofwhatitistoown
such. If commerce students could
take only two seconds to look
around the room, they would find
two or more waste cans in which
trash can be deposited.
Remember that we all can make
mess but my mess is more undesirable to you than your own, so is
your mess more undesirable to me.
If I am constrained to define mess,
it is any clean thing in the wrong
place.

Let us show an appreciation and
gratefulness for the improvements
provided by our University by taking care of what we have.
JOHN TOCBAKALLIE WOODS

Junior

Commerce-Economic-

s

The Kentucky Kernel
established

The South' Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

tuesday, feb.

1894

16, 1965

William Crant,
David Hawfe, Executive Editor
Sid Webb, Managing Editor
Linda Mills, News Editor
Kenneth Cheen, Associate News Editor
IIenhy Rosenthal, Sports Editor
Cay Cisii, Women's Page Editor
C. Scott Nunley, Arts Editor
13litiie Runsdorf, Feature Editor
Editor-in-Chi-

Tom Finnie, Advertising Manager

Business Staff

Michael
Editorial Page Staff

L.

Damon, Circulation Manager

Thomas Bersot, Arthur Henderson, Claudia Jeffrey, Robert Staib, James Svara

Letters To The Editor
To the Editor of the Kernel:
It comes to mind that the spirited citizens of this campus organizers of committees, petition writers,

etc., have failed to champion the
cause of the poor, harassed dwarfs
that guard the portals of Margaret
King Library.
Of course the library officials-werwise enough to only allow one
exit to the library this takes much
of the load off of these protectors
of the book world, and seriously
increases the risk of death by fire,
but this step alone is not enough
to insure an absolute in the safety
of one million plus volumes protected by those hallowed walls.
One man against a university
full of dishonest, crafty students is
hardly a fair advantage. We could
at least reduce this contest of the
book thieves vs. the book inspectors to its naked essentials.
I propose that the small area
to the front of the reserve reading
room (which is being wasted on
typing booths) be converted into
a dressing room. And, furthermore,
that all students entering between
the aisles which are jealously guarded by the library Gestapo do so in
the nude.
The bare facts are these students steal volumes from the library daily, despite the careful,
but not too thorough guardianship
of our valuable publications.
I even heard one student openly
bragging that he had been stealing a 500 page volume of The
German Population of Wisconsin,
And The Growth Of Beer Production In Milwaukee by daily taping
a page to each of his legs. Had he
been made to enter and leave the
library nude certainly, those as

tute book checker-outer- s

would have
discovered the uncovered plot.
We are, after all, adults on this
campus, and surely we shouldn't
object to disrobe the dishonest intention of this university of book
thieves. It is the only way we assure the judicious inspection of all
property carried