xt7bg7373d50 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7bg7373d50/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19661005  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  5, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  5, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7bg7373d50 section xt7bg7373d50 Inside Today's Kernel
Rep. Perking is pushing for on extension of the current aid im edUoaflwn
act: Poge Two.

Welfare administration
local rule: Poge Five.

Lt. Gen. Lewis Hershey would "go
to joil" rather than compromise his
convictions: Page Three.

SAS's down the Lambda Chi's in llog
football: Page Six.

The Administration is ploying that
"game" ogain, editorial says: Poge
Four.

features more

A Mississippi ruling could mean universities can't fine parking violators
without a hearing: Poge Seven.

Draft Beyond
Normal A

University of Kentucky

Vol. 58, No. 25

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5, I960

-

Eight Pages

A

r--W

Those Over Age 26
May Receive Call
Many University professional and graduate students who previously felt secure from the draft now have new reason for concern,

Confronting

concern.

The Selective Service has
ordered
physical
examinations for about 70,000
men between the ages of 26
and 35.
Those given the examination
will be single or married men
with no dependant children and
who are classified as
(available for military service) or
(consciencious objector available
for noncombatant military serA

vice only).

A man's draft liability normally ends at the age of 26,
but if he has been deferred for
any reason, such as to continue
his schooling, which is usually
the case, he is draft eligible
until age 35.
In recent years, deferments
past age 26 meant draft exemption because the Selective Sei- vice has not inducted men from
the older group.

Col. Stephenson

Here Thursday

Col. Everett Stephenson, director of the Kentucky Selective
Service, and Dr. Elbert Ocker-maDean of Admissions and
Registrar, will be the featured
speakers at a YMCA meeting
Thursday.
Jack Dalton, YMCA director,
said that the meeting will discuss problems in the draft policy.
n,

"Dr. Ockerman will define
the university cooperates
with draft boards in student
matters and Col. Stephenson will
help clarify the operation of local
draft board branches," Dalton
said.
how

of the UK and
Transylvania faculty will form
a panel to discuss draft policies
and a question and answer session will follow.
The meeting will be at 7
p.m. in Faculty Club at the
Student Center.
Members

Now, feeling a pinch for manpower, the Selective Selective
Service's recheck could produce
about 50,000 potential draftees.
But officials emphasized there
are no present plans to put any
of these men into uniforms.

In a telephone interview, Col.
Henry L. Bethel of the state
Selective Service Board in Frankfort said the manpower situation
in the past was so that there
was no need to induct those
between the ages 26 to 35.
"Now," he continued, "there
is a probability that they would
be

taken."

Bethel said the call for the
physicals is the
government's way of taking a
"look-see- "
to find which men
will be available if there was
a need for them.
A spokesman for the board
in Washington said 28,153 men
in the previously deferred 25
to 35 bracket have already been
found qualified for service.
In an unpublicized move two
weeks ago, local boards were
ordered to give physicals to the
remaining 41,780 men in this
category.
About 1,100 Kentucky men
will be affected by this order,
a spokesman for the state Selective Service said.
Some will be called in November, he added, and the rest
will be called in the following
months.
Miss Winifred Phillips, Selective Service coordinator for the
Louisville area, said 365 of the
Kentuckians called will be from
Jefferson County, with the remaining 735 from throughout the
state.
Those who pass the physical
will be placed in the fifth priority
category for induction.
Some men in the fourth categorythose married in recent
years during a period of automatic deferment for married
men are now being called.

Father James Basham, center, talks with students
at the Newman Center Tuesday night. Father

Basham gave a brief talk on "Love and Sexual
a discussion followed.

Surrender" and

Students First Concern
Of Plans, Governor Says

Gov. Edward T. Breathitt said
this week the University's first
concern in relocating the football stadium should be the student.
He said the University must
be concerned with getting students to and from the proposed
site regardless

of where

it is

located.
In an interv iew, Breathitt said
the stadium should stay in the
college town.
"I believe the stadium should
stay as close as practical to the
campus," he said.
Breathitt said he has seen it
work where students were transported away from campus to the
stadium by university-furnishetransportation.
But he said he did not feel
it was feasible to leave the stadium at Stoll Field because of
the value of the land for academic
d

purposes.
"I believe the campus planners have said the land is to
valuable to be kept for the stadium," he said. "1 think we need
a new stadium."
Breathitt said now that we
have a chance to build we should
go ahead.
"The stadium is an image
builder for a university," he said.
"But it will be built so as to
not divert funds from academic

needs."
"Funds that will finance a
new stadium will not be the same
ones as funds used for academic
building purposes," Breathitt
said.

"Funds from ticket sales

supporting the football program
should pay for most of the stadium."
He said the University was

Human Rights Group To Survey
Businesses On Job Discrimination
The Campus Committee on Human Rights will
conduct a survey of Lexington and University to
see if discrimination exists.
The decision was made Tuesday night at the
group's second meeting of the year.
Specifically, the committee decided to form
field research teams to take surveys of local and
campus business' records.
The group is seeking to discover if groups
rightly claim they do not discriminate in hiring
while assigning Negroes only to menial tasks.
A member of the committee suggested that
Negro waitresses are not generally seen in Lex

A Moral Issue

ington while a large percentage of the kitchen
help in many restaurants is Negro.
The CCHR said they felt it is important to
see how far the stereotyped image of the Negro
as maid or porter and only being capable of
maid or porter positions is affecting present-dahiring procedures in Lexington.
"We need more complaints," Mike C.
a field representative of the state Human
Rights Commission, told the group.
Any person w ho feels he. has been discriminated
against because of race, color, creed, or religion
can submit a report to the campus group for
forwarding to the proper state authority.
y

Recti-bine- r,

"wise to carefully study the planning with local offic ials and planners before going beyond the
point of no return."
Breathitt said he had no personal preference where the stadium site should be but he said
the site should be changed.
"When I brought the governors up here from the conference
it took almost an hour for us
to get to the stadium for the
game," he said. "That's a bad
situation."
Recently

University

officials

hinted that the stadium may not
be moved from its present Stoll

Field site if four possible locations under consideration are
found to be unsatisfactory because of traffic conditions and
community planning.
Vice President for Business
Affairs, Robert F. Kerly said "Before we can definitely say the
stadium will be moved, we first
have to find a site that will

work."
Kerley said the final decision
on the site will come in
following a survey of
traffic and student transportation
cost.

Ruby Trail Invalid,
Appeals Court Rules
From Combined Dispatches

AUSTIN, Tex. The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals today
reversed the conviction of Jack Ruby for the murder of Lee Harv ey
Oswald, identified by the Warren Commission as President Kennedy's
assassin. The panel ordered a retrial.
Improper admission of evi- District
Henry
dence by police officers of con- - W:1 i . 1(ler Attorney
f)f the nrosecution
versations with Ruby shortly
in the Ruby trial, said in Dallas,
after the killing was the basis
"We don't think there was an
of the reversal by the three-ma- n
error. We will file a motion for
panel.
rehearing in that court down
The case will be retried in there (the Court of Criminal Apsome county other than Dallas,
peals) within two weeks and
the original trial site.
hope to get them to change
The court ruled invalid testitheir opinion. This is not final
mony by a policeman that Ruby
yet."
told him he had seen Oswald
Wade said his role in the
in a police lineup and, seeing
should the trial move
Oswald's face, had decided to prosecution county "will depend
to another
kill Oswald if he got the chance.
on where it's moved." He said
The statement constituted
his participation would depend
"oral confession of premeditation
on whether or not it was rewhile in police custody and therequested by the local attorney
fore was not admissible," the
in whatever county is chosen.
tribunal ruled.
The Austin tribunal cited U.S.
"The admission of this testiSupreme Court decisions in the
mony was clearly injurious and
cases of Billie Sol Estes and Dr.
calls for reversal of this convicSamuel Sheppard in saying the
tion," the opinion said.
trial court "reversibly erred in
W. A. MorPresiding Judge
refusing
rison said reversal based on inadRuby's motion for
missible testimony made it unchange in venue."
necessary to consider another
The Sheppard and Fstes conpoint raised by Ruby's attorney s, victions were reversed on the
"the error of the court in failing basis of intensive mass media
which the court ruled
to grant Ruby's change in venue." coverage
interfered with a fair trial.
was convic ted in March,
Ruby
1964 for the slaying of Oswald
Judge W. T. McDonald, who
on Nov. 24, 1963 as Oswald was
recently lost a bid for
and will be serving in the Court
being moved by police officials
from the City Jail to the County
only until January, concurred
Jail in Dallas. The move was with Morrison's opinion, based
televised, and an estimated 140 on the refusal of the trial judge
million viewers saw the attack. to move the trail out of Dallas.

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Oct.

Perkins' Bill Asks Aid Extension

Studio Players

'

presents

'Absence of a Cello'
By

Oct.

ha Wollach

CURTAIN
$1.50

13, 14, 15

7-- 8,

From Combined
WIDE SCREEN

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TIME 8:30 p.m.

rw

299-787-

two-ye-

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program was started
through the House of Representative, Tuesday, by Kentucky
Democrat Carl D. Perkins.
Perkins, of Hindman, is chairman of the general education
subcommittee of the House Committee on Education and Labor.

tance

3

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Several difficult moments are

envisioned for the bill which will
increase funds to be spent on

The Fireplace
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Weds.

&

MAG-- 7

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2--

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Thurs. only -- THE MYSTICS
. . . SATURDAY JAM.
5

Perkins, who presented the
bill to the House and has often
had reservations about federal
aid to church schools, said that
"in the area of private school
participation the record is a remarkable one. Congress made
it clear that the law was to
help all educationally deprived
school children regardless of the
school they attend."
Perkins had originally asked
r
for a
extension of the
program, however, in the committee, Republican members and
several Democrats, cut it to two
years. It is also likely that an
effort will be made to cut the
financial authorization, although
final say on this will come from
the Appropriations Committee.
four-yea-

EVERY EVENING

NOW

MMfflMm

lll

school pupils as well as public
school children. The help was
to be in the form of books and
other educational materials, how
ever the provision has yet to be
tested in court.

grade schools and high schools
from the $1,415 billion approved
in 1965 to $1,677.
After the first increase there
would be another the following
year bringing aid to $3,046 billion.
One controversial issue added
in the "Perkins formula" for distributing assistance, is a method
by which poorer states would
receive greater assistance.
By this method, Kentucky
would recieve $21.93 million more
than if all states are treated
alike. This and other factors
would bring Kentucky's allotment to $67,504,941 for the fiscal
year starting in July, 1967.
Another obstacle, wHIcTi has
plagued the House on education
bills before has been the issue
of whether parochial schools
should receive funds.
The bill passed last year
allowed that many benefits, especially in the poverty areas,
should be 'extended to church

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CRAZY?

INCIDENTALLY, we at Max-fon'- s
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Perhaps, weddings, dances, fraternity, sorority events, or any
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This is the name College Hall

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the man who likes a change of
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This "streamline sharpy" looks
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JUDY LEWIS
NANCY BERG
MIKE BRADFORD

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. HYdm

Contributions Asked For Review
Hobcrt V. Walker, Editor of
the Kentucky Heview has
that contributions for
the new campus magazine are
being accepted at room 410
Bradley Hall.
The Heview

is

open to all

interested persons, students,

staff, or faculty without restrictions to a particular department.
The purpose of the magazine
is to profile activity in all the
arts at UK from graphic arts
to short stories.
Walker, a junior majoring in
English, initiated the idea for
a campus arts magazine last
spring when Stylus, the English

poetry magazine disbanded.

Stylus left a necessary
ment to be filled, Walker

plained, "so
my

idea

I

for

eleex-

began discussing
a new kind

of

magazine with other people on
campus."
Dr. Jacob Adler, Chairman
of the English Department, first

supported Walker's proposal,

followed by approval from the
Hoard of Student Publications
Sept. 4.
Vice President Hubert Johnson
has fully endorsed the Heview
and his office is underwriting
part of the expenses. Walker said.
The staff of the Heview have
been contacted personally, either
by Walker or through recommendations from faculty.

There arc faculty advisers
representing the English department, Art Department, Philosophy Department, and one to
be chosen from the School of
Architecture.
The advisers and editors will

JFC Shortens Rush
Spring fraternity rush has been shortened by one full week in
light of criticism by the various houses.
In its regular meeting TuesDean Hall also reminded the
day night, the Interfraternity
Hush ChairCouncil approved
representatives that all housing
man Dave Hatterman's proposed contracts were for one full school
schedule for freshman rush. Bus year, and that men couldn't move
fratrips will begin Jan. 7, and bid out of the dorms and into
end rush on Jan. 29. ternity houses second semester.
day will
Only two houses of those presA resolution that the fraterent voted against the shortened nities
help in the operation of
period.
the "Nexus" coffee house in the
Chris Dobbyn, Sigma Alpha
Presbyterian Center failed.
Epsilon, was elected to filllFC's
A motion asking IFC to send
seat in the Student Government.
Dean of Men Jack Hall asked a list of names to President Osthe representatives to see that wald and Student Government
their groups be more careful and President Carson Porter, recomconsiderate while carrying and mending names of fraternity men
displaying their flags at home to serve on SG and other campus
football games.
committees, was tabled.

AMAZING

...

BUT TRUE!

THE

woik together in screening material as it is channeled from
Walker's office to the respective

departments.
Though all donations will be
given critical consideration there
are no restrictions on the kind
or amount of material a person
may contribute.
Unlike Stylus, the Hev iew w ill
not be censored, and all material
will be copyrighted. Itsestimated
size is 98 pages, however length
and format depend soley on

Draft Boss Hcrshey
Would Go To Prison
Not To Violate Ideals
From Combined Dispatches
Conn-- Lt.
NEW HAVEN,
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, director of Selective Service, told a
hostile audience of Yale University Law School students Monday

night, that, rather than support
something he found morally impossible, he would go to jail.

Greeted with light hissing on
his arrival, Gen. Hershey made
the statement when asked what
he would do if he were of draft
age and found he would be forced
to perform military acts he "found
morally impossible to support."
Hershey said that his office
has little to do with the country's policies and that students
who object to its policies
"should change the law rather
than hammer the administrator
over his head for doing his duty."

r,

Cm.

n,c KC..t..cky Kcmd
The
Kernel,

University
Krntutky
Station, University of Kentucky, s
40506. Srrond-clasKentucky,
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Hoard
of Student Publications, Nick Pope,
chairman, and Patricia Ann Nickell,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894. became the Hecord in 1900. and the Idea
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

The deadline for matrri.il for
this semester is Nov. 1.
A Heview will be published
each semester and will be available to students for 50 cents
and adults for $1 at book stores
on campus and throughout Lex1

ington.
Walker hwpes to have copies
distributed to nearby colleges and

SUBSCRIPTION
RATES
Yearly, by mail $8.00
Per copy, from files $10

universities.

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* AmlNow Gentlemen, Here Is Another

What-Problem-?1

Fuel About UK"

Johnson, again in the batter's
box, candidly admitted to the Student ("enter Hoard that "anyone
could speak anytime." He was
also quick to point out that he
Brad WashThe routine generally follows only suggested that
freshman member of Stua
a set pattern. First, there is the burn,
dents for a Democratic Society,
surprise and dismay over the reput off his planned speech because
ports, and then a long public or he
thought it should be in "an
private statement, filled with
context."
to explain how the educational
the whole story is not
Again,
topic is not an issue at all.
'
being told. What Johnson did not
This pattern developed over a
is that putting speeches in
period of years when the pressure say
"an educational context" will
was on to integrate all facets of
e
and sponcramp the
the University.
taneous interchange of ideas WashFirst, the athletic board said
this certainly was not an issue, burn is seeking.
The Kernel, which has been
since anyone who wanted to go
accused of "manufacturing the free
out for the University's teams was
speech crisis," has suggested that
welcome.

It is amusing, hut very disturbing, to watch the various executives on this campus go through
their routine whenever an issue
within their area conies to the fore.

free-styl-

to limit speech, even in order to
make it "educational," is an unwarranted affront to the idea of
a university and the free exchange
of ideas.
We can only hope that students,
scores of them, will take the vice
president at his word and begin
"speaking anywhere, and anyroster.
the game apparently
The same system is operating time," since
that a clearcut policy canrequires
when Vice President Robert Johnnot be developed until there is
son, his Dean of Men, and Dean
nowhere else to turn.
of Women discuss integration withWe would think that in two
in UK's Greek system.
areas Greek discrimination and
"There is indiscrimination that
the speaker policy the time has
we are aware of," they announce
come for the Administration to
almost in unison. Johnson adds
its cards on the table.
there is a campus rule that every put
At least one fraternity admits
organization must admit members its constitution has a "Caucasian
without regarfl to race, color, or
only" clause, yet the Administracreed.
there is no discrimination.
The sorority adviser notes that tion says
Speakers can speak anywhere
no Negro coed has ever gone out
and anytime they want, yet Washfor rush, but she hurriedly adds
burn was told his speech should
that if one did, she would be
wait until a "policy evolved."
treated like any other woman.
All we ask is that the AdminNone of them mentioned, of istration establish an official Univecourse, the subtle pressure used rsity-wide
policy bringing all of
to keep Negroes from rushing. Of these scattered statements onto the
course the pressure is applied very official record.
unofficially by students and others
If they are against fraternity
who "level" with the Negroes; but and sorority discrimination as
to discuss it, or even to admit they say they are let them ban
the existence of the problem, would it as the University of Louisville
be against the rules of the game has done and put teeth into their
the Administration plays with the decision so it will be enforced.
public.
If they support free speech
The "game," as members of as they say they do let them
the press covering the University
make this the official University
have come to call it, is now being position and eliminate this nonsense about an "educational
played all over again on the question of a speaker's policy.

Then, after considerable public
pressure was applied, the board
went on record supporting integration and requiring the recruiting of Negro athletes.
Sev eral years later, two Negroes
were signed for the football team,
and they now are on the freshman

Letter To The Editor:

Evaluation Program
To the

Editor of the Kernel:
In your September 30 issue was
an article on page 12 entitled "Private Plan Hegun To Evaluate Fac-

study and give a report on other
universities' and colleges' efforts to
establish faculty evaluations.
As

result of Mr. Patton's
ulty."
efforts, a bill was presented in
Mr. Hankin Terry, who is conCongress on Sept. 22 setting up
ducting an independent faculty eva- a teacher
evaluation program. The
luation, said he hoped that "The bill
passed Congress Sept. 29 and
University, the Student Govern- work has
already begun to select
ment, or some other interested
an
We hope for
group will continue the program
of this evaluation by
on a long-terbasis." I would completion
1967.
like to inform Mr. Terry that the spring semester,
Student Congresss at the end of
Louis liillenmeyer
last semester appointed Hep. Phil
Student Government
Pat ton to chair a committee to
Representative
"

Strangling The Teacher Corps
The Senate's vote to give the
National Teacher Corps $7.5 million is not an appropriation. It
is a liquidation payment.
Some Administration sources,
apparently in order to save face,
have spread the word that this
grant of funds represents a victory
for one of President Johnson's favorite projects. The fact, as Senator Wayne Morse so bluntly stated,
is that it is a rebuff to Mr. Johnson and, more important, a blow
to education in the rural and urban
slums. The amount thus provided
will pay for existing commitments,
mainly the salaries of the 1,250
trainees now attached to schools,
but will not carry the Teacher
Corps beyond the end of the current academic year.
This means that, instead of supporting the corps, the Senate has
given notice that there is to be no

continuity. Financially embarrassed and otherwise harassed by legislative hostility from its inception, the once promising venture is
now prevented from undertaking
the kind of planning and recruiting essential to success. Idealistic
young men and women who might
have committed themselves to this
vital service will turn away from a
plan that is being strangled by

Congress. Surely, if the Peace Corps
had been similarly treated, it
would now be remembered only as
failure.
a
well-intention-

At this time of the most severe
teacher shortage in a decade and
of desperate need to infuse new
people and ideas into the schools
of the slums, no elaborate argument is needed to demonstrate the
value of a plan that has captured
the imagination of youth and is
not tainted by pork barrel expenditures. For the moment, the best
that can be expected is that the
Senate-Hous-

conference will ap-

e

the

without
prove
further truncating the sadly diminished corps. The next essential step
will be to persuade Congress to
correct its shortsightedness by
giving the project supplemental appropriations early enough to permit orderly future planning.
$7.5-millio-

n,

If this is to be accomplished,
a major responsibility rests with
President Johnson, who has repeatedly taken credit for the plan, and
with his own education establishment to save the National Teacher
Corps from being phased out, without a chance to prove its potential.
New York Times

a

editor-in-chie-

m

Barry Cobb, Cartoonist

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED 1894

The South's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

WEDNESDAY. OCT. 5,

f.

Walter

M.

Grant,

1966

Editor-in-Chi-

Terence Hunt, Executive Editor

Gene Clabes, Managing Editor
Judy Crisham. Associate Editor
Ioiin Zeh, Associate Editor
Frank Browninc, Associate Editor
Straw, Sports Editor
Larry Fox. Daily New, Editor
Barry Cobb. Cartoonist
'

PL

William Knapp,

Business Manager

Ed Campbell, Circulation Manager

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Wcilm-Miay-

()t.

,

5,

IfMif- i-r

Washington Insight

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

New Approach To Welfare
Features More Local Rule
By Joseph Kraft
WASHINGTON
The congressional debate on
the poverty program this year provides further
evidence of a new approach to public welfare that
is finally coming to supplant the now outworn
philosophy of the New Deal. It also reveals that
in the politics of poverty there is a great gap
between local and national leaders.
The New Deal approach featured centralized
governmental action to help poor people and
communities. Washington developed programs for
insurance, public works, job training, and relief,
insurance, public works, job training and relief.
Funds were shelled out either directly by federal
bureaucrats or indirectly by these bureaucrats
to local officials. The state was the doctor, the
individual the patient and, in some cases, the
victim.
The political advantages of that system, particularly to congressmen, are obvious. It gives
congressmen the maximum opportunity to intervene on behalf of their constituents with appropriate government agencies.
The new approach features direct participation
in the formulation and administration of programs
by groups of local citizens.
To a large extent, moreover, local people have
a voice in running the programs they have chosen.
This local emphasis has an obvious appeal
for local political leaders.
n
The local support includes" not only
Democratic players of welfare politics
well-know-

such as Mayor Daley, but also even some conservative Republicans.
Indeed, because of the
emphasis on decentralization and in line with a
recent article in Life magazine by Hugh Sidey,
the Republican mayor of Tulsa, Okla., J. M.
Hewgley has said of community action that
"this is a Republican program, if we only had
the brains to know it."
But local control leaves Washington politicos
out in the cold, particularly congressmen whose

bread and butter has been intervention with

federal agencies on behalf of constituents. And
the debate on the poverty measure in the House
of Representatives this year has largely turned
on efforts by congressmen of both parties to get
back in the game of welfare politics.
The Republican proposal which has been defeated would have vested most of the programs
now in Sargent Shriver's poverty agency in old-lin- e
departments that are so responsive to congressional pressure. The liberal Democratic bill
approved by the administration also moved to
recaptur