xt7bk35m9g24 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7bk35m9g24/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19201203  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  3, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  3, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7bk35m9g24 section xt7bk35m9g24 Best Copy Available

The Kentucky Kernel
vol.

XI.

LEXINGTON. KY. DECEMBER

Semi-Week- ly

3, 1920

CAVALRY TROOP WILL
NOT BE ESTABLISHED
T

TO

$5025 BUDGET PLANNED
The annual financial campaigns of
the University Y. W. and Y. M. C. A.
will bo conducted the second week In
December. Tho Y. W. C. A. will
their campaign December 5, and
will run through the week. Tho Y.
M. IC A. will begin on December
7 and continue
These
four days.
campaigns are separate In that women students and faculty will contribute to ono organization and the
men to tho other but the purpose of tho
campaigns are one and the same In
that each organization is striving to
serve the students of the University
and every plan and purpose of the Y.
W. and Y. M. C .A. is to promote the
"things which are most worth while
for the benefit of the students.
The budget for the Y. M. C. A. this
year is $4,125, of (Which the University
and other sources contribute about
$2,200. The Y. W .C. A. has a $900
budget. Every student in the University should feel that these are their
organizations .and contribute to their
support.
Plans are made for large and constructive work this year and the students will have to help if these plans
are carried out.
Give to the Y. W. C. A.
C:A.
Give To

be-gi- n

5

V

v

JOINT MEETING HAS
Professor W. H. Mlkesell Addresses
Students on Religion.

the-Y.--

A largo number of students attended
the joint meeting of tho Y. W. C. A.
and Y. M. U. A. at Patterson Hall Sunday evening, November 28 to hear tho
talk which ,wus given by Prof. W. II.
Mlkesell, Head of tho Department of
Public Speaking. Ho spoko on what it
means to the college student. Ho emphasized tho permanency of religion
by say that "people may come and
people may go but religion stays on
and on."
Nellie Stono led the meeting.

Lack of stnblcs and funds to build
them will prevent tho establishment
of a cavalry troop nt tho University
of Kentucky as planned by tho War
Department. The horses and complete
equipment were recently offered to the
University
on condition that the
ntablcs be furnished by the institution.
Tho University is almost certain to obtain the troop any time that it can
provide tho stables and they may petition the next Legislature to appropriate funds for this purpose.

KENTIICKIAN STAFF

TWELVE MEN TAKEN
III

DELIA SIGMA

PI

"Big Jim" Server, who has been
elected captain of 1921 Wildcats.

National Professional Fraternity in Commerce

Y.

Enters Kentucky.

TWO HONORARY

Ml A.
MEN

MEN

Delta Sigma Pi, national professional

No Material Accepted For
Publication After

SENDS 31

Dec. 8.

CONFERENCE

TO

GET ANNUAL NOW
"If in the dim haze of the distant
future when many a grain of sand has
trickeled through the glass of time,
these pages shall echo the friendship
and joy of our college life and awaken
recollections of our happy U. K. days,
then this book will be memory's
est possession and our work will not
Jave been In vain." This excerpt from
the foreword of the 1921 Kentuckian
expresses the desire of the Kentuckian
staff to make this year's Annual one
worthy of the University and one that
will In years to come be a source of
the most profound pleasure to everyone who has one in his possession.
But in order to carry out these plans
the cooperation of the student body
with the Kentuckian staff is imperative and the staff takes this opportunity to urge every student to do what
he can in furtherance of the work.
Every one can help, first of all, by buy- ing an annual. Does the student body
realize that the Kentuckian of '21 is
being launched by a staff that is doing so on its own initiative with absolute refusal of help from the University? It is a prodigious undertaking
and without the support of the student
'body the annual cannot be published.
Shall the University of Kentucky have
no annual this year because the students are not interested enough to
buy one? The business manager made
the statement at the Kentuckian staff
meeting Monday that unless 700 annuals are sold before the holidays no
annual can be published this year.
Wjill you of the student body do your
part to make publication possible?
You can also help in other ways, by
doing things you aro asked to do by
by the members of tho staff. Seniors:
have you filled out your information

Appointments are Borrowed
From Georgetown and
Centre College.

fraternity in commerce, entered the

University
Saturday,
of Kentucky
when ten students and two members
of the faculty were initiated from Pi
The IJerea Conference, which will
Chi, local fraternity in commerce. The
ceremonial was held at tho Lafayette be held December 3, 4, and 5. has
so much interest that the Y.
hotel during the afternoon and evening"
M. C. A. at the University has been
of November 27.
President Frank L. McVey and Doc- forced to borrow appointments from
tor Edward Wiest, head of the School Georgetown and Centre' colleges which
of. Commerce are honorary charter are not sending their full quota of men.
e University was entitled to twenty- members, while the following under-- !
ve students and faculty men, but al- graduates were taken in as members
men going anu
of Eta Chapter: Fred Augsburg, Lex- - reauy nas tmrty-onington; John S. Casner, Providence; others who desire to go if accommoPaul P. Cooper, Benton; Otis L. Jones, dations can be made.
The' Y. M. C. A. is fortunate in havBroken Bow, Okla; H. B. Lloyd,
Fordsvllle; William Hugh Peal, Ban ing a thoroughly representative group
dana; Robt. J. Raible, Louisville; Ray- - of men going to this conference and
mond Rodgers, Milton; Glen Tlnsley, we feel that they will be repaid for
Hartford and George Sun, Lexington. their trip. The students going are
Representatives from the national George Baumgarten. James Server, O.
organlzation at Chicago came here to V. Watson, Flenor M. Heath, Burton
Install Eta chapter at Kentucky. H. Prewitt, Georgo Gregory, John Al-Wright, national president of the bright, Stuart Neff, George Zerfoss,
E. R. Hoyt and F. H. Brad- - bert Smith, R. J. Raible, Frank
of the
national , kenburg, Charles Ormand, H. W. Wil- members
counoil, constituted the official Instal- Hams, J. Lisman, Paul Morris, F.
C. Delanoy, Bob Davis, P. W.
lation team, which conducted the iniFollowing the Gregory and Charles Downing. The
tiation ceremonies.
Initiation there was a banquet for the faculty Is to be represented by Dr. P.
local members and tho distinguished K. Holmes, Prof. A. Burlaw, Dr. Wm.
L. Roberts, Judge Lyman Chalkly,
guests.
Delta Sigma Pi fraternity is estab- Prof. W. Payne, Prof. P. E. Karraker,
lished In imany r the Schools of D. H. Peak, C. R. Melcher and Dr.
commerce throughout the country and Charles A. Shull.
Bart N. Peak, secretary of tho UniIs one of tho most powerful and Influential professional fraternities In versity Y .M. C. A. will bo one of the
tho colleges and universities of tho speakers at the conference.
United States. It was organized to
4,
0
foster the study of business In unlver-sitles; to encourage scholarship andi
TURN IN YOUR
tho association of students for their
QUESTIONNAIRE
mutual advancement by research andj
Only three hundred question- practice; to promote closer affiliation
Continued on Page 2.
nalres have been turned In. Every- betwoen tho commercial world and
FINANCIAL COMMITTEE
" who has not filled out one
students of commerce and to further ,
should get one at the Book Store
IN CHARGE OF MEETING
a higher standard of commercial ethics
at once. Those who have ques- and culture and tho civic and ooramor
Tho financial committee of tho Y.
tionnalres out should turn them
clal welfaro of tho community.
.W. C. A. is In charge of tho meeting
Immediately.
In at the book store
a which will be held at 6:30 on Sunday
SERGEANT PROMIN
4
evening, December 5. The chairmen
ADDITION TO STAFF
Sergeant John Promln of tho For-Tho Kentucky Association of Col- - of tho different committees will ex- tleth Infantry, Camp Sherman, Ohio, logos and Universities will meet at tho plain their work and tho amount of
4s a recent addition to tho
University of Kentucky Saturday, money that will be required during the
'
coming year.
University.
missioned stuff of the
December 4.

dear-arouse- d

-'

j

e

COLLEGE

WOMEN TAKE

PART
A

Miss Mamie Stormes Dunn,

Popular

Co-e- d,

Marries

Missouri Man.
Miss Mamie Storme3 Dunn, of Lancaster, married Mr. Russell Wayland,
of Columbia, Missouri, Saturday afternoon at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Ashborn Price,
on the Richmond road. The Reverend
E. B. Bourland, pastor of the Christian
church, officiated. About seventy-fiv- e
guests were present.
The old home was decorated in yellow and whlto chrysanthemums and in
tho living room was an altar of palms
with a large wedding bell swung from
a canopy above. As the guests
'Mrs. Ueonafd Miller and
Mrs. Harry Tomllnson gave a musical
program.
The bride and attendents came down
tho stairway thru the hall and reception room to the altar. First came the
ribbon bearers, Master John Orrel and
Miss Dorothy Perkins, carrying broad
yellow and white satin strenmers, followed by tho matron of honor, Mrs.
Bradloy Dourno, aftor whom came tho
maids Misses Gertrude Walllngford,
Anna Urackott Owen, Martha Buck-maMurphy, Virginia
Elizabeth
Moran and Alleeno Fratman, aftor
whom came tho maid of honor Miss
Tho bride ontored
Kdna Berkley.
with her brother, Charles Dunn, who

Lin-sha-

$

!

non-com-

Continued on Page 2.

j

OF

LARGE ATTENDANCE

Funds Insufficient to Provide Stables
For Housing of Horses.

Students Should Rally To
the Support of These
Organizations.

No. 10

Tuesday-Frida- y

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Former Kentucky
Students Eligible For

16,000

Membership

EVERY COUNTY CLUB
With 10,000 former students now
eligible for membership, tho Alumni
As30oiatlon of tho University of Kentucky lias started out to effect a larger
and more comprehensive organization,
having as its first aim the successful
completion of tho State Memorial
Building campaign.
Mr. Herbert Graham, of Frankfort,
political writer of the Lexington Herald, has resigned to devote all his time
to further the organization of the
Alumni Association, of which ho Is
secretary, and to the State Memorial
Building campaign, of which he is
manager.
The new basis for membership in
the association, which allows all former students of the University as well
as alumni to be members, was decided
by a referendum vote of 3 to 1. Plans
are being made to have an effective
alumni association club of the University of Kentucky in every county of
Kentucky and also in every city of
any size in the State. Formerly only
twenty-threcounties were organized,
while Lexington and Louisville were
the only cities in which there were
clubs.
Mr. Graham is in Louisville now,
having gone there to attend the meeting whicn lis to be held tonight to reorganize the Louisville club of the
e

Continued on Page 2.

ignorance threatens
america;tigert says
'

Country is Ceasing to Be
Great Melting Pot of
the World.
America is ceasing to be the great
melting pot of world it has for so long
been pictured, Dr. J. J. Tigert, head of
the Department of Physiology, declared In an address at the chapel exercises Tuesday morning at 11:41
o'clock.
"United America" was the subject
of Doctor Tlgert's address and tho
theme was Americanism. Tho address
was pronounced one of the best ever
delivered in the chapel and aroused a
great deal of enthusiasm among members of the audience.
Doctor Tigert opened his address by
quoting tho preamble to tho constitution of tho United States and giving
six reasons for tho establishment of
this preamble. He then discussed the
problems, styling the chief of these as,
Laborism, Socialism and Classism. Referring to tho tower of Dabol, the
speaker declared that ours was a babel
of classes.
In pointing to tho dangers to tho
country iirlsiug from ignorance, the
speaker called attention to tho fact
that only fill par cent of the boys and
girls of school age in tho United States
wore in school last year and also that

j

Continued on Page

3.

* Best
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
THE KENTUCKY, KERNEL o
The

pulillrntlon
I'nlvcMlty of Kentucky.

olflclul , ottulent

of

llio

I'ulillf lied evory Tuemlny mnl Krlilny ilurlnp
tlio colloRlnto year.
rcupnnMhln for thn
Tho
editorial policy of the pnper; tlio MnrmRlnff
rdltor for tlif new policy.
Kntercil
hh ppcoml clnM
poatofflcc, LcxInRton,

matter fit
Kentucky,

Jl.fin n Yrnr

ft

.IOUKNAI.1HM

rent

IMIIt.DINii

KniTOIt-IN-CHI-

ROBT. J. RAIBLE, '21
l'lionos noon nnd 10IB-MANAOINfl KDITOK
K. AUGSBURG,
I'linncN 11(57 anil 2117--

FRED

SPOHTINO

'21

KDITOK

Arthur Cameron, '21
ASSOCIATE KMTOKS
Allele Slnde, '21
Katlierlno .McGlblion, '21
Virginia Throckmorton, '11

REPORTERS
Kntherlno Wenkley, '21
Lucille Moore, '21
Knthrlno Herring, '21
Enrl Wnllnce. '21
George Gregory, '21 Adallne Maun, '22
Hodges, '23 Blle Rncho, '23
Arthur
Margaret Lnvln, '24
Dnn Bowmar, '21
BUSINESS MANAGER
H. B. LLOYD, '21

ADVERTISING MANAGER
,T. Iltirton I'rewltt, '22
MANAGER
CIRCULATION
Glenn Tlnnley, '22

FRIDAY,

By Troy

L' "'son

Perkins

0

0

DECEMBER 3, 1920.

TWICE A WEEK
While tliis is but the second edition
of The Kernel issued under the twice
a week plan, indications already
promise that the trial will prove successful.
It is true that The Kernel does not
present such an imposing appearance
dn
form as it did in the eight-pag- e
style but so many advantages
may be derived from the new form
that it will more than offset this single
criticism.
The box has been removed from the
heading on the front page, thus not
only allowing more space for news,
but also giving The Kernel more the
appearance of a newspaper.
o
o
K
SERVER, CAPTAIN
A veteran who has fought on Kentucky's gridiron for three years and
a mainstay Of the 1920 line is "Big
Jim" Server. His election as captain
of the 1921 Wildcats was certainly
deserved. "He was the logical man for
the job and with all good wishes for
next year, The Kernel congratulates
him.
four-pag- e

PROFESSOR DANTZLER
ADDRESSES FRESHMEN
Professor L. L. Dantzler, of the Department of English, addressed the
students of (Matriculation Lecture Saturday, November 30, on the subject,
He said
"What is an Education?"
that a great many students have been
induced to take a special course that
will prepare them for a certain profession, without first acquiring a good
foundation by taking some of the
cultural subjects. He told the students
that an education consisted In having
poise and the best way to obtain it Is
to become acquainted with the classics
which depict the finer side of life.
"Though so many people emphasize
the need of a knowledge of Science,"
said Professor 'Dantzler, "nowhere are
the cultural subjects, or humanities, as
they wore called some years ago, of
more advantage than In Kentucky,
which nbounds in a wealth of literature and

COURTSHIP OF PRISCILLA
"Cheer up boys, there is a hell."
H. L. Mencken.

p

foster-father-

high-schoo-

l.

BOURBON STUDENTS
ORGANIZE CLUB

The students from Bourbon county
met recently and organized a club of
'twenty-flvmembers. The main pur
pose of the club is to interest students
of Bourbon county high schools in the
University of Kentucky by explaining
to them tho advantages of the University and many and varied courses that
are offered here
The following officers were elected:
Basil Haydon, president; Fannie HelMiss Frances Jewell attended the ler, vice president; Raymond Connell,
semiannual meeting of the Kentucky treasurer und Edna Snapp, secretary.
Vassar Alumnae held at the Seelbach
BUY YOUR
KENTUCKIAN NOW
hotel In Loutlsvillo, November 27.
folk-lore.- "

Major Mitchell, the newest member
of tho commissioned staff of tho University of Kentucky, was graduated
from West Point in 1902. Ho was
stationed in tho Philipincs 1905-0and
.
In the meantime he wan an
instructor at West Point. After two
years service on tho Mexican border
ho was aent to Franco and was placed
in command of tho Tank Corps Brigade. After his return from Franco
last yenr ho was in command of the
Tank Corps 'Brigade at Camp Meade,
Maryland, until October, when ho became assistant commander of the R.
O. T. C. at Norwich University, Norwich, Connecticut.

HAS

RETURNED

COLLEGE WEDDING
Continued From Page 1.
gave her in marriage, and at the same
time the bridegroom entered with his
best man, William Yager of Danville.
A recoption was held immediately
after the ceremony, and following that
Mr. Wayland and his bride left for a
wedding trip to Columbia, Mo., Kansas
City, Mo., before going to New Wilson,
Oklahoma, where they will make their
home.
The bride, matron of honor and
maid of honor are former Kentucky
students und the bridesmaids are all
now In the University.

ALUMNI

REORGANIZE
Continued From Page 1.

President Frank L. McVoy returned Alumni Association. Tho leaders in
Wednesday from Austin, Texas, whero tho reorganization of
tho club In LouJs-vill- o
he addressed tho annual convention of
are W. II. Grady, '05, a trustee
tho Texas State Teachers' Association. 'DC; Leo, J. Sandman, '14; Miss Emma
KENTUCKIAN STAFF

1911-14-

Tho production Inst Tuesday of an
adaptation of Longfellow's "Tho Court-Bhlof Miles Stnndlsh," gives renewed
attention to a specimen Interesting to
The prim, tho
literary 'researchers.
maidenly, tho kittenish, the virtuous
Longfellow, undoubtedly intended no
heresy in his pious outpouring bearing
that name. Yet ho here echoed unintentionally tho doctrine of Shaw and
the moderns that woman is tho pursuer and man the pursued. This doctrine, however, was not new with
Shaw, nor for that matter with Schop.
Enlarged
enhauer, Its
and broadened It comes down as tho
commonly acctepted principle of today
that women lmve much more to gain
by marriage than men, and that the
majority of men are aware of it, and
would never marry at all if it were
not for women's relentless effort to
bring them to it. There Is, of course,
a defense for women in this. Shaw
has shown it in his treatment of the
matter in "Man and Superman: We
laugh at the haughty American nation
because it makes the negro clean its
boots and then proves the moral and
physical inferiority of the negro by the
fact that he is a shoeblack; but we
ourselves throw the whole drudgery
of creation on one sex and then imply
that no female of any womanliness or
delicacy would initiate any effort in
that direction." Due ,to John Alden's
contemptible stupidity, it became desperately necessary that Prlscllla make
toward passes; it was no sentimental
or rom&ntic notion that prompted her:
it was the voice of her sharp and
Longfellow's
practical intelligence.
accidental embrace of this Hunnlsh
theory was undoubtedly due to the fact
that the matter of the piece came to
him in the nature of a legacy.
The acting in the presentation of the
piece was very well done .being of
Laurlne
l
caliber.
good
Wells as Dame Hadley sang pleasantly.. Mamie Woods acted the shrinking violet, Priscilla, according to the
best movie models. But as Priscilla
was a Puritan maiden, one would prefer a little less violet and a little more
shrinkage. R. E. Davis, in the part of
Miles Standish, displayed a trifle more
energy than insight, but he Btrutted
well. Troy Perkins acted and looked
almost exactly as John Alden looked
and acted, if John Alden looked and
The outacted like Troy Perkins.
standing point of the pogrom was the
staging by Professor William Mike-selThe arrangement of the stage
and accessories showed considerable
Ingenuity. Judging by this the professor should be able to do several
interesting things in the future.

e

McVEY

To Commissioned Staff

the

n Copy

Major Mitchell Added

PROCRUSTEAN BED

In

Rilltor-ln-plil-

OFKirP.

o

Continued From Page
i

1.

blanks for tho senior section? If not,
do so Immediately. Oct tho blanks at
the Kentucklan room In tlio basement
of tho Library. Secretaries of Organizations: You must turn in to the editor
of tho Kentucklan the names of the
officers of your club, the names of the
members or whatever material you
desire to nppear on your page, by Wednesday, December 8. No material for
publication will be accepted after this
date. All fraternities and sororities
nre requested to hand dn pictures of
their houses. All Freshmen, Sophomores nnd Juniors are requested to
hand in snapshots for the snapshot
pages of the respective classes.
Seniors are asked to hand in individual snapshots. Anyone having any
good snapshots of U. K. people or
campus scenes are also asked to hand
them dn. A prize will be given for the
best set submitted.
If the student body will help in these
things it will be greatly appreciated by
those who have the burden of the
Kentucklan on their souls.

J. Werner, '05; Mrs. Albert Krleger,
of tho University; Dr. H. A. Davidson,
'06; Dr. Samuel L. Pottlnger, '92, former president of the club.
At present there nre active clubs of
the Alumni Association of Chicago and
New York. The Philadelphia club
will be reorganized Jn tho near future
A splendid response has been mado
by former students and alumni to letters which the Alumni Association
have sent out. Letters have been received from all parts of the lUnited
States as well as from several foreign countries. The .Kentucky Kernel
Is being sent by tho Alumni Association to members of the Association
who are in Spain, Camada, South Africa and France. Many of the alumni
who are receiving The Kernel have
written to the Alumni Association saying that The Kentucky Kernel is one
of the best college papers which they
have seen.
As soon as the Alumni Association
has successfully completed the State
Memorial Buiildlng Campaign, it is
planning to do all In its power to secure sufficient funds from the State
Legislature for the maintenance of
the University.

What Is Air?
BEFORE

thought he knew what air is. "A
mixture of moisture, nitrogen and oxygen, with

1894 every chemist

t

of hydrogen and carbon dioxide," he would explain.
There was so much oxygen and nitrogen in a given sample that he
simply determined the amount of oxygen present and assumed the
rest to be nitrogen.

One great English chemist, Lord Rayleigh, found that the nitrogen obtained from the air was never so pure as that obtained from
some compound like ammonia. What was the "impurity"? In
with another promintnt chemist, Sir William Ramsay,
it was discovered in an entirely new gas "argon." Later came' the
discovery of other rare gases in the atmosphere. The air we breathe
contains about a dozen gases and gaseous compounds.

This study of the air is an example of research in pure science.
Rayleigh and Ramsay had no practical end in view merely the discovery of new facts.
A few years ago the Research Laboratories of the General Electric
Company began to study the destruction of filaments in exhausted
lamps in order to ascertain how this happened.
It was a purely
scientific undertaking.
It was found that the filament evaporated
boiled away, like so much water.
Pressure will check boiling or evaporation. If the pressure within
a boiler is very high, it will take more heat than ordinarily to boil the

water. Would a gas under pressure prevent filaments from boiling:
away? If so, what gas? It must be a gas that will not combine
chemically with the filament. The filament would burn in oxygen;
hydrogen would conduct the heat away too rapidly. Nitrogen is a
useful gas in this case. It does form a few compounds, however.
Better still is argon. It forms no compounds at all.
d
lamp appeared, and so argon,
Thus the modern, efficient,
which seemed the most useless gas in the world, found a practical
application.
gas-fille-

Discover new facts, and their practical application will take care
of itself.
And the discovery of new facts is the primary purpose of the
Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company.
Sometimes years must' elapse before the practical application of a
discovery becomes apparent, as in the case of argon; sometimes a
practical application follows from the mere answering of a "theoretd
lamp. But no substantial
ical" question, as in the case of a
progress can be made unless research is conducted for the purpose of
discovering new facts.
gas-fille-

General&Electric
Company
GMMTtl Offc

Scks ctidy, N.Y.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
FIRST CADET HOP
SAT. AFTERNOON

FOR LAMBDA ALPHA
CHAPTER OF CHI OMEGA

Tho next mooting will bo hold Dec.
at 8:15, in tho Lecture room. Tho
subject wJH be ''Corn
nnd
A dance will bo given Friday night will bo presented by Mr. Davis who
from 9 to 12 by Mary McMcckln in has dona n great deal of work with
honor of Lambda Alpha Chapter of Chi Doctor Valleau on this disease Every-onwho is interested In Botany Is
Omega. Besides tho usual University
crowd many friends from a distance cordially invited to attend.
will bo present. A saxophone sextette
will furnish music and punch' will bo
IGNORANCE THREATENS
served during tho evening.
Continued From Page 1.
DANCE

1,

Root-Rot,-

Six Hops and Military Ball Planned
Fop This Year.

YES!

"

o

The first cadet hop of tho year will
be given under tho supervision of the
military department in Buoll Armory
Saturday, December 4, from 3 to 5:30
p. m.

The hop will be tho first of a series
of military dances including bIx cadet
hops and the military ball, all of which
will be given under the supervision
of tho military department of tho University. In order that crowding may
be avoided, the hops this year are to
bo Limited strictly to cadets. Tickets
for the hops will bo issued to cadets
only, and all tickets will bo checked
up by a rooster at tho door of the
Armory.
The music for the dance, which will
be furnished by Slomer's Saxophone
Quartet, will begin promptly at 3 p. m.
In the past, those who have attended
University dances have formed the
habit of coming to the dances an hour"
or two late and then complaining
the dances ended too early.
However, this year dt is hoped that a
custom of beginning all dances on
scheduled time may be established at
the University. With this in view,
those in charge of the military dances
urge that all who attend the hop Saturday como promptly at 3 o'clock.
The following is the personnel
of the Cadet hop committee for the
Herndon Evans, cadet
year
major; J. P. Gibson, iCapt. Co. "A";
C. D. Clay, Capt. Co. "B"; Silas Wilson, Capt. iCIo. "C; R. H. Barr, 1st
Soph. Group; Scoggin Jones, 2nd Soph.
Group; C. D. Hunter, Co. "A"; T. G.
Foster, Co. "B"; J. N. Hawkins, Co.
Lieuten"C" and members
ant Colonel George D. Freeman. Jr.,
Inf., U. S. A., Major Albert S. J. Tucker, Inf., U. S. A.

3

RAFINE8QUE CLUB
The Rafinesquo Club met Wtednos-danight November 17, at 8:15 o'clock
In tho Botany Lccturo room. W. A.
Anderson mado a very interesting talk
on the fiber crops of tho world. He also mado a report on tho Garden Maga-zinfor November. After tho program
a delightful social hour was enjoyed.
iThursday afternoon, November 18,
tho club mot , and planted twelve
Evonymus Radicans Vegetis, beautiful evergreen vinos around White Hall.
y

o

x

We have everything a "College
Man" may need in the way of

Wearing Apparel, and you can
llfecl assured that we are at your
service at al; times.

"
tho average man at present is a
in intelligence. Tho shortage
of teachers and the fact that many of
tho persons engaged in this work aro
deserting the profession for moro
lucrative fields was stressed by Doctor
Tigert, who sounded a warning note
with tho statement that tho Babel of
Ignorance may destroy tho Templo cf
Freedom.
C. 'R. Melcher, dean of men, also
spoke at the exercises and echoed tho
sentiments voiced by Doctor Tigert.
"sixth-grador-

Company

Thorpe-Le- e

CTYLE HEADQUARTERS
where

Sofifttl Brand (HlothfS aresoli
streets

at Main and Mill
(Incorporated)

Campus Togs
CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN
also
SHOES HATS, FURNISHINGS

Company

Graddy-Rya- n

Xmas Stationery

(Incorporated)

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Suits Pressed, 50c; Suits, Dry Cleaned and Pressed, $1.50

1920-192-

WITH THE COLLEGE OR FRATERNITY
SEAL IN COLORS
ALL GRADES AND PRICES

P. B. ROBARDS, College Men's Tailor.
Phone

QUICK SERVICE

152 South Limestone

15iO--

University Lunch Room
Wonderful Cakes For

JUNIOR CLASS MEETS
The Juniors held a class meeting
the fifth hour on Wednesday, December 1, to discuss aorae of the plans for
the year. Edgar Gregg, president of
the class, presided at the meeting.
One of the many things discussed was
the amount of the class dues and it
was finally decided that they would be
$5.00. Each Junior is urged to pay
this sum ito the treasurer, Arthur
Shanklin, at his earliest convenience.

Efficie nt

Clean

University Book Store

Late-Rise- rs

Courteous

Just "Say It With Flowers"

Don't Think For Hours

FROM

Tj .
151-15- 5

JUSTRIGHT TAILORING
APPEALS TO COLLEGE MEN
There's snap and pep to the styles of our Tailored to
Measure Suits and Overcoats at

J upright Tailoring Co.
"WE FIT YOU"

BENCKART & FOTSCH, Proprietors.

N. Broadway
LEONARD

A. FENNELL
House Block

Opera
ROUSE, Student Representative

Phone 498

CALLOWAY'S
FOOTBALL SUPPLIES, SWEATERS, KOADAKS
DEVELOPING AND PRINTING
Lexington, Kentucky

46 West Main Street

Eagle Barber Shop1

Opposite the Phoenix Hotel.
Lexington, Kentucky

107 SOUTH LIMESTONE STREET
First-Clas-

Svery

Work Guaranteed

s

ay

more men are buying The Florsheim
Shoe again, perma

nently. It's sound
merit and reputation do not disappoint The name in
every pair.

WALTER S. WELSH
Successor

STATIONERY, ENGRAVING
DIE STAMPING.

United Qpifxmi

PROGRAMS

FRAT AND DANCE
A

124-12-

8

AND

SPECIALTY

Lexington, Kentucky

N. Limestone

INCOPf9ATCD
Next to Union Depot
Lexington, Ky.

UNCLE CHARLIE

IS BACK AT A NEW PLACE

He Has no Successor.

52

SOUTH LIMESTONE

Come and Sec Him

AT

Phoenix Fruit Store
--

to

WEL8H & MURRAY PRINTING COMPANY

MONOGRAM

YOU ARE WELCOME

FOR-

FANCY FRUIT AND DELICATESSEN

PERSONAL SERVICE
It Is always the endeavor of our officers and employees to see that
you receive personal attention to your Individual requirements
whether the business being transacted is of large or small volume.
Our facilities are always at the disposal of your friends and
quaintances.

THEFAYETTE

NATIONAL BANK

LEXINGTON, KY.

ac-

* IssCr

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
-- MYTHICAL

DIFFICULT

MEMBERS OF STOCK JUDGING TEAM

IS

ELEVEN

m

TO SELECT

ft Sport Writers Fail To Agree
On Choice For
tucky Team.
All-Ken-

fPICK YOUR

RETURN

University Pharmacy
offers to the students of the University a complete
assortment of Stationery, Candies and Toilet Articles. Prescriptions filled promptly.

-I

CIGARETTES, CIGARS and TOBACCO
Bring Your Kodak Films Here
Opposite Campus

OWN SQUAD

Dospitc the fact that Centre, one of
the strongest football teams in tho

South Is a next door neighbor of tho
Blue and White eleven, the Wildcats
Vcomo'ln for a nice slice of the players
squad.
on tho mythical
No two coaches or sport writers of
The members of the Stock Judging short shown in every ring. This was
note In tho Stato picked identically toam have returned from Chicago done In order to satisfy breeders who
Nothing aids the natural ability of a team more than.
the same teams, so hero is the gist of where they placed thd University prefer
the first type, and tho college outnts oi uncmestonea auantv.
the picking:
seventeenth in the list of twenty-onmen who are taught to appreciate the
$
The principal papers of the State universities competing for honors. In
We carry a complete line of A. J. Reach & Son's sporttypo. As a result our team was
picked seven or eight 'Centro men and the preliminaries Kentucky made first latter
ing goods.
mihe rest of the men from Kentucky and place but in the finals seventeenth was not so fortunate when the final score
HAY HARDWARE CO.
All of them agreed up- as close to first place as the team was known, notwithstanding our men
Transylvania.
(Incorporated)
excelled such teams as Purdue, Ohio
on the left side of the line. It was came.
LEXINGTON
KENTUCKY"
There were two types leggy and and West Virginia.
Snoddy, Montgomery and Roberts, all
of Centre