xt7c2f7jrx0k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c2f7jrx0k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky 1951 athletic publications  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Football Media Guides University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1951 image University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1951 1951 2015 true xt7c2f7jrx0k section xt7c2f7jrx0k UNI r:            
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I

 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
1 951
I FOOTBALL BROCHURE
rl
1
CONTENTS
Facts About U. of K. .............................,.............,.....................,.................. 3
Information For Working Press B. Radio .......,....................,....................A,,.. 4-S
1951 Schedule ...............,.................,.......................,.,........................,.........r. 5
1950 Success Story .,......,......,........................,.......................,.,.............,....... 6
The Plan For ’52 .............................................,....................................,......... 6
The Outlook For 1951 ......,..............,... . .............,..... . ...............,. . ..............,..... 7-8
The Bryant Story ...........,.......................................,..................................,..... 9-10
The Coaching Staff ........ . ...,...................,..........................,......................,..... 11-13
Kentucky Captains-—Coaches Through Years ...................r............ . ........... 13-14
~ Letterrnen Lost, Returning Lettermen,
Squad Breakdown By Classes ...............................,..............,................. 15
The Wildcat Offense ..,...............,........................................,.... , ......4.............. 16-`I7
Summary By Positions .........,.................,.................,.,r,..................,......4,......, 17
Kentucky All-Americans, All-SEC Players ......,.,........r.,,A.....................,.,...... 18
I(entucky's Bowl Record ......4.....,......,.........,..................,............................... 18
National & SEC Records Set By Kentucky .......,.....,........,............................. 19-21
Kentucky Statistics, 1950 ..............................,........4......,.,.r..........,................ 21-24
Kentucky's Modern Record At A Glance .........................,.................,........ 25
Origin of "WiIdcats" Nickname .,..........,................r...................................... 25
Headquarters On Football Trips ...,.,............r............,..,............,.......r..........4. 25
The Kentucky Babe ..........................,....,..,.....,.............,.................,............... 26-29
Kentucky’s Colors ......................,.......................,.....................,..................... 29
1951 Roster .,......,....,.......,.,.,........... . ...... . ...................,...,r............,................. 30-33
1950 All Opponent Team .......,. . ....................,........,....,..............................,.. 33
Thumbnail Sketches ....................... . .................,,..,,.................................r..,.. 34-44
Composite Opponent Schedule ....,............,........ . ..,..,.....,........................,...... 45
Schedule Details .............,,...,,...............,.......,..,..........................................,.. 46-53
Stoll Field —- McLean Stadium ..........,..... . ..........,..,..............................,........ 54
Press — Radio —- TV Outlets ....................,.........,.....,.........,..........,...,...,...... S5
University of Kentucky History ...........,.,....,,...........................,...............,.... 56
U. of K. All-Time Football Record .................................,..,.......... 1 ......,,........ 57-62
Prepared by Ken Kuhn
Sports Publicity Editor
Composition and Printing by University of Kentucky Press
SPORTS PUBLICITY OFFICE
TELEPHONES
Dept. of Public Relations   Athletis
205 Administration Bldg., ` M dx '
2189 0 2180  ,     `
· . Lexington, Kentucky 5 “`I'\ 5

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A isi ..·A   A..’   — 1 i   ;·_  
i Kentucky Grid Chief Paul (Bear) Bryant (right) gratefully accepts the
A solid silver antique Sugar Bowl symbolic of his Wildcats' stunning victory l
over the Oklahoma Sooners in the `I95'I gridiron classic at New Orleans
from Charles Zatarin, president of the city's Mid-Winter Sports Association. ~
The trophy is the original bowl made by silver-smiths in London, England,
in `l830 and will be replaced by a replica before being returned for the `l8th
renewal of the Sugar Bowl game on New Year's Day, 1952.

 Facts About
I O
I The Umversnty of Kentucky
l
1 LOCATION—Lexington, Ky., a community of about _l00,000 in the
heart ol Kentucky’s famed Bluegrass region. City is thoroughbred
l horse breeding center ol` America, largest loose-leaf tobacco market
in the world, located about S0 miles east ol` Louisville and 85 miles.
south ol` Cincinnati, Ohio_ _
FOUNDED - 1805
ENROI,I.MEN'I` -— Approximately 5,500
PRESIDENT —Dr. Herman L. Donovan
VICE-PRESIDENT—Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain
COM PTROLLER — Frank D. Peterson I
FACULTY CHAIRMAN OF ATHLETICS — Dean A. D. Kirwan
,»\'I`HI.ETlC DIRECTOR — Bernie A. Shively (Illinois ’27)
I-IEAI) FOOTBALL COACH -— Paul Bryant (Alabama 'S6)
ASSISTANT COACHES—Carney Laslie (Alabama ’33); Ermal Allen
(Kentucky ’/I2), Clarence Underwood (Marshall ’?>8); _]im Owens.
(Oklahoma ’50); Paul I)ietzel (Miami (Ohio) U. '47); Charles Mc-
Clendon (Kentucky ’5l); Bill McCubbin (Kentucky V10); Vic Brad-
lord (Alabama ’39);   D. Langley (Chattanooga ’43); and Pat
james (Kentucy '5l)
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS —— R. M/. “_]ack" \*Vild (Ken»
tucky ’35)
SPORTS PUBLICITY EDITOR — Ken Kulm (Michigan State ’42)
EQUIPMENT MANAGER- Bill Brown (Eastern Kentucky State V12)
TRAINER — Charles (Smokey) Harper (Mercer ’23)
TICKET SALES MANAGER — Harvey Hodges (Kentucky ’3l)
I STUDENT MANAGER — Al Weiman
MASCOT — "Colonel" (a live Kentucky wildcat)
l ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Southeastern
NICKNAME OF TEAMS — Wildcats
BAND — "Best Band in Dixie" (IOO men)
SCHOOL FIGHT SONG — "On, On U. of K."
STADIUM —- McLean Stadium on Stoll Field (Capacity — 36,000)

 Information For The
g P A d R d
Workin ress n o io
The Stoll Field press box, re—bt1ilt entirely during 1949-50 at a cost
~ of more than $30.000, is believed to be one of the Hnest in the country. 1
Constructed in two decks, the box has a two-level lower deck that is l
enclosed with heat-resisting, glare—reducing plate glass to increase y
visibility of the field for the working press and an upper deck par-
titioned olf into 14 open-front booths for radio stations and newsreels.
_ Also located on the upper deck, at each end, are unique press—radio
lounges—large. glass-enclosed rooms where writers, sportscasters and
photographers may congregate.
# 1= =X=
The press section of the box can be ventilated in warm weather
and is electrically heated in cool weather by thermostat-controlled
blower heaters. Restrooms are located near the entrances at each
end ol the box. Outside telephone service is available at seat number
104 on the back row of the press deck.
*1% =1|= =l<
Applications lor space assignment by members of the working press,
photographers and radio men should be addressed, as [ar in advance as
y possible, to Ken Kuhn. Sports Publicity Editor. University ol` Kentucky,
i Lexington, Ky. Telephone Lexington 2-2200, Extension 2241. Admis-
 i sion to the press box is limited to male personnel.
, lf you intend to hle from the Held. please advise that when making
space reservations so that you may be assigned a seat next to, or as
near as possible to. the \Vestern Union operator who will handle your
hle. It is advisable also to make advance reservations with the Lexing-
ton oflice ol` \z\’estern Union. particularly if a direct. guaranteed wire
is required.
dk >l€ =l=
Radio stations desiring to broadcast Kentt1cky’s home games must
first secure a permit from the University Radio Director outlining
sponsors, fees paid. and any network arrangement. Address requests
to broadcast to Elmer G. Sulzer, University of Kentucky Radio Studios,
` Lexington. Ky., as far in advance of the game as possible. Booth
assignment will be made and tickets issued to the working crew by ·
the Sports Publicity Ofhce upon notihcation that permit has been
granted. Spotters are available if requested in advance. Stations should
order lines installed by contacting the Lexington Telephone (Lom-
pany. Linemen also are on duty in the press box during the game to
correct any trouble that Illlly arise.
Kentucky`s current broadcast policy prohibits simultaneous tele-
vision ol` home games, but permits delayed televising ol motion pictures
ol` the game upon advance approval by the University.
4

 Sideline passes will be issued only to accredited photographers
shooting for daily newspapers or picture services. We ask that you
limit yourself to one assistant for messenger or caption writing duties.
Space for newsreel 1nen and photographers working with long range
cameras will be made available in the upper deck of the press box.
>I= if =I=
i Complimentary stands tickets are awarded only by the University
l Complimentary Ticket Committee and are distributed prior to the
( opening of the season.
# >I= >lf=
Your press-radio-photographer pass admits your car to the reserved
parking space along the circular campus drive west of the stadium
enclosure.
Possession of this pass also entitles you to enter any stadium gate
on your way to the press box. l-lowever, other members of your party
without such pass must enter the gate designated on their ticket.
\/Vhen leaving the press box late after the game, you will find gate
number one open. This gate, under section .=\ at the left end of the
stands on the opposite side of the Held from the press box, is an exit
to Avenue of Champions (formerly Euclid Ave.) in front of Memorial
Coliseum.
is =lf= #
Programs, brochures. current rosters on both teams, mimeographed
running play-by—play'accounts, halftime and final indivil University of Miami (Fla.)  
Nov. 8 Tulane University . (H)
Nov. I5 George \/Vashington University (H)
Nov. 22 University of Tennessee (A)
Nov. 29 University ol Florida (H)
  I

 i The Outlook For l95l
l When Paul Bryant took over the reins of the Kentucky football
\’Vildcats five years ago, he calmly proclaimed to sportswriters assembled
at his first press conference two hihly significant aims for his tutoring
administration.
First off, he declared in a language appropriate to the Bluegrass
horse country that he was "not interested in place or show."
Secondly, he said in effect that to produce a winner and a football
"name" with national prestige for Kentucky would take five years.
That the "five year plan" proved amazingly successful and even
more amazingly an accurate timetable of the VVildcats’ climb up the
national football ladder is attested by the history of the 1950 season that
saw Kentucky reach climactic heights in annexing a Sugar Bowl cham-
pionship at the expense of the nation’s number one ranking team-
Oklahoma.
Toda Y, a wiser and more ex ierienced Br rant can’t be iinned down
l , . . .l l * .
to such accuracy in his predictions on the prospects of the l95l version
of the gridiron X·Vildcats. But he hgures to start a new “hve year plan"
and hopes for a stepped up production of winning teams.
The possibilities of taking up where he left off New Year's l)ay
and tutoring another bowl team of the same or better calibre are
pretty remote for ’5l, according to the man who should know.
Faced with what is unqualihedly termed one of the toughest sched-
ules ever handicapped for a Kentucky eleven and a squad virtually
riddled by graduation of key men. Coach Bryant fears that 1951 will
be a long. hard winter of re-building a- solid foundation for future
progress.
lientucky`s 1951 team will be the most inexperienced. weakest in
reserves of any team fielded by Coach Bryant since his entry on the
Bluegrass scene five years ago.
Nineteen lettermen, 13 of whom started the Sugar Bowl game on
either offense or defense, will be missing from the lineup during the
coming season and only five of the 17 lettermen returning were starters
in the post-season scrap.
7

 The \iVildcats appear destined to be only a shadow of their former
defensive selves, far weaker than the standards set by the 1949 and
l95() Kentucky teams which ranked as the number one and runner-up
units in the nation in the all·arouncl defense department.
, Big gaps in the line have been produced by the graduation loss
of such outstanding performers as All-America tackle Bob Cain; \Valt
Yowarsky, tackle voted the most valuable player of the Sugar Bowl V
game; Pat james and Bill‘\V2l1l11ZlIl12ll{€I", considered two of the best
defensive guards in the South; and regular ends Al Bruno, Charlie
l\/1cClendon and Benny Zaranka. Only two offensive and two defensive
starters oll the Sugar Bowl squad return to take over their regular
positions in the forward wall—guards Gene Donaldson and john
lgnarski, tackle _]im Mackenzie and center-linebacker Doug Moseley.
The secondary also will be particularly weak in both first line and
reserve personnel.
Despite glaring weaknesses, one good defensive unit undoubtedly
t can be fielded by the \Vildcats but they will he dehnitely handicapped
` by the necessity of doing double duty as the llllII1l)CI` one offensive outfit
as well. The outlook for suflicient capable personnel to operate a two—
platoon system appears very dim.
_ On the brighter side of tl1e ledger, the team shapes up as having
very fine leadership from within the squad in the persons of returning
Sugar Bowl veterans. They appear to be ambitious and have the right
 ` spirit and if the younger boys get the same spirit quick enough the
; situation should be right to win some ball games. Besides the prospect
_ of good leadership, the 1951 Kentucky team will have an extremely
dangerous passing attack led by All—America quarterback Babe Parilli,
back for his final season. Bryant's also hoping for a slightly improved
running game, but the personnel which will carry most of the burden
is a big question mark. Bruising Bill Leskovar, first string fullback last
year, is back, along with halfbacks Emery Clark and Ed Hamilton,
neither of whom played first string on offense last season.
Freshmen will be eligible for varsity competition this year due to a
relaxed Southeastern Conference ruling, but Coach Bryant puts his \
lack of faith in any appreciable help from the yearlings in these words:
` "1f anybody’s really helped by freshmen this year, 1 just hope we play
· that team."
The big question mark in the \lVildcats' plans for ’51 seems to
be whether a top flight offense can offset a woefully weak defense.
ln other words, will the military strategy axiom of "The best defense
is a strong offense" hold true on the gridiron as it sometimes does on
the battlefield.
8

 The Bryant Story
`
A y _' ( Coach 1’aul ( B e a r ) Bryant has
_  ¤Y   »*,/ "/Q; taught Kentucky footballers and fans
ff' jj; _;__ .. 1 .   how the other half lives and they love
.  V  V    l, if   it-
`   Q   ,   For years, Kentucky spent the ma-
    _   jority of its Saturday afternoons get-
4       _ ting its collective gridiron teeth kicked
  :..   Wi t   » in. Like being slugged repeatedly on
      the head with a sledge hammer. this
    ya  was not regarded as morale building.
    111 1946, Bryant gave up the reins
  ___,  , Z,      .___   at the University of I\t1aryland and ac-
N V_.· ·  y ·     cepted a fiye-year contract at Kentucky.
  '  ,,     He explained at the time that it
V-  _ »,»;   would take that amount of time to
   Q ''V. “  ;·V   get the Wildcats oil the floor. shake the
·A        cobwebs from their respective heads
J A     v*'iii`4i`iA' V   and start them moving up the national `
grid ladder —— an assignment few young mentors would have cared to
risk their futures on.
Last year was the Hnal chapter of Bryant’s "l*ive—Year Plan" and
at the season’s end the VVildcats capped a sensational climb to fame by
smacking down the nation’s number-one—ranked team, the Oklahoma
Sooners, 13 to 7, in the Sugar Bowl at New Orleans.
The 1950 Bryant edition won ll and lost only one in anuexing the
first Southeastern Conference football title ever won by the school- Over
the Hve»year period, the Cats won 40, lost 13 and tied two; appeared
in three bowl games (Great Lakes Bowl, 1947; Orange Bowl, 1950;
and Sugar Bowl, 1951) and won two of them.
A record of two victories and eight pastings was the best Kentucky
could do in 1945, which was one year B.B. (Before Bryant). The next
season, Bear rewrote the script and the Cats stunned C\'C1`y()11C by
winning seven and dropping three. The l*\’ildcats felt something like
an elephant in a bird cage with this overnight success—their best
season record in football since 1912.
But they began to get used to the feeling. In 1947, Bryant`s, charges
copped eight and again dropped a trio of tilts. Recognition of their
"dark horse" rise to national prominence came as they accepted a bid
to perform in the inaugural Great Lakes Bowl game at Cleveland in
December, 1947, and defeated Villanova 24 to 14. The game marked
Kentucky’s Hrst post-season bowl appearance.
Hit hard by graduation, Kentucky still managed to stay on the
winning side of the ledger in 1948 with a mark of five victories, three
setbacks and two ties which kept intact the Bryant record of never
having lost more than three games in a single season.
9

 A new surprise was in store for the football world in the next
year as the 1949 club won nine and dropped only three, including a
21-13 loss to Santa Clara in the Orange Bowl at Miami, while playing
what was considered at the time to be the sc11ool’s most difficult
schedule. Bryant's charges also finished breathing down the neck of
the league leader in the con ference race, second by a scant 33 percentage
points.
The fourth chapter in the Bryant story at Kentucky proved a
brilliant one. His team had accomplished goals which no other UK
grid aggregation had managed to attain in the sch0o1's 61—year foot-
ball history—f1nish second in the SEC and participate in a major
postseason bowl game. Prior to the Bryant era, the Wildcats gained
seventh place in the Conference standings twice to mark their best _
efforts in 58 SEC games over a 12-year period.
At the close of Bryant’s first season with UK, school officials were
so pleased with his accomplishments that they tore up his original
Eve-year pact and replaced it with a then—unique, 10-year agreement.
‘ After Kentucky’s Sugar Bowl victory, UK officials again voted confi-·
Q dence in the youthful mentor by tossing out his 10-year contract-
which still had five seasons to run —and replacing it with an unprece-
dented 12-year pact extending through the 1962 season.
Before coming to Kentucky in 1946, Bryant, an Alabama end from
1933-35, tutored Maryland to a 6-2-1 record in 1945 for that schoo1’s
, best mark in years. His one—season Maryland post was the first head
A coaching job he held.
r During his days at the Capstone, Bryant was Bama’s regular right
  V end and was a member of the famed Crimson Tide Rose Bowl eleven
g of 1935. The 37-year—old native of Fordyce, Arkansas, became an as-
sistant coach on Frank Thomas’ staff at Alabama following his gradua-
tion in 1936. He moved to Vanderbilt in 1939 as line coach and two
years later entered the Navy. He was discharged in 1945 as a lieutenant
commander. Following a season as head coach at Maryland in 1945,
the former Bama flankman started his carrer at Kentucky in 1946.
Professional and collegiate clubs alike have tried to lure the amazing
Mr, Bryant into lusher fields, but he has consistently chosen to remain
at the challenging task of building Kentucky football into “big-time"
prominence and keeping it there.
` BRYANT'S RECORD AT KENTUCKY
SEC Bowl
Year Won Lost Tied Standing Games
1946 7 3 0 Eighth
1947 8 3 0 Seventh Great Lakes (won)
1948 5 3 2 Ninth
1949 9 3 0 Second Orange (lost)
1950 11 1 0 First Sugar (won)
T6 E Y
10

 I
The Couchmg Staff
CARNEY LASLIE (Alabama '33) . . . Silver-haired Laslie has been
associated with Paul Bryant almost continuously since the days when
both were performing with Alabama’s Crimson Tide` in the early
thirties. He lettered three years (’30-’3l-’32) as a Bama tackle and star-
red on the famous Rose Bowl eleven of 1932. Following graduation in
1933, he remained at the Capstone one season as an assistant to Frank
Thomas. It was this same year that sophomore end Bryant was de-
veloping into a Tide great. Laslie became head coach at Blytheville,
Ark., High school in 1934 and enjoyed outstanding success as his teams
went undefeated for three successive seasons. In 1937, he moved to
l V.M.1. as line coach. From the Lexington, Va., military school, he
entered the Navy shortly after Pearl Harbor. He was associated with
Bryant again as both were assigned to prepare the North Carolina Pre-
Flight team for the 1945 season. Discharged in 1945 as a lieutenant
commander after three and a half years’ service, Laslie joined Bryant
as an assistant at Maryland for the ’45 season and came to Kentucky
when Bryant; was named head coach of the VVildcats in 1946.
ERMAL ALLEN (Kentucky V12) . . . One of Kentucky’s most famous
athlete graduates, Allen at 31 has had a full career as a collegiate star,
pro-football player and successful college grid coach. He starred at ·
quarterback for the VVi1dcat forces from 1939 to 1941 and entered
military service following graduation. Returning as a graduate student
after his discharge, Allen became the center of one of the Southeastern
Conferences most controversial cases when he attempted to play a
fourth year of football in 1946 and was declared ineligible after two
games. He had not played varsity ball as a freshman and was cer-
tified by the University as eligible under an interpretation of a war-
time SEC ruling allowing freshmen to compete in varsity ball and, in
effect, permitting four years of varsity competition. Allen joined the
U.K. coaching staff for the remainder of the ’46 season, spent the ’47
campaign as a T-quarterback with the professional Cleveland Browns,
then re-joined the \Vildcat staff in 1948. He became head freslnnen
A mentor in 1950 and was promoted at season's end to fill the backheld
coach vacancy. _
CLARENCE UNDERFVOOD (Marshall ’38) . . . Friends call Under-
wood by the somewhat un-respectful nickname of "Buckshot," but he
has earned high respect from players and fellow coaches, alike, since
he joined the Kentucky staff in 1948. Besides the usual duties on the
football field, he has the sometimes difficult task of keeping gridders
eligible by prodding them to tackle the daily classroom grind with the
same forcefulness demanded of them on the greensward. He had a suc-
cessful career as a high school coach at Beckley, XV. Va., from 1938-43
and served three years in the Navy as a lieutenant during \Vor1d \*Var 11.
1.].

 CHARLES McCLENDON (Kentucky ’5l) . . . Added to the coaching
staff after concluding his collegiate career with the Wildcats in the
1951 Sugar Bowl game, McClenclon gives the impression of being as
hard a worker as a coach as he was while playing defensive end from
1948-50. He made the All—SEC Sophomore team and earned two let-
` ters during his playing days. In VVorld War Il, Mac served three years
in the Navy.
PAUL DIETZEL (Miami, Ohio, U. ’47) . . . An indefatigable football
laborer, Dietzel has a background of fine play as a Little CAll-America
center at Miami U. and as a college coach. After his graduation from ‘
l Miami in 1947, he joined Sid Gillman’s staff and served with the school
until Gillman took him to VVest Point in 1948. At the Academy, he was
Plebe football and basketball coach. When Gillman moved on to Uni-
versity of Cincinnati in 1949, he took Dietzel with him as an assistant.
Kentucky called for Dietzel’s services after the 1950 season and he
joined the staff for 1951 spring practice. He was a B-29 pilot with the
  Army Air Force during World War II.
JIM OWENS (Oklahoma ’50) . . . All-America end and co—captain of
the Oklahoma Sugar Bowl team of two seasons ago, Owens joined the
  Kentucky coaching staff shortly after the Wildcats humbled the Sooners
{ in the ’51 New Orleans classic. During his playing days under Coach
Bud VVilkinson at O.U. from 1947-49, Owens performed in four bowl
l games (Gator, 1946; Sugar, 1949-50; Senior, 1950) and the All-Star
 { Game at Chicago. Last fall, he played pro ball with the Baltimore
_ Colts and served as end coach on the johns Hopkins staff. During
\/Vorld \iVar 11, he was in the Naval Air Corps as an enlisted air
crewman.
BILL McCUBBIN (Kentucky 40) ...r -\ former Mlildcat end (1937-39),
McCubbin has been a part-time assistant on the football coaching staff
for six seasons. He also is a member of the University Physical Educa-
tion teaching stalf and serves as director of intra-mural athletics. During
the grid season, he helps coach the freshmen and B-team squad mem-
bers and sandwiches in a large slice of scouting duties.
_   I). LANGLEY (Chattanooga ’43) . . . Langley brings to Kentucky a
background of outstanding experience as a college football player,
professional baseball player and high school grid coach. Performed
at center for University of Chattanooga from 1941-43; spent seven years
with the \N’ashington Senators baseball chain; and achieved an over-
all coaching record of 44-14-5 at Bremen and Rockmart, Ga., High
schools. His 1950 Rockmart team weht undefeated and Langley was
voted "High School Coach of the Year" in Georgia.
12

 VIC BRADFORD (Alabama ’39) . . , Al1—Southern quarterback at Ala-
bama in 1938, Bradford has a record of five seasons as a college back»
Held coach and five years in professional baseball with the New York
Giants farm system. He was an All-American in baseball at ’Bama in
1938. His first coaching experience was at University of Kansas in 1946
immediately following discharge from the Navy as a lieutenant senior
y grade. After two successful campaigns with the Jayhawks, he moved to
the Naval Academy when George Saeur became headmaster there. His
next move came when Saeur transferred to Baylor after two years at
` Annapolis and he coached the varsity backs and served as baseball
- chief at the Texas school. joined Kentucky for the ’51 season.
Kentucky Captains and Coaches
Through The Years
Coach — School \\’ 1. 'l`
1881 1 2 0
1882-1889 No Varsity 'l`eatns
1890 1 0 0
1891 _]. 1. Bryan (1 1 0
1892_ lid Hohdy jackie '1'hompson, 1’urdue - 2 3 1
1893 Ulysses Garrad jackie Thompson, Purdue 5 2 1
1891 George Carey \\’. P. Finney, Purdue 5 l 0
1895 Smith .=\l1`ord Charles Mason, Cornell »l 5 0
1896 Walter Duncan Dudley Short, Cornell 3 G 0
1897 Roscoe Seyers Lynion 11. liaton, Cincinnati V1 »1 0
1898 Roscoe Severs W. R. Bass, Cincinnati 7 0 0
1899 .»\. S. Reece W. R. Bass, Cincinnati 5 2 2
1900 Wellington Scott W. H. Kiler, lllinois 1 7 0
1901 Wynn Martin W. H. Kiler. Illinois 1 7 1
1902 john H. 1.. \`ogt li. X. McLeod, Michigan 3 5 1
1903 David Maddox C_ .-\. Wright. Columbia G 1 0
1901 _]_ White Guyn 1*. li. Schacht, Minnesota 9 1 0
1905 W. P. Kemper F. li. Schacht. Minnesota ti 3 1
1906 Frank Panlimi _]. White Gnyn, Kentucky ~1 3 0
1907 George Adair   White Guyn. Kentucky 8 1 1
1908 George Hendrickson ]. White Guyn, Kentucky V1 3 0
1909 Richard Barhee li. R. Sweetland, Cornell 9 1 0
1910 Richard Webb li. R. Sweetland, Cornell 7 2 0
1911 loin Earle P. l'. Douglas, Michigan 7 3 (1
1912 \\’. C. Harrison li. R. Sweetland, Corncll 7 2 0
1913 Herschel Scott _]. _]. '1`igert, \'anderbilt 6 2 0
191—1 AIJIIUCS Park Alpha Brumage, Kansas 5 3 0
1915 Charles Schrader j. j_ Tigert, Vanderbilt 6 1 1
1916 M. j. Crutcher _]. _]. Tigert. Vanderbilt 1 1 2.
13

 A 1917 j. A. Brittain S. A. Boles, Vanderbilt 3 5 1
1918 john (L. Heher Andy (Lill, Indiana 2 1 0
1919 j. A. Dishman Andy (Lill, Indiana 3 #1 I
l92() li. V. Murphree W. j. juneau, Wisconsin 3 =l 1
|921 james Server W. j. juneau, Wisconsin ·1 3 1
, 1922 B. L. Prihhle \\’. j. juneau, Wisconsin 6 3 0
1923 Dell Ramsey j. j. Winn, Princeton ·1 3 2
l924