xt7c2f7jqj8p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c2f7jqj8p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19200206  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  6, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  6, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7c2f7jqj8p section xt7c2f7jqj8p The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY FEB. 6, 1920

VOL. X.

COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES

ALUMNAE CLUB TO
GIVE CARD PARTY

COMPETITION INTENSE SLIGHT DECREASE
IN STROLLER TRY-OUT

PLANS FOR RECEPTION Rehearsals Are Well Attended as

Se-

SECOND REGISTRATION

lection of Parts Draws Near

Students and Faculty Unite
In Entertainment of
Legislature
At the timo that the Kernel went
to press, President MoVey had issued
the following announcement for the
entertainment of the Kentucky Legis-

lature:
Students and faculty will assemble
p. ei. along the driveway leading
from the main entrance to the Administration Building. The members
f the Legislature will walk from the
cars to the chapel accompanied by a
company of cadets and the band. Faculty and students are asked to fill the
chapel to overflowing. After brief ex
ercises in chapel tha Legislators will
be taken on an automobile ride
around the University grounds. Then
will follow a reception at Patterson
Hall by the young women of the University. In the evening entertainment will be furnished by the Lexington Board of Commerce at the Phoenix
Hotel. There will be no classes
Thursday afternoon.

at

22

WENS GIVES REPORT
F S. V. M. CONVENT

Secretary Echoes Appeal
For Workers in Foreign Countries
KERNEL TO BE SENT TO
ALL KY. HIGH SCHOOLS

In accordance with it's policy of extension, the University has decided to
send at least two copies of the Kernel to all accredited high schools of
the State. This is a step long contemplated by' President McVey, but
could not be attempted until estimates
of the cost and work required could
be obtained and now it is assured that
each accredited high school in the
State will receive each week at least
two copies lof the Kernel.
This will greatly help to bring about
a more cordial understanding, of the
ideals, aims and activities of the student body of the lUniversity of Kentucky, on the part of the high school
students of the State, as well as their
parents and friends at home.
The Kernel in the high schools
will not only link the University more
closely to them, but will furnish a
source of good reading matter for the
students and will no doubt arouse a
community of interest and a feeling
of fellowship throughout the State.
SENIORS, NOTE

I

There will be an important meeting
of the senior class Friday afternoon
in chapel. The meeting was called
by Mary Turner, vice president of the
class, for the purpose of discussing
the question of electing a now president, Ed. Dabney having completed
his work at the University, has accepted a position as lawyer with a
firm in Shreveport, Louisiana.
Other important business matters
will be discussed and it Is Imperative)
that every member. of tho class be at
the meeting.

Entrants

Sixty-seve- n

Rehearsals for the parts In "The
Climbers," the play chosen by tho
Strollers for their annual production,
aro being held every night In the
Recreation Hall at Patterson Hall.
Interest and competition are Intense.
The play is thought by some critics
to be 'Clyde Fitch's masterpiece, 'and
affords parts for twelve men and ten
women.
The cast will be chosen from the
best talent in the organization, and
readings of the play are progressing
in such a way that final announcement
of the parts will be made this week.
The play will be presented at the
Lexington Opera House the last of
March and repeated in nearby towns
at later dates.

Secretary R. V. Owens gave a report in chapel Tuesday of the Student
Convention
Movement
Volunteer
which was held at Des Moines, Iowa,
4 and was atDecember
tended by eleven of the Universitr
students.
"There were 8,000 regular delegates
1,000 universities and
representing
colleges from the United States and
other
Canada and from forty-threnations. Leaders were brought from
all parts of tho world to tell us of the
needs and conditions of other countries that wo might help to satisfy
those needs," said Mr. Owens. So
you can realize what a great privilege
was ours.
"Mr. Haggeron, in a little book,
'You're tho Hope of the World,' recently published, said that young
America was the hope of the world.
It is true that England has her preachers, doctors, lawyers and statesmen,
but they are getting old and her
young ones lies sleeping on the battlefields of Europe. It is the present
student generation that will take
England's place. It is from the students of today that the leaders of
tomorrow will come.
"These nations are needing farm
ers, teachers, engineers, everything;
In fact, there is not a profession represented in this University or in any
other university whose exponents are
not needed. There is a wonderful op
portunity for service. Tho doors of
the world aro wido open," said Mr.
Owens In conclusion, "and every man
and woman has a chance to take that
which Is vital to those in need."
e

Patronize Our Advertisers

Fail

To Make Up Loss in
University's Ranks
CLASSES

RESUMED

The second semester of the
scholastic year of the University
began Tuesday, with a total registration of 946 shown in the registrar's
office Wednesday at noon. This numnew and
ber Includes the
former students who have entered for
the ensuing term, but who were not
at the University of Kentucky last
term. The total registration Is slightly less than the number, 989, who
were in college at the close of the
last semester.
Several reasons have been given
for this decline in attendance, including the natural reaction following the
war; the high cost of living in Lexington ; and the lack of dormitories at
In a few cases,
the University.
courses have been completed this semester by students who were out of
school for one term while serving in
the army.
Among the former students who
have returned this year are Eliza
and Katherlne Weakley. Miss
Piggott, who was graduated in the
class of '19, was the managing editor
of the Kernel two years ago and tho
of the Kentuckian last
f
year. She is retaining her desk as
State Editor of the Lexington Herald while taking graduate work at
Kentucky in sociology and the Red
Cross Institute. Miss Weakley was a
member of the Kernel staff last year
before she was compelled to leave
school on account of ill health'. She
has returned this term to complete
her course.

1919-192- 0

sixty-seve-

n

Pig-got- t-

editor-in-chie-

1920 BASEBALL

April
April
April
April
April
May
May
May

May
May
May

SCHEDULE.

Georgetown, at Lexington.
Michigan, at Lexington.
16 Miami, at Lexington.
17 Centre, at Danville.
30 Tennessee, at Lexington.
1 Tennessee, at Lexington.
6 Cincinnati, at Cincinnati.
7 Miami, at Oxford.
8 Oepauw, at Depauw.
15 Georgetown, at Lexington.
22 Georgetown,
at George3

10

town.
May 25

No. 17

Centre, at Danville.

STUDENTS INVITED
TO MAXWELL PLACE
The students and faculty of the
University will be the guests at a reception to bo glvon Tuesday night
by Dr. and Mrs. McVey,
from
at their home, Maxwell Place, on tho
campus. Mrs. McVey will bo assisted
in entertaining by student assistant
hostesses.

ATTEND FARM

eneflt For Scholarship Fund To Be
at Phoenix Hotel.
On Saturday afternoon, February 7,
tho Alumnae Club of the University
will give a card party at tho Phoenix
Hotel for the benefit of tho scholarship fund. The hours will be from
two to five. Tables may be reserved
in advance by applying to Miss Margaret McLaughlin. Candy and prizes
will be contributed by faculty and
students of the University. The committee in charge of the party are: ,
Misses Margaret King, Margaret
Tuttle, Mary Didlake, Margaret McLaughlin, Linda Purnell, Eliza Clay
Buchignani;
Mason, and Theresa
,
Mesdames A. F.
Maurice
Wiehl, and Mrs. F. Kesheimer.
She-use-

LOAN COMMITTEE
GIVES GOOD REPORT
No Necessity For Students

To Leave
University For Financial
Reasons.

The University Loan Committee,
whose funds were almost exhausted,
has received $700 in the last week
and is raising more. This committee
which has helped many worthy men
and women to get through college,
finds itself in great need of money,
having exhausted the alumni fund of
$1,050 and the small University fund
of $150.

According to a recent survey made
by the University Loan Committee, of
which Professor W. E. Butt is chairman, 277 students are earning money
are earn
while at college. Forty-siing enough each week to pay all of
their expenses and an additional sev
enty-fivmake enough to meet one- s
of their expenses.
half or
With summer earnings taken into ac
count, 125 young men (nearly one out
of five), are going through tho University on their own resources, meeting all their expenses from their Individual earnings. A few young women
also support themselves while taking
the regular courses?
The committee wishes it understood
that when a student proves real need
for funds and is able to show a record
for scholarship and a reputation for
industry and assiduity in his studies
that is above criticism, he may be
certain of help. No loan is made to
a student who has been in residence
at the University for a shorter period
than one semester and a preference is
shown to juniors and seniors.
There Is also a Southern Railway
Loan Fund of $1,000, which is available only to students of the College
of Agriculture whoso homes are In
counties traversed by the lines of tho
donors.
Tho duration of the average loan
Ordinarily the
is about two years.
noto becomos duo ono year from the
student's graduation.
x

e

two-third-

Patronize Our Advertisers

E

Notable Kentucky Speakers
on

Four-Da- y

Program
j

URGED
The Eighth Annual Farm and Home
Convention held at the University of
Kentucky from January
inclu
sive, and attended by more than a
thousand persons, was considered the
most successful of local farm conventions yet held.
The convention program was for
mally opened by Dr. McVey, who ad
dressed the delegates on the subject
of "Better Agriculture."
He urged
the tilling of more land by the own
ers, better education for country pet-pi- e
and greater
among
farmers. He also told the audience
of farmers and their wives that the
great task before them today is to
eradicate the existing evils of the
tenant-owne- r
plan.
Mat S. Cohen, formerly State Com
missioner of Agriculture was another
speaker of the first morning.
He
spoke on "What of the Future," discussing horse and Jack stock breeding in Kentucky. He was most optimistic regarding the future of the
breeding industry in Kentucky.
One of the most important addresses
of the meeting was that given by Professor E. A. Trowbridge, of the University of Missouri, an expert in animal husbandry.
His subject dealt
with the value of draft horse blood
in mule production.
In the afternoon, W. C. Hanna, Commissioner of Agriculture, spoke on
what can bej done to make the stallion and jack more profitable to their
owners.
Style Show In Little Theater.
The feature of Tuesday's program
was a style show, which was given in
the Llttlo Theater, under the direction of the Department of Home Economics. Miss Cornell spoke on the
standardization of dress in America,
and the exhibit was most delightfully,
given In the form a tea, In which members of the classes in dressmaking,
tailoring and millinery appeared before the audience, dressed In wearing apparel which had been made in
these classes. Miss Cornell explained
the value of points illustrated by each
article, giving 'the cost of making
compared with the price which would
probably be asked in tho shops.
Dr. H. IC. Taylor, chief office of
Farm Management, Washington, D.
C, addressod tho general assembly In
chapel on that same day.
L. J. iHorlachor was another speaker on Wednesday's program. Ills subject was "Some Lessons of tho Past
Year in the Grading and Pooling of
Wool." J. R. Humphrey spoke on "A
Proposed Wool Pool."

it

27-3-

(Ceatlaued

oa Page 7)

rfi

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2

STRAND

CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING

ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

THE STRAND

"THE BEST ORCHESTRA
EVERYBODY

IN THE
SAYS SOI

Y

LATE

PAYMENTS

Seniors and Heads of Organizations Must Settle Up
With Business Manager
Won! comes from the Kcnlucklnn
office that the nnnu.il is being held
back because both organizations and
individuals nro still negligent nbout
paying fees asked by the staff for
space in the Kcntuckian.
Not only is each organization or
senior running the risk of having the
year book appear this spring without
n picture which may be left out enarc made
tirely unless payments
soon, but the whole publication is being retarded. Those who have boon
here before remember how eagerly
each student awaits the appearance
of the Kcntuckian, and how desirous we all are to have this book to
take home with us. This year, the
staff has worked unusually hard, in
order that the copy might be in earlier than usual, and that the material
might be in the hands of the publisher
in time to insure the publication of
the Kentuckian early in spring.
The seniors have been especially
negligent in this respect, and the
Kernel is sure that those who have
been guilty have not realized the full
necessity of an immediate payment.
The class of 1920 bids fair to get out
an annual which will exceed all former records. This cannot be accomplished unless every member of the
with the staff;
class will
unless every head of every organization will see to it that the money necessary for the publication of the picture in which he is interested, is in
the hands of the business manager of
the Kentuckian.
Moonlight on a Garbage Can.
Silver sheen and shine,
Delicate tracery of line,
Shadowy hint of a handle there,
Kissed by a breeze of soft night air,
Odors of past delights and thrills,
Garnished with parsley's pale green
frills,
Shades of roses dead all these years,
Bringing to eyes the moisture of

tears
There's a dreamy lure In thy yearlong span,
garmoon-li- t
Thou
bage can.
By A. KERR DOGUE.
palely-illumine-

PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT, METRO,
REALART, GOLDWYN and

OPEN 10 A. M. TO 11 P. M.

SELECT PICTURES.

Adults, 18c, plus 3c war tax, Total 30c.
Children, 18c, plus 2c war tax, total 20c.

SOUTH'

BRITISH EDUCATORS TO
VISIT BIG COLLEGES

KENTII

HOME OF

By Helen C. Denman.
the
iCollegc
women throughout
country, graduates
and undergrad-

this nrrangement,
but the Rhodes
scholarships
nro awarded only to
graduate Htudcnts nnd do not involve
nny intcrchnngo between the countries concerned. Under tho plans of
the proposed federation, Polish students in economics may come to Columbia University
additional
for
courses; American students of architecture mny finish their propnrntlon
at tho Sorboune; gp,,! students of
history mny study for their theses nt
Cambridge,
nnd so on Indefinitely,
through nil tho permutations and comns
binations.
And undergraduates,
well
ns graduates, may benefit by
these provisions.
Interchange of students will mean
In promoting "understanding
much
and friendships between the university women of different nations" but
the most direct method of insuring
mutual understanding is at the fountain-head,
through the teaching force
of a nation. The proposed federation
provides for an interchange of professors and Junior lecturers. The larger
men's universities in the East have
already tried this experiment but the
exchange has not been general. The
proposed federation will make an interchange of the teaching forco of nations universal, with a consequent effect ion the understanding between
countries which will be readily recognized as incalculable and which deserves a chapter in itself.

REMEMBER

"The

Best

In

Moving

Picture"

THE CLASSY PLACE
FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS
HOME-MAD-

E

CANDIES AND LUNCHES

uates, canot fail to take keen interest in the visit to the United States
at this time, of the three distinguished British university women,
"EVERYTHING NEW"
Professor Caroline F. E. Spurgcon,
Dr. Winifred Cullis
nnd Mrs. Ida
Smedloy MacLcan.
Besides being
representatives of a university training whoso standards wo in America
FOR FRUITS, CANDIES, NUTS
are growing more nnd more to admire, Miss Spurgcon, Dr. Cullis nnd
PHOENIX BLOCK
.Mrs. MacLean are here to promote a
plan for the uniting of college women around the globe in a vast federBECKER DRY CLEANING CO.
ation. College women the world over
have a feeling of solidarity. A movement based on their sense of common
understanding
and purpose cannot
fall to make a strong appeal.
The federation, moreover, is backed
by many of the leading educators in
WE ARE ALWAYS CN THE JOB WHEN YOU WANT ANYTHING
CLEANED, PRESSED OR REPAIRED.
America, including President Mary E.
Woolley of Mount Holyoke, Acting
PHONE 621-President Helen Taft of Bryn Mawr,
Dean Virginia Gildersleeve, of Barnard, President William" A. Nellsou of
Smith nnd others.
The proposed federation is no unsubstantial dream. A tentative constitution has already been drafted,
the provisions of which are definite
(Incorporated)
and detailed. The purpose of the
W. B. GRIGGS
federation, as stated in the draft,
114 N. UPPER
PHONE 210
Opposite Agriculture Building
"shall be to promote understanding
CIGARETTES, TOBACCO
friendship between the univer- CIGARS,
nnd
AND SOFT DRNKS
sity women of different nations and
thereby further their interests and deSTEP IN AND SEE ME
velop sympathy
and mutual helpfulness between the peoples of the
world." Membership in the federation
"shall be open to national federations
of university women which are approved by the Council," the central
executive committee of the federation. Provisions are made for a
president, executive secretary
and
councillors, for central offices and
expenses.
It i3 when we come to the means
by which the purpose of the federation is to be carried out, that college
women will be chiefly interested, for
the means are almost entirely educaOFFER SPECIAL VALUES IN
tional. Provisions are to be made so
that through the agency of the federation, college or university students
may be interchanged among the coun$39.50
Warm Winter Overcoats
tries represented in the union. The
Rhodes scholarships have already faUnion and Two-Piec- e
$1.90
Underwear
miliarized us with something like

McGurk & O'Brien

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE

Cleaners
That

Satisfy

Cropper s Laundry

Graves, cox & Co.
at

at

New style in Soft Hats, special at

$49.00

$4.50

JUST TO FEW LEADERS TO "SHOW YOU"
THE GREAT VALUES TO BE HAD HERE.

SUIT SPECIAL
Suits That Appeal to the Young Fellow.
Form-fittin- g
d
models, single and
effects. Greys, Browns, Blues, Greens and Scotch
Mixtures. Selected from our highest-grad- e
suits
all this season's goods.
double-breaste-

Stores

INCORPORATED

firoves, Cox & Co.
Incorporated.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 8

HAVEN OFFERED TO
LEAP-YEA-

R

VICTIMS

History lms proved that nil Brent
customs nnd Institutions in the course
of time fulfill their mission nnd thus
becoming useless, pass away. Wlmt
else can wo expect of tho Women's
Tompernnca Union, thnt
Christian
which nfter
honored organization
years of struggle has nt length gained
its point nnd fulfilled tho purpose for
which it wns brought into being.
As we spenk of W. C. T. U.'s, however, wo nre reminded thnt not nil of
them have cither gained their point
or lived through their period of usefulness. Back in tho dim past, 1912
to be exact, in another one of those
fateful yenrs In which woman felt
herself called upon to take tho initiative, a bnnd of men, feeling some net
necessary to protect them ngninst n
common foe, an enemy employing
means to gain its end far moro effective than the tnnks of the British, or
the poisonous gas of the Hun, organized n W. C. T. U. This organization
by Its timeliness served Its purpose of
enabling the men to hold themselves
intact as effectively as modern labor
unions serve in the retarding of the
world's welfare.
The letters W. C. T. U. had the sigmeaning,
Can't
"Women
nificant
Touch Us." It is expected that the
local chapter of this organization will
before many months.
be
A diligent search has failed to disclose
or procure the old constitution and
s
but such an organization by
the name itself defines its purposes
and attracts to it thousands as a haven
of refuge.

KENTUCKY'S REQUEST
FOR FUNDS DELAYED
Requests of the University of Kentucky for additional appropriations
will not come up for discussion in
the Legislature for several weeks. The
budget committee, which will have to
pass upon the requests, is now far
behind in its work. It is expected the
requests from the University of Kentucky and the two State Normal
Schools will be presented to the committee separately. The appropriation
asked by the University is to provide
means of erecting new dormitories
and making other improvements.

Down Town

University Book Store

Meeting Place

The College Store

for

For College People

University Boys

Text Books

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

Pennants

High Class

Kodak Hooks

Haberdashery

Fountain Pens

College Boys Styles in Our Special Designed Clothes

DOBBS FIFTH AVENUE HATS
MANHATTAN SHIRTS

Down Town Store
233 West Short

Basement Main
Building University

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

Geddes & Luigart

Manunoih Garage Co.

Phoenix Block
GENE SULLIVAN

"Let's Get Acquainted"

Studebaker
Automobiles

Ours is the Quality Shop
The finest and most complete exclusively retail Optical establishment
anywhere in the South.
A faithful and accurate Optical Service in all its branches.
EYES examined by an Optometrist intimately familiar with the most
Intricate problems of refraction.
The grinding of the lenses, the expert fitting and all other details
are accomplished within our establishment.

That Good Gulf Gasoline
and Supreme Auto Oils

WE FEATURE ONE DAY SERVICE

Fayette Optical Shop

SOUTH CAROLINA

Everything for the Automobile

H. CLAY

East Main Street.

Dick Webb, President.

WELSH &

Optometrist

ODENBAUGH,

ITOAV

PRINTING CO.

COLLEGE STATIONERY

WANTS FRAT3.

(Gamecock.)
Tho student body of the University
of South Carolina has gone on record as favoring the return of tho open
fraternity to the campus. Requests
will be made of the legislature to repeal the present law that prohibits the
existence of a fraternity at a Stato
In case of a repeal tho
Institution.
trustees of tho (university will bo
askod for their approval.
Fraternities were abolished at tho
university In 1898 In accordance with
un act passed by tho legislature of
that year. Since that time several
attempts havo been mado to have tho
law ropealed, but all have failed so
far. Tho Btudout body is of tho opinion that tho legislature will tako
action on tho matter at this
session.

Lexington, Ky.

Phone 3972

W. Main St.

313-31- 5

NOTICE!
of
All Students having snapshots
campus scenes are urged to hand
them in at the Kentuckian office before the end of tho week. The snapshot campaign ends this week and
students intending to enter the contest are urged 1o hand their snapshots
in at as early a date a3 possible.

GEO. LUGIART

GEO. GEDDES

(Incorporated)

GRADDY-RYA-

N

ENGRAVING

CO.

AND

Incorporated

DIE STAMPING

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE

FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS

Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

124-12-

Pianos
Player Pianos
Columbia Grafonolas

DE LUXE
Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

Aeollan-Vocallo-

2nd Floor
Laxlngton, Ky.

Phont

Established
1899

n

Records
Musical Instruments
Player Rolls
Sheet Music

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishing

Competent Home Tailors
lank 4 Trust Building,

PHONE 592

The E. C. Christian Music Co.

P. ANGELUCCI

Unlan

LEXINGTON, KY.

N. LIMESTONE

8

Pianos a Specialty

177--

f:

205-20-

7

East Main

Lexington, Ky.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for tho benefit of tho students,
nlumnl and faculty of tho institution.
The Kentucky Kernel Is the official newspaper of the University. It
Is issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all tho college news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of Interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.

fubllshed ovory Friday throughout tho College year

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofllce as Becond-class

EDITORIAL STAFF.
A. GAVIN NORMENT.
Louise Will ..

..EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

--.Managing Editor
.Assistant Managing Editor
Editor
.Squirrel Food Editor
Sport Editor
Exchange Editor
Feature Editor

Robert Halblo ....
Adele Slado
Mary Elizabeth James.
Donald Dinning
Margaret McClure
Frances Marsh

Co-c-

--

REPORTERS.
Elizabeth Marshall, Elizabeth Caul, Mary Archer Doll, James A. Dixon.
Margaret Smith, Martha Duckman, Robert Mitchel, Terril Corn.
Harry Cottrell.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager
J. P. Barnes
Circulation Manngcr
H. B. Loyd
Assistants
J. Burton Prewltt, Gilbert Smith
ON TO VICTORY.

j

"Lives of great men all remind us
We must make our lives sublime."
February, tho birth month of Washington, Lincoln, Edison, Dickens
and numerous others who have left "footprints on the sands of time,"
should be a lucky time to start a new semester. The slates are clean.
Those who weathered the storm of examinations are ready to take a new
lease on life and those who were unfortunate enough to be shipwrecked
on the rocky shores are sadder, ,perhaps, but oh, so much wiser.
The spirit. of the last semester has been splendid and wo feel- that
the students as a body are to be congratulated upon the good work done
and the high average of grades made. As we look back upon Jast year
when tho terrible epidemid of influenza made all scholastic progress almost
bu realize J'the overwholnlingadvantages which.
impossible,
A year ago we began the sec-- '
February, 1920,ii6lds over February-lblOond semester with a knowledge that practically all the work of two semed- ters had to be completed in one. It is our obligation to make the quality
of work for the coming semester far superior to that of last year.
However ,the dire results of all work and no play are familiar to us
and the social committee, to make such effects impossible, has arranged
all
a brilliant calendar for tho coming term, with dances, plays and other
dates from now till June.
functions filling all week-enOn behalf of the faculty and students, the Kernel wishes to take this
to the University. Of tho sixty-ninopportunity to welcome the
are women. It is most gratifynow students registered twenty-seveing to see the vapid grovth of tho Graduate School in which eighty-threstudents have entered since December first. We are glad to have you
it
all and want you to feel at home. Affiliate yourselves with campus organizations, the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Join the literary and oratorical
societies and glee clubs. There is a place for each one of you. This is
final warning to all.
Don't let the call of spring, which is not far away, and the Campustry
Department, which is always with us, lure you away from Chemistry Lab.
Buckle down. Let each one do his utmost to make this the biggest and
best semester the University of Kentucky has ever known.
.

;

And will let you try ngnln.
Then start in nncw, nnd try and get

But

I

doubt it, even then.

CLOSES

e

n

me.

Ho: Oh no, it's only the way the
brush was made.
Mademoiselle On bit says: 'i'Wash-Jlngtowas my 'favorite hero until I
discovered that his birthday comes
on Sunday this year. I really believe
I prefer Lincoln."

I saw something green where the sun-

light cast
A shadow, and I cried:

"THE SONG OF THE FLUNKER."

"Ah, Spring

"We fought a good fight," cried the
at last!"
victors.
" 'Twas a
But like a ghost, the fleeting vision
yelled the
past
flunks.
It was only a Freshman.
The prof's all sigh'ed; Some failures
cried.
In
The Janitors burned
The Kentucky Colonel says: "That
chunks.
doggone groundhog saw his shadow
and now we're in fo' six moah weeks
r
fights are so funny.
These
of wintah weathah."
Just a stampede for A's and B's.
Tho Knight of the Lexington Drug Then sad is tho tale; That goes thru
the mail,
"From the looks of my
remarks:
And say's all we got was Es.
schedule, I expect to carry one subject and drag about five."
Don't say that you have been mistreated,
Red Huekel (to Morris standing in
And for another chance you'll try;
lino to register): Hold that check
closed up tight in your hand before Don't say: "Whut's tho use"; nor give
an excuse
you give it in.
Or pull some stale alibi.
Walter Morris: Why so, Red?
Red Huekel: So it won't be a cold Just pray that tho profs may be
check, you nut!
"quiz-pads-

mid-yea-

"

CONFERENCE ATTENDED
BY UNIVERSITY

n

'

.

.

Clinic:
or bust."
Cynic:

.

'

n--

"I'm going to win that girl
"Probably both."

Jester.

ALUMNUS SUCCESSFUL
IN BANKING BUSINESS

e

FOOD

15.

FEBRUARY

Then if you arc ono of the victors,
And are burdened with A pluses Bids For Annuals Outnumand such.
ber Former Records
Don't try and got flip, nnd start
shoot'in your Hp.
The subscription campaign for the
For you suro'll wind up with a Kentucklan in now In full swing. According to tho students soliciting subcrutch.
scriptions tho number of Kontucklans
Now life is all full of bumbers;
ordered this year bids fair to far outCramed full of rough spots, and number those of former years. Stuknots;
dents desiring annuals this year are
Worries, and trials, and hnrd luck for urged to pay their subscriptions withmiles,
in tho next two weeks in order that
And it is paved with the roughest extra copies of the annual may bo
printed if necessary. Since tho num
of rocks.
bcr of annuals printed is necessarily
So don't yell "enough" if you are limited, students handing in their, or
failing;
ders late cannot be sure of getting
Just buckle, and try 'em once more. copies. Owing to the fact that tho
The little mistake will n'er overtake supply of copies in the last few years
You, Bud, for you'ro grit totho core. has exceeded tho demand, many stu
FRIZZY.
dents have been disappointed in get
ting their annuals and those wishing
Ho: I've been finding a number of 1920 Kentuckians are urged to profit
black hairs in my clothes brush lately. by the experiences of former years
She: Why, my goodness, I have and order their annuals early. The
brown hair. You must be tricking campaign closes February 1(5.

d

new-come-

FORMER

11.

K. FACULTY

thru;

Mr. M. Holbrook, an alumnus of
the University, is now located at the
Kobe Branch of the International
Banking
Corporation.
Association
Holbrook, after- leaving the University enrolled in a class in banker's
training offered by the corporation,
and was soon listed for foreign service.
The same opportunity is offered by
America's largest banking institution
The National City Bank of New
York to other University of Kentucky
men, who qualify for its Foreign Service Scholarship.
-

Seniors, juniors and sophomores
will be selected soon from colleges
throughout the country to enter the
Bank's Training Class for Foreign
Service. While in training the men
will receive salaries sufficient to meet
their expenses.
Undergraduates
will spend their
summers in Now York City, learning
the "ropes" of the banking business.
They will follow the laboratory method of doing real bank work in Wall
Training of the scholarship
Street.
students is under supervision of the
Bank's Educational Department.
After graduation students will finish training and be assigned to one
of the more than GO foreign branches
of the bank. These are located In
South and Central America and Europe. Some students may be assigned
to branches
of the International
Banking Corporation, located chiefly
in the Orient.
The bank announces that its resources now exceed one billion dollars. This is a now record for any
bank in tho Western Hemisphere.
New branches are constantly being
started, enabling students to advance
in new fields when assigned.

i

U.

MEN

Repreentajties ,eet
witn iransyivania'uin?
cials in Interest of
Library

Few of tho people of Lexington and
fewer still of the people of the Stato
and county know that here in the
Library of Transylvania College is
a collection of rare volumes of value
and interest not to be equaled in the
South a