xt7c2f7jqj73 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c2f7jqj73/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19171011  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 11, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 11, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7c2f7jqj73 section xt7c2f7jqj73 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
VOL, X
TEAM LIKE

MARYVILLE

SORORITIES

SOPHS ARE LOSERS

UNTO MONTH OE MARCH TIGHTEST

TUG

OF WAR

Game Starts With a Bang, Bathing Is Fine In Summer
But Weaker Teams WithTime, But Water Is
ers Before the Cats
Chilling Now

Maryville men might have little
lambs, but the Wildcats took their
goats. The Job was done even to a
taste in a
Prussian's
football massacre last Saturday on Stoll Field. A rare bit of the
real stuff was put in the Wildcat display window in the first half and it
was liked by the fans. The spectacular stars for Kentucky were Walker,
Brlttain, Gay, Hedges and Pegasus
Pullen. Maryville, too, showed a
cattisli adaptability for football for a
time," especially in the first quarter.
But the Maryville team was like the
montli of March. In the closing quarter they dropped out so fast the game
began to drag.
Reinforcements began to pour into
Kentucky's
trenches in the
second frame, the fresh men helping
pigskin between
to rush the puffed-uthe posts for the first touchdown.
Riddle, who had been sent in for
Hedges, called a formation intended
The new
to
mislead Maryville.
quarterback was stopped before the
last chalk line was crossed, but as he
was going down he slapped the ball
into the ready arms of Brit, who got
it over safely. The two backs had
indulged in some rapid thinking and
quick action. John Alford then kicked
goal.
The next series of plays which resulted in a touchdown, began when
one of the big Downing brothers intercepted a forward pass. The ball
was Kentucky's and about forty yards
from where the cats thot it ought to
Budge Walker, who had been
be.
running, plunging and butting like a
demon all the while, was given his
cut. He made ten yards and it was
again State's first down. Gus Gay
gained six yards on the next play and
then Walker made four more. The
two hairs seemed to be working in alternation, for the boy with the title
of Augustus was given the next play
and when the ball was passed to him
he began running for cover like a
.
This pretty open
field spurt, which netted touchdown
number two, was one of the features
of. the game.
Our LHliputlun quarterback was responsible for another feature. When
the smallest man staged one of the
largest plays of the gamo in the third
quarter,
hearts went
'if Jimmy had announced himself for
president of the depot immediately
after ho had clutched an almost perfect puns from the freckled hand or
Scrub Adair, ho would havo undoubt
edly recolved tho unanimous suffra
gette vote. Pullen, too, going in as a
ninoteen-to-nothin-

first-lin-

e

p

gun-sh-

0F

IS GOOD PLENTY

WALKER

bird-dog-

co-e-

(Continued on Pago Five.)

t.

SPIRIT

Exactly three minutes after Dr.
Master of Ceremonies, fired the
shot that started off the annual
between the
the Sophomore class, the entire
ninety-onof them, followed the steel
cable thru Clifton Pond, and the
Freshmen, 135 of them, paraded down
Rose Street like the conquering
heroes they were.

t,

undor-classme- n

e

The fun began beforo time. When
the cable was loosened from its pole
for a test botli classes began to tug
and easily the Freshmen pulled It
thru, two Sophomores, Thompson and
Sewell, following It into the pond.
This plunge into the icy depths of
Clifton Pond, whose banks were lined
witli some eight hundred people, terminated the controversy between the
clases, and with the emerging of the
rememall
dripping
sophomores,
hazardous
brance of
climbs up dizzy heights, surreptious
hidings behind dark corners and open
fights on the campus were put away.
Each class, at 1:30, assembled at the
Building, the freshmen around
tho cannon and the sophomores in
The absentees
chapel, for
were recorded and catalogued for further reference. Then they marched
to the scene of battle.
By the Hip of a coin, the sophomores
obtained the level side, forcing the
freshmen up over the hill, towards the
East. It is rumored that the
class was placed opposite the
setting sun so that their opponents
would not be blinded by the rellected
light.
Main

roll-cal- l.

foot-hold-

PLEDGE. ACTIVE ARMY

The sororities of the University
announce the following pledges:
Alpha Gamma Delta
Gertrude
Walllngford, Evelyn Panncll, Mary
Myrtle Bailey,
Helen Whitworth,
Francis Moore, Allle Carsencr, Mlnno
Jameson, Kathleen Oglesby, Clementina David.
Kappa Kappa Gamma Helen Taylor, Martha Prewltt, Irene Evans, Martha McDowell, Elizabeth Smith, Mildred Porter, Elizabeth Arnett, Nell
Arford, Eugenia Hume, Lilly Cromwell, Julia Anderson.
Kappa Delta Florence Brown, Edna Berkeley, Mayme Stormes Dunn,
Elizabeth Craft.
Chi Omega Nancy Bucner, Mary
Heron, Elizabeth Davis, Mary Adams
Talbott, Margaret Downing.
Alpha XI Delta Isabelle Dickey,
Kathryn Meglbbon, Katie Henry, Virginia Shanklin.

SIT UP FRESHMAN AND
TAKE

SPECIAL

NOTICE

If You Must "Rush" the
Ladies Do It Off the
Campus

"CRUEL

RULES"

The privileges of the Senior class
and the rules that shall govern the
underclassmen have been prepared for
publication by a committee, meeting
in Senior Heaven of the New Dorm.
It is authoritatively stated that any
infringement or any of these rules by
an underclassman, especially a freshman, will be met with summary and
severe punishment.

bald-heade- d

Each tugger was adorned with his
class colors, girls from both classes
having been honored with the task of
beribbonlng their heroes. Tho seniors,
accompanied by mustaches and canes,
acted as sponsors for tho sophomores,
while tho freshmen wore supported by
tho juniors, who had visions of a sousing at tho hands or tho sophomores
who wore present. The customary tar,
tabooed by the
dust and
authorities, wore In evidence on both
sides.

No. 5

KENTUCKY, OCTOBER 11, 1917

LEXINGTON,

Senior Rules.
No underclassman shall carry- - a
cane, wear a mustache, wear any article of clothing made or corduroy, ap1.

pear without a coat or
tho campus at any time.
2. No underclassman
shall bo
lowed on senior floor except when
companied by a senior.
bare-heade-

on

alac-

UNIV.

T

COMES AS

No

him-sui-

g

.').
Tho members of tho Senior
class must bo glvon right or way at
all times.
LASLEY PRESIDENT
().
Any student guilty or ungentle-manlOF SOPHOMORE CLASS
conduct towards a lady shall
answer for each offense.
The Sophomore class held its elecr
7.
Every student shall conduct
tion or officers Thursday afternoon
In a manner corresponding with
in chapel with tho following result:
Marlon Lasley, of Lowisburg, presi- his status.
5. No freshman shall stroll about
dent; Dorothy Mlddloton, or Lexington, vico president: Ed. Dabnoy, ot' tho campus with a lady.
I).
Under no circumstances shall a
llopklusvllle, socrotary, and Virginia
Holm M liner, or Union Star, treasurer. freshman smoke on tho campus
of his room.
Gus Gay, last year's president, pre10. Every right shall bo protected
sided at the meeting until tho now
and ovorv wrong shall bo punished.
prosidont was Installed.

y

him-soi-

out-sid- n

PLANNED

CAMPAIGl
BY Y.M.C.A.

Captain Royden From Fort $2,500 in Two Days is Aim
of the "Y" in New
Oglesthorpe Given
Campaign
the Office
ARRIVES

THIS

WEEK $185.50 IS NOW PLEDGED

With the arrival of Captain W. E.
Hoyden, U. S. A tills week, the battalion of the University begins its
new life under government control,
and the fifty members of the Officers'
Reserve Corp will hold places on the
payroll of the United States Government.
Under these provisions of the Officers' Reserve Act for College Men
the fifty men enrolled in the It. O. C.
will receive as "pin" money, nine dollars a month and an initial fourteen
dollars on the cost of the uniform.
These uniforms are to be purchased
in the open market but must conform
to army regulations.
The junior and senior officers of
the Reserve Corp, upon filling out the
blanks now on hand in the office, will
swear allegiance1" to their country and
take a military oath before coming
qualified as officers. These student
officers will attend two summer training camps of four or six weeks' duration, during their college years. After
the completion of the course in military science at the University, under
the regulations of the Officers' Reserve Act, the graduates are eligible
for appointments to commissions in
the United States Army.
Captain Royden, recently stationed
at Fort Oglesthorpe, Ga., is expected
this weeK. and upon his arrival the
payroll for the officers will be made.
In tHis Act. are specifications that the
officers will be required to drill the
battalion on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday of each week and attend
classes in military science on Monday
and Thursday.
The battalion, the largest in the
history of the University, Is rapidly
the squad movements under
the discipline of
D. R. Ellis, who will present a
to
the new combattalion

well-drllle- d

freshmau shall "break" a
senior or a junior at any University
dance.
r
4. No freshman shall present
at the head or any table at the
Mess Hall or use any form of board-luhouse slang.
3.

WAR

mandment.
Major Smoke, retired army officer
who has been previously announced as
the new commandant, did not accept
tho office.

MORTON MADE EDITOR
OF 1918 KENTUCKIAN
Samuel Helm Morton, of Owens-boro- ,
senior in tho College or Law,
was chosen editor or the Kentuckian
tho first part of tho week by a committee appointed by Virgil Chapman,
president or tho senior class.
.Morton Is especially girted for work
or this kind and tho tho publication
or the Kentuckian is a big job, there
is no doubt that a man has been
found who is fully capable of filling It.
Tho editor will complete the selection
or his staff as soon as possible.

Twenty-fiv- e

hundred dollars pledged

in two days is the aim of the University Y. M. C. A. in connection with the

National War Work of the Association.
The campaign was organized Monday night at a banquet in the Mess
Hall.
Each of the eighteen students
present pledged himself to interview
every man on the list handed him and
secure his gift or the promise of a
gift. At the same meeting $187.50 was
pledged by the workers themselves.
After the banquet Acting President
Boyd, Secretary Johnson and Captain
Brittain spoke to the men. According
to tho plan presented, each student
has until December 1 to pay his
pledge. Southern colleges are asked
for $100,000 and $2,r00 is the University of Kentucky's share.
"This means an average pledge of
$".00 from each boy in the University." said Secretary Johnson. "There
is no better way in which we can help
if we are not in the training camps,
than to contribute to this fund. Your
friends are in the camps, and the "Y"
is administering to them all the physical, mental and spiritual help that is
need your
in its power. It will
money."

DR. BUSH TO GIVE
SERIES OF LECTURES
Beginning Tuesday evening, October 23, at 7 o'clock, the Rev. Benjamin J. Bush will deliver the first of a
series of talks on Christian Fundamentals to the students and the
These talks
of the University.
will b3 given on Tuesday evening.,
from 7 to 8 o'clock, in the Association
Uoonts, in the Gymnasium Building.
Both men and women are invited.
Mr. Bush is one of the most popular
speakers who come to the University
and this series of talks will be helpful
to every student.
The following Is the program that
will be offered:
October 21!. "Life's Great Reality";
October 150, "Tho Man of Galilee":
November (i, "The Abiding Brotherhood"; November 13, "Tho Great
Classic"; November 20, "Christianity
and the War"; November 27, "Tho
Peace Program"; Decombor 14. "The
World Mind"; December 11. "The
Need or tho Hour."
rac-ult- y

STAFF MEETING.
A

meeting or the Kernel stall' will

bo hold In tho Journalism

Rooms

to-

morrow, Friday, at noon. This meeting Is of tho utmost Importance, and
all members or tho staff are requested
to bo present.

* 1
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Page Two.

STRAND

5c, 10c. and 15c.

Admission

MRS. BARTLETT

Y.M.C.A. CAMPAIGN

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P. M.

HERE. FIRST

KENTUCKY

Morris Bartlett, of
MEETS DEATH IN WAR
former president of the Ken
tucky Federation of Women's Clubs,
has been appointed by the University
Secretary From Camp Tay as nn agent for tills district In the Stanley H. Smith on U. S. S.
Wilkes Dies in Forlor Tells of "Y" Work
new emergency home demonstration
eign Waters
There
work.
Mrs. Bartlett will have an office at
$2,500 NEEDED
the Experiment Station this winter, E.N
and is anxious to communicate with
Word informing friends at this UniH. V. MoChesney, educational secevery organization in Lexington wishversity of the death of Stanley H.
retary of the army Y. M. C. A. at
ing for practical Instruction.
Smith In foreign waters was received
Camp Zachary Taylor, spoke to the
here .Monday. The letter wlilch bore
students In chapel Tuesday of the
pin. the sorrowful news was sent from
work being done among the 30,000 LOST Kappa Sigma fraternity
Reward if returned to Beard Doss. Crawford, New Jersey, the former
Ilsoldiers of Kentucky, Indiana, and
home of Mr. Smith, to Jimmy Hedges.
linois stationed at the Louisville cantonment. Following Mr. McChesney's AT THE ADA MEADE. The writer, an aunt of Mr. Smith, said
talk, Mr. S. E. Johnson, secretary of
that the family had received the mesthe University Y. M. C. A., announced
A
bill will complete sage from the War Department on
the opening here of the three-da- y
cam the week at the Ada Meade. Jack Polk, September 20, but that details of the
palgn for $2,500, which is the Unlver a clever comedian, will open the bill. fatality were not given.
sity's share of the $1,000,000 to be Little Miss Flirt Co. has a charming
Stanley Smith left the University
raised by college students of the na girl act that is bound to please. Hugh of Kentucky last May at the instance
tion as part of the $35,000,000 asked Emmet & Co. comes to the fore with of the first call for volunteers.
He
for the army Y. M. C. A. work.
a clever little playlet. The Wilhats enlisted in the yeoman service of the
Air. Aicunesney explained the or romp into action with comedy, song navy and was assigned to the U. S. S.
ganizatlon of the work at the camp and chatter predominating. The Nip- Wilkes, on which ship he was station
which is under the supervision of the pon Duo have a blend of nonsense and ad at the time of his death.
National War Work Council, and car harmony and will bring the bill to a
All who knew Stanley Smith say
ried on by a camp general secretary, fast close.
that they never came in contact with
the secretaries o fthe religious, edu
A snappy, sparkling tabloid, full of or were associated with a finer young
cational. and physical departments, girls and music, is promised the man, a youth who promised much
and near half a hundred helpers. Part patrons of the Ada Meade beginning The deceased was formerly a stu
of the money asked for the work is next Monday afternoon.
dent in the Law Department, a memneeded at Louisville for more build
Max Bloom and his Sunny Side of ber of the Phi Alpha Delta law fraings and equipment, altho nine build Broadway will be the attraction. ternity and of the Pi Kappa Alpha
ings, valued at $75,000, are now on the Though Mr. Bloom has retained the social fraternity.
While at the Unigrounds. These include an adminis old title the show will be entirely new. versity Mr. Smith utilized his spare
tration building, which seats in its Bockey,
t!ie horse
comedian, will time by doing stenographic work in
vast auditorium 5,000: seven service again be seen with the company. the main office.
buildings, each having an auditorium During the summer months he has
The relatives and friends of Mr.
seating 1,100, a complete moving pic- been taught some new tricks, among Smith may cherish and keep holy the
ture outfit, a reading rom supplied them the Charlie Chapman walk.
fact that he was not a slacker and
with books from the Louisville Public
With Tloom will be seen Alice Sher, that he has faithfully done his part
Library, and a writing room accom a girl who is both pretty and clever, in the defeat of autocracy. The Unimodating 2o0 soldiers at one time.
and can wear stunning gowns. They versity of Kentucky can also rememMr. McChesney, as secretary of the will be supported by a company of ber him as the first man, graduate or
educational department, has charge of twenty-two- .
mostly girls.
undergraduate, known to have met his
all entertainment;
under his superviThe "tab" abounds with catchy death in the struggle with Germany.
sion there is some kind of program in music, clever dancing and specialties.
of the seven buildings every The management claims it to be by
eacli
HOME EC GRADUATES
night. Twice a week there is a pic- far the best show that Max Bloom has
HOLD TO PROFESSION
ture show; at other times there are ever had. (Adv.
the best of chautauqua programs, as
in the University
No department
the National War Work Council has are often laymen, is limited to twenty
put the camp on a chautauqua circuit. minutes. Hundreds of the soldiers, can boast of a higher percentage of
teaching the
Mr. .McChesney and his
busy as their life is, pursue the daily graduates engaged in
theory and practice of their chosen
have also drawn heavily on the talent Bible reading course, and the Sunday
Home Economics
of Louisville. The soldiers often get School lesson is a resume of these. profession than the
Department. Only two of all the gradup entertainments
themselves, with The Sunday afternoon volunteer song
so
prayer meet uates of this department are not
the aid of the camp musical director. service and the
employed.
The Y. .M. C. A. of an army camp, ing are as well attended as the nightAll four of last year's graduates are
said .Mr. .MoChesney, must meet all ly entertainments, and the problem is
so all indoor and outdoor not how to get the men to come to the instructors in various parts of Kendemands,
sports known to the athletic world Y. M. C. A., but what to do with tho tucky. Frances Geisel, one of the best
"all round" girls at the University,
are open to the soldiers, and carloads crowds that come.
of equipment for all kinds of games
Taylor is typical has charge of the lunch room in the
The work at Camp
Johnnie
School.
are provided by the National Council. of that being done at other camps, Maysville Higli
According to Mr. McChesney, it is and to broaden the scope of that Cramer is instructor in Home Eco
not necessary to thrust religion down work, money and more money is need nomics in the Lincoln and Maxwell
thethroats of the men, as they turn to ed. A committee from the. local Y. schools of this city. Jessie Florence
it for helpfulness, and the Sunday M. C. A. will solicit subscriptions from has filled tho position formerly occu
services in eacli of the auditoriums tho college students. The amount al pied by Jessie Acker, graduate of two
are always crowded, probably because lotted to the University is $2,500, years ago, in the Madisonville schools.
Linda Purnell is back at the Univertho sermon, or talk, as the speakers which means $5.00 a man.
sity instructing in foods and cookery,
Mrs.

LISTED IN MAY

HERE

DENTIST

MAN

Lawrence-burg- ,

Kentucky Kernel

For any kind of dental service call on

DR. J. T. SLATON

$1.00 Per Year

127 CHEAP8IDE
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UNION.

The Union Literary Society met
Saturday night in tho society room,
with L. V. Hlschof presiding in tho. abLeon Wise
sence of tho president.
entertained thoso present witli a dramatic reading. Tho Darwinian theory
of tho survival of tho fittest was tho
t
subject of a unique discourse by
Mitchell.
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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

TLll 1 lie airt?
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Best Pictures,
Best Music
Prices 5 and 10 Cents

"O,

DISABLED TEAM MEETS
IE

I'psllon chapter

Spirit Brings
Kentucky
Hope to Wildcats in
Spite of Odds
LAST

FIGHT

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA
PARTY AT PATT HALL

IN

1912

"We're going to have to nlay mighty
hart! to beat them," said Daddy Holes,
Tuosdny, in referring to the game
with Mlama Saturday.

heavy team. One
"1 hey have
man In the lino weighs 230 pounds.
'1 hroo of the. backileld men played last
year, when they were champions of
the Ohio Conference. "Chief" Crawford is the only backileld man who did
not return this year and his place is
We know we
filled by his brother.
are to meet experienced men, because Miamn never plays a Freshman.
n-

"Our team is not in the best of condition today, and I cannot say whether
they will be improved by Saturday or
r.ot.
These men arc on the cripple
Pullen
Oldham,
Shanklin,
list:
Adair, Gay, Hodges, Walker, Bastln
D. Downing,
Brittain and Herndon
Of course they are not seriously hurt
but their injuries, sustained in the
ladt two games and in practice, would
prevent their playing their best."
Confidence is a great thing, and
Daddy is confident his Wildcats will
scare .Miami to death even if he didn't
say it. There are now possibilities
cropping out every day on the field
and new plays and tricks are being
tried. Miami, even tho it was the
champion of Ohio Conference last
year, will find the Wildcats the hard
est customers they have had this year,
.lames Park, assistant coach, saw
them defeat Ohio Northern 33 to 0
last Saturday and he still has faith in
reputation of the Wildthe
cats.
The last time Miami played U. of K
was in 1912. They won by a score of
thirteen to eight. The year before,
they drew the small end of the score
at Oxford, Ohio. The Wildcats brought
homo twelve and left them nothing.
Miami did not lose a game last year.
follows:
Tho probable- line-uold-tim- e

-

Miami.

Downing, D.

nity (lowers, ret! and buff roses, were
used for decorations, while the orchestra, Smith's Saxnphono Trio, was
screened off by large palms and ferns.
Dancing wns enjoyed from S until 12
o'clock, a light luncheon being served
at 11 o'clock.
'I he hostesses
were the following:
Active Chapter Laura Lee Jameson,
Allcen Kavanaugh,
Ruth Cnssady,
Ruth Cardwoll, Mary Meal!, Elizabeth
Card, Ada Hardesty, Mae Stevens,
Lillian llaydcn; Alumnae Mrs. Arthur Huckle, of Reed City, Mich.;
Barklcy,
Wiley, Marie
Katiierino
Maria Nlliott, of Somerset; Pearl Bastln, Mary K. Hamilton, Mary Gray
Ashbrook, of Cynthiana; Margaret
Lair, of Dayton, O.; cluqterones, Professor and Mrs. A. C. Zembrod, Dean
and Mrs. Roberts.
Tiie guests were: Misses Adelaide
Crane, Katiierino Megibben, Frances
Moore,
Fvelyn
Panell,
Elizabeth
Leonard, Virginia Shanklin, Ella
Virginia Throckmorton, ElizaGertrude Walling-ford- ,
beth Mac.Murray,
Clayton,
Norma
Elizabeth
Rochclle, Isabella Dickey, Helen Taylor, Minnie Jameson, Thelma Wright,
Edna Ucrkley, Fannie Lehman, Mamie
Davied,
Storms Dunn, Clementina
Myrtle Bailey, Mary Helen Whitworth.
Kathleen Oglesby, Ola Figg, Lelale
Gault, Elizabeth Pickett, Allie Kars-neBow-do-

r.

About one hundred young men from
the University and surrounding towns
were also present.
ENGLISH

CLUB

TO

Left End.
Murphree

Robeson

GIVE

PARTY.

The next meeting of the English
Club will be in tho form of a party,
Friday, October 12, at S p. m. at the
home of Miss Ruth Mathews, 0(50
South Limestone. All members of the
facility of the English Department
and all English major students are
cordially invited and urged to bo present for an enthusiastic beginning of
the activities for this year.

PROF. NOE SPEAKS
ON COLLEGE IDEALS

Left Tackle.

The largest attendance of the year
marked tho Y. M. C. A. meeting SunLoft Guard.
day night, when Professor J. T. 0.
Dempsey
Perroue
Noe spoke on "College Ideals."
Center.
Professor Noe spoko particularly of
Brittain
Mittendorf ..
roalth, scholarship and loyalty to the
Right Guard.
University.
Bastln
Sauer
McOlure, Warth
E. Peekloy
Right Tackle.
Left Guard.
Hebor
r.lake
Hoone
Hecker
Right End.
Conter.
.
Hurt
McGregor, Harrison
Schirmer
Quarterback.
Right Guard.
Walker
Munns
Horntlon, Moore
Corbet
Loft Half.
Right Tackle.
Gay
MaVey
Hutchcraft
Riloy
Fullback.
Right End.
Adair
Kroadmoro
Riddle, Cambron
MoKio
Right Half.
Quartorback.
will bo made from tho
Substitutions
Shanklin
Goodman
following:
Loft Half.
U. of K.
Miami.
Oldham
Dollrovoy, Wllhelm F. Ileokley
Coulter
Fullback.
Left End.
Pullen, Hnugh
llorntlon, Mahoney Crawford
Stoll
Right Half.
Tackle.
Left
Goodfellow

Downing, C.

-

W.
BY

Alpha Gamma

U. of K.

Sexton, II

of

Delta cnfortalnod with n tlance at Patterson Hall Saturday evening, October
A.
Dahlias, glatllolas and the frater-

Page Three

UNIV.

B.

Marlins

P. II. ROBARDS

Barber

COLLEGE

SHOP

Y.M.G.A.

The Closest Shop to University
HAIR

Months'
Seven
Report
Shows Bi'oatl Field of
Activities

Cleaning
Suits Pressed

CUT

Shave
Shampoo
Glover's Shampoo.

.15

.2.
.50
152

MEMBERS

255

NOW !;',

TAILOR

BOYS'

Suits Dry Cleaned and Pressed.
$1.20
..

S. Limestone St., Lexington, Ky.

The following briof statement will
give the student body some conception of the work that was accomplishII air Cut
25c
PROGRESSIVE SHOE
ed by tho Young Men's Christian AsGeo. T. Martin Barber Shop
REPAIRING SHOP
sociation in tho University last year.
III!)
HAST MAIN ST II HUT
My Work and Prices Always
llnseinent Opp. I'IkiimiIv ltott-The general exodus of students the
1T.AIX. SIIOWKII AND
Keep Me Busy.
first of April practically brought all
TTKKI li HAiKS
I'HI K ( HA IKS Host of Sirlri140 South Limestone.
activities to an end, so that only seven
months were allowed for work.
Membership records for tho pre- Patronize Our Advertisers
vious year were not available and
.J.D.PURCELL CO.
membership in the association was
LEXINGTON,
KY.
CORRECTION.
put on a new basis, that of service
NEWEST FALL MODES IN
Two hundred
aiid Christian ideals.
Mr. and Mrs.
Qulnn hold their
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS,
members were enrolled.
and
dances on Tuesdays and Friday not
The rooms were freshly kalsomined Tuesdays,
SKIRTS and WAISTS.
Thursdays and Saturdays,
Pleasingly Priced.
and made as attractive as the funds as in
last week's advertisement.
would permit. The Edison was pro
IS
vided witli
records. The local
papers and a dozen county papers, toleading magagether with twenty-fivzines furnished reading matter. One
hundred volumes of light fiction was
donated by tho First Methodist
was proChurch. Free stationery
vided.
Chess and checkers helped to
while away some vacant hours. The
larger room was used by both gleo
clubs. The Strollers, for class meetings and in other ways.
Nearly $2,000 in work was provided
for students.
Three socials were conducted during the year. The reception to new
students was attended by nearly four
hundred. The Freshman stag was the
occasion for a pleasant evening for
sixty freshmen. One hundred and
twenty-fivpounds of candy was
AND
served to more than four hundred in
preMarch. Only a lack of funds
THIS NEW IDEA SHOP BEGAN PROVING
vented other events.
Ministers, business men, Y. M. C.
TO THE UNIVERSITY MEN TWO YEARS
representatives of tho
A. secretaries,
boards spoke to the students
church
AGO THAT IT IS USELESS AND FOOLISH
on Sunday evenings. The average at.
TO HELP PAY THE BIG RENTS AND HIGH
tendance was
Ten professors and twenty students
FALUTIN FIXTURES OF STORES WHEN
attended tho State Student Conference
stuat Georgetown in December. Two
BUYING CLOTHES.
dents and the secretary were at tho
Student Volunteer Conference at
and the secretary and one student
THE REMARKABLE AND EVER-GROWINwere at tho Mine Ridge Conforonco in
June.
RESPONSE TO OUR ECONOMY PLAN
A number of students have engaged
in this service at tho reformatory on
SHOWS THAT YOU FELLOWS KNOW A
Sunday afternoon, in teaching first aid
GOOD THING WHEN YOU SEE IT.
in tho public schools, In teaching SunSunday afterday School classes on
noon at tho Odd Follows and Pythian
Homes for Orphans, and in Roy Scout
REALSPEED THIS FALL. SEE OUR FIRST

Sam Gullo

I

fifty-fiv-

-

e

e

Your Attention

fOR A FEW MOMENTS
PLEASE THAT

ISIF

YOU
ARE INTERESTED IN

WHAT IS GOOD AND
ECONOMICAL IN FALL
WINTER WEARABLES

e

forty-five-

He-re- a

G

work.
During December and June, tho secretary visited Kentucky Wesloynn,
Uoroa, Centre- and Georgetown
and tho Eastern Kentucky Normal School in tiie interest of tho State
Committee or Y. M. C. A.
Last spring when tho troops were
brought to Camp Stanley, about two
weeks' time was given to getting the
association work under way for tho
soldiers. Volunteer service was given
by tho presidout of our association for
a week.
Tho following financial stntomont appears in another part of tho papor.

OFFERING OF NEW FALL AND WINTER
SAMPLE

LINES

NOW

$

.35

Alterations a Specialty.
All Work Guaranteed.
PHONE 1550-Y- .
S. Lime.
Lexington, Ky.

READY.

HATS, CLOTHES, UNDERWEAR.

aAHGASf STOP

FALL

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Page Four.

Now that Wo arc In this war wo
must fight It to n finish.
Wo must
"hoar it that our oppressor may be
awaro or us." Tho last vostigo of
militarism must bo blotted from the
earth.

The Kentucky Kernel
jar

Published
of the

l

by the student body
Tlmixln.v throughout the College
itlMTsttj- of Kentucky, for the benefit of tho students,
alumni ami faculty of tlio Institution,

THE KENTUCKY

FOOB

la the official nowiipjipcr of Iho University.
It Is lasuod with n view of fnrnlahhig to lis subscribers nil tTto oollogo news
of Kentucky, together with a digest or itomi of Intorait concerning the
KISRM13L

universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
Entered at Lexington PoBtofffco as seeoml'dlnas ninll mat tor.
EDITORIAL STAP"F.

Ktill

D.

Woods

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Plggott
J. Thornton Council
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss .Mlldrod Graham
Charles Planck
.
Frederick Jackson
Sam .Morton
.Miss Eliza

.M.

...

r

Agriculture
Engineering
Phllosophiun
Literary Societies
Patterson Hall

Leo .McLean
.Mrs.

1

F

Managing Editor
Associate Editor
"Squirrel Pood"
Sporting Editor
Fonturo Editor

John J. Lonian
O. .Mayas

Virgil Chapman
.Miss Virginia Holm Milnor
REPORTERS.

Henry Grohan.

.Miss Margtiret Wilkinson.

BUSINESS STAFF.
Eugene Wilson

Kusinoss .Manager

Y. M. C. A.

The Kernel hopes and believes that the Y. M. C. A.
is, by its own manly, straightforward efforts, placing
itself in the light in which it should appear to every

thinking college man.

The Y. M. C. A., on foreign battlefields and in the
camps of our soldiers at home, has d'one more than any
other one thing to reverse the moral conditions that
have hitherto permeated camp life. Who can tell but
that we ourselves may be cared for by them, somewhere thousands of miles from home, before the world
is made safe for democracy?
At present, the Y. M. C. A. is doing more for us
than we, at first thought, realize. One of the chief factors determining the respect with which a degree is regarded by the world is the morale of the institution
from which it comes. It is th