xt7bnz80m28f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7bnz80m28f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19540702  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July  2, 1954 text The Kentucky Kernel, July  2, 1954 1954 2013 true xt7bnz80m28f section xt7bnz80m28f TTDn

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VOLUME XLV

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1954

Parking Tickets Given
To Cars Without Permits
Additional Fines
To Be Levied On
Unregistered Cars
The Judiciary Committee of the
Student Government Association
has announced that parking tickets
are now being given to automobiles
parked on campus without authorized permits.
Leslie Morris, chairman of the
Judiciary Committee, said that all
parking areas have been filled to
capacity and that the Committee is
now in the process of distributing
permits to the last of the qualified
applicants. He also noted that many
student-drive- n
autos had not been
registered with the Committee. A
$3.00 fine is added to the initial
parking ticket received by the owner of a
car.
Owners were given an opportunity
at the UK registration period to apply for permits and to register their
automobiles, but he added that the
Committee would be glad to receive
late registrations now in the office
of the Dean of Men.
Morris stated that the SGA policy
on parking fines is as follows: $1.00
each for the first and second tickets
received; $2.00 each for the third
and fourth tickets, and $5.00 each
for every ticket thereafter. Immediate payment, he added, prevents
the eventual doubling of fines. Official transcripts of grades cannot
be issued until students have paid
all delinquent fines.
Morris urged students to direct
further inquiries to Mrs. Rosemary
Harris, SGA secretary, and to make
an appointment to see the Judiciary
Committee if, for any reason, they
feel they have been done any injustice.

Public May View
Mars At UK Plant
The public will have a chance to
view Mars through the University

of Kentucky observatory telescope
tonight. Dr. H. H. Downing, professor of mathematics and astronomy, announced.
The observatory will be open tonight at 8:30 o'clock. Dr. Downing
said Mars, Earth and the Sun were
in a line last night and that tonight Mars will be closest to the
earth by a distance of approximately
40.000,000

miles.

Grad Applications
Due On July

University
Announces
3. Students

NUMBER 33

Dr. Martin Takes Over
As Dean Of Students

Henry C. Current, Margaret Holy-fiel- d,
Thomas Kosler, Pauline L MilAll seniors wno expect to complete ler, Jennette K. Peters, Isabel C.
their requirements for graduation at Rankin, Anna L. Starkey.
j
the close of the summer term, are
Diogenes Allen, John T. Bondur-an- t,
requested to make application for
Lois C. Dale, John W. Donohoe,
I
I
degrees on Tuesday or Wednesday,
William W. Douglas, Ellen M. Flip-p- o,
July 6 and 7. This applies also to
Mildred Jo Ann Hopkins, Bar1
graduate students who expect to
Joyce Lake, Kenneth M. Litchcomplete their requirements for bara
t
field, Fred Little, Evelyn Jane
graduate degrees.
Si.
Leslie W. Morris, Jack L.
All applications should be filed in
Nelson, Thomas W. Ramage, Robert
Room 16 of the Administration M. Rodes, Joseph L. Rose, George
Building.
:'HT
H. Sanderson, Charles B. Severs,
Because the commencement lists
r,
D.
Harriet
are made from these cards, it is very Gene A. Thomas, Watlington,
John
Patricia S.
important to file an application at
E. Wiltz, Kay Fisher.
this time.
Candidates for the Bachelor's deHenry R. Bennett, Leonard L.
gree will be charged a graduation Bennett, Jack W. Clark, William D.
fee of $9.00. This will cover the Daugherty, Wallace E. Fluhr, Fredrental of cap and gown, diploma dy David, Clarence W. Flairty, Robfee, The Kentuckian, and other nec- ert J. Hoag, James F. Lafferty,
essary expenses.
Harry L. Mason, Victor T. Nicolas,
Candidates for advanced, other John A. Sproule, Henry A. Steil-bur- g,
than the Doctorate, will be charged
Frank F. Taylor, Omer E.
a fee of $20.00, which will cover the Williams.
above with the exception of The
Mildred I. Atkins, Elizabeth Bart-let- t,
Kentuckian and in addition the cost
Nancy L. Campbell, Sarah S.
of the hood to be presented to the
candidate. The fee for the doctor- Collins, Dorothy Domermuth, Ann
C. Fincel, Myra A. Henslee, Phylate is $25.00.
"Fine Arts Under Fire," a photoGraduation fees are payable not lis K Heuser, Jean G. Pival, Mary
later than the fourth day preceding Malone Smedley, Dorothy C. Smith, graphic exhibition illustrating the
work of the Allied Armies in prethe commencement.
Elizabeth Ann Smith.
serving and salvaging Western Europe's historic monuments and works
of art in combat areas during
World War n, is now on exhibit in
the Fine Arts Building.
1
The show consists of 30 panels of
!
1
vS"I
enlarged photographs accompanied
by a running text which reveals the
care of the fine arts during the war
and the extent of the little-knoprogram for the protection and salvage of the cultural heritage of
Europe.
The first few examples show the
extent of damage to historic buildings during the war. The showing
emphasizes the application of the
Allied Armies' program for the pro'
tection of those monuments within
the limits of military necessity for
the saving of whatever remained of
buildings and collections, and the handling of dispersed
and looted works of art.
Part of the exhibition shows archives officers attached to the
armies at work in Austria, Italy,
France, Belgium, and Germany inspecting and assessing damage, directing salvage from rubble and exposure taking measures to prevent
further deterioration to damaged
frutiTflifrrin"
buildings.
The problem of returning the
ISS BEING HOT TOO
100,000 looted and displaced works
of art is shown in the second part
of the display.
The exhibition is located in the
north corridor, first floor, of the
,99
Fine Arts building and will be on
display through July 12.
6-- 7

.

Mc-Nee-

r

...

Van-Cete-

7

2L

Army Photos
Displayed
In Fine Arts

,

S

iiV

ed

Beginning this week, the UK observatory will be open to the public
at 8:30 pjn. each Tuesday through
Aug. 10. On these nights, Dr. Downing or Dr. Donald C. Rose will be in
charge.
More Appropriate Time Wanted
An avid reader of the Lexington
Herald called and inquired as to
whether or not another eclipse could
be scheduled for that afternoon at
a more appropriate time to be seen.
Another interested party called
wondering if Mars could be held at
The Community Concert and Lecits closest point until they arrived ture Series will present "The Men
from a former appointment.
Of Song" in a concert which will
be given at Memorial Coliseum at
8:15 p.m. DST, Wednesday July 7.
This concert is open to the public
and there will be no admission
Reading examinations in French, charge.
This bonus concert will present a
German, and Spanish will be given at 2:00 pjn. DST, July 20, in quartet of four outstanding male
voices, with successful experience of
Room 302, Miller Hall.
Students who plan on taking more than two years on the concert
the examinations should confer stage, radio, television and records,
with Professor Bigge for German, in a progTam of songs and ballads
Professor Walker for French, or everyone knows.
Recently the quartet was named
Professor Server for Spanish in
order to get an appropriate book one of the ten best musical attractions in America by the National
approved.
Society of Music.

Community Concert Series
To Present "Men Of Song

Reading Exams

Given On July 20

Members of the group are John
Campbell, tenor, a graduate of the
Julliard School; Alfred Kunz, tenor,
who achieved fame at the Paper
Mill Playhouse and on the "The Hit
Parade" and "Voice of Firestone";
Roger White, baritone, a graduate
of Columbia University and a fellowship student at the Julliard
School; Edmond Karlsrud, bass, a
graduate of the University of Minnesota and the Julliard School.
Pianist-arrangfor the quartet,
Charles Touchette, has been arranger and choral director for all
the major recording companies as
well as for NBC, CBS, and the
Mutual Network.
er

Schedule List
For Holidays
The Independence holidays for
University students and faculty will
begin Friday, July 2 at 6:00 p.m.
CST and continue until Tuesday,
July 6 at 7:00 a.m. CST.
The registrar's office will be open
until Saturday at noon, but will be
closed on Monday, July 5.
The Margaret I. King Library will
be open until 3:00 p.m. CST Saturday but will be closed both Sunday
and on July 5.

Kirwan To Devote
Time To Teaching
And Research

Dr. Leslie L. Martin has ta':n
over the office of Dean of Men effective Thursday, July 1. Dr. Martin was formerly Assistant Director
of Personnel in charge of counseling.
He came to the University of Kentucky in February, 1949, from Indiana University where he was
Assistant to the Dean of the freshman division in charge of freshman
counseling.
He received his B.A. and his M.A.
at Purdue and his Ph.D. in psychology and education from Indiana.
Dr. Martin is also an assistant professor in the Education College. He
teaches Educational Psychology and
Guidance Counseling.
Dr. Martin and his wife are living
in Bowman Hall fulfilling a University requirement of the Dean of
Men. Mrs. Martin will be housemother and hostess for all
halls on the campus.
The former dean, A. D. Kirwan,
has assumed duties as professor of
history with his office in Frazee
Hall. Professor Kirwan resigned his
position as dean in order to devote
full time to teaching, historical research and writing. He assisted the
History Department while serving as
dean.

Blood Needed
For TB Study
The department of bacteriology
has issued a call for volunteers to
donate a small sample of blood for
a study on tuberculosis being conducted by its members.
The department is especially desirous of obtaining the cooperation
of persons who have had tuberculosis and have been cured. Without
the help of volunteers from this
particular group the study cannot
be completed.
Any persons of this group who are
interested in donating blood for the
futherance of this project should
contact Dr. Morris Scherago or Mrs.
Hall at the Funkhouser Biological
Science building, room 104, or phone
extension 2311.

SUB Plans Free

Horse Farm Tour
A free Blue Grass tour will be
sponsored by the Student Union on
July 9.
All students enrolled in the University are eligible to go on the tour,
however, a limit of 35 persons will
be taken.
The tour will include visits to
Elemendorf, Dixiana, Walnut Hall,
and Faraway Farms.
It is suggested by Miss Mackie
Randall, director of the Student
Union, that all interested students
sign up at the information desk in
the Student Union before noon,
July 8.
A waiting list of 10 additional persons will be kept in the case of any
cancellations from the original list.
The bus will leave the south entrance of the Student Union Building at 12:00 noon CST and will return there at 4:00 p.m.
Miss Randall requests that all
those signed up for the tour assemble at the south entrance of the
Student Union Building 15 minutes
before the tour is scheduled to start.

e

* THE KENTUCKY

Pace 2

KERNEL

Farmington Plan For UK
Bull
Called Impractical

Summer Calendar
The calendar of special events for

the summer term has been

an-

Orchestra,

Memorial

Coliseum,

7:00.

nounced by the University. All hours Tuesday, July 27
Movie: "Lost
indicted are Central Standard Horizon," Amphitheatre, 7:45.
Time.
Wednesday, July 28 Recital, Betty
Oram, pianist and Barbara WatJuly
son, soprano. Laboratory Theatre,
Tuesday. July 6 Movie: "I'd Climb
7:00.
the Highest Mountain," AmphThursday, July 29
Outdoor Polk
itheatre, 7:45.
Dance, women's gym, 6:30.
Wednesday, July 7
Concert: "The
Carolers," Male Quartet and SoAugust
prano with piano accompanist. Sunday, August 1
Summer Band
Memorial Coliseum, 7:15.
Concert, Amphitheatre, 6:30.
Thursday, July 8
Outdoor Folk Monday, August 2
Celebration at
Dance, women's gym, 6:30.
Ashland, home of Henry Clay,
supper
featuring burgoo-barbeqF: !ay, July 9 Student Union Tour
or Bluegrass Farms (sign at inforand celebrated speaker. Dr. Edgar
DeWitt Jones, Henry Clay Home,
mation desk, SUB, by noon, July
4:00.
8), meet at SUB, 12:00.
Movie: "O
Tuesday, July 13
Movie: "The Tuesday, August 3
Henry's Full House," AmphitheaGrand Concert," Amphitheatre,
tre, 7:45.
7:45.
UK Summer
Wednesday, July 14 Summer Band Wednesday, Aug. 4
Opera (tickets, Guignol box ofConcert Amphitheatre, 6:30.
fice), Guignol, 7:00.
Thursday, July 15
Outdoor Folk
Thursday, Aug. 5
Outdoor Folk
Dance, women's gym, 6:30.
Dance, women's gym, 6:30; UK
Tuesday, July 20 Movie: "Captain
Summer Opera (tickets, Guignol
Blood." Amphitheatre, 7:45.
box office), Guignol, 7:00.
Wednesday, July 21 Chamber Music by the Music Faculty, Memorial Friday, Aug. 6 UK Summer Opera
(tickets, Guignol box office), 7:00.
Hall, 7:00.
Saturday, Aug. 7
UK Summer
Thursday, July 22
Outdoor Folk
Opera (tickets, Guignol box ofDance, women's gym, 6:30.
fice), Guignol, 7:00.
Friday, July 23
U. of Kentucky
Friday, Aug. 13
Summer School
te
High School Summer
Commencement, Memorial Coliseum, 7:00.
The Kentucky Kernel
Recreational Activities
Mon.-FridGolf (special rates:
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
60c per session, on sale, swimming
Errtrrrd at the Pcwt Office at Lexington,
pool equipment room. Coliseum),
kentuckv, as second class matter under
0.
Picadome,
the Act of March 3, 1879.
Published weekly during school except
Thursday
Outdoor Folk Dancing,
holidays and exams.
women's gym, 6:30-9:0Henry Mayo and Louis Pritchett By Appointment
Horseback Riding, Blue Grass Field, telephone
All-Sta-

ay

7:00-12:0-

0.

CAMPUS AGENCY
a campus apent to sell
nationally advertised drawing; instrument sets and slide rules
to engineering freshmen this fall.
Tremendous profits. Free posters
and brochures. No investment
required. Write: Empire Engineering, PO Box 114, Canal St.
Station, NYC 13, NT.

We need

L4oittS

Baseball Captain
Signs With Colts
Miles Willard, captain of the 1954
Wildcat baseball team, has signed
a contract with the Lexington Colts
of the Mountain States League.
The smooth-workin- g
infielder who
works equally well at third and
short will probably be alternated at
short and second by Colt Pilot Zeke
Bonura.
The Vandergrift, Pennsylvania,
youth hit a sizzling .358 in his final
year with the Wildcats. He was also
a stalwart halfback on the Wildcat
football squad, although injuries
hampered him.
Willard majored in physical education at the University and plans
to coach after he serves a two-yehitch in the armed forces. Miles has
received his ROTC commission as a
second lieutenant and he expects to
be serving this time next year.

Swimming, students.
faculty and staff. Pool, 3:00-4:3- 0.
Mon.-Sa- t.
Tennis, Courts, 7:00-6:0-

2-71-

Alum-

Dial

ni Gym,
Various other sports such as
horseshoes, handball, basketball,
shuffleboard and table tennis are
available at times that the gymnasiums are open.
0.

2-22-

FOR THE

FINEST

VINE AT SOUTHEASTERN

IN
REFRESHMENT

PINKSTON'S

TRY

WATCH SHOP
Fine Watches
Watch Repairing
ELGIN
BULOVA
CRUEN
PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS

i

Roles Watches $150.00 up
Diamond Rings

m

130 N. Limestone Phono
Next door to Chop Suey
Lexington, Kjr.

TEXT BOOKS
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES
AT

Im mw

-

I
I

f -- If

IJ

'

30

Ray Jones is a happy man this week, and with
good reason. You see The 1954 Kentuckian, for which
he was business manager, will be going into the campus postoffice by the hundreds during the next few
days bound for all parts of the USA and in some
instances headed for overseas.
The people around the School of Journalism will
be happy, too for Ray and for themselves. They have
been replying to the flood of mail coming to The Kentuckian. The chant has been steady: "we want our

Kentuckian!"
Well, all 416 pages of the big and attractive 1954
Kentuckian will reply to the chant, and the Stirrup
Cup hereby extends an invitation to Ray to come in
and enjoy any two of their appetizing meals.

Now Serving Daily

11:45 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

MM

fine

Block from University

820

f

NOON AND EVENING MEALS

fee cream
1

The Week

Off

Radio Equipped

27

Taylor Tire Co.

The child who eats all of everything is not always one to be emulated; he may only grow up to have
indigestion.

Inc.

24 Hour Service
DIAL

ad

YELLOW CAB

0.

Volleyball,

wide-spre-

LEXINGTON

Mon.-Fr- i.

11:00-12:3-

proving most effective in promoting
reading.
The ALA meeting, held at Minneapolis Municipal Auditorium, June
21, was the annual business meeting of the group. It was attended
by 3,500 people. Miss Bull also attended the meeting of the Association of Research Librarians, June 20.

?;

0.

Mon., Wed., Fri.

part of the program, Mr. Harry
Schacter, promoter of the Kentucky
Bookmobile work, spoke about the
movement in this section. In his
talk he mentioned that there were
less than 50 libraries in Kentucky,
and that the bookmobile method was

COLONEL

ar

Swimming, children of faculty, staff and students.
9:30-11:3-

ftnoirtll

f

Tues. and Frl.
Pool.

in the way of
There is a god-sea library plan for the publishing
houses of the world. The Farming-to- n
plan is In practice over the
country in the largest libraries. Under it, an institution places a blanket order with a government, buying all the material that its presses
produce in a year.
Miss Jacquelin Bull, who has just
returned from the meeting of the
American Librarian's Association,
where she represented U.K., says it
would be Impractical for the Uni
versity because the volume of material is so immense that there would
have to be an addition to the library.
At a luncheon, given by the
Friends of the Library, which was
nd

'

ue

$149.00 EASY

Friday, July 2, 1954

S. Limestone St.

High St. and Cochran

944 Winchester Rd.

STIRRUP CUP
RESTAURANT

KENNEDY

AIR CONDITIONED

BOOK STORE

MAIN ST. AT ASHLAND

405 S. LIME
ACROSS

FROM SUB

* KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY

Friday, July 2. 1954

Welch Accepts Bid
On Mich. Consul

civ'

'

:

'

"

"

.

"MEN OF SONG" WILL APPEAR JULY 7

Music Department Assisted
By Top Music Educators
Two of the nation's outstanding
music educators will assist the University Department of Music in the
direction of workshops in music education this summer.
They are Bernard Fitzgerald, professor of music education and director of bands at the University of

FLOWERS

For Any

Occasion
CALL

E.

Maxwell Dial

29

Ashland
Q

ILC
,us

Chevy-Chas- e

John F. Whiteley, has
a certificate for "meritor- ious achievement" at Fort Bragg,
Carolina.

hav-receiv- ed

Air-Nor- th

He received a Bachelor of Arts
Degree in Journalism and also an
ROTC commission in 1952. Prior
to entering active duty Whiteley
worked for the University's Public
Relations Department. He completed the basic airborne course at Fort
Benning, Georgia, in October of
He also was responsible for a 1952 after attending the basic inlarge increase in the total number fantry officer's course.
of news releases emanating from
Lieutenant Whiteley will receive
the Public Information Office section to local, state, and national his discharge on June 26, and has
news media.
accepted a position as staff writer
Lieutenant Whiteley has been with with The San Antonio Express.

Dry Cleaning

Laundry

Ex-Edito- rs

Visit Kernel

DeBOOR

Two former editors of The Kernel, Merrill McCord and Miss Noi
Peers, visited in the Kernel newsroom and the School of Journalism
during the last few days.
McCord has been at Stanford
University the past year on the
Charles Samuel Jackson, Jr., Fellowship and was awarded his M.A.
Degree from the Institute of Journalistic Studies on June 13. He reported to Fort Knox on Tuesday to
begin active duty in the Signal

15 Per Cent Discount

and CARRY

CASH

Corps.
Miss Peers, Pine Bluff, Ark., came

through Lexington en route to

Eu-

at no added cost

One day service

rope. She was editor of The Kernel
Mcfor the first semester, 1953-5Cord was editor for the second semester, 1952-54.

Monday thru Friday

3.

SOAP FREE
8 to 5
8 to
8 to

562 to 9
noon
1

Thursday
Friday
Saturday

HIGH ST.

Summer Schedule
For Library Hours
The regular summer school schedule for the Margaret I. King Library
will be from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
DST, on weekdays; 8:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. DST, on Saturdays; and 2:00
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. DST, on Sundays.

DIAL

PHONE

6 to 9

PHONE

387

35

Any Past Year Available

New and Used Portables,
convenient terms.

Official University of Kentucky Ring made
especially to suit your individual specifications. Set with synthetic Spinel, Ruby or
or
Genuine Black Onyx. Any year-dat- e
order blank below.
degree. Use convenient

s

Carbons, Ribbons and Office
Supplies.

3-02-

Class Rings

Typewriters, Adding Machines,
Sales, Service and Rentals.

35c

8 to 5
8 to 5
8 to 5

Euclid Ave (Next to Coliseum)
and 880 E. High

ROSE ST.

55

FILL OUT THIS ORDER FORM, ENCLOSE

'

'i

Office

tion since July, 1953, previously
ing served with the 505th Airborne
Infantry Regiment of the 82d
borne Division.

Lieutenant Whiteley was instrumental in setting up the Fort Bragg
radio network which encompasses
13 stations carrying the "Fort Bragg
Open House," a
musical
reports, speshow with
cial events, and features.

SERVICE

Shopping Center

- Damp Dried
Washed - Triple-Rinse-d
Additional Charge for Drying

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
877 E.

A 1952 University graduate, First the Public Information

KENTUCKY TYPEWRITER

Self Service Laundry
UP TO

Meritorious Achievement
Awarded To Former Student

All-Sta- te

Michler Florist
417

Texas, and Ralph Rush, professor
of music education at the University
of Southern California.
In progress at the present is a
workshop in General Music directed
by Miss Mildred Lewis, associate
professor of music at the University.
Part of the general music workshop will be devoted to keyboard
experiences with two guest consultants to direct these sessions. They
are Dr. Lloyd Slind, professor of
music education at Florida State
University, and. Dr. Marion Egbert
of the American Music Conference,
Chicago.
Beginning July 19 will be a workshop in School Orchestra directed
by Ralph Rush, professor of music
education at the University of
Southern California. During this
workshop the Kentucky
Orchestra will be on the campus
and will be directed by professor
Rush.
Professor of music education at
the University of Texas, Bernard
Fitzgerald will conduct a workshop
on the school band July 25 through
August 6. Professor Fitzgerald is on
the campus this summer as a visiting professor of music.

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation of
Battle Creek, Mich., has extended
Dean Frank J. Welch of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture and Home Economics an invitation to serve on their advisory
committee. Dean Welch has accepted the invitation for a term
extending until January, 1956.
President Morris of the Kellogg
Foundation pointed out in his letter
of Invitation that the program of
the foundation is developed and administered through seven divisions,
of which agriculture is the newest.
It was established in October, 1953.
Each division is assisted by an
advisory committee of four to six
members. The purpose of the committee now being set up is to advise
with Dr. Thomas N. Moss, director
of the new division, in appraising
current activities and developing
future activities.

Page 3

PRESCRIPTIONS

CAMPUS BOOK STORE
University of Kentucky, Lexington,
described UK Ring
My finger size
Year-Da-

SCHOOL

or Pin and Guard
, Initials

Encrust in Stone
FRATERNAL EMBLEM

10 Karat

CS

Men's Ring
Ladies' Ring
Pin and Guard
(Stat

OS

'

Ruby Stones

Onyx
Gold

AND MAXWELL

, Degree

.'

te

Spinal

WILL DUNN DRUG CO.
LIME

to apply on the following
.

(Check properly below to indicate article wanted)

SWIMMING ACCESSORIES
SUPPLIES-TOBACC-

DEPOSIT

Ky.

Enclosed is deposit of $

Fountain Service
TOILETRIES-COSMETI-

$5.00

AND MAIL TO

$30.00
$26.50
$16.50
whether guard

b)

$5.00 ADDITIONAL
to be Yr. Data

or Q Dergee)

Federal and or State Taxes EXTRA (present Federal Tax 10
no State Tax)
When manufacturing is complete, make shipment (C.O.D. for any
balance due) to:
(Name)
Street and No.

City and State

* THE KENTUCKY

Pace 4

The Campi
By O. II. ELL
WE WONDER IF: People will give
up smoking if it is scientifically

linked with cancer. . . anybody
got up to watch the eclipse . . .
birds sitting on a telephone line is
a product of natural adjustment, or
Just more comfortable than a tree
limb
it makes any difference to
a fish what kind of artificial plug a
fisherman throws at him . . . professors know that they generally run
overtime in summer school which
helps students be late for the next
class . . . any Republican is brave
enough to curb McCarthy . . . girls
will ever realize that boys dislike
those ballet shoes or whatever you
call them . . . anybody can tell the
difference between New Orleans jazz
and Dixieland. A disk Jockey from
that city claims there is a distinction . . . people knew that the University grounds once was a Fairgrounds site. Sometimes the Impression still lingers . . .

...

The most interesting remark we've
was from a Hopkins-vill- e
radio man who was in Chicago
on business. During polite conversation he was asked if he knew
He replied in his best
southern tones, "we've howdy-e- d but
we ain't shook."

heard recently

A Virginia historian, Dr. Thomas
Perkins Abernethy, chairman of the
Department of History at the University of Virginia, visited the University Wednesday as the first summer lecturer in the UK Blazer Lecture Series.
Dr. Abernethy voiced distress at
what he termed "a very marked
tendency of . . . younger Southerners to apologize for our ancestors
and to think of them only as they
were connected with a system of
labor which we cannot approve. His
topic was "The Creed of the Old
South."
He continued, "We should not,
under the mistaken idea that we
are being 'liberal' disparage the
regime of our fathers. History is
not plastic, and the society of the
Old South had much that was worth
preserving."
The Virginia educator, himself a
native of Alabama, also pointed out:
"Its aristocratic flavor gave it
tone; its individualism bred democracy; its liberality added charm, and
its ideals furnished leadership. Let
us not apologize for it. Let us not
be ashamed because of Appomattox."
The speaker reminded his audience, that although It Is true that
slavery made it possible for the
South to develop a landed aristocracy and to follow British tradition
in social, political, and religious
matters, it is "important to remember that the tradition came from
Europe, not from Africa."
"Individualism was probably the

Store

USED BOOKS

257 North Lime
Phone

N

E

Friday, July 2, 1954

L

Abernethy Condemns Trend Summer Cinema To Present
To Apologize For South
Seven Free Film Programs

The University faculty contains
some well known and distinguished
authors of both fiction and historical
note. Dr. Summers of the English
Department has appeared in many
of the
small magazines
both here and abroad and is also
the author of several books. Dr.
Knight of the same department has town.
made several well known studies of
middle 19th and early 20th century
The Summer Cinema series which
American writers and expects a new will present seven free films at the
book to be published this fall.
amphitheater certainly has a carefully selected program that should
Professor Eaton of the History provide excellent entertainment, but
Department has recently published when Charles Laughton and Marilyn
a study of the War Between the Monroe appear in the same film the
States and was very favorably re- gauntlet of emotions will be well
viewed in both the New York papers traveled.
and the SRL. These are Just a few
On the same subject we would ofof the many, many outstanding con- fer a film for the week but having
tributions to the fictional, historical, seen none it makes it difficult to
and scientific world of literature but review. Summer films and summer
it was just a passing thought that popular music are about the same
sometimes we don't realize how light, dull, and repititious.
eminent our professors are. For
those who may be confused just beIf you have anything to say about
cause the athletic seasons are out of us or the Kernel, simply tear off the
the limelight, the University doesn't top of your head and, with $500 to
fold up its tents and move to a new cover postage, mail it to: US, Box
342115, Pasture Patch, New Mexico.
It will cost a little more if you live
in New Geetusland, Africa,
Book
Dennis
most important characteristic of the
ed

KER

gentleman of the Old South, and it
is one that has lost ground with the
passage of time," Dr. Abernethy
said.
The Virginian contended that the
gentlemen of the Old South were
meticulous in carrying out their
social obligations, even though no
promise had been made.
"This involved hospitality to
strangers, loyalty not only to family
and friends, but to all who were dependent upon him. And in general,
the planter class was suspicious of
innovations and reforms and believed that the old ways were the best
ways."
However,

The University Extension Department will present a series of free
motion picture programs for the
benefit of its personnel and summer
students. A group of seven full
length films will be featured by the
Summer Cinema.
On July 6, Susan Hay ward and
William Lundigan will recount the
story of simple faith in a small
Georgia community and how a
Methodist minister meets the crises
of his congregation in the film, "I'd
Climb the Highest Mountain."
"The Grand Concert" comes to the
Summer Cinema on July 13 bringing
a spectacular presentation of some
of the world's greatest artists of the
opera and ballet of the U.S.S.R.
The swashbuckling romantic tale
of "Captain Blood" appears July 20,
and the old soldier of fortune, Errol
Flynn, and his girl Olivia da Havil-lan- d
will star.

the speaker told the
local audience that "leadership of
the planter class, of course, had its
faults as well as its merits . . .
perhaps their greatest fault was
their lack in public education."
While commenting on slavery in
the Old South, Dr. Abernethy mainFrank Capra's monumental protained that "cruel and unreasonable
duction of "Lost Horizon" arrives
masters" were the exceptions.
"Slavery was an evil system, but July 27. The spectacular, the drano people have ever managed it matic and the superb are ablely
more humanely than did the gentry
of the Old South, and they were
not responsible for Its being," the
speaker contended.
Therefore, he reasoned, "no moral
taint attaches to them because of
Men's and Ladies
its existance; and the spirit in which
it was operated is manifested by the
Plain Suits
fact that the cruel master was ostra-

CLEANED

cized socially."
He urged his listeners to recognize

both the merits and faults of the
Old South, and suggested that the
modern world might do well to remember and profit by them."
"Need we blush for a system that
produced Washington and Jefferson,
Calhoun and Clay, Lee and Jackson?"
The lecture was held as a joint
meeting of the Filson Club, Kentucky Historical Society; a dinner
preceded the lecture program.
University President H. L. Donovan presided at the program, and
the speaker was introduced by the
president of the Filson Club, Davis
Edwards, Louisville.
The Blazer
Series is administered by the UK
Department of History, and is made
possible by a grant established by
Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Blazer,

presented by an excellent cast including Ronald Coleman, Jane
Wyatt, and Thomas Mitchell.
"O. Henry's Full House" will be
shown August 3. Five carefully selected O. Henry stories combined
with the continuity of John Steinbeck capture the classic humility
and insight into human nature that
O. Henry sought. Charles Laughton,
David Wayne, and Marilyn Monroe
are but a few of a long cast.
There is no admission fee for these
programs which are held in the
Memorial Hall Amphitheater at 7:45
p.m. GST. In case of rain the programs will be held inside Memorial
Hall.
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