xt7bcc0tt64b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7bcc0tt64b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670111  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 11, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 11, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7bcc0tt64b section xt7bcc0tt64b Inside Today9 s Kernel
Moddox win may hurt the Unirer'
sity of Georgia in its president-hunt-ing- :

TKIE IE HIE
University

J

of Kentucky
11,

Vol. 58, No. 73

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, JAN.

Poge Two.

Johnson asks tor more taxes, "stajinn
power" in Vietnam: Poge Four.

Sixteen Pages

19G7

Registration: A confusing day for a
newcomer: Page Five.

Editorial says Congress should en
dure Powell: Poge Eight.
A "Man in the News" profile of W.
Garrett Flickinger: Page Ten.

Sigma Chi heads the Top Ten in

tramural basketball:

in-

Page Fourteen.

Passes Part Of Sweeping
Faculty
Student Rights Reform, Delays Rest
Present Discipline System Is Hodge Podge

1

By DARRELL CHRISTIAN
Kernel Staff Writer
College students are often said to be
mature adults who are competent to make
their own decisions.
But that statement has been little
more than rhetoric in American higher
education and college administrators have
role
most often taken a decision-makin- g
in place of a student's parents.
This policy, called "in loco parentis,"
is aocal point in the findings and recom-

mendations of the Faculty Senate Committee on Student Affairs dealing with
student discipline.
The committee's report assesses the
present system at UK as having "no
specific procedures or offenses of any
kind . . enumerafed in the Governing
Regulations." There is no active formal
.

for violation of state or local laws. This
is the sole prerogative and duty of the
state and local police and judicial systems.
The sole concern of a university is to provide protection of, and facilities for, those
who seek knowledge.
Obviously, the system here accepts
system of investigating and handling

legations of student misconduct.
Decisions on disciplinary action rest
mainly w ith the Dean of Men and Dean
of Women and basis for these decisions
have never been formally stated. Only one
specific offense is enumerated in the Governing Regulations hazing with several
generalizations about alcoholic beverages,
cheating and financial delinquency.
The committee says, "The University
is not responsible for imposing punishment

Criticism
Over Reagan

Plan For

broader responsibilities.
In various situations, the Deans of
Men and Women act as disciplinarians.
The procedures governing student offenses have developed outside formally
specified regulations of the University.
In actuality, there are really no concrete rules on what is a v iolation of discipline and how to determine and punish
any alleged violation. An inconsistent pattern of application of disciplinary rules
supports the committee's finding that

al-

J

Continued on Page

KEA Wants
ri School Aid

J

"

Overhaul

UC

By FRANK BROWNING

Special To The Kernel

LOS

ANGELES-Protests-

are

mounting against Gov. Ronald
Reagan's proposals to slash by
10 percent the budget of the University of California and to begin
charging tuition to California
students.
UC Regents discussed the
matter in a closed session here
Monday and the coordinating
Council for Higher Education
will discuss the education budget
at a special meeting Feb. 21.
Dr. Clark Kerr, the university's president, opposed the budget cut and the tuition at a press
conference upon his return from
the Far East.
Kerr also said that he was not
looking for another job although
he had had many offers both
while chancellor at the Berkeley
campus and since becoming presschool.
ident of the
On the suggestion that Cal
students be charged tuition, Kerr
said "the cost of getting an education are already too high."
He continued: "We tell a student he must be prepared to pay
nine-camp-

$1,750 a year

for room,

3

lxard,

U)oks, and laundry."
To make these costs higher,
he said, will be to limit further
the realization of the American
dream in which education is a
large part.
"This state has the best system of education the world has
ever known," Dr. Kerr said. "Our
income per capita is higher by
20 percent than the rest of the

United States. Our education

sys-

tem is partly responsible."
Dr. Kerr also attacked the budget cut. He said enrollment this
year is 87,000 on the nine campus school and that 10,500 more
are expec ted next fall.

Kernel Associate Editor
education in Kenwill not be put in the
tucky
national forefront by a recent
Kentucky Education Association
proposal, but it "would at least
move up," a University education professor says.
Dr. James B. Kincheloe, chair-

Public

nil

s

A

I

'"

'

"

Dwarfted

man of administration

There's something about registration that positively makes you
feel small and insignificant. And even though by all reports it
was better this semester than ever before, the feeling is still the
same. Story on Page Five.

super-

vision, calls the KEA recommendations "a blueprint for where
Kentucky needs to go in educad
tion." Kincheloe was a
on fage 4

Flickinger
Asking For
Early Mecl
By TERENCE HUNT
Kernel Managing Editor

The chairman of the Committee on Student Affairs has
requested a special meeting of
the University Faculty Senate
within the next two weeks to
continue debate begun Monday
on the committee's recommendations concerning student discipline.
Monday the Senate passed one
portion of the Committee's proposals concerning the University
in the role of a landlord, but
failed to vote on other portions
of the report when a demand for
a quorum call did not find enough
members present.
When the vote was taken on
the first portion of the bill a
quorum of at least 88 senators was
The text of the committee's
recommendations h e g i n s on
page eleven.

available. However, as discussion
continued on a second portion of
the recommendations members
began leaving and a quorum w as
not present for a vote at 5:30 p.m.
It is expected that the Senate
will honor the request for the
special meeting made by
W. Garrett Flickinger. In the past 11 months
Flickinger' s committee has examined the University-studen- t
relationship in the area of student
discipline, and has produced a27
page report w hich clearly defines
rules, discipline procedures, and
punishments, and a new rela- -

consul-Continue-

( ontinued On Page

10

Educators Eye Reagan Fearfully
By WILLIAM REECE

Of The Chronicle of Higher Education Staff

BERKELEY, Calif. -- Higher education
was a major issue in Ronald Reagan's campaign for the governorship of California, and
his decisive victory is certain to have repercussions on campuses throughout the state.
Items:

and a Berkeley alumnus (class of '22). And
By virtue of his new office, Reagan
he continued along this line throughout the will sit on both the university's board of
election campaign.
regents and the state colleges' board of
Among many faculty members, rumors trustees. In addition, he will appoint new
members to these two boards and to the
were plentiful that if Reagan won the election, it would be only a matter of time state board of education as the terms of
before Clark Kerr, Cal's president, would be present appointees expire. The state board of
forced out of the university. For his part, education prov ides state-levguidance to the
Kerr has often said he would stay in his state's 78 public junior colleges.
job at least until the university celebrated
In his campaign, Reagan charged that
its centennial in 1968. And at a
the "New Left" was using the university
press conference, when a reporter asked if
as a propaganda base and accused
the election results would change his plans, campus
Gov. Edmund G. "Pat" Brown of a policy
Kerr answered, "No."
of "appeasement" toward the institution. In
California's superintendent of public
the aftermath of the Free Speech Movement
instruction, Max Rafferty, a frequent critic and
subsequent troubles at Berkeley, he said,
of Kerr and the university, was an outspoken
undergraduate applications have dropped,
Reagan supporter and is expected to play
professors are leav ing, and graduates are finda large role in the new governor's adminising that employers "are leery about hiring
tration.
them because of the university's new reputaof the University of
The chancellor
tion for radicalism."
California at Los Angeles, Franklin Murphy,
Asked to comment, officials at Berkeley
is generally regarded as a favorite of the
said.
southern California members of the university board of regents, many of whom also
The university is not involved in politics
happen to be Reagan supporters. Murphy and therefore we do not comment on such
has frequently been mentioned as a likely statements."
successor to ("lark Kerr, if and when Kerr
Continued On Page C
leaves the presidency.
el

Even before the election, student rallies
reminiscent of the "Free Speech Movement"
of 1964-6were occurring on the University
of California's Berkeley campus. Ostensibly
they were concerned with internal matters
at the university, such as rules governing
student conduct. But many observers thought
they were prompted at least in part by a
desire on the part of some groups to bring
"confrontation"
about a
when, as they were sure would happen, Reagan won the election.
Throughout his campaign, the candidate himself appeared to be doing everything possible to arrange such a confrontation
alter the election. In his opening speech on
statewide television in September, lie promised, if elected, to launch an investigation
of the Berkeley campus by John J. McCone,
former head of the Central Intelligence Agency
5

Berkeley-Reaga-

n

post-electio- n

* 2

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Special

To The Kernel

-

More than
of Georgia
students registered here last
week for a quarter that may
be more tension-fille- d
than any
since the school was integrated
in 1961.
For the University of Georgia
is seeking a new president to
replace Dr. O. C. Aderhold
who retires June 30, and although officials are reluctant
to discuss the matter publicly
there appears to be a deep concern that the state's political
situation will hamper the selection process.
Dr. Aderhold announced last
year that he would retire at the
Near when he reaches the mandatory retirement age of 67.
Chancellor George L. Simpson, head of the Georgia University System of which UGa.
is a part, immediately named a
faculty and alumni committee
to submit names to him for recommendation to the system's
regents.
Prof. Robert West of the English department, chairman of
the faculty advisory committee,
said that the committee had
screened about 80 submitted
names and placed "these men
in categories according to desirability."
West said that a:; far as he

ATHENS, Ga.

14,000

University

anina joecia

Dry

University Students end Faculty Only!
THURSDAY of Each Week

o MEN'S & LADIES'
Suits 79c each
o LADIES' PLAIN DRESSES
79c eacH
2-pi-

O SKIRTS

C.

e
Maddox,

candidate and
vote was 1S2 for Maddox, the Democratic
the lUpublkan.
GO for Hep. Howard (Ho) Callaway,
to vote for cither
Ten legislators, 9 of them Nemcs-refus- ed
of the two segregationists.
1821 that
The Maddox victory marked the second time since
elected a governor.
the legislature, rather than the people,
Within five minutes after the legislature announced its decision.
Maddox was sworn into office by State Superior Court Judge
Harold Ward in the judge's chambers in the State Capitol.
A contingent of State Troopers barred reporters from witnessing
the ceremony.
Maddox, according to some sources, insisted on an immediate
swearing-iceremony, to forstall any further legal attempts to
him from becoming the state's chief executive.
prevent
The unusual election was set in motion during the November
General Election, when Callaway, the first Hepublican gubernatorial candidate in Georgia in nearly 100 years, ran ahead of
.
Maddox by about 3,500 votes, but failed to poll a majority.

The'

Maddox Win May Hamper Choice
Of University Of Ga, President
lly WILLIAM GRANT

1

Nw York Tlmn Nw Service
elected Lester
Georgia Legislature Tuesday night
as the new governor of
a militant segregationist,
(f

Atlanta-Th-

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TXHCoIEIN

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Georgia Gets Maddox

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ander Heard of Vanderbilt.
knew no names had been submitted by students but that a Heard publicly took his name
out of consideration.
student committee had appearIt is not known, however, if
before the faculty group to
ed
these names were ever actually
discuss the qualifications for a
given serious consideration. As
president in "a general way."
one source said, "Name anyone
Then came the unsetting Noin Georgia and there's been a
vember gubernatorial election
rumor about them getting the
in which neither Republican
job."
Howard Callaway nor Democrat
Chancellor Simpson -- is relucLester Maddox received a matant to discuss the selection
jority as required under Georgia
The process and offers only a brisk
law to elect a governor.
matter went undecided until "no comment" when asked about
the political situation and what
yesterday when the Legislaeffect it might have on the namture named Maddox.
Both the unsettled situation
ing of a president.
There was one rumor reand the prospect of a Maddox
governorship have caused some cently that a move is afoot to
presidential candidates to take allow Dr. Aderhold to stay on
a second look, sources on the past the retirement age until
a successor is named, but the
campus said.
retiring president said he knows
One such source identified
nothing of the move and will
the school as fearful of what
not say if he would consider
Maddox governorship would
the
such a proposal.
including
mean, and many
Aderhold is highly regarded
members of the Regents have,
on the campus and he is given
that Maddox's unsuggested
national
favorable
reputation much credit, by the students at
least, for keeping the process
would hurt if a
e
wanted for of integration peaceful in 1961.
resident were
Students this quarter are bethe job.
One Regent admitted that the
ginning an "Aderhold ApprecU'
at ion Fund" with the 'goal of
Regents "have sort of been
water" while the govraising $10,000 to buy books
treading
for the UGa. library. Faculty
ernor's race was untangled. Anand alumni groups plan similar
other, who frankly suggested
drives.
that the state's political situation would hurt the school,
noted that "any unsettli1 1, sitKentucky Kernel
uation never helps in things of
The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexthis sort."
ington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Campus observers frankly adPublished five times weekly during
mit that "there's not as much
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
talk about the president's leavthe summer semester.
as there was before the
Published for the students of the
ing"
University of Kentucky by the Board
November election. Even the
of Student Publications,
UK Post
Office Box 4986. Nick Pope, chairman,
rumoring of possible choices
and Patricia Ann Nickell, secretary.
a favorite pastime of both facBegun as the Cadet in 1894. became the Record in 1900, and the Idea
ulty and students has all but
in 1908. Published continuously at the
Kernel since 1915.
died down.
non-Georg-

to-b-

The

Those mentioned openly in
the past were Gov. Carl Sanders who steped down with the
Maddox election, Georgia State
College President Noah Lang-daland Vice Chancellor Alex
e,

SUBSCRIPTION

2321

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2320
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233-04-

19

* 1,

TIIF. KENTUCKY KEKNF.I..

.m. II. I'll."

V'ilnivl..y,

-

I

Present Discipline System Not Specific

Continued From rage

"(lisx)sition of

I

varirs according to tin- attitude of a particular Dean at a particular time
towards the student invoked and
liis offense."
a cast'

-

Some eases, according to Assistant Dean of Women Sandra
Kemp, have been identical in nature and referred to different
Miss Kemp
agencies.
)ncei
pointed to theft eases handled
both by the
and by

Women's

Advisory

The committee challenge d the
as an
validity of the
ad ivtry Itoard to the Dean. "The
about
Dean briefs the
eases that he refers to it," the
report reads. "Because ol this
action and because he must
e
decisions, the Dean
indirectly influences J board
trials. Therefore, it is not surprising that nearly all
decisions are approved by the
Dean."
ap-pro- v

--

Couneil

(WAC), the judicial Itoard of
the Assoeiated Women Student.
Acting Dean of Men Jack
Hall said in the Spring he withholds cases from the
and considers them privately
when "an emotional disturbance
or moral issue is involved."

Bulletin Board
Students interested in working on the Kernel staff are invited to meet in Hooni 111 of
the Journalism Ruildingat 7 p.m.
Thursday.
Applications for theMiss University of Kentucky Pageant are
being accepted through Fiiday
at Hooni 201 of the Student Center or at the desk of a University
residence hall. Miss UK will
represent the school in the Miss
Kentucky contest.

000

The Graduate Club will sensor a Good Luck Sing Along
at 4:13 p.m. in Room 206 of the
Student Center. Singing will be
conducted by a professional
group. Dress will be casual, and
dates are not necessary. All University graduate and professional
students are invited to attend.

In April, Hall said he had
recommenaccepted all
dations since his appointment in
January. Miss Kemp said she
could recall only one case in the'
past year when the Dean of
Women had not accepted the Women's Advisor Council recommendation.
The Dean of Men and his staff
handle misconduct occurring outside the residence halls or refers it to the Student Congicss
Judiciary Board. A student may
always request his case to apbut rarepear before the
ly has one been appealed about
the Dean.
Offenses occurring in the
men's residence halls are handled
by the Head Resident, who refers
all violations (drinking, gambling, damaging property, etc.)
to an Advisory Board appointed
by each residence hall government.
Punishment may take the form
of a reprimand, disciplinary probation, disciplinary undated suspension and suspension from the
residence halls.

ommendations for change. Dean
of Women Doris Seward has

her philosophy
tent that tin

refused comment to Kernel
the issue.

Icttci."

The

in loco

parentis practice,

brought to the forefront by statements like Johnson's and eouit
l
rulings calling for
proceedings, is especially evident
in the Dean's relationship with
local police.
When a student is arrested
for an offense, a member of the
Dean's staff is called at any
hour to talk to the student, and
often obtains his release. The
Dean becomes disciplinarian instead of counselor when the student often is paroled to him lor
quasi-judicia-

punishment.
The Dean of Men al
acts
as an intermediary betw een male
students and local individuals
conducting business with them.
A student who fails to meet some
financial obligation is usually
reported to the Dean's office. The
student is then contacted, informed of the legal steps that
may be taken against him and
urged to fulfill his obligation.
Dean Seward believes, the
committee found, that women's
misconduct usually stems from
tensions and frustrations. Consequently, the Dean conceives
of herself and her staff as being
guidance counsellors rather than
disciplinarians. "The objective
is not to force the student to
abide by rules and regulations
but to enable lier to understand
why she has violated them and
should not continue doing so.
"in summation, the Dean beVice President for Student Af- lieves in reason rather than force,
fairs Robert L. Johnson, one of in therapy rather than punishthe leading proponents for ment, and in examination of mochange, has said, "We (the Uni- tivation rather than discipline
versity) operate epiite clearly un- of action," the report adds.
der the in loco parentis conIt continues to say, "The Dean
of Women has imbued her staff
cept.'
Dean Hall endorses the rec and student representatives with

to sin
e

set

ute

an exto the

h
it

he Woman's Advisory Counwhich is solely concerned
with violations of hours and
drinking, tries to make the student aware of her responsibilities
and why she should fulfill them.
One of the major arguments
in the (h bate has been the question of notifying parents even
whenthe student involv cd isover
IS years old. One of the recommendations of the committee
prohibited this without the student's consent because it "sometimes has the undesirable effect
of embarrassing and hairassing
the student more than traditional
disciplinary measures would hav e
1

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News Mrvicr

ASHING I OX 'I he United
States House ol Repi esentativ es
denied a seat and tin' oath of
of lice Tuesday to Adam ( la
ton Powell.
at least until a Selee t ( JMiimittee m estimates and leports.
lie committee w as al!
ed
five weeks to act from the time
W

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its

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Spe.ikt

appointment
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Will Dunn Drug
Corner of 5. Lime and Maxwell

The College Store
DELIVERY SERVICE
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Powell Denied
His House Seat

Dr. Jack Mulligan of the University Health Seivice and Dr.
Harriet Rose, head ol the Counseling Service, loth sup)orted
the
recommendation.
They
pointed out that it was not advantageous as a counseling technique.
Prof. Ray W ilkie of the Counseling aid Guidance Division of
Co II ei', e
of
Kducation
the
th.it
suggested a compromise
would icquire every student and
his parent to complete a Uni-ci sit ionu indicating the source
of the student's financial aid.

FOUNTAIN
COSMETICS

.
1

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rfrn
u y in
r

Ak

r-i-

tic

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan.

1

11,

17

KEA 'Shows Where Stale Needs To Go'
Continued From Tage 1
taut to tlu' recommending committee.
The report was released Saturday and was a product of two
years of study.

Entitled "Beyond the

imum

...

A New-

Kentucky's
gram," the

Min-

Dimension for

Foundation

Pro-

pro)sal asks for increases in salaries and funds for
capital outlay and operating expenses and recommends an incentive program to coax local
school districts to make a greater
tax effort.
,
No cost is stated for the KEA
recommendations. And purposely
so.

Kincheloe explains the
of a price tag as a j)si-tiv- e
effort to concentrate on the
merits of the educational program rather than to dwell on
the costs of implementing it.
However, estimates made by
sources close to the KEA indicate
at least a doubling of the state's
present $140 million outlay to its
schools.

One estimate quoted

in

a

Louisville newspaper Tuesday
said the state will have to spend
$163 million a year more if it
implements most of the KEA
suggestions.
One of the most expensive
parts of the proposal which
should provide a basis for the
KEA 1968 legislative programs-off- ers
incentives for local dis- Central Kentucky's Largest

USED BOOK STORE

tricts to upgrade their tax

sup-por-

Houghly, the itucntive plan
would be to reward local sclwo
districts with a lnus if they
raise more mone than the required minimum.
While Kentucky ranks fairly
high nationally in the amount
of state supjiort given its schools,
it ranks low in the amount of
local support many districtsoffer,
Kincheloe explains.
The incentive plan would
hope to remedy the problem
somewhat.
Kincheloe said it ispasedon
an equalizing formula wherein
the incentive is given in relation
to local effort.
However, even without the
incentive plan and some other
proposals cost has still been estimated at alxuit $81.5 million
more than is now being spent.
Dr. James V. Martin, a former commissioner of finance and
a retired member of the college
fatuity of business and Economics, says if the $140 million
estimate is light immediate implementation could raise the total
state and local taxes from about
$96.17 per $1,000 pervmal income
to about $119.32 per $1,000.
Martin gets his tax information from 1963 census figures
which show average state and
local tax burden as just over
$103 per $1,000. The highest taxes on this basis are in Vermont
and Minnesota where the rate
is$127-plu- s
per $1,000.
In Kentucky highest revenues
come from the sales tax which

(Other Than Text)

DENNIS
BOOK STORE
257 N. Lime

Near 3rd

t.

Dispensing Opticians
SPECIALIZING in CONTACT LENSES
JOHN G. KRAUSS III
183 N. Upper St.

Lexington,

K--

J

ran $119 million in 1963.
According to Martin there is
no advantage to issuing bonds
to pay for the educational programs. He explains first it might
be illegitimate to liorrow for operating expenses, and secondly
that ImmuI issues are really only
deferments of payment to which
interest and other costs must
be added.
Observers, however, do not
see the KEA proposal as likely
to be enacted as a package request. Rather it should come
on a priority basis with specific parts being called for over
a longrange program.
Likely to be high on the list
of priorities are requests for increases in capital outlay, current

handicapped to use them.
Lowering the teacher
dent ratio from 27 and

and teacher
operating expenses,

salaries.
I
Recommend salaries are mm
depending upon
$3 000 to $10,000
Presently
experience and degree.
Minthe range under the states
Foundation Program is
imum
$1,300 to $6,200. Capital outlay
allotments would jump from $600
to $1,100 and
per classroom unit
would go from
operating expenses
$900 to $1,300 per classroom unit.
Most of the other proposals
are:

Initiating

i Merging school districts of
less than 1,300 students with
their own county district.
Expanding the minimum
school term to 190 days by adding 5 more days.
. Allowing
all instructional
personnel to be included in an
extended employment provision
for summer school and special
sessions.
f Using the previous year
rather than the current year to

kindergarten

classes in all districts under the
foundation program. Now only
grades 1 to 12 are so financed.
.
Increasing the number of
special education classes to allow
children physically and mentally

compute foundation allotments
to provide advance knowledge
to teachers and administrators
for planning purjxses.

Johnson Asks For More Taxes,
More 'Slaying Poiver' In Vietnam
WASHINGTON

-

for the
sought last
appropriations
for
year, including $
the "model cities" program to
reward urban
The centerpiece of the Presgrams, Johnson

three cents on every tax dollar.
In a generally sober and cau-

liy MAX FRANK EL
(c) New York Times News Service

President

Johnson called on the American people Tuesday to pay
slightly higher taxes and to

muster the "staying power"
needed to fight a costly war in
Vietnam and to carry on with
reforms at home.
The president asked congress
to levy a six percent surcharge
on personal and corporate income taxes for two years. The
increase w ould affect about four
of every five individual taxpayers and take from them about
six cents more each year for
every $1 of their regular tax
'

bill.
Officials indicated that they
expected the surcharge to take
effect July 1, so that the additional cost in 1967 would be

called

full

tious State of the Union message to a joint session of the
Congress, the President portrayed the nation's economy as
essentially sound. But he foresaw "more cost, more loss, and
more agony" in Vietnam and
said the Administration's heavy
commitments would not allow
it to do "all that should be
done" at home.
The President therefore emphasized the need to consolidate the domestic programs already enacted and did not propose many costly new measures,
lie asked for an antipoverty
program of about
with new funds for the preschool Head Start program and
for vocational training of youths.
For other great society pro

100-milli-

self-hel- p.

ident's welfare proposals was a
considerable increase in Social
Security benefits. He had previously announced plans to raise
benefits at least 10 percent, but

the

plan

unveiled

n,

the Dean of the
College of
Best-Dress-

ed

Brand New This Year . . .
DcB oor's Student1 Service
A unique service designed for the
College
student. Receive top quality, professional

laundering at prices you can't believe possible. . . . Available only at our Euclid
office, next to the Coliseum.

r
1)
la

wM

Next Door
To The Coliseum

Sanitonc
CtrtiflgXIaskrViydcaacr

Charge Accounts Invited

2) Free Laundry
3)

Bags

Personal Checks Cashed

Tuesday

would raise them a minimum of
15 percent and a maximum of 59
percent, effective July 1. A modest increase in .Social Security
taxes will be needed to pay
for the plan.
But the Social Security
change and some other measures suggested by the President
will not significantly affect the
Administrative budget soon to
be submitted to the Congress.

Memofrom

i4P

to

23 and 1.

Attention Students:

.aWMy
ri
iniiuf
tin i i iitm'

stu1

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Jan. II. Ib7

-

r

Confusing Day For A Newcomer
"

Iy JOIINZEII

Kernel Asvxiatc I'ditor
Megistration l!X7 was not without problems,
frustrations, anxieties.
Tom Creene knows.
lie went through the University's
procedure for the first time Tucsdaj, and
didn't enjoy it.
"It was a real pain." he sighed alter emerging
from the Coliseum an hour and a half after he
entered.
Creene is air entering freshman from Arlington.
Va. who arrived on campus Sunda. He is critical
of the University's mid-yea- r
orientation system,
g

if

;

wv

calling

A

STUDENT SEEKS All) DURING SPRING REGISTRATION

Officials Smiling
Over Registration

were smiling during this semester's registration, happy with a "smooth operation'' so far and optimistic
alxnit having an equally successful drop-ad- d
procedure.
For the first time, they enter
the period during which students effort to change." One student
mav droo or add classes with who likes to sleep late said he
little apprehension. Last semes- was given four 8 a.m. classes.
ter, students clogged dean's "One on Saturday!" he prooffices trying to modify their tested.
The associate registrar comschedules.
Bui this time officials think plimented students and advisers
that will not happen, because for their new attitude" about
students . took prcrcgistration preregistration. Dean of AdmisV.
seriously, scheduling classes they sions and Registrar Elbert
not just going Ockerman, before he left town
really wanted,
on business Wednesday, issued
through the motions.
The admissions office expects a statement praising faculty
a student who got the schedule members who assisted in the
he wanted to keep it, and has Coliseum for "contributing to
done everything short of for- the smooth operation."
Here is the procedure for
g
to curtail
bidding
the practice. "But if he has a
Pick up forms in your dean's
legitimate reason for the change,
we would be the last ones to office, discuss the change with
block him," said Associate Regis-ta- r your advisor, securing his okay.
Co to the department whose
Robert S. Larson.
One student's father came to class you want to change, sethe Coliseum and plaintively cure a class ticket, return to the
sought permission so his son dean's office, turn in the class
could add another class, having ticket, fill out an IHM card,
been convinced by him that a sign it.
Fees payment is going well,
change was virtually impossible.
!"You know that fellow's ki