xt7bcc0trf20 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7bcc0trf20/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580307  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  7, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  7, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7bcc0trf20 section xt7bcc0trf20 1

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1 9 Groups To Compete

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Dates for tin 19"S All Campus Sin
Ihth cliant'il to Thursday ami Friday to
avoid conllictiun with NCAA finals Saturday
niht. Fliahoth Van Home, chairman of the
event announced the change in plans.

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women's groups and all men's groups will compete
Friday at 8:00 p.m. in Memorial Hall. Due to the
small number of entries, there will be no men's

jPire Causes $2,500 Loss
damage electrical
and tools at the
n
Aeronautical Laboratory Wednesday morning.
The blaze was believed to have
been started from an overheated
refrigerator motor. A janitor discovered the fire at 6:50 a.m. and a
Lexington fireman said it "must
have burred all night."
In addition to electrical appli

ances and tools, the fire damaged
about 25 square feet of flooring
and smoked the walls badly. The
room was in use again later in the
day.
E. B. Farris. chief engineer of
Maintenance and Operations, estimated the damage. He said the
building is not checked regularly
by the campus police because it
does not contain extensively valuable equipment.

Five hundred high school news-

preliminaries.
Women's group competinif, their selections and
their directors are: Alpha Delta Pi. Into the Night
and Arkansas Traveler, directed by Llhby Kurchett:
Alpha Gamma Delta, Gloria Lippold directing, I
Wonder As I Wander, Greensleeves, and You'll Never Walk Alone.
Alpha Xi Delta, under Charlene Gaines. Speak
Low, Three Little Maids; Boyd Hall. Give Me Your
Tired. Your Poor and Whistle A Happy Tune, directed by Judy Bloethe;
Chi Omega, directed by Marlene Begley, I'll Walk
With God. Happy Talk; Delta Delta Delta. Becky
Bishop directing. Patterfugue and the Serenade
from the fitudent Prince;
Delta Zeta, Joan Stadelman directing-- Dancing
In the Dark, Great Day; Dillard House, under
Rochelle Stephens, He's Got the Whole World in
,

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500 Editors
Will Attend
Press Clinic
paper and yearbook editors and

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The women's preliminaries will be held Thursday

1

A S2.50C fire

Olre Club,
directed by Gail Jennings, Where F're You Walic
nrui Clap Yo' Hands; Kappa Kappa Oamnvi. under
F.li7abcth H.unxl. Medley from 'HaiiH Christian
Anderson" including Thumhehn.i. , Iiuh-WorSong, and Wondeiful Copenhagen;
Kappa Alpha Theta. directed by Betty Grass, t
Hehr A Harp and Sayonara; Kappa Delta, under
Betty Allison. No Other Love. The Orchestra Sons,
and Still of the Night.
Five men's choruses have entered the contest.
They are Kappa Sigma under Dave Ratencraft
singing Fire Down Ilelow, Grass, and Autumn
Leaves; Hi I Sigma Kappa, directed bv Wayne Hill,
singing Night and Day, You'll Never Walk Alone
and De Gospel Train.
Sigma Alpha FpMlon. directed by Jack Zuverink.
Arkansas Traveler. Violet, and Forever Blessed Be
Thy Name; Triangle, under Robert Perkins. Save
Your Confederate Money, Boys and Jesu. Joy of
Man's Desiring: Sigma Nu, under Pat O'Brien. Yellow Bird and Water.
Four men's groups have entered quartets. They
are the Baptist Student Union, Delta Tau Delta.
Sigma Alpha Epsllon. and Sigma Nu.
entertainment for the final night will be by the
Charmettes of Lafayette High School and by th
Delt Chorus, which has won first place In the Men's
Division for the last two years and Is thus InelJglbU
to compete this year.

at 7:30 pm. in Memorial Hall. Finalists in the

tm

nopliances
Wenner-Gre-

His Hind and Sprak I,ow ;
Good Samaritan School of Nurslntj

Vol. XL1X

'Salcliiiior
Booked For
Little Derby

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, March 7, 1938

Number

Louie Armstrong." the irreplaceable hero of musicians"
will make his first appearance
in the Hluegrass area for a ma
concert to climax the Little
Kentucky Derby Weekeiul.

18

ttaff members are expected. to aty
journalism clinic
tend 'a
one-da-

at the UK School of Journalism

State Highway Conference
To .Open Here Wednesday

'
March 14.
clasApproximately 20 one-hoses on news writing, editing, photography, feature writing, advertising, layout and other phases of
newspaper work will be conducted
by newspapermen and members of
the UK journalism staff.
Dr. Holman Hamilton, UK history professor and a former newsApproximately 600 Kentucky
paper man, will speak to the stucontractors, c o
dents in Guignol Theater on
and state officials will at"Newspapers, Then, Nnow and In tend the 10th annual state highTh Future." The talk is schedule way conference at the UK College
for U a.m.
The schedule also calls for
achievement tests in spelling,
journalistic techniques, vocabulary
and current events. A total of $75
.v
in prizes, contributed by the LexHerald-Leade- r,
ington
will be
awarded to the top scorers.
Sigma Delta Chi. mens professional journalistic fraternity, will
present an award to ah outstanding high school newspaper a.t the
at the close of the clinic.
The clinic will be sponsored by
by the Kentucky High School Press
L- '
Association.
ur

road-buildi-

ity

ng

.

'

Frat Rush
Reopened
By IFC

A.

and streets will be discussed at
the sessions.
Prof. T. E. II. Williams, professor
of highways at Kings College, University of Durham, Great Britain,
will be one of the main speakers.
He will present an illustrated lecture at the Thursday morning session on historical background of
highway problems in his country.
rpcpnrrh Pnginwr
wiiiism i
in air craft structures, and a high- umv rnncuiHntr rivii nnrt strnr.
tural engineer. At the University

Satchmo will present a two-hoconcert Sat., May 10. in Memorial
ur

Coliseum.

All-Sta- rs

American Society of Civil Engineers March 12. He is also going
to speak to the civil engineering
faculty, graduate and seminar students March 14 on "Civil Engineering Graduate Study in England."
James W. Martin, Kentucky
Commissioner of Highways, will be
the principal speaker at the opening session March 12. He will talk
on "Highway Construction."
Gov. A. B. Chandler will speak
at a noon luncheon. The af ternoon
program will include special sep- s.
arate sessions on
structure, urban highways and
streets, and
discus
sion involving design, construction,
traffic, materials, research, and
maintenance.
D. II. Bray, state highway engineer, will discuss "Kentucky's
(Continued on Page 12)

hPflH nf hiph.
nnrham
way engineering and traffic studies
division. He received B.S. and MJS,
degrees from the University of

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be-g- an

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right-of-way-

wide-rangi-

Whales, and a Ph.D. from the
versity of Durham.
At present Williams is a visiting
professor of civil engineering at
Northwestern University, Evanston,
Illinois, and is also engaged in research on Chicago traffic. In a
previous visit to the U.S. in 1955
he attended advanced courses in
highway engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He
will participate in "International
T. E. II. WILLIAMS
Study Week In Traffic Engineer
ing" at Copenhagen, Denmark,
of Engineering Wednesday and next summer.
Thursday.
ne will speak on "Civil Engl- Construction, design, traffic, re- - neering Education In England"
and maintenance of roads fore the student chapter of the
Uni-

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Hailed as America's greatest Jazz
group. Armstrong and his
will give final emphasis to the
"Most Spectacular College Weekend In America."
The Little Kentucky Derby
last year as an annual function on the I'K campus for the
purpose of establishing a scholarship fund. Derbv weekend activities will start Friday. May 9. with
the Debutant Stakes, a tricycle
race for girls; the Little Kentucky
queen contest; and a street dance
In front of Memorial Coliseum.
xhe big weekend will continue
Throueh Sat.. Mav 10. with a
parade in downtown Lexington, the
preliminary races, stall Judging,
activities at Stoll
and pre-derField with the main race as the
last feature of the afternoon.
Armstrong wiir close out the
weekend with his "hot" Jazz
by

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be-sear-

Fraternity rush has been reopened ty IFC on an informal

basis. The rush period began yesterday and will continue through
March 15.
' Bill Kinkead, IFC treasurer
moved that rush be reopened without any stipulations as far' as rules
are concerned. The rush period
which ended on Feb. 15 was a type
of SGA have presented a
The president and
of formal rush 'and several fraternities reported they had rushees petition to the House in Frankfort opposing the abolishment
who failed to sign up for rush.
of absentee voting.
IFC made its decision on the
l)avclaveucraft and Pete lVrhnau: presented the L(XK1-basis aLivhat-it-- f
a general
a
manpower shortage in .the UK name petition to Morris Weintraub on Tuesday. Weintraub,

SGA Officials Present
Petition To Legislature
vice-preside-

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fraternity

system. It

was also

brought out by several IFC representatives that nearly 20 men were
unable to pledge because of the
signing up deadline.
John Proffitt, assistant to the
dean of men, asked IFC to consider
this informal rush on the basis of
"previously recognized conduct".

who

is

Speaker of the House, presented the petition to the

SGA voted on Feb. 17 to circu-- a
House. He also gave the assembly
objections late, petitions opposing the abolish-t- o
summary of the SGA
ment of absentee voting. Dave
the proposed legislation.

said
Perlman said both he and Ravencraft. SGA president, were
spoke with their repre- - approximately 1,000 names
Ravencraft
sentatives from Ashland and turned in.
Ravencraft added that Repre- v.ni..,Lv..uHlaiiji)hn

vi,

Brecfcenridge.
LANCES SCHOLARSHIPS

Applications are available in
the Dean of Men's office. Any

male can apply. Four scholarships will be given away.

Lexington

repre- -

Lowman of
festive oririnal bill
that

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Dancers Perform Tonight

if.

It
Ashland
would prob

sentative.
ably not pass. Similar petitions
Breckenridge said a substitute
in
turn.
ii,. l A l i I i r.
Dm nas Deen
"tu JIU8,it . ed (nto the legislature from Eastern
replace the bill which UK students and Cforf etown
petitioned against. The new bill
The substitute bill now beins
would still allow absentee voting
ed allows absentee voting,
butwill require voters to apply for feut requlres the absent voters
absentee ballots at least 15 dayS eimibilitv to be ascertained before!
the ballot is sent to him.
in advance of the election.

A

Tau Sigma, modern dance group.
nrf spnt. it k anniinl cnncprt Fri- day and Saturday nights in the
Euclid Avenue Building. The pro- Hl
in t 8
botn

Tom Ruh. Ruh will recite poetrjr
rinrinp hi rlnnrp One trroim dancfl
willbe done to metronome accom- paniment.
Admission Is $1 for adults and
75 cents for students. The program
'
nlgnisb under the auspices of the Worn- The.prograrr'illfeature solos en-- miysical EducatignPepart- by Shirley Perry, Patty Harper and ment.
u.

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* '.'--

KENTTCKV KERNEL. Friday. March 7, 10:8

THE

!.

"Best" Pledges Named

,

Banquet
Al Greek Week Tan Delta
Linker;
(Delta

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Bob
nnd their orpaniza-lioiFrank Schooler;
Farm House
aro: Alpha Delta
Reynolds LeBiu;
Sue Kappa Alpha
Delta
Ohrc: Alpha Oamma Judy Cop-ixwDick Mullikin.
Hall; Alpha Xi Delta
Kappa Sigma
Nancy Water-HelChi Omepa
Alpha John Farm-je- r;
Lambda Chi
Barne
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Bill How-jel- l;

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Phi Gamma
Graham
Phi Kappa Tau
Delta Zeta Dctty Oreene; Kappa Alpha Theta Anna Hornsby; Beard; Sigma Nu Dave Fuller;
Ctenge; Kap-p- u Sigma Chi Jim Peloff ; Sigma Phi
Kappa Delta-Di- ana
Evelyn Rridpe-lortKappa Gamma
Adams; Tau Kafcpi
Cather- Epsilon Joes
Zeta Tail Alpha
Bill Desmond; Triangle
Epsilon
ine dough.
Pine; William Harrison; Phi Sigma KaAlpha Gamma Rho Dick
Bib Russell; ppaEd Angus; Zeta Beta Tau
Alpha Sigma Phi
Larry Lynch; Jack Isaacs.
Alpha Tau Omega

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THE COLLEGE SURVEY

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT

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ANNOUNCES

1958
THIS YEAR IN TWO COMPLETE GUIDES
Each including extensive listings of openings and- addresses, information on their pay, responsibilities and
necessary application forms.
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Outstanding Pledges
"

The Kentucky Heart Association
and its chapters established and
..,,r,
or. -- nrforv KanL-- " in u.hirh
are stored live human arteries

available to any Kentucky surgeon
for use in replacing damaged!
arroriP fnnnH durillff a heart
operation.

Design Investigator
Construction
OF
Roads

PUBLIC WORKS

S

Bridges
Drains Hydraulic

Buildin- gs-

Works

See the Representative of the

COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES

Civil Service

Commission

ON THIS CAMPUS MARCH 21
Our brochure is on file in your Placement Office

Wis

JiVflt

Holds Meet

$1
CAMP AND RESORT EMPLOYMENT
Counselors, life guards, instructors, and directors in
lifeguards, etc., in
'camps." Waiters," waitresses,-bartenderresofTs and dude ranches.
mountain and sea

j

Since 1951 the Kentucky Heart
eight
Association has
permanent diagnostic heart clinics
for indigent natients which pres- ently serve 56 of the state's 120
counties.
With proper medical care, most
women with heart disease can bear
children safely.

Engineering Recruitment Service

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Thp annual district meeting of
Phi Alpha Delta. "legal fraternity.;
was held recently at Louisville.
Delegations present elected of- ficers and selected the pFace for
the next meeting.
Hugh Moore, president of the
Henry Clay District of Phi Alpha
Delta, represented theUK chapter.
Charles E. Goss was elected the
district president. It was decided
that the next district meeting is to
be held at the University of Kentucky.

FOR POSITIONS IN

ENGINEERING

T

MJ f(Yfw

MARITIME & GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT $ 1
Deck hands, wipers, stewards, messmen on ocean liners,
dredgers, freighters, tankers, and sail or motor yachts.
Fire control aids, guides, technical assistants, laborers,
and others in national parks and game refuges.

s,

,

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EMPLOYMENT IS GUARANTEED only to those
students in the several colleges where announcements of
The College Survey appear who are able applicants and
have their account number registered in our files by APRIL
3, 1958.
Account numbers and our special application
forms' are given only to recipients of both guides. jThose
purchasing only one guide must exploit the sources therein without the guarantee of employment through our placement facilities";.

i

SEND ONE DOLLAR FOR EACH OVIDE TO

THE COLLEGE SURVEY
BOX 625, Charlottesville, Va.

K
a workout

Give your psyche

idler a little

-i-

)

!

NO

YES

1. Do you think all coeds should be required to wear the
new "sack" style dresses? (For men only!)

CD CD

3. Do you go to see foreign films just for the plot?.

4. Do you think the school week is too short?
5. Do you question this statement: "The best tobacco gives
you the best smoke"?

6. Do you sit as far away as possible from the prettiest gal in
class in order to concentrate better on your studies?

I ; Ak

rJr

.

7. Do you think the study of Home Economics is all a girl
needs for a happy married life?

Hlave

a

reafl

CD

O

CD CD

8 Do you think your professors are too lenient in grading

CD CD

exam papers.'

ft

If you answered "No" to all questions, you obviously smoke Camels a real cigarette. Only 6 or
7 "No" answers mean you better get on to Camels
fast. Fewer than G "No's" and it really doesn't
matter what you smoke. Anything's good enough!

CD CD

s.

AO'

But if voir want to enjoy smoking as never before,
switch to Camels. Nothing else tastes so rich,
smokes so mild. Today more people smoke Camels
than any other cigarette. The best tobacco gives
you the best smoke. Try Camels and you'll agree!

cigarette- - have a

R.

J. Rernold

Tobwx

Ct'

* Till: Kl.NTl

Library To Exhibit 27 Initialed

Rare Book Collection

Dr. Lawrence S. Thompson, director of UK libraries, lias
announced that a selection of rare old IxoKs and manuscripts
from the collection of Col. David M. Mck'ell of Chillicothe,
Ohio, will he on exhihit in the main foyer of the Margaret I.
Kins Lihrary during the month of March.
collection "has no rival In the Ohio
Valley." One of the most interesting books, he said, is a manuscript
of an astronomical medical caleny,
dar, prepared in Hagenau,
about 1430, which is the
only one in the United States.
There are only four similar
pieces in Europe. The book is full
of medieval medical superstition,
with occasional bits of sound
dietary advice. "It ought to have n
dedication, not to the pioneering
medieval physician, but to the
hardy medieval man who survived
the medications of his doctor," he
said.
The display also includes a London edition of Nostradamus dated
in 1672. Another book of prophecy
is the life of Mother Shipton, a
h
witch and prophetess of
in Yorkshire at the end of
the 15th century.
Two editions of Aesop's fables
will be on display also. One is an
edition published in Basel in 1492
with "unusually fine" wood engravings, Dr. Thompson said. Another, printed in London in 1665,
contains illustrations by Francis
Barlow, one of the great book illustrators of his period.
A writing book by Giovanbattista
Palantine contains many forms of
letters, both calligraphic and letterpress. There is also a rebus
Oer-man-

form of
pictures, said to have been composed by Leonardo da Vinci.
Two facsimiles of 13th rentury
block books, or books of which the
whole paje was rarved from a
single wooden block, will be
One of them is printed entirely
on vellum and was distributed only
to the 40 members of the Rox- burghe Club of England, the
world's most exclusive organization
of book lovers.

( KY

KIRNM.. Iiid.n. M.itdi

When You Need a Job

Call

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or

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IT.-

90

COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT
and Sorviccs

l Banquet

825 EUCLID AVENUE

The Home Economics Club held
its initiation banquet for new
members last month in the SUB
Ballroom.
Mary Lois Williamson, director
of vocational education, Frankfort,
was the speaker.
Thoe initiated were: Rena Huz-zeJanet Stephans, Nancy Babbitt, Gertrude Thompson, Betty 8t.
Clair, Kathleen Poore, Lynn Crut-che- r,
Mariana Ruggles, Nancy
Smith, Betty Foley, Patricia Clark.
Jane Brown, Mollie Jo Voll, Patricia Soloman.
Jane Clark, Joyce Dotson. Janet
Humphries, Alice Qadberry, Sandra
Foyers, Alice Evenburfth. Joyce
Combs, Joyce Wood, Betty Young,
Ruth Ann Hatchett, Yvonne Abma,
Gail Collins, Ida Lee Drake.

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Used Books
Collected Fotf
Indonesians

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The campus in the campaign to

collect used text books and periodicals for the University of Indo-anes- ia
has been very gratifying,
gays Dr. Stanley Wall, associate
dean of the College of Agriculture
and Home Economics.
One of the outstanding contributions to the book drive has been a
20 year volume of Reader's Digest.
Collection points .are located in
all major buildings on campus, and
the drive, sponsored by the UK
Agriculture-Hom-

Economics

e

r

Stu-

dent Council, will continue until

March 17. The books will be presented to the University of Indonesia on behalf of the UK student

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S-

* The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky
t Lexington. Kentucky
second clam matter wider
the Act of March 3, 1879.
A
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cabmi3,
j
uunanni wrr 1M uuiuix Bkuuu CAiri nuimnja mm A.wia

Entered at the Pout Office

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THREE DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

JAMES BLAND, Editor
ANN SMITH, News Editor
ALTEMUEIILE, Managing Editor
DAVE
ED FORD, Sports Editor
JOHN EGERTON, Makeup Editor

FRANK C. STRUNK, Associate Editor
Andy Epperson, Makeup Assistant
Tracy Walden. Society Editor
Hampton and Norma Shelton, Feature Editors
Jim
Bill Tully, Assistant Sports Editor
Ray Cravens and Vernon VindJng, Cartoonists
Charlotte Bailey, Exchange Editor
NORMAN McMULLIN, Adv. Mgr.
PERRY ASHLEY, Bus. Mgr.
MITCHELL, Staff Photographer
JOHN

Seward's Folly
It is indeed a sad day when the seat of liberality and
the University, has in its administration persons
who arc the epitome of
We refer, of course, to the office of the dean of women.
Once again it has seen fit to summon girls who pose for
cheesecake pictures lor the Kernel, mis issue was orougm
up once before and it's time it was again.
How merely posing in shorts is going to undermine the
moral fiber of a girl who has had 0 years of Christian upbringing is beyond comprehension. If such a small thing as
this can do so, then it is quite probably past time for a
of our entire set of moral values.
Posing for such pictures has been termed "undignified and
indecent." It's rather difficult to define what standards are to
be used in measuring whether this is the case or not, but certainly the standards of the Victorian period aren't adequate
and those by which Dean Seward is measuring date back to
pro-gressivene-

narrow-mindednes-

ss,

s.

18-2-

"

that age.

h
college wear shorts
Girls from high school-o- r
in physical education classes, they go .swimming in bathing
modern dance groups perform in
suits which are
skin-tigleotards and ballerinas dance across the stage in
abbreviated costumes.. And some of our greatest' art is that
which depicts the female form in the nude.
By Dean Seward's standards, and those of the Victorian
age, such things would be indecent or undignified. That's just
how ridiculous this thing has become.
Red is considered "a suggestive color" for girls' clothes,
"
contest
bermuda shorts are undignified, and the
of the Sigma Chi Derby was adapted to meet the dean's standards and lost so much of it's interest that the contest may
well die.
One could understand this if the University had always
contended that these were degrading or indecent. Such is
not the case. Until Dean Seward arrived such things were
considered all right. What is right one day doesn't become
vrong the next day simply because the dean of women says so.
If this trend is allowed to continue and the gestapo-lik- e
techniques for enforcement are left unchallenged it is quite
obvious what the next step will be. The Soapbox Derby will
have to go, as will many queen contests, and eventually it
will become taboo to mention the word SEX.
her standards
It's time that Dean Seward cither
or for the University to look for a new dean.
(ED. NOTE: It has been learned that Dean Seward either
has sent or is considering sending a clipping of the Kernel's
cheesecake picture of a girl to the national headquarters of
the girl's sorority for that organization's comment.)
lower-throug-

form-fittin-

g,

ht

"form-fitting-

re-cvalu-

Cheers Fot
Dr. Johl

It was refreshing to see Dr.
Ernst JokU director of the Ken-

tucky Rehabilitation
Center.
stand up and fight the Fayette
County Medical Society after that
group's attack on him.
The thing that added some significance to his reply Is that he
is highly respected not only in his
particular field, but also In the
medical field In general.
This was the second occasion on
which the Society has caused a
disturbance at the University. Previously, it Involved the fact that
the Infirmary was giving shots to
staff, faculty and employees for
the mere cost of the serum.
In neither case was it really a
matter of medical standards, but
simply an objection because the
doctors could see that cool green
cash slipping through their fingers.
Too long have we regarded doctors as near-deitit's a healthy
sign to see someone at least take
a swing back at them and jar their
pedestal.

nm

sT

y

i

&h)'

0

y;

Wanted: Inventors

Kernels:

With the immense emphasis which has been put on the
education of scientists another shortage seems to be lurking
in the shadows which may be as important, if not more so.
The shortage referred to is that of research scientists and
what has been called an "inventor." The two are closely related, but it is the latter of which we have such a drastic need
in this country. An inventor, in .this context, is one who has
creative originality aand not just someone who makes a new

Blesset are the pure in spirits
for there's nothing worse than a
mixed drink.

It's imposible to find anything
more irritating than someone who
whispers in a dull roar while class
is in sesion.
For four years the University has
dumped loads of manure and grass
seed on a small patch of ground in
front of White Hall. For four years
students have suffered through the
stench, yet there is no gras; the
patch still resembles a bald man's
head. Perhaps it would be a good
idea to turn over the project to our
efficient and scientific Agriculture
school , . . unles it proposes to use
manure too.

gadget.
This was brought to mind by an article by Eugene Ayres,
an inventor, scientist,; author and former, research director for
a. large petroleum company. Mr. Ayres pointed out that the
efficiency in the
steam engine, the atomic bomb, the
generation of power from heat, all came from aliens who came
to this country. Native Americans have made few contributions in this field. Even the Explorer was put up by a predominantly German crew.
Americans have a great capacity to develop ideas already
conceived, but seldom conceive any new ideas.
Mr. Ayres says, "What we need is the scholar who can escape from the grooves of accepted theoretical knowledge and
the engineer who can escape from his handbooks of formulae.
For the conception of new ideas in theory or practice wc need
b,

YMCA Strives For

Campus Leaders
The YMCA has opened a series
of leadership workshops for fresh-

men and sophomore men. It's
hoped that through participation
in these sessions some of the boys
can be developed into campus leaders and will assume leadership upon graduation.
This project at least has a worthwhile objective. Whether it will
produce or not remains to be seen.
Regardless of the outcome, the instigators deserve some recognition
for being aware of the pressing
problem of lack of campus leadership.
One of the main problems facing
the directors of the workshop is to
produce individuals who are indeed leaders and not just titular
heads of impotent organizations.
We've had too many of these in
the past and still have for that

inventors."
What are the characteristics of the inventor? "He is a nonconformist, a poor 'organization' man, and he
grudgingly. Other less obvious characteristics are that he is
inexperienced, usually under 33 years of age, and is likely to
know kss about his field of technology than many of his
co-operat- es

non-inventi- ve

contemporaries."
Another point well made by Mr. Ayres is this: "Too much

conventional learning dulls the imagination, though it makes
admirable scholars and engineers."
That statement is worthy of some serious thought by both
instructors and students.
There will probably come a time when this country won't
always be so fortunate as to have inventors come here with
their ideas. When it does, we had better be prepared to carry
on on our own and if we can't, God have mercy on us.

matter.
It's a real challenge and It's
gratifying to see someone accept it
and try to do something construcarea of
tive in this
long-neglect-

ed

student life.

UNIVERSITY SOAPBOX

Russian Educators Face Same Problems As In U.S.
FOUNDATION OF
HIGHER EDUCATION
In ten years a Russian child has as many class-hou- rs
as an American child does in twelve years.
school is far from universal yet.
But this
school is the usual one outside the
The seven-yecities; some rural children even now have only a
four-yeschool. Since most university students
come from the towns, we can limit our comments
school.
to the
The curriculum is standardized over the whole
country; students have no electives. As our newspapers have ben reporting in recent weeks, a graduate of one of these schools will have had five years
of physics, four in chemistry, five in biology, and
mathematics including some calculus. A foreign
language is begun in the fifth year of school. Until
recently only a small fractjon of Russian youth had
this rich educational diet.
Inevitably tome schools are In poor buildings and
have little equipment. In many places pupils must
attend in shifts, the last shift ending at 7:00.
Though the teaching is bookish and many textare only 17 pupils per teacher
books are
as contrasted to our 27, and drill work can pack
this knowledge into pupils' heads.
For several years about 40 of the ten years has
consisted of science, 54 of humanities courses, and
ft littlephysical education, home economics, and
military training. In 1955 the humanizes share was"
cut to 47 in favor of more science and crafts.
It is not surprising that Russian children are
ready for professional training after flinishlng this
school, while we are not ready until we
X college.
fcave had a couple ol year
4. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

RUSSIAN
10-ye-

ar

10-ye-

ar

old,-ther-

10-ye- ar

10-ye-

10-ye-

e

ar

semi-professio-

ar

school.

ar

ar

ofw the pupils would pass In
expected that 90
each grade. Teachers are rated on the basis of
their pupils' records and receive bonuses for superior classes.
It is not surprising that the children in the
"college preparatory"
schools have been
overworked. Many of them think it is worth the
effort, since admission to college, a good job, and a
high income depend largely upon the school

school has been a highly selective
This
one until recently. At the end of the 7th grade pupils were divided into those who would attend the
schools, a vocational school, or a

Those who demonstrated outstanding talent in
dance, the arts, or music wer