xt7c2f7jsq44 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7c2f7jsq44/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19641020  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 20, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 20, 1964 1964 2015 true xt7c2f7jsq44 section xt7c2f7jsq44 Women In Men's Quadrangle
Protest Dorm Food, Service
(Editor's Note: This story was
written
by three Kernel reporters Judy Grisham, Kenneth
Green, and Gary Huddleston
who covered the protest Monday
night in Donovan Hall).

Five women residents in the
Quadrangle set up a table Monday niglit in Donovan Hall cafeteria to collect names for a petition in protest of the food and
the food service.
On the table were several
sheets of paper for signatures
and for the complaints.

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In less than 20 minutes after the cafeteria opened yesterday, more
than 115 students had signed the p tition begun by women in the
Men's Quadrangle who protested the Donovan Hall Cafeteria food
and the food service. Sign at the table says, "Are you hungry?"

Bette Gabbard, who organized the protest move, said that
copies of the petition and the
complaints would be sent to
President Oswald, the deans of
men and women, the residence
hall director, and the head of the
food service.
The petition read: "We, the

IK. IE DRInJ IE Uj
of
University

Vol. LVI, No. 27

LEXINGTON,

OCT.

20,

196--

(AP)-Her-

But time, finally claimed him.
No other former president except John Adams, the nation's
second president who died at 90,
had reached such an advanced
age. Adams lived 90 years and
eight months, Hoover, 90 years
and two months.
Hoover, who passed 90 on
Aug. 10, 1964, said in a birthday
message that the key to America's
abundance is its freedom.
"Freedom is the open window
through which pours the sunlight of the human spirit and of
human dignity," he said.
As president when the "great
depression" hit the nation in
Hoover endured much
1929,
abuse, but he lived to regain wide
affection and esteem as a wise,
humane elder statesman.
He was sought out for counsel
by Democratic officeholders, as
well as Republicans. Countless
friends and admirers came to love
him as a man of immense sympathies and gentle wit.
Even his grave illnesses of
recent times did not stop him
from leisurely conversations with
callers, and from keeping two

bert

der the rotunda of the national
Capitol.

Following services there, his
body will be flown to West
Branch, Iowa, where the final
services will be held as he is
laid to rest in the National Park
at the site of the small cottage
where he was born in 1874.
Repeatedly, and sometimes
almost miraculously in his latter
years, he had fought off serious

ailments.
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Typical complaints on the
"Gripes" sheet were:
"There's no substitution."
"We don't get seconds."
"There's too much grease in
the food and too much jello."
"There's no variety; we have
spaghetti every other day."
"The breakfasts are always
the same."
"The mashed potatoes are
like cream of wheat."
"The bread is always stale."
One of the biggest complaints
heard was that there were insects
and other trash in the food. One
girl said she found a hair in her
soup. Another said she had found
a fly in her spaghetti.
The other girls were Judith
Hapner, a transfer student, and
freshmen Tricia Smith, Priscilla
Pettigrew, and Jane Jones.

The group then began discussing the food and decided to see
what they could do about it.

"Everyone's been sick lately," one of the girls said,
"and at the Med Center,

they keep asking us where we've
been eating. First, we just want
to bring people's attention to the
problem. Even before the sign
was put up, people were ready
to sign the petition. We want
only serious, legitimate gripes."
"We can't understand why
we're paying the same as Blazer
and the food is twice as bad,"

said Miss Hapner.
Sophomore Meredith Smith,
who ate in Blazer Hall last year
and now lives in theQuadrangle,
said, "I think the food over
here is very poor in comparison
to what I ate at Blazer. Just as
Continued On Page 8

Eight Pages

Institute Approved

institute at the University,
Approval of a
which may ultimately receive more than $5 million a year in
federal money, was made Monday by the executive committee ot
the Board of Trustees.
for such things are being chanThe Trustees' monthly meetneled back to the originating
was held at the Henderson
ing
school, meaning that about $24
Community College where meaa year per student will go toward
sures concerning the Henderson
a student center building.
school were also approved.
A request by Big Rivers Rural
President John OsUniversity
Electric Cooperative Corporawald said the water:resources
institute would be established tion for an easement across the
with federal funds under the college property was rejected
Water Resource Research Act of since it would render about 35
acres unusable for any kind of
1964. Money, to run the institute,
building. However, Dr. Oswald
will be available in increasing
amounts from $1 million the first was delegated the authority to
negotiate for some other settleyear, growing $1 million a year ment.
up to $5 million the fifth year
The Board also confirmed
and each year thereafter.
The institute will not take the higher tuition rates set by
the State Council on Public Highover the job any other agency
does now, Oswald said, but will er Education. Dr. Oswald stated
he had apparently been misunhelp and advise groups such as
the Corps of Engineers, the Ohio derstood on the higher tuitions
though he had been quoted corRiver Valley Sanitation Commisrectly in the press.
sion, and State conservation
forces.
He said he did not mean to
Dr. Marshall Arnold, director
imply that he wanted to see
of the Henderson college, outhigher tuitions to keep
lined that school's need for a
students out of Kentucky,
student center, a larger auditorrather, he wished to have a betium, more classrooms, and an ter balance of students and not
athletic building. Dr. Oswald a crush of out of staters simply
said student fees which are used
because UK was inexpensive.
water-resourc-

secretaries at work with his writing.
Until lately, it had taken eight
of them to keep up with his output. But waning health slowed
him down.
He underwent surgery for an
abdominal cancer in August,
1962; made an astonishing comeback from anemia brought on by
intestinal bleeding in June, 1963,
and recovered from a kidney
hemorrhage complicated by a
respiratory infection in February,
1964.

Asked how he felt on his 90th

birthday, he said, "Too old."
He didn't make it to the 1964
Republican convention in San
Francisco, although he had attended every other one since
1928.

Student Dies
In Accident;
Driver Hurt
A
University sophomore engineering student was
killed in a one-ca- r
traffic accident 8.8 miles west of Lawrence-burlate Sunday night.
Anderson
County Coroner
Maurice Sparrow identified the
youth as John Mitchell Ragland,
Leitchfield, Route 2.
John Ellis Sirles, 111, also 19,
of Horse Cave, Route 1, was first
taken to the King's Daughters
Hospital at Frankfort and later
transferred to the UK Medical
Center where he is suffering from
injuries of the face anil light
a fractured leg anil other
hurts. His condition, though serious, was described as satisfactory.
State Trooper William Zopff
said the 1058 model automobile
rounded a curve, left U.S. 62 and
rammed into a tree. He said Sirles
was the driver of the auto.
Sparrow said Ragland died of
head and chest injuries.
Services were held at 2 p.m.
today at the Leitchfield Methodist Church.
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have her meal ticket at lunch and

didn't get to eat. "Like somebody
would want to steal a meal ticket!"

Water-Resource- s

Former President Hoover
Dies Today After Illness

NEW YORK
Clark Hoover, 31st President of
the United States, died today
at the age of 90. Death came
at 11:35 a.m. (10:35 a.m. Lexington time).
His death followed a recurrence of massive gastrointestinal
hemorrhage.
Death came quietly at his
apartment at the Waldorf Towers
which he described as his "comfortable monastery."
Hoover will lie in state in St.
Bartholomew's church, Park Ave.
and 51st St., for two days. After
memorial services, he will be
taken by train to Washington.
There, he will lie in state un-

The drive started, the girls explained, when one of them didn't

Board Of Trustees Meet

Kentucky

KY., TUESDAY,

residents of the Quadrangle, and
Donovan and Haggin halls, here
protest the food we have been
served at the Donovan cafeteria.
We ask the right to discuss this
problem with the proper officials."

fa

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The National Swedish Chorus will appear In concert at the Memorial
t'olUeum at 8:15 p.m. today. The concert U sponsored by the Central
Association. Students are admitted by 11)
Kentucky Concert-Lectur- e
cards to all concerts of the aerie. Student wives' tickets are available
la the Graduate Student Office for $5.1.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday,

Oct- - 20, 1964

Staff Changes Announced 'Man For All Seasons'
Grant
Opens Guignol Year

Green,
Are Promoted

Cuignol Theater opens its 37th season with a production of
Robert Bolt's "A Man For All Seasons." This will be presented
Oct. 22, 23, 24 and 30 and 31.
The time of the play is the historical era of Henry VIII, a
time of severe religious conflict.
The background of the play is based on Henry's marriage to
Catharine, his brother Arthur's Spanish. widow. Although such
marriages were forbidden by church law, the Pope had permitted
this one after appeals from the English and Spanish governments.
Henry, however, sqon fell in love with Ann Boleyn and felt
he should be granted a divorce. Rome refused to grant this and the
Pope would not release him from his marriage contract.
Sir Thomas More, Chancellor of England, refuses to give public
approval of the divorce, yet Henry needs his approval.
More Is a pious man of high principle and an orthodox Catholic, so he feels it is impossible to condone this action of Henry

Crrra

and Walter
Grant have been promoted in a
realignment of the Kernel staff
designed to broaden the coverage of campus men.
Kenneth

Creen, presently assistant to
the executive editor, will assume
the newly created position of
news editor.
Crant, now a staff reporter,
will replace Creen as assistant
to the executive editor.

The

appointments

,-

nounced today by Kernel
William Crant, become
effective immediately.
In the new position, Creen
will be responsible to the Kernel's managing editor for the
coverage of all campus news
events.
The managing editor, Gary
Haicksworth, will continue at
the supervisor over all the news
departments of the paper news,
Editor-in-chie-

f,

tports, xiomen't, end arts.
The editor also announced
three other appointments. Cay
Cish, a sophomore from Nashville, Tenn., will become the
social editor;

Sally Athearn,

a

junior from Clen Cove, X.Y.
will become women's feature
editor; and Frances Wright, a
junior from Mayfield, has been
appointed assistant news editor
for Fridays.

Mil.

KENNETH GREEN

WALTER GRANT

to the campus 14 hours faster
Chi, professional journalism socithan ever before and ice feel that ety, and a member of Alpha Tau
ultimately ire trill be able to Omega fraternity. He is junior J
deliver a vastly better newsCrant, trom Winchester, is a
paper trith a heavy emphasis
sophomore transfer student from
on campus news," he said.
Creen, from Russellville, is Centre College and a member of
vice president of Sigma Delta Sigma Chi fraternity.

UK To Host Meeting
Of Speech Educators

The Kentucky Speech Association's fourth annual Speech
Educators' Conference will be held at the University Oct. 23 and
1.

In announcing the staff realignment. Editor Crant said,
"The appointment of Mr. Creen
as campus editor will place the
Kernel in a much better position
to cover campus news. Previously, news coverage was directed by
the managing editor who was
also charged with the overall
responsibility for the paper's
news content. This new position
will take rriuch of the work load
off the managing editor, allowing

him to function more efficientl.
and placing one person in sole
charge of campus newscoveraga.
"Both Mr. Creen and Mr.
Crant have distinguished themselves in their present positions
and we feel certain the staff as
whole will function more efficiently under the new system,"
the editor said.
"These appointmentt reflect
an overall concern on the part
of the Kernel ttaff for the complete coverage of news affecting
the campus," Crant said. "The
publication of an evening news-papdelivers the tame product
CewtraJ

-

7

an-

Dr. Bower Aly, a past president of the Speech Association
of America, will be the guest
consultant.
The theme for the conference
is "The Teaching of Speech.'

All levels elementary, secondary and college of oral communication education will be
discussed
Dr. Denver Sloan, executive
secretary of the Kentucky Speech
Association, said that the association planned on 150 educators
attending the meeting.
Dr. Aly, the guest consultant,
currently is visiting Professor of
Speech at Cornell University.
Also Dr. Aly has written numerous books and articles and for

years he has been editor of 'The
Discussion and Debate Manual"
for the National University Extension Association.
In addition to sessions devoted to techniques of teaching
speech and drama, the conference
will include a special Cuignol
production and a demonstration

debate.

At the present he is associate
editor of Speech Monographs and
chairman of the National Committee on Discussion and De-

bate.
The conference will also hear
a choric interpretation by the

Wordmasters of Georgetown

Col- -

The playwright has treated "Thomas More, a Christian saint,
as a hero of selfhood." More, a victim of Henry's self indulgence,
fights for the principles which are so firmly engrained in his

character.

Dr. Swanson
To Address
Educators
Dr. John Chester

Swanson,
professor of school administration at the University of California will address a convocation
at 4 p.m., Thursday in the Taylor Education Building.
Dr. bwanson has worked in
school administration in California, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma,
and the Panama Canal Zone. He
is a past director of the National
Study of Vocational Education,
and while at UK he will act as
a consultant in the

of the vocational education

pro-

gram.

The convocation will be held
in the auditorium of the Taylor
Education Building, and is open
to the public. Dr. Swanson will
be speaking on "New Challenges
in Vocational Education and Implications for all of Education."

TONIGHT

The Kentucky Kernel
as the Cadet in

Begun
1894, became
the Record in 1900, and the Idea in
1908. Published
as the
continuously
Kernel since 1915.
Published at the University of Kentucky's Lexington campus four times each
week during the school year except during holiday and exam periods. Published
weekly during the summer term.
The Kernel is governed by a Student
Publications
Board. Prof. Paul Oberst,
College of Law, chairman; and Stephen
Palmer, senior law student, secretary.
Entered at the post office at Lexington. Kentucky as second class matter
under the act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail-17- .00
Per copy, from files $ .10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing

2321

Editor

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Socials
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Oct. 20,

m mm,w

Society

Coeds Escape From
Hectic Dorm Life
e
Winken, Blinken, and Nod took off on a
day, in hopes
oi finding a place where everybody observes 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.
were ousted by a prowling lawn
quiet hours
Harriett Swart and Jaye mower.
Hinerfeld, both of Louisville, and
The amount of sleep they acKaren Barrett, Milford, Ohio, quired varied among the girls
parked themselves under the old from 45 minutes to none. They
maple tree in front of the Ad- dreamed, said the coeds, of everyg
ministration Building.
to footthing from
All residents of Boyd Hall, the ball.
coeds explained that there were
They also reported helping a
several difficulties in the dorm lady to parallel park her car.
which drove them on to greener "She got in all right," said Karen,
pastures, the main problem being "after she hit the car behind her."
noise. All they wanted was some
What effect did their campout
have on the rest of the University?
peace and quiet. And anyway,
they were tired. What better way It certainly didn't go unnoticed.
s
to study for
than out As Harriett described it, "Some
under a maple tree asleep, cutting people passed by as if this were
two classes?
an every-da- y
occurrence. But
The girls equipped themselves other people stared, gawked,
for their escapade like veteran smiled, and shook their heads
campers, clad in their armor of before they walked on."
sweat shirts, bermuda shorts,
What did their friends in Boyd
knee socks, and weejuns. They Hall think of all this? Harriett's
were armed with radio, alarm roommate, Joan Rickard, said,
clock, pillows, sheets, combs, "I was hoping someone would
blankets, sunglasses, books and call Harriett, so I could tell them
notebooks, pepperoni, and bagels. she was camping out in front of
Their four-hocampout was, the Administration Building with
some girls from down the hall."
however, terminated by hunger.
And several unpleasant inciMost of the girls in the dorm
dents were reported by the girls had the same reaction. "Oh, no."
during their stay. The squirrels "You're kidding." "If anybody
threw nuts on them. The blackasks, we don't know you."
birds rustled the leaves in the
Do the girls plan any more
adventures?
"The
cherry tree. The air got cold when camping
the sun went behind the clouds. weather is just a little cool now
Sirens sounded endlessly. And for camping out," said Jaye. "We
near the end of their stay, they think we'll wait for spring."

'

gy major from Louisville.
Tracy Owen, senior history
major from Chicago, 111. and
member of Kappa Delta, to John
Cox, senior history major from
Louisville and a member of Kappa Sigma.
Joyce Ann Wiedemer, sophomore French major from Cincinnati, Ohio and member of Chi
Omega, to Gary Bates, graduate
student in civil engineering and a
member of Lambda Chi Alpha.

horse-racin-

mid-term-

r

3

Engagements

-

--

-

Judy Vanderpool, junior education major from Ashland, to
Alan McDonald, junior psycholo-

fall-lik-

t

1964

Pin-Mat- es

How To Beat The Study Habit

Three freshman coeds relax as they camp out In front of the Administration Buildlnf to avoid the noise and commotion of the
dormitory. Harriett Swart, left, Karen Barrett and Jaye Hinerfeld
nap on their blanket and seemingly forget the studying that was
their reason for leaving the dorm.

Elections
Kappa Sigma: president, Jim
Ashmore; vice president, Joe Dur-kiand master of ceremonies,
Carl Spina.
Junior IFC: president, P. J.
Bloomfield, Kappa Alpha; vice
president, Sonny Martin, Phi Delta Theta; secretary, Dave Switzer,

Delta Tau Delta; and treasurer,

Gary Martin, Sigma Alpha

n.

Epsi-lo-

1

Alpha Gamma Delta Pledge
Class: president, Rickie Coleman;
vice president, Denise Wissel;
secretary, Nancy Dorton; treasurer, Lennye Ammerman; chaplain, Susan Taylor; Junior

and scholarship chairman,

Mar-

garet Ulmer.
Kappa Kappa Gamma Pledge
Class: president, Beezy Hobson;
vice president, Miriam Caitskill;
secretary treasurer,
Courtney
Helm; Junior Panhellenic representative, Betsy Keyes; scholarship chairman, Kay McDonald;
social chairman, Betty Cline; activities chairman, Susan McClel-lan- ;
athletic chairman, Mary
Bates; public relations, Pat Man-soart chairman, Marianne Ban-tand music chairman, Brenda
Anderson.
--

a;

ic

representative, Jane Bay-lisprogram chairman, Jeri Haas;
activities chairman, Jerri Smith;

s;

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Mary Ellene Salmon, senior
English major from Madisonville
and a member of Chi Omega, to
Tom Johnston, senior drama major at Transylvania College, from
Madisonville, a member of Phi
Kappa Tau.
Judy Crumbaker, junior education major from Madisonville,
to Jim Ashmore, junior civil engineering major from Madisonville and a member of Kappa
Sigma.
Pat Fowler, senior education
major from Kankakee, 111., and a
member of Alpha Gamma Delta,
to Jim Paul, senior economics
major from Elsmere, and a member of Kappa Sigma.
Elaine Morgan, freshman education major at the Northern
Center, from Florence, to Tom
Vogelpohl, senior marketing major from Elsmere, a member of
Kappa Sigma.

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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
BASEMENT OF STUDENT CENTER

The University of Kentucky is believed to have the
best dressed coeds on any
campus.
The Sportswear Mart, on
the Northern Belt Line
(probably the only fashion
shop of its nature in the
area) is the most
important factor in helping
the UK coeds maintain this
reputation.
The Sportswear Mart carries only the finest in name
brand, famous label, casual
wear and every Item in their
tremendous selection is discounted that's right, girls!
every top line In the country has o price tag far lower
than you'll see for the same
garment in other fine stores.
If you're new to the University ond to Lexington-- put
the Sportswear Mart on
your list of "sights to see."
The store hours are
every day.
Mid-we-

st

9-- 9

* More Action Needed
Many University students often complain about various aspects
of campus life which they consider
unjust and not in the best interests
of the student body. These students
file their complaints with their
peers and usually take no steps in
an effort to alleviate the particular
situation.
Many of the things which are
considered problems actually are
in the best interest of the most
students. There are, however, some
problems which justify action.
Likewise, most of these problems
will not be corrected unless someone takes an initiative to get students together, in protest of rules
or regulations which they deem
unjust.
Early in the semester a group
of students circulated a petition in
protest of registration procedures
and the method of paying fees. The
petition was submitted to President Oswald and a committee was
appointed to advise the faculty on
possible improvements in this area.
Several students; Monday col- lected naYresfor
in pro- -'
test of the food and the food service in Donovan Hall cafeteria.
The students represented residents
from the Quadrangle and Donovan
and Haggin halls. Copies of the
petition reportedly will be sent to
President Oswald, the Deans of
Men and Women, the residence
hall director and the head of the
food service.
We will not

sides on these particular issues at
this time. We do feel, however, that
such problems will go uncorrected
unless students show concern
through legitimate protests.
Campus organizations, such as
Student Congress, actually are not
representative of the entire student
body. Many students complain
about this lack of representation,
yet only a small percentage of students vote in campus elections.
Most campus organizations
have shown a desire to take' steps
to benefit the entire University
community. It is almost impossible
for these groups to benefit the whole
campus if voting members, do not
represent the whole campus. It is
possible, however, for students who
are not members of such organizations to use these campus bodies
as a media for various protests.
Opinions which are expressed in the
"letters to the editor" column of
this newspaper usually express the
views of one individual and may
tend to be biased. Protests by a
group or organization usually
ceive the attention' of prppex of'
ficials. "
voiced by stuMost complaints
dents probably are insignificant
and not justified. Members of the
University faculty, however, pay
close attention to action which
represents a problem effecting a
large group of students. All problems will go unnoticed if students
do not express their opinions and
initiate drives for change.

.

'

'

attempt to take

Decisions Facing Britain
Britain's election brings to an
end a demoralizing interregnum
that has lasted almost two years.
Critical decisions in defense and
foreign policy, long postponed, now
will be in the hands of a new government.
A crisis already is at hand in
Britain's economy which will affect
the nation's opportunity for choice
in every field. A balance of payments deficit now is running at a
jate that, without borrowing
could wipe but the nation's
"gold reserves iri 16' to 22 months.
Trade deficits and gold outflow
in the past have led Tory governments to brake expansion intermittently by deflationary measures, a
policy that has
meant a growth rate half that of the
Common Market countries. This
year, with an election in the offing,
significant brakes have not been
applied. The problem now is whether urgent corrective measures can
be devised that will not curb
growth. Import controls and exporting subsidies a form of partial
devaluation are being discussed.
But even outright devaluation of
the pound, which is not expected,
would only be a palliative without
painful structural reforms and modernization of British industry and
labor practices.
The Conservative party, divided on the issue, tried to achieve
modernization painlessly by entering the Common Market, despite
Labor opposition. Hut confusion
toll ow til President de Cule's veto
in January 1963, compouiuUx,y a
power struggle within the Con,.
start-stop-sta- rt

Nation"

"Non-Alignc- d

vative party and a prolonged electoral campaign. With London's attitude increasingly ambiguous, the
six Common Market countries now
may shortly begin talks on political
union without Britain.
Britain's dilemma over this development is complicated by conflict with Washington over the proposed eight nation multilateral
force (MLF) of Polaris ships that
has aroused the opposition of both
Britain's major parties.
London must decide within a
matter of weeks whether to risk
staying out of the MLF on the
chance that this would kill the
project rather than lead to a
nuclear force, as
Bonn and Washington have warned.
The alternative is to agree in principle, then bargain for concessions
similar to those the outgoing Conservative Government recently indicated it would seek, if it decided to
join. Britain's nuclear deterrent,
the future nuclear organization of
NATO and Britain's untimate relationship with Europe all will be
vitally affected.
No government in Britain since
the war has faced more critical
decisions than the one now about
to take office. These decisions may
chart Britain's role in the world
for decades ahead.
-- The New York Times
--

'

When a candidate- relies on
'help him win the great
American vote he should make sure
that 76 trombones are waiting to go
into action on his behalf. We suspect that Henry Paolucci, a candidate for the United States Senate
in New York State, did not even
count his saxophones. He seemed to
be listening to Grecian shepherd
pipes, or the classic measures of
Cluck's "Orpheus."
-

The conditions

of conquers are
always easy. We have hut to toil
awhile, endure aw hile, believe always,
and never turn hack. -;.

I

music" to

Anyway,he said: "'I agree with'
Aristotle that music is the foundalife."
tion of a
There may be a vote or two in
that, from the neighbors of a popular proprietor of a fruit store near
Sixth Avenue and 40th Street who
call him "Aristotle" in honor of
his nationality.
well-ordere-

d

Like so many great ideas, this
one appears dangerous to the man
who first has the courage to utter
it. That is how unfair politics can
get. Politics itself has leaned on
music for both moral and tactical

advantage. The national convene
tions of the American parties always
give ear to a "keynote" speech; harmony in political ranks is sought
with cacophonous fervor.
We doubt that Mr. Paolucci
was thinking of this kind of "music"
when he said that it "tunes the
heart." What is music to a politician's ears is not exactly what made
Beethoven tear up his dedication of
the Eroica Symphony when Napoleon declared himself emperor. It
is not the beat of a Toscanini but
the count of the computer.
Yet we look forward with Mr.
Paolucci to the arrival of the
political life in which a
g
president will simply
give way to a 'cellist when the time
for a change has come, in which
elections will be superseded by
contests like that in the "Meister-singer,- "
and may the most melodious tenor win.
But for the moment, well what
is the count in Winooski?
- The Christian Science Monitor
well-order-

piano-playin-

The Kentucky Kernel
The South' s Outstanding College Daily
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

ESTABLISHED 1804

TUESDAY,

William Chant,

W'alteh Chant.

Kenneth Cheen,

OCT. 20, 1064

Editor-in-Chi-

David IIawpe, Executive Editor

Gary Hawkswohth,

New$ Editor

Managing Editor

Assistant to the Executive Editor

Cay Cish, Sudui Editor

Kernels

Trombones

Seventy-Si- x

Henhy Rosenthal, Sport Editor
Sam Abell, Chief Photographer
Sally Atheahn, Women't Feature Editor

Face Walkeh, Advertising Manager

Business Staff

John T. Pauuiaday, Circulation Manager
Editorial Page Staff
Fhank II. Bail